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2017-09 27

[Academics]Low Energy Consuming Utilization of Chemical Sensors

When a chemical sensor is embedded into a mobile device, the significant sensing properties are amplified by low costs, high response, great stability, and robustness. However, there is one property of a chemical sensor that hinders technicians from utilizing it with a mobile device--unbearable power consumption. In his paper, “Self-heating effects on the toluene sensing of Pt-functionalized SnO2-ZnO core-shell nanowires,” professor Kim Hyeon-woo of the Division of Material Science and Engineering proposes a self-power sensor that allows low energy consumption of 31 μW at 5 V. Kim is explaining about the novel discovery of his research. In order to apply chemical sensors to mobile devices, the temperature of the sensor should be high enough to be generated. However, in the process of raising the temperature, the magnitude of energy consumption is vast. “Chemical sensors have extreme advantages such as cheap costs, small size, excellent stability, and robustness. However, the high energy consumption prevents scientists to consider them as an option for mobile devices,” said Kim. To reduce the energy consumption, Kim and his fellow researchers have exhibited a self-heated nanowire sensor through this study. “For the reduction of energy usage, we synthesized Pt nanoparticle-functionalized SnO2–ZnO core–shell nanowires. The shells of these wires utilized for the chemical sensor are thicker than usual. This allows a larger self-heating ability and a higher sensor response,” explained Kim. SnO2–ZnO is a synthesis of tin dioxide and zinc oxide that results in a strong core-shell (class of materials which have properties intermediate between those of small, individual molecules and those of bulk, crystalline semiconductors). The total energy required for this chemical sensor to be self-heated was 31 μW at 5 V. “This novel discovery was possible due to the groundbreaking nanowires that allowed the sensor to self-heat even at room temperature,” said Kim. Thus, this research, has ultimately suggested the potential application of chemical sensors into mobile devices, fully utilizing their peculiar sensing properties. “The sensor industry in South Korea will now be able to gain international competitiveness by exporting this novel sensor, which is currently in the process of development,” proposed Kim. Kim is holding a sensor that he's currently developing. The academic life of Kim has been devoted to nanostructure and sensors. His original research area was on nanostructure (a structure, especially a semiconductor device, that has dimensions of only a few nanometers). “I have always studied nanostructure, and I realized that the practical application of this leads to sensors,” explained Kim. Gas and radioactive sensors are Kim’s further research subjects, which he looks forward to utilizing in real life in a few years. “Pragmatic application of dramatic discoveries in research is difficult, but I will try my best to improve this industry,” revealed Kim. Kim Ju-hyun kimster9421@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Choi Min-ju

2017-09 25

[Academics]A Tactile Sensor for Texture Recognition

With computers today, auditory and visual senses can be materialized—through sound and screens. The other three of the five senses, on the other hand, have not yet been on the platform of materialization because they require a somewhat more delicate mechanism and are harder to deliver with technology. Professor Park Wan-jun (Department of Electronic Engineering), in his paper, “A tactile sensor using single layer graphene for surface texture recognition”, presented and elaborated on a tactile sensor that could distinguish different materials, which opens many doors for future technology. It is hard to imagine the sense of touch being delivered with a machine because it is usually perceived as something only humans are capable of. But why can sound and sight be materialized by computers but not touch? The answer is, electronic signals for sound and vision are made possible in the aspect of engineering, while that of touch is not. What Park presented in his paper is a small chip-like device that enables perception of touch for surface texture recognition. The output of Park's research, which is a chip-like electronic device. (Photo courtesy of Park) The first thing he had to do, according to Park, was to turn the sense into electronic signals. Only then can the machine read what is being conveyed. Once the signal of touch is conveyed to the device, it will analyze the signal and distinguish what kind of texture it is. The subtle and clear differences in terms of texture between various kinds of surfaces can be perceived and distinguished by the tactile sensor, detecting the microscopic scale of differences. There is a single layer of graphene embedded in the device, which creates a different resistance variation each time a surface comes to interaction. It is what functions as the main player in telling apart different surfaces because it is what creates the different signals. The signal is then sent to the computer by the chip, which is to be analyzed and categorized into different kinds of textures. “Just as there is virtual reality (VR) for sight, a touch-version will be possible with this device,” anticipated Park. “A tactile display is also possible with this device, as the signal for touch is now readable by the computer. If you put your hand on the tactile display device, you can actually feel whatever the object or texture input in the computer is,” envisaged Park. This technology is also applicable in the medical field. Those who lost their sense of touch in certain parts of their body by burns, for example, will be able to regain their sense by implanting this small device in the portion of injury. Now that the signals of touch can be read by the device and since senses can be transmitted in the form of signals, delivery of the sense of touch is made possible. The inserted chip will send signals to the brain and this will enable the patient to feel what is being touched. “In recap, this research of mine has provided a human-sensorlike device that will enable transmission of the sense of touch in terms of engineering. Now I’m currently working on machine learning by categorizing and classifying different textures into groups and making the device absorb the data. The ultimate goal of my research is to complete materializing the sense of touch from the perspective of engineering so that further technologies could be developed based on my research,” planned Park. Park's further research is set on mechanizing the sense touch. Jeon Chae-yun chaeyun111@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Choi Min-ju

2017-09 11

[Academics]Making a Better Environment to Live In

Until the 21st century, the world has gone through excessive amounts of civilization. People were able to make various visible developments while failing to keep the environment without pollution. Professor Kim Ki-hyun of the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, therefore, focused on the environmental problems through his paper, “Biochar as a Catalyst”. Through the paper, he introduced a new material that could better purify various impurities. Biochar is a compound word of ‘bio’ and ‘char’, which is biology and charcoal. This material is a type of waste that is produced when you burn any biological materials that possess carbon. Just as charcoal is made when you burn trees, biochar is made when you burn biological materials. Through this not-so-helpful looking waste, people can purify the environment. When soil is polluted with something, such as oil, pesticides or heavy metal, biochar can be effectively used to absorb these contaminations. They combine well with toxic substances; therefore, it allows purification of soil only though scattering these materials in the soil and skimming them out again. The picture of the process of making biochar. (Photo courtesy of Kim) Kim introduced his overall research related to biochar. He studies various metal organic frameworks, which are much like biochars, used to purify polluted environments. “There are over 20 thousand types of metal organic frameworks, and I am currently working on which framework will be the most effective when purifying pollution,” explained Kim. Moreover, he talked about electronic cigarettes which are a relatively newly introduced invention. As there isn’t a proven result of the components within the electronic cigarette, Kim is working on the methods to discover the dangers of them. Kim said, “There isn’t a precise database related to electronic cigarettes. They could also consist of numerous cancer-causing agents and harm, just as original cigarettes does. I intend on discovering these substances and, furthermore, purify them.” Kim, however, does not solely research on this one material. He pays attention to the general issues within the society. His main interest lies on various aerial issues such as air pollution, fine dust, indoor pollution and stenches. Kim said, “There, indeed, are a lot of problems regarding pollution related issues. However, there are also a lot of methods that can be used to solve these problems. My goal is to make effective solutions through comprehensive research.” He explained that the biochar mentioned in his paper is only a small example of his overall goal. He intends to research on more new materials and solve various social issues. Kim hopes people could have correct information on the environment. Kim hopes that people would have a better understanding of environmental pollution. “When the dust level exceeds 100 microgram per 1 cubic meter, the Ministry of Environment suggests to refrain from going out. However, when people wear masks right after they smoke to protect themselves from fine dust, they breathe in eight hundred to nine hundred micrograms of dust. Due to excessive amounts of information, people sometimes make contradictory actions,” explained Kim. He wished that more environmental education would be made in the pursuit of proper knowledge. He added that Hanyang University students should give more interest towards the environment. “Let’s keep the air clean, with correct information!” On Jung-yun jessica0818@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Park Young-min

2017-09 04

[Academics]Chlor-alkali Electrolysis in Use

Professor Park Joo-yang of the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering is an expert in the field of engineering. His paper, “SWRO brine reuse by diaphragm-type chlor-alkali electrolysis to produce alkali-activated slag” discusses a novel method of breaking down the brine after the desalination process. After the desalination process, what is left over is the brine (salt water with twice the concentration) and fresh water. Letting the brine out back into the ocean would cause a destruction of the ocean life cycle because thousands of tons of water is desalinated everyday and the concentration of salt would cause trouble for ocean farms. Through electrolysis process of the brine, chlorine gas and hydrogen gas are produced and this would be reused in diverse ways such as tap water. Park is explaining about the break down of brine process. Electrolysis process would leave chlor-alkali which would be used to produce alkali-activated slag used for pavements. Through the activation process of the alkali with the slag, it would turn into hard substance which is then processed to make pavement blocks. Since it is produced out of what should be discarded, it is economically efficient and is very durable, and also environmentally friendly. Some of the problems that Park is facing is that the research studies regarding this plant is almost reaching the developed level but has difficulty in terms of industrialization. Since brine has been let out into the ocean until nowadays which resulted in low handling expenses. For Park’s team to collect the brine and run the electrolysis process costs way too much even considering the fact that the slags would be produced at a reasonable cost. Handling costs outweigh the expenses of economic and environmental costs which makes it reluctant for companies to invest in producing such power plants. Park is continuously working to produce more environmentally friendly and cost efficient products through electrolysis processes although it may be a hard task to implement it. “I believe that continuously working in a field of expertise would open the doors for many opportunities,” concluded Park. “Continuously working in a field of expertise would open the doors for many opportunities.” Kim Seung-jun nzdave94@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Choi Min-ju

2017-08 31

[Academics][Researcher of the Month] What Makes People Pro-Environment?

“Whenever I go on a trip or big festivals, I always worry about all the trashes people throw away. It’s just too much.” Professor Hyun Sung-hyup of the Division of Tourism recently published his paper, "Fostering customers’ pro-environmental behavior at museum". The paper thoroughly investigates the affective and cognitive factors of individuals visiting museums and analyzes which factor has the most impact on their pro-environmental intentions. Hyun emphasized that most people are very environmentally friendly in their house. They recycle well, try not to waste food or water. However, the point is that the very same people behave entirely differently from the moment they leave their house. Trashes are disposed not separately, which then has to be combusted, letting carbon into the air. Tissues, water, food and all kinds of resources are wasted. Hyun wondered what is behind the people’s paradoxical behavior. He also wanted to figure out what needs to be triggered in order to resolve such paradox and to motivate eco-friendly behavior from the general public. A table showing relations of each factor and their effects (Photo courtesy of Hyun) Over the course of a year, Hyun went to a broad range of museums which deal with themes like art, war, and tradition to interview, survey and observe the visitors. From the data collected from 321 tourists, he ran statistical analysis simulation program to construct a conceptual framework that can predict people’s behavior in public spaces. He also sought for professional advice from other fields such as environmental specialists or professors in engineering for further insight. Based on his field research with dozens and hundreds of related papers he studied, Hyun found out that ‘Environmental Knowledge (EK)’ out of five cognitive factors, was the most significant factor in determining one’s environmentally responsible decision-making process. Hyun is explaining the process of his research. Hyun asserted that environmental education on a regular basis is essential. People with more professional knowledge on the vulnerability of the environment or the impact of their action is more inclined to show consistent behavior both in and outside of their home. "It seems like a lot of people lack education regarding the environment in both public and private sectors," said Hyun. Lamenting at such reality, Hyun wishes environmental education to be part of the public education curriculum in the near future. When asked what inspired him to become a researcher in Tourism, Hyun smiled and answered that his professors during college years influenced him a lot. “Hanyang University offers the best curriculum on Tourism, with respectful professors. I always looked up to them.” Hyun said he decided to study further because there are so much intriguing topics to research in the field of Tourism. He encourages future researchers in the field to boldly try out, because tourism is very future oriented, interdisciplinary and economically significant field of study. Hyun himself plans to vigorously research further on issues related with environment and tourism. “Researching while lecturing, mentoring and living personal life is tough but I still enjoy it,” said Hyun, with affection to his work. Kim So-yun dash070@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Choi Min-ju

2017-08 22

[Academics]Beyond the Matter of Life and Death

Most people do not enjoy postoperative scars, especially on the visible parts of their body. Professor Tae Kyung of Department of Medicine recently reported the outcomes of newly developed operation method in his paper “Functional and cosmetic outcomes of robot-assisted neck dissection by a postauricular facelift approach for head and neck cancer”. As from the title Tae’s research compared surgical outcomes of both conventional neck dissection and his new facelift approach, which takes cosmetic aspects of the patients into account. “Nowadays, it is more than just life and death. Quality of life after the operation is also important.” (Photo courtesy of Tae) In the case of patients with head and neck cancer, cancer cell often spreads to the lymph node of cervical (neck) area. The conventional surgical method to treat the lymph node metastasis is to give vertical and transverse cervical incision (cut), which leaves permanent mark in the patient’s neck. As always having interest in plastic surgery – which is part of Otolaryngology (Head and Neck Surgery) – Tae concerned for postoperative quality of life. Therefore, he took the facelift approach which is still mostly used for cosmetic purposes, especially to unwrinkle one’s face. This way, the scar is left in the back side of the patient’s ear alongside the hairline, which is significantly less visible. The paper “Functional and cosmetic outcomes of robot-assisted neck dissection by a postauricular facelift approach for head and neck cancer” specifically reports the postoperative outcomes of the revolutionary implication as short as one day after the surgery to as long as 12 months. From 2013 Tae and his co-researchers collected data of 113 patients who underwent unilateral neck dissection both through the particular approach and the conventional approach. As a result, the team led by Tae was able to compare the functional and cosmetic outcomes which proved that Tae’s method is advantageous. Namely, patients suffered from less neck edema (swelling of neck) and sensory loss. Cosmetically patients reported significantly lower satisfaction scores. (Note that the higher the satisfaction is, the lower the scores are.) Both neck edema and sensory loss is lower in the robotic procedure, as shown in the tables. (Photo courtesy of Tae) Another specialty of Tae’s method of operation is that it requires robotic assist called Da Vinci robot because the operation makes a very thin tunnel inside the neck, making it physically impossible for the surgeons otherwise. Tae, as one of the first person in the world to conduct robotic neck dissection wanted to further develop the method and evaluate it. This report is one of his efforts trying to keep evaluating and improving his new surgical method. “It is still early to report the cure rate of cancer through this method, but now we know about the postoperative sensory loss, motion limitations, and the satisfaction of patients through this research,” said Tae. Tae also struggles to improve Otolaryngology in Korea and Asia. He mentioned that he chose to become head and neck surgeon because the area was less developed and researched at that time, and that challenged him. Now he is a general secretary of Asia Pacific Society of Thyroid Surgery which he founded, wishing well for the future of the field. “I wish my students to improve Korea as much to be the leading country in Otolaryngology and become global leaders.” Kim So-yun dash070@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Choi Min-ju

2017-08 15

[Academics]Upgrading Transcriptome Map

Incredible amount of transcriptomes encoded by eukaryotic genomes has been produced as RNA-sequencing reads are published in piles. The transcriptome is the sum of all RNA information contained in a body’s cells, which is an indispensable data when creating the transcriptome map of the body. The current map, however, is not its apotheosis since it was constructed based on RNA-seq reads that lack their orientations and certain boundary information. In his paper “High-confidence coding and noncoding transcriptome,” Professor Nam Jin-wu of Department of Life Science has presented the transcriptome map with RNA-seq reads with high accuracy and efficiency. “What makes this research valuable is its contribution to the scientific community. It will function as an indispensable infrastructure.” RNA and the map In the past 10 years, with the technology of next generation sequencing (NGO), data of individual’s genome and transcriptome has been developing at a rapid pace. Genetic information of both healthy and diseased individuals aggregates to approximately 10 peta bytes from all over the world, from which Nam focused specifically on analyzing the transcriptome, disregarding the genome for the moment. A critical difference between the two is that genome has orientation while transcriptome lacks it. This indicates that it would be extremely difficult and inconvenient to arrange the little pieces of information to form the whole genetic map of transcriptome. “What it means by ‘lack of orientation’ is, simply picture this situation: putting batteries in a remote control which has no plus or minus indicators. You would have to find the right direction by just trying. It is also like jigsaw puzzles where you have to search thoroughly the scattered pieces and find and put the right ones together until you get the whole picture,” explained Nam. Constructing a genetic map with orderless pieces of information could be an arduous task, since the massive bio-big data offers a tremendous amount of genetic information and they lack orientation. What Nam has created through his research is an algorithm that predetermines the orientation and boundaries of transcripts and genetic information. This will not only lessen the work of constructing the transcriptome map by assembling RNA-seq reads that lack orientation but also increase the accuracy and quality of the resulting maps. The outcome of his research, in a word, orients the directionless RNA-seq reads and locate them where they belong. Now with the more accurate and systematic transcriptome map, the amount and structure of RNA in a cell in the body could be figured. Nam first started this research three years ago, spending the first two years constructing the algorithm and spending the last year producing data using NGS. He is currently researching on the noncoding RNA (RNA that does not produce protein), which is highly related with various types of cancer and other rare diseases. The ultimate goal of Nam’s studies is to solve the mystery of unexplored RNA. 98% of RNA in human body belongs to the noncoding category, so how exactly do they affect the way a human being is and how do they account for different anomalies? “A good question begets a good study.” Jeon Chae-yun chaeyun111@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Choi Min-ju

2017-08 08

[Academics]Founding Father of the Pragmatic Application of Stepping Motors

Every moving object needs a power plant. In the industrial world, permanent magnet stepper motors are widely used, which are designed with permanent motor (PM) rotors that are commanded by electrical pulses. In his paper “Nonlinear H2 Control for a Nonlinear System with Bounded Varying Parameters: Application to PM Stepper Motors,” Chung proposes a new nonlinear H2 controller for the PM motors that can increase the efficiency both in its speed and practicality. Chung is the pioneer in South Korea to discover new methods of applying nonlinear H2 control for a nonlinear system. Utilization of the PM motors vary from household purposes such as printers to industrial purposes such as gas systems and cars. Since its earlier usage from the 1970s, these motors have thrown questions to scientists and engineers on its formula. “Despite the fact that these motors are popularized in the industry, there are constraints in the PM motors, such as speed restriction,” said Chung. To solve this problem, engineers have discovered the DQ (direct quadrature) transformation of the motors which is a tensor that rotates the reference frame of a element vector matrix to simplify the analysis of it. “My research team has found that DQ is comparatively inefficient in terms of energy saving and cost control. Thus, we detected a new mathematical method to replace the DQ transformation,” said Chung. Often times, engineers used the linear system to control the PM motors. A linear motor is an electric motor that has its stator and rotor unrolled, so that instead of producing a torque, it produces a linear force along its length. However, linear motors are not necessarily straight, which causes restrictions in speed. “Formula of the linear system consists of homogeneity and additivity, and the main point of our research was to minimize the relationship between them using the H2 control system,” emphasized Chung. This FOC (Field Oriented Control) with the H2 system went through an experiment with other traditional methods for a comparison. “The results were outstanding as more simplified version of mathematical calculation and less usage of sensors beforehand were required, while the tracking errors and energy cost were reduced respectively,” said Chung. The green line of case 3, which uses the FOC (Field Orientation Control) of the H2 control shows the extreme distinction in tracking errors. (Photo courtesy of Chung) The most desired application of this method is on the intelligence vehicle, which is a car that can drive by itself without any interference of a driver. “Learning about the motion control, which is the main issue of my paper, is the most important criteria of designing a self-driving vehicle. This study allowed me to grow this industry rapidly in five years,” astonished Chung. Currently, Chung’s research lab for the intelligence vehicle based on motion control is the best in Korea which acquire all the knowledge on the sensors, actuators, and control algorithms. Chung’s passion for science was conspicuous from the days he used to make a radio on his own. When he started gaining interests in engineering, motion control grabbed his sight. “The stepping motors and their control system are fundamental technologies. I thought that developing them into pragmatic applications would be exciting,” reminisced Chung. Currently, Chung is passionately contributing to the scientific and technological advancement. For the visible result, he had launched the IEEE (Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers) ‘s CDC (Conference on Decision and Control) conference at Jeju Island, South Korea. “This is the first time ever that the CDC conference is being held in South Korea and I consider this the greatest achievement of my academic life so far,” smiled Chung. Chung is currently working on developing more advanced intelligence vehicles. Chung’s everlasting hope for his students is that they could study both science and liberal arts. “I wish South Korean educational system could teach students to embrace the joy of learning. This will eventually rear the bright sprouts of Korea,” said Chung. Kim Ju-hyun kimster9421@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Choi Min-ju

2017-07 30

[Academics][Researcher of the Month] World Class Solar Cell Developed

Professor Kim Eun-kyu of the Department of Physics is July’s Researcher of the Month for his active role in spreading knowledge in the field of physics. In his paper, “Iodide management in formamidinium-lead-halide-based perovskite layers for efficient solar cells”, Kim explains how he has created the ‘perovskite solar battery’ with the best efficiency in the world. Perovskite batteries have high efficiency and low production cost which is how it is gaining interest for the next generation solar energy source. Kim is explaining about the perovskite solar battery. Perovskite is material created out of anion, cation, and halide and is used inside the solar battery to create electricity. Kim has carried out his study along with Ulsan National Institute of Science Technology (UNIST) and Korea Research Institute of Chemical Technology (KRICT) and the paper has been introduced in the world renowned academic journal, Science. The research has been carried out through the support of Ministry of Science, ICT and Future Planning. The key theme of the research has been that through the control of halide, efficiency was to be raised from 20.0% to 22.1%. Currently, solar batteries are created with silicon materials but with the newly developed technology, new solar batteries could produce the highest efficiency with half the cost. Not only could it be used in the solar batteries, but they could also be used to produce new and renewable energy in the future with further integration of different technologies. Graphs showing the efficiency of the solar battery at 22.1% (Photo courtesy of Kim) Kim has started this study since all types of batteries should implement high level of efficiency. With high efficiency follows the lower production cost which was why this was important for the commercialization of the solar battery field. Kim and his research team are the best in the field currently showing the highest level of efficiency and still working for better technology. Although the technology itself has been developed to produce the most efficient solar batteries, mass production and commercialization problem is yet to be solved. Kim and his team are currently working on the perovskite battery to further test its safety and to control the halide. Although Kim and his research team have already reached their goal of creating the efficient battery and printing their paper on Science, further studies will be carried out to make the lives more convenient for people. Kim wishes to develop a more efficient solar battery in the future. Kim Seung-jun nzdave94@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Kim Youn-soo

2017-07 23

[Academics]Vitalization in Detecting NO2 in Daily Life

As environmental pollution is deteriorating, various hazardous gas face people unrecognizably in their daily lives. Professor Kim Hyoun-woo of the Division of Material Science and Engineering is an active researcher in various sensors that could help identify various gas, humidity, or even radiation. His recent paper “Enhancement of gas sensing properties by the functionalization of ZnO-branched SnO2 nanowires with Cr2O3 nanoparticles” proposes another effective method of detecting a particular gas, NO2. Kim expaining the nanostructure of his paper. His research aimed for an effective NO2 detecting nanostructure, which is a structure made from molecules. NO2, also called as nitrogen dioxide, is required to be detected since it can be found relatively easily through the atmosphere even when it is a toxic, air-contaminant gas. Kim mentioned “Once a practical method through this nanostructure is constructed, I wish people can be easily detect this toxic gas.” This nanostructure is composed of three different substances. First of all, a SnO2 (tin oxide) nanowire is required. A nanowire is a nanostructure of an extreme, fine line which has a diameter of one nanometer (10−9 meters). Next, ZnO (zinc oxide) nanowires are branched on the SnO2 nanowire. Then the last substance, which are Cr2O3 (chromium oxide) nanoparticles, would grow on the ZnO nanowires. With a completed nanostructure, detecting NO2 become possible. An illustration of Cr2O3 -functionalized ZnO branched SnO2 nanowires. (photo courtesy of Kim) This nanostructure mentioned in his paper is highly sensitive, which makes it a significant structure. A current always flows within a structure, and a resistance is made whenever there is a current. However, the resistance differs when there is an inflow of another gas. The external gas takes away the electron in the structure, therefore heightening the resistance of the structure. The sensitivity is determined through resistance within the sensor. When the sensitivity is elevated, a structure can perceive more NO2 than the one with low sensitivity even when there’s a same amount in the air. The nanostructure mentioned in the paper is indeed a unique technology. However, Kim also mentioned the insufficiency of this nanostructure. In order to detect NO2, this gas needs to be heated in an extremely high temperature; in the case of the paper, 300’C. Therefore, there is a difficulty for people to sense the gas in the current stance. Kim mentioned that he wants to improve this difficulty through further research. He is currently working on methods that could allow this nanostructure to detect NO2 in a room temperature. Kim wishes to develop a practical nanostructure. Kim is an enthusiastic researcher. He constantly works on structures that could benefit people in their daily lives. He is striving for extreme-high sensitivity in his structures so that people could quickly recognize and react to the contamination. Kim mentioned “I want to make a structure that can be commercialized. A lot of the inventions disappear due to the lack of cost competency or efficiency. I wish to contribute to the promotion of mankind welfare.” On Jung-yun jessica0818@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Kim Youn-soo