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2018-05 14

[Academics][Excellent R&D] Heading for the World of New Physics

The field of physics is largely divided into three categories: particle, optics, and condensed matter physics. Especially in the field of particle physics, the Standard Model is a theory that explains almost every phenomenon in the universe. However, how would you feel if something that you’ve been trusting for the last 50 years turned out to be wrong? Professor Cheon Byung-gu (Department of Physics), is trying to solve this question through his new research project titled "Study of Heavy Flavor Physics using e+ e- Collision." News H met Cheon Byung-gu (Department of Physics) to hear more about New Physics. The Standard Model is a theory describing three of the four fundamental forces in the universe, which are the electromagnetic, weak, and strong interactions, not including the gravitational force, along with classifying all known elementary particles This has been believed to be consistent due to successfully providing all experimental predictions, but leaves certain phenomena, such as dark matter and dark energy, unexplained. Therefore, this signifies there is a certain particle that has not yet been discovered and yet must be in existence. Cheon, therefore, is developing and planning to proceed with research through a Belle Ⅱ experiment, to search for this very particle. Cheon proceeds with his experiment through colliding an electron and a positron together to uncover a new particle through rare decay events. They are so extremely small that making these two particles collide is extremely difficult; therefore, it can only be done using special vehicles, the SuperKEKB collider and the Belle Ⅱ detector, which is a kind of microscope capable of seeing objects smaller than a nucleus. Once these new particles are discovered, they could provide the foundation for a novel theory named New Physics, beyond the Standard Model. An image of an electron and a positron colliding, making an occurance of new particles seen as blue lines. (Photo courtesy of Cheon) The Super KEKB shoots countless electrons from one side and positrons from the other side, providing an instantaneous luminosity 40 times higher than that of the previous KEKB collider. Then the Belle Ⅱ detector identifies the particles, using seven kinds of sub-detector systems, including a calorimeter trigger system, that selects events that are valuable enough to investigate further. The researchers could have better sorted sets of events to analyze through this detector at real time operation, which Hanyang University group is leading its own independent line. Cheon’s final goal is to find a New Physics phenomenon beyond the current Standard Model through the Belle Ⅱ. These physical studies might not look like something that could directly be connected to everyday life. However, much of our abundant technology in our life has its foundation in physics. “Medical technological skills such as X-ray, CT, and PET detectors all started with knowledge of physics. In the field of physics, new discoveries and new acknowledgements contribute to the mental wealth of humankind,” said Cheon. "Don't be afraid to show your abilities as a world leader!" Cheon is currently working not only as a researcher, but also continues his lectures and manages academic affairs as the dean of the Department of Physics. He has online meetings with researchers in Japan every week to continue his research, trying to let his students improve to be talented people who can contribute to society. “I wish to provide my students with an environment where they can work with foreign researchers. I hope all Hanyangians in the 21st century will also be willing to look not only at Korea, but to the whole world.” On Jung-yun jessica0818@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Kang Cho-hyun

2018-04 02

[Academics][Researcher of the Month] Controlling Hydrogen in a Chemical

During the 2018 Pyeongchang Winter Olympics, Hyundai allowed free trial rides of NEXO, their new fuel cell vehicle, to twenty thousand people, deriving huge attention and public interest on the new innovation of hydrogen-powered fuel cell vehicles. A total of 733 vehicles were reserved on the 19th of March which was the first day of sale by pre-order. This attention to fuel cell vehicles has also increased the interest in the methods the consumers can receive their fuel: hydrogen. Professor Suh Young-woong (Department of Chemical Engineering) introduced a novel method of the transfer of hydrogen through his research, "2- (N-Methylbenzyl) pyridine: A Potential Liquid Organic Hydrogen Carrier with Fast H2 Release and Stable Activity in Consecutive Cycles." Suh's research paper was published in the ChemSusChem journal. Hydrogen is the main fuel cars like NEXO require in order to run. However, researchers face an immense difficulty when working with this sensitive gas. Hydrogen is great when powering the car itself. However, the transport of this gas requires much pressure and delicacy. For example, if hydrogen is made in Ulsan, it needs to be transported to major cities such as Seoul, since people will need to charge their cars. In order to transport this hydrogen, the gas needs to be pressured under 700 bars (the unit of measuring pressure), with specially produced tanks. This presents the danger of enormous explosion as well as economic problems. Collaborating with three other universities to alleviate these current concerns, Suh helped introduce a new chemical substance that can store and release hydrogen safely. This new chemical material allows hydrogen to inflow and release within itself at a certain temperature. This results in a massive improvement over the current status as it can transport much more hydrogen in a single tank, with much more safety. Moreover, they can release hydrogen from the chemical at 230 degrees Celsius, while the present technology requires a temperature of 270 degrees Celsius. This chemical material can even be reused up to a hundred times, which even makes it more efficient. The image of the new chemical structure The two arrows are showing the inflow and the release of Hydrogen. (Photo courtesy of Suh) This research took each of the three teams one and a half years to finish. They had to go through endless trial and error procedures with seven different chemicals. “There wasn't any preliminary research we could have referenced. Some chemicals didn't work, and some chemicals would work but released hydrogen at the same 270 degrees Celsius,” reminisced Suh. As a result of their efforts, Suh was able to find a method that could inpour and discharge hydrogen from the chemical. This chemical is not yet fully developed in its validity. However, this is the closet chemical that is on the verge of commercialization. "Communicate with a lot of people and practice reading and writing!" Suh is currently researching not only the storage of hydrogen, but the creation of hydrogen itself. His research team is working on producing hydrogen from biomass, which is organic matter whose residual energy can be harvested to produce consumable energy. He is trying his best to develop technology related to hydrogen, an alternative fuel the whole world is anticipating. “As a professor, I want to produce a lot of outstanding researchers to conduct better research in society,” said Suh. “And to all Hanyangians, I wish for each and every one of you to find your own unique path and to fully dedicated yourself to it!” On Jung-yun jessica0818@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Kang Cho-hyun

2018-03 26

[Academics]Constructing an Image of a Region

Everyone has a certain image of a location, whether they received this image directly or passively. In the study of tourism, this image is also a field that needs to be studied in order to understand the behavior of tourists. Professor Kim Nam-jo (Division of Tourism), showed this relativeness through his article "Destination Personality, Destination Image, and Intent to Recommend: The Role of Gender, Age, Cultural Background, and Prior Experiences." Kim developed the research with his student, Kim Woo-hyuk. “This research started with the popularity of ‘Gangnam Style,’ when the location Gangnam caught the world’s attention,” Kim started off. "Gangnam Style," a popular song by Korean artist Psy, was a big hit, ranking second on the Billboard Hot 100 Chart. Along with the popularity of the song, the interest towards this particular location named Gangnam also drew interest from foreign tourists. Therefore, Kim and his student, Kim Woo-hyuk, started research on the interpretation and the image of this particular area. Kim's research attempted to comprehend the characteristics of this area and the image tourists have of it. “There are two types of images tourists receive,” explained Kim. An organic image is an image a particular individual receives without intention. For example, people living in or around Seoul are mostly familiar with Gangnam through their everyday experiences such as interactions with the news, transportation, or the people around them. This allows a natural formation of an image of Gangnam. In contrast, an induced image is made through the opposite manner. It is created when an individual intentionally seeks out information about a particular region. “When these two images combine, the image of the region Gangnam could be strengthened and lead to the creation of a destination personality. This destination personality can lead to an actual effect of visiting the region,” said Kim. As tourism is not a study that has direct cause-and-effect relationships, they had to spend additional time and effort verifying the existing logical structure. They re-examined and demonstrated the structure based on standards such as the destination personality, image, and intention of the tourists. Moreover, they connected their proven logical structure to satisfaction and loyalty, to search for a point to emphasize when promoting Gangnam. This type of research required actual responses from tourists, which were collected though surveys and in-person interviews. Kim had surveyed 20 questions and interviewed around 320 people. Kim enjoys his busy, everyday life. Through this research, Kim was able to prove the logical structure they had initially started with, through the example of Gangnam, known to foreigners through the song "Gangnam Style." Currently, Kim is conducting research on Gyeong-ju. Due to the recent earthquake that occurred, Kim is studying the changes in the area's image after the incident. “It’s only a small region of Gyeong-ju that was damaged from the earthquake. However, the overall image of Gyeong-ju has become negative,” explained Kim. Seen through this example, Kim is working on a strategy that could be made to solve this kind of prejudice. Kim is not only conducting research, but he is also actively working as the President of the Tourism Sciences Society of Korea. He is enjoying every project he is involved in, and is planning on continuing to do so. “A lot of students aren’t sure of their passion or their future career in our school. Even though you aren't sure, there is definitely something inside you that makes your heart pound. I hope every Hanyangian can find and specify their dreams and bring them out to the bigger world. Widen the prospects of your thinking skills!” On Jung-yun jessica0818@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Lee Jin-myeong

2018-01 31

[Academics][Researcher of the Month] Producing Energy by Wearing Clothes

Clothes that create electricity is not something in a movie anymore. In the midst of searching for various renewable energy, Professor Hong Jin-pyo (Department of Physics) created a new energy source that is created through friction in a single thread, as demonstrated in his research, ‘Hierarchically Nanostructured 1D Conductive Bundle Yarn-Based Triboelectric Nanogenerators.’ Hong conducted his research on energy-producing threads. When designing a wearable device, people generally think of light and slim devices attached on one’s clothes or body, usually charged by a solar heat system. This is referred as a two-dimension technology, as an object is placed upon another object. This does have its own benefits but also contains deficits such as weight and energy sources. Therefore, Hong created a one-dimension energy source – a thread that is used when weaving clothes. “Once a material is attached to clothing, the efficiency lacks uniformity,” explained Hong. He invented a thread that can produce energy itself, without having to attach anything onto a particular piece of clothing. The threads that make up the clothing could create energy itself. This thread, also named as a ‘triboelectric nanogenerator’, is a structure made from the notion of friction that we experience in our daily lives. For example, when we rub a balloon to our hair, friction occurs, resulting in a form of spiky hair. This phenomenon occurs when an electron is moved from one object to another, when these two objects continuously collide with each other. Depending on the characteristics of an object, one object would lose electrons and the other would gain electrons, meaning some sort of slight energy is formed. In this thread, polymer and aluminum are used; the former collects the electrons and the latter releases the electrons. Therefore, once the body wearing the clothing weaved from this thread moves, energy is created. The microscophic strucuture of a thread. (Photo courtesy of Hong) This triboelectric nanogenerator is still in the midst of its research. As this thread is extremely thin, Hong’s research team created a conductive bundle yarn so that they could have more strength. Moreover, he attached polymer-like nanostructures onto a single thread, so that the thread could have an increased surface area of energy production. Once energy is created through a larger surface area, bigger energy could be created within a single thread. This whole process is also known as a tribo electric effect. This one-dimension thread has a bright future in front of them, as technology closer to human are fondly being conducted on. “Once a sensor could be attached onto the thread, even more tasks could be done. This sensor could send whatever information they require to the owner’s smartphone, once the sensor adapts a Bluetooth function,” commented Hong, when asked about the future of this invention. He wished that this function would be able to let citizens to have control of their IoT (Internet of Things, a system of interrelated computing devices, mechanical and digital machines, object, animals or people that are provided with unique identifiers) through their energy producing clothes. "Keep trying! No matter what!" As Hong has not majored in clothing and textiles, he is not yet an expert of clothing, but has not been afraid of pioneering this area. “I had been proceeding my research in semiconductors at first. As new technologies evolved, I believed it was important to keep up with these changes to improve what I have been initially doing,” reminisced Hong. As he had achieved an unexpected success through his passion, he also gave the same advice to all Hanyangians. “Don’t make excuses. What really matters is whether you tried your best or not. I wish all of you can improve yourself through endless challenges!” On Jung-yun jessica0818@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Choi Min-ju and Lee Jin-myung

2018-01 21

[Academics]Combination of Machinery and Medication

Diseases such as myocardial infarction, which are related to the blockage of blood vessels, are threatful diseases to both the suffering patients and the doctors who cure them. As vessels require great sensitivity and attention in the process of treatment, professor Jang Gun-hee (Department of Mechanical Engineering) proposed an alternative way in his article: ‘Magnetic Helical Robot for Targeted Drug-Delivery in Tubular Environments.' Jang has been working on this robot for 9 years. “Once one’s blood vessel is blocked, doctors have to use a thin tube made of medical grade materials, called a catheter,” Jang started off. With the catheter, doctors have to push it through the vessel to find the blocked area, inject a liquid for dissolution, then drill it out. This process itself is indeed difficult as they mostly have to depend on a doctor's experience and skills. However, doctors face another difficulty, with their own health affected during the procedure. "Doctors have to face countless radiation when curing a patient, since they have to keep track of the position of the catheter though x-rays. The doctors even wear clothes made of lead to obstruct the radiation, but still is not enough,” explained Jang. In order to solve this dangerous progress, Jang’s research team created a micro robot. This micro robot is made to swim within a vessel of seven to eight millimeters, to transport and emit the designated drug to the intended spot to dissolute the clot, and to drill itself on the clot, just as the catheter would do. This micro robot is moved by the magnetic field created outside of the body, allowing the doctors to be less exposed to radiation. Jang commented, “Once this method is in commercialization, doctors would be able to remote control the robots outside of the operating room, while having better controls within the surgery.” A picture describing the structure of a micro robot (Photo courtesy of Jang) From the midst of the interview, Jang explained the motivation of his research. “My mother’s coronary artery had been blocked 10 years ago and, doctors, therefore, had to insert a few catheters in her body. As this is a genetic phenomenon, I gave attention to the process and then realized the difficulties of these surgeries,’ reminisced Jang. Studies on magnetic robots have been ongoing since the past, especially in Switzerland and Germany. However, their research was mostly concentrated on the swimming itself, while Jang’s research team had to make the robot in command of various movements, which had to go through various trials and errors. Jang and his students are standing beside the machine they have made by themselves. Jang’s research team had to import pure iron from China, produce the frame in another factory, and transport this four-ton-machinery to school in order to materialize the machine required to magnetically steer the micro robot. Students had to coil the iron by hand, assemble the pieces together, to complete building this two-meter machine. Jang emphasized the importance of the activeness of Hanyangians through this example. “I continuously tell my students ‘no one can achieve anything if we can’t’. I hope students make a higher goal and achieve their dreams even if it takes a long time because they all have the capability do to so.” On Jung-yun jessica0818@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Kang Cho-hyun

2017-11 20

[Academics]Conducting on a Sturdy Building

The current society is suffering from various natural and man-made disasters starting from terrors to earthquakes, such as the recent earthquake that panicked the citizens in Pohang. When a strong impact is made upon the ground, buildings require enough solidity to endure damage in order to protect the people. For a stronger, safer building, professor Yoo Doo-yeol (Department of Architectural Engineering) introduced an improvised concrete in his paper, ‘Effect of fiber geometric property on rate dependent flexural behavior of ultra-high-performance cementitious composite’. Yoo wishes to make sturdy structures for the citizens' safety. Most buildings are made of concrete, and it takes a huge part on the safety of a building. Concrete is initially vulnerable in tension, so there are already improvised versions of concrete commonly used in North America. The new model contains Micro steel fibers within the concrete to prevent the concrete from breaking into two big pieces. Through the steel fiber, the concrete only results in having micro-cracks even when a sudden weight is stressed upon the concrete. In this already improvised concrete, Yoo made a further research to strengthen this concrete in both quasi-static (a state in which something is almost still, but not completely) and impacted states. A ‘quasi-static’ state refers to an ordinary state with only mere impacts such as the vibration of footsteps everyday. These two states require a different sturdiness for different purposes, and the researchers concentrate on improving both of these conditions. Yoo focused on the aspect ratio of the micro steel fibers installed in the current improvised concrete. Aspect ratio is a numerical figure of the division of the diameter from the length of the fiber. Once this aspect ratio was changed in a quasi-static state, Yoo found out that the solidity was maintained and the energy absorption force was strengthened even when the amount of micro steel fibers were reduced. With the same amount of micro steel fibers with the changed ratio, Yoo was able to discover that the energy absorption force almost doubled within a shocked state. The results made through different aspect ratios. Micro-cracks can be seen within the pictures. (Photo courtesy of Yoo) Yoo emphasized the importance of this improvised matter. “Protecting the citizens within the buildings is becoming an urgent matter as countless accidents are occurring more frequently. The current structures lack enough safety to minimize the loss of lives.” The breaking of cement is distinctly more critical than the cracks in cement. Therefore, thorough research is required to make a sturdy building. “We had difficulties in capturing the process when the cement was impacted,” reminisced Yoo. The test cement is fully demolished within 0.001 second (a millisecond), and he had to capture all of the procedures within that millisecond. No kinetic equipment is available in Korea. As a result, he had to proceed with his research research by using the equipment from the University of British Columbia. Despite their mechanical hardships, Yoo made an innovative result in the field of architecture. 2017 is only his second year as a professor in Hanyang University. As the field of architecture is conservative, his final goal is to make practical application with his research. “Various factors such as durability and energy absorption force need to be considered when building a structure as it is directly related to the people living inside the building. This is only the beginning. I still have a lot more factors to work on, but I will continue my research enthusiastically until my studies can be applied to daily structures,” commented Yoo. Yoo will continue on with his goal to make a practical application with his discovery. On Jung-yun jessica0818@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Choi Min-ju

2017-10 02

[Academics][Researcher of the Month] Producing Energy Through a Single Thread

'Lack of energy’ is an issue the whole world is focusing on. Various countries are searching for effective renewable energy and new materials that could replace the current energy sources. Professor Kim Seon-jeong (Department of Biomedical Engineering) discovered a new material every researcher was looking for. Kim's paper, “Harvesting electrical energy from carbon nanotube yarn twist” introduces the world’s first new material, which can produce energy through slight movements. Kim explains the concept of his new material Professor Kim’s research team started its first project in 2006 on artificial muscle. However, after his research, Kim realized its limitations as they were only able to move through an external energy source. Therefore, he thought of a new idea that the muscle would be more effective when it is able to produce energy by itself. Carbon nanotube is a new material which is a type of conductor and has a diameter of only a few nanometers. This material was made as a thread in the artificial muscle. However, when these threads were finely twisted into one direction, they were able to produce energy by itself through its contraction and relaxation without an applied voltage. Being made into a spring, their length can be changed as much as 30 percent on average. This new material, named as ‘twistron harvester yarn’, allowed a chance for the muscle to move by itself without a separate power source. This twistron harvester yarn looks and acts as if it were an ordinary thread. This states that making clothes out of this material is possible. Once this comes into realization, this would give a boost in making wearable devices, as producing electricity without an energy source is possible. Moreover, this thread is possible to use inside water, giving another possibility of an effective alternative energy. This has already been tested in the East Sea of Korea. Kim’s research team made a model consisting of a glass bottle connected with an electrode, the thread, a balloon, and an equipment that could measure electricity. As the twistron harvester yarn contracted and relaxed, electrical energy was verified from the ocean. Kim showed great passion in the research he was conducting. This research on the twistron harvester yarn was his fourth research. He has been working on artificial muscles for the past nine years before he started this research. “I didn’t start this research solely to find the twistron harvester yarn. I felt the limitations within the research I conducted earlier and was seeking for development,” reminisced Kim. He explained that he wasn’t the only person who conducted the research. Eight teams from three different countries worked on this new material for two years to deduct a better result. “We had a meeting through Skype every week, along with frequent visits to each team. Everyone had great passion and interest towards this research, and I believe that shows the firmness of this research,” said Kim. "Reach towards your own interest!" Kim also emphasized the attitudes Hanyangians should have towards their life. Even though he mainly teaches graduate school students, he wished all students could find what they truly wish to do. “Find something unique of your own. Find something you enjoy, and then you will be able to continue on with whatever you are doing. There are countless routes for all students. I wish students would keep challenging themselves to make the greatest results of their own,” wished Kim. Just as his words, Kim will continue with his work with great passion, for even better convenience for global citizens. On Jung-yun jessica0818@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Kim Youn-soo

2017-09 11

[Academics]Making a Better Environment to Live In

Until the 21st century, the world has gone through excessive amounts of civilization. People were able to make various visible developments while failing to keep the environment without pollution. Professor Kim Ki-hyun of the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, therefore, focused on the environmental problems through his paper, “Biochar as a Catalyst”. Through the paper, he introduced a new material that could better purify various impurities. Biochar is a compound word of ‘bio’ and ‘char’, which is biology and charcoal. This material is a type of waste that is produced when you burn any biological materials that possess carbon. Just as charcoal is made when you burn trees, biochar is made when you burn biological materials. Through this not-so-helpful looking waste, people can purify the environment. When soil is polluted with something, such as oil, pesticides or heavy metal, biochar can be effectively used to absorb these contaminations. They combine well with toxic substances; therefore, it allows purification of soil only though scattering these materials in the soil and skimming them out again. The picture of the process of making biochar. (Photo courtesy of Kim) Kim introduced his overall research related to biochar. He studies various metal organic frameworks, which are much like biochars, used to purify polluted environments. “There are over 20 thousand types of metal organic frameworks, and I am currently working on which framework will be the most effective when purifying pollution,” explained Kim. Moreover, he talked about electronic cigarettes which are a relatively newly introduced invention. As there isn’t a proven result of the components within the electronic cigarette, Kim is working on the methods to discover the dangers of them. Kim said, “There isn’t a precise database related to electronic cigarettes. They could also consist of numerous cancer-causing agents and harm, just as original cigarettes does. I intend on discovering these substances and, furthermore, purify them.” Kim, however, does not solely research on this one material. He pays attention to the general issues within the society. His main interest lies on various aerial issues such as air pollution, fine dust, indoor pollution and stenches. Kim said, “There, indeed, are a lot of problems regarding pollution related issues. However, there are also a lot of methods that can be used to solve these problems. My goal is to make effective solutions through comprehensive research.” He explained that the biochar mentioned in his paper is only a small example of his overall goal. He intends to research on more new materials and solve various social issues. Kim hopes people could have correct information on the environment. Kim hopes that people would have a better understanding of environmental pollution. “When the dust level exceeds 100 microgram per 1 cubic meter, the Ministry of Environment suggests to refrain from going out. However, when people wear masks right after they smoke to protect themselves from fine dust, they breathe in eight hundred to nine hundred micrograms of dust. Due to excessive amounts of information, people sometimes make contradictory actions,” explained Kim. He wished that more environmental education would be made in the pursuit of proper knowledge. He added that Hanyang University students should give more interest towards the environment. “Let’s keep the air clean, with correct information!” On Jung-yun jessica0818@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Park Young-min

2017-07 23

[Academics]Vitalization in Detecting NO2 in Daily Life

As environmental pollution is deteriorating, various hazardous gas face people unrecognizably in their daily lives. Professor Kim Hyoun-woo of the Division of Material Science and Engineering is an active researcher in various sensors that could help identify various gas, humidity, or even radiation. His recent paper “Enhancement of gas sensing properties by the functionalization of ZnO-branched SnO2 nanowires with Cr2O3 nanoparticles” proposes another effective method of detecting a particular gas, NO2. Kim expaining the nanostructure of his paper. His research aimed for an effective NO2 detecting nanostructure, which is a structure made from molecules. NO2, also called as nitrogen dioxide, is required to be detected since it can be found relatively easily through the atmosphere even when it is a toxic, air-contaminant gas. Kim mentioned “Once a practical method through this nanostructure is constructed, I wish people can be easily detect this toxic gas.” This nanostructure is composed of three different substances. First of all, a SnO2 (tin oxide) nanowire is required. A nanowire is a nanostructure of an extreme, fine line which has a diameter of one nanometer (10−9 meters). Next, ZnO (zinc oxide) nanowires are branched on the SnO2 nanowire. Then the last substance, which are Cr2O3 (chromium oxide) nanoparticles, would grow on the ZnO nanowires. With a completed nanostructure, detecting NO2 become possible. An illustration of Cr2O3 -functionalized ZnO branched SnO2 nanowires. (photo courtesy of Kim) This nanostructure mentioned in his paper is highly sensitive, which makes it a significant structure. A current always flows within a structure, and a resistance is made whenever there is a current. However, the resistance differs when there is an inflow of another gas. The external gas takes away the electron in the structure, therefore heightening the resistance of the structure. The sensitivity is determined through resistance within the sensor. When the sensitivity is elevated, a structure can perceive more NO2 than the one with low sensitivity even when there’s a same amount in the air. The nanostructure mentioned in the paper is indeed a unique technology. However, Kim also mentioned the insufficiency of this nanostructure. In order to detect NO2, this gas needs to be heated in an extremely high temperature; in the case of the paper, 300’C. Therefore, there is a difficulty for people to sense the gas in the current stance. Kim mentioned that he wants to improve this difficulty through further research. He is currently working on methods that could allow this nanostructure to detect NO2 in a room temperature. Kim wishes to develop a practical nanostructure. Kim is an enthusiastic researcher. He constantly works on structures that could benefit people in their daily lives. He is striving for extreme-high sensitivity in his structures so that people could quickly recognize and react to the contamination. Kim mentioned “I want to make a structure that can be commercialized. A lot of the inventions disappear due to the lack of cost competency or efficiency. I wish to contribute to the promotion of mankind welfare.” On Jung-yun jessica0818@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Kim Youn-soo