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2017-08 28

[Alumni]The Master of Go

Currently a professional player and a professor of the game Go, Jeong Soo-hyun (English Language and Literature, ’83) dreamed of becoming a professional Go player since he was in high school. Jeong learned to play Go as a student and was charmed by the joy until he eventually decided that he wanted to be a master of it. As a professional player, Jeong has written about 40 books, has been teaching Go for more than 20 years, and has telecasted on numerous TV programs. Go and life Jeong navigated his life toward the world of Go and sought his career in that field at first because he was purely attracted by its joy. It all began as an interest and a passion, after which he grew to be more enthusiastic and ambitious. To Jeong, Go is not just a job but rather something that links to his mind and thoughts. “I found another world studying Go. I might call it a world of Go culture,” laughed Jeong. “I often refer to Go as a panacea, which is the cure for all ills. I sometimes get amazed by how extensive Go can reach in our daily lives. It teaches us so much!” exclaimed Jeong. After graduating from high school, he entered the Korea Baduk (game of Go) Association as a researcher, which is the first and indispensable step of becoming a professional. He had about 40 Go matches every year, through which Jeong studied and accumulated his skills and knowledge. “It’s not through practice that you improve yourself in Go, but it is rather through analyzing other players’ games. So I made several small groups and focused on growing insights and developing my own mastery.” Jeong read books about Go in order to get the holistic picture of the game and to master the theory of it. The more he studied, the more he was absorbed into the game. Jeong reached the highest level of 9th grader in Go after countless matches starting from level one when he was 41. Higher levels could be achieved through gaining points by winning Go matches. “I highly recommend learning or practicing Go as a hobby. It is not only fascinating itself but also extremely lesson-full and wisdom-giving at the same time. Recently, Go has become a global mind-sport, meaning being good at it will enable you to be good at communicating with people.” After becoming a professional Go player and entering Hanyang University, Jeong has established a club named “Hanyang Giwoohui”, which has become more active even after Jeong’s graduation. "Go is full of lessons!" (Photo courtesy of heraldcorp) As a professional and a professor It has been more than 20 years since Jeong became a professor of Go at a Korean university. He spent the longer part of his Go life as a professor than as a professional. With his life motto “no pain no gain”, he has been teaching his students that where there is no effort, there is no outcome. “What I’ve learned through my life as a Go player is that it feels more worthwhile to do something for the others than for just yourself and that the ultimate result will be in your favor. I believe doing what you love with passion will beget meaningful outcomes,” manifested Jeong. Winning the second place in both KBS Baduk Match and SBS Baduk Match, and being the first winner of the Professional Baduk Match, Jeong’s name is mentioned in lists of the winners of many professional Go matches. “I only won the second place because my rival was mighty. I can still recall the bitterness,” reminisced Jeong. Currently taking the role of the president of Korea Professional Baduk Association and Korean Society for Baduk Studies, Jeong is continuting his studies of Go. “No pain no gain is my life philosophy. If you don’t work, there will be no award.” Having published about 40 books of baduk (Go), Jeong’s recommendations for beginners are ‘Introduction to Baduk’, ‘Master of Management’, and ‘CEO Who Reads Baduk’, all of which are perfect for baduk beginners to read. He first wrote a book due to a request of learners, after which Jeong got a number of requests from other publishing companies to publish more books. Thanks to all his publications, he acquired the nickname “baduk professor” even before he became one. His achievements all together as a professional Go player spotlights him as one of the most prominent players. "I believe hard work always pays off. There awaits rewarads for those who work hard." (Photo courtesy of heraldcorp) Jeon Chae-yun chaeyun111@hanyang.ac.kr

2016-11 27 Important News

[Alumni]Yoo Seul-gi's Vocal Music and Career

Yoo Seul-gi of the Department of Vocal Music (’10), whose life has been associated with music since the age of four, embarked on his journey of pursuing his career as a vocal singer when he was in middle school. Recently televised through an audition program called Phantom Singer, Yoo drew public attention with his singing abilities and his record- graduating Hanyang University as valedictorian and being the vocal trainer of the famous singer Yoon Min-soo after graduating. The alumnus is looking forward to making vocal music more popular and approachable, as well as becoming a renowned vocal singer himself. Yoo on Phantom Singer After finishing his military service in 2015, Yoo was considering of going abroad for further studies on vocal singing. However, circumstances were not too favorable for him to do so, despite his avidity and eagerness. An alternative option that provided Yoo with what he wanted was the audition program Phantom Singer, which gave him an opportunity to let the public hear his voice. While on air, he performed the music titled ‘Granada’, through which he gave a message: since this song possesses both smooth and tough sensations, Yoo wanted to demonstrate that he is able to manifest both facets at the same time. “It is hard for a soft person to look strong and vice versa. By performing this music, I wanted to show that I have my own unique feature, a mixture of both aspects,” remarked Yoo. ▲ Yoo performing 'Granada' on Phantom Singer “Among a big group of voices, it is essential for me to sort out my own voice, knowing what my best part is,” explained Yoo. In this context, Yoo regards himself as his own rival, distinguishing his voice from the others’. Winning to the final round of the audition, Yoo is determined to make each stage memorable and impressive to the audience, not focusing too much on the outcome. When Yoo was a freshman, he did not think he had a talent for singing. However, on his very first vocal test, he was evaluated as the best student among his peers. It was from that moment that Yoo pushed himself to work harder and do his best, which he did by practicing until late at night every day throughout the six years of his university life. “It is undeniable that people with innate abilities have different starting points and more advantages. Yet I strongly believe that if one has the passion that supports that confidence, they can acquire such a talent,” said Yoo. "While I was at university, I was taught by Professor Kho Sung-hyun, one of the most eminent baritone singers of Korea. I could say that there are traces of his teachings in my singing,” he added. Coaching the famous singer Yoon Min-soo on vocalization is also Yoo's notable task. He became the vocal trainer of Yoon through an acquaint composer who offered Yoo the place. Yoon had never received vocal training before but he insisted on getting lessons from a vocal musician, since vocal music centers on vocalization when producing sounds, signifying considerable help to a singer. “I want to make vocal music more friendly to the public. Compared to popular music, vocal music may feel distant from people, being somewhat unfamiliar to them. Through television programs like Phantom Singer, I hope vocal music draws more attention and becomes more receptive,” noted Yoo. Yoo Seul-gi, the alumnus of 2010, Department of Vocal Music (Photo courtesy of Yoo Seul-gi) Jeon Chae-yun chaeyun111@hanyang.ac.kr