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2017-04 25

[Alumni]CEO of Design Egg

Among fierce competition in the entertainment and design industry, there came a glittering 'star' company: Design Egg. With the launch of the program “Tap Tap Como” on the Seoul Broadcasting System, the CEO of Design Egg, Jung Je-won (Department of Entertainment Design, ERICA Campus, '07), is working on his creative design tasks more ardently. News H met him to hear the path he has taken, and the future he is paving for. Jung is explaining the path he has taken to found Design Egg. When others break an egg, it is fried egg, but when you break it, it is a chick Company Design Egg has been founded on 2007 and its task force is divided into two spheres: commercial and contents. The commercial part concentrates on the tasks handed over by other subcontracting companies, while the contents part focuses on its creative self-development. “With the financial surplus earned from the commercial sector, we invest all our ability to develop new animations, designs, and contents within our creativity. Thus, the contents part is what we value the most,” said Jung. The name 'Design Egg' was founded 10 years ago, when Jung and three of his fellow colleagues gathered round. “There’s a saying that when an egg is broken by others, it becomes fried egg, but when it is broken by itself, it becomes a chick. We tried to embed this meaning in our company- blooming prosperity and creativeness,” emphasized Jung. Design Egg's booth at a character fair is boomed by children. (Photo courtesy of Jung) Due to Jung’s experience at the Designing industry, he cherished the hope to ameliorate the poor environment. “After the graduation, I worked at the designing company to build wider personal connections and experiences. But, the low income and harsh welfare made me grasp the magnitude of this industry,” said Jung. In the attempt the set the better example and path to his juniors, he decided to found a company of just environment with his colleagues. When you’re lonely and tired, Como will tap-tap you Animation created by Design Egg “Tap Tap Como” brought Jung and his crew a significant amount of opportunity and fortune. However, the production process was a continuous adversity. The target was children and the animation itself was six to seven minutes long, which was immensely longer than what Design Egg has been producing for their commercial goods. Even so, they made steady progress. “To define children’s tastes, we aired an incomplete piece in kindergartens and tried to communicate often with moms around us,” noted Jung. As a result, the heart of the animation was born: the Tap-Tap dance of Como. <Tap-Tap Dance of Como, Video courtesy of Design Egg> Como in the animation is the main character and a baby chick. Como’s friends are Toto, who came from the urban area, Wormy, a worm whom Como did not eat but became friends with, and Uba, who is a warm-hearted baby duck. Together, they learn the goodness in life, solicitude, and love. “Babies are the kindest beings. I have a faith that this purity in animation will remind adults of the innocence and naivety they once had.” Jung strives for the betterment of the entertainment design industry for his juniors. Jung’s ultimate goal is not limited- it adds up as he seeks betterment. “It is the most blissful moment when my babbling baby giggles when Como is being played.” Developing Design Egg into a sustainable and welfare-based company like Disney or Zebra is now propelling Jung onwards. Kim Ju-hyun kimster9421@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Kim Youn-soo

2017-04 17

[Alumni]A Pro in Both Fields; Pansori and Gayageum

Just as a guitar player may also sing beautifully, Choi Min-hyouk is a professional player and singer of gayageum, or Korean zither, and pansori, a type of Korean traditional music. His field of music is called Gayageum sanjo mit byeongchang in Korean. Hi diligence and passion enabled him to master gayageum and pansori to complete the course of Intangible Cultural Property .23 designated by the South Korean government. Recently, Choi was awarded the prestigious Ureuk Grand Prize at the 26th National Ureuk Gayageum Contest, a nationwide competition for gayageum players and pansori singers, held on March 31st to April 1st. Also working as a chief member of Daejeon Yeonjung Korean Music Center, an organization whose mission is to preserve Korean traditional music, or Gukak, he endeavors to deliver the excellence of Gukak to Korea and the world’s general public. For the first time, a male contestant, Choi won the grand prize at the 26th National Ureuk Gayageum Contest. (Photo courtesy of Choi) The 26th Grand Prize Winner of the National Ureuk Gayageum Contest The largest number of contestants consisting of of 214 teams participated in this year's contest. Choi was the first male competitor to win the Grand Prize. “Despite my skills that need more refining, it was luck that awarded me this fruitful outcome. I’ll use this opportunity to work harder and devote myself more deeply.” he modestly revealed. The songs Choi sang and played with his gayageum are 'Hwaryongdo' from Jeokbyeokga in the preliminary round and ‘On the way to the castle’ from Simcheongga in the finals. Jeokbyokga, a Chinese war story, and Simcheongga, a tale which a devoted daughter helps to recover eyesight of her blind father and subsequently becoming a queen in her homeland, are famous pansori songs from the Joseon Dynasty. ‘“Hwaryongdo' depicts scenes of fierce war and ‘On the way to the castle’ vividly describes the blind father well. The two songs made it easier for me to showcase the charm of a male pansori singeri, ” he explained. Choi singing pansori and playing his gayageum. (Photo courtesy of Choi) Efforts To Preserve and Maintain Traditional Music Currently a chief member of Daejeon Yeonjung Korean Music Center, Choi takes part in various music performances in and out of the country and teaches gayageum and pansori. “Today, pansori is perceived as something old and boring by the general audience. As a gukak performer, I believe prejudice is the problem we have to overcome. I am working hard to teach gukak easily and make it more approachable to the general public,” he said. In addition to practicing his music, Choi also focuses on communication and harmony between other members of the group. Choi began practicing pansori when he was ten-years-old, at the suggestion of his father. Choosing pansori as his major, he started studying gayageum after taking classes as his minor. From his classes, he first met his teacher Gang Jeong-suk, who had much knowledge and skills for Intangible Cultural Property No.23 Gayageum sanjo mit byeongchang. Becoming a disciple of Gang, and after four years of training, he was selected as the gukak musician to complete the necessary course as a receiver of Intangible Cultural Property No.23. “My motto is ilchaeyushimjo(一切唯心造), which is a term from Buddhism that means everything depends on how you think. Positive thinking and incessant exertion reap good results for certain,” Choi claimed. Choi also believes that the performer of music needs to be a good person first in order to play good music. Therefore, his prime objective is to become a good person who plays good music. “Nowadays, all gugak majors learn both purely traditional and crossover music. However, I believe that only when the root of the tradition is firmly established can there be room for creative crossover music, ” he advised. Choi believes that the performer of music needs to be a good person first in order to play good music. (Photo courtesy of Choi) Jang Soo-hyun luxkari@hanyang.ac.kr

2017-03 27 Important News

[Alumni]Effort as the Mother, Modesty as the Father

“In a universe of ambiguity, this kind of certainty comes only once, and never again, no matter how many lifetimes you live.” Ardent love story from the movie “The Bridges of Madison County” has been reborn as a musical in South Korea. Fateful memories that Francesca and Robert recall, perhaps, is full of emotions that ordinary actors can’t express. There is a musical actor Park Eun-tae, an alumnus of Hanyang University’s Business School, who fully absorbed himself into Robert Kincaid. Acting with passion From ‘Phantom’ and ‘Frankenstein’ to ‘The Bridges of Madison County,’ Park has filled his 11 years with 25 performances. Despite the tight schedule, Park is referred by the media as one of the most improved musical stars in South Korea. One of his most favorable pieces is ‘Frankenstein. Musical ‘Frankenstein’ reveals the brotherhood of characters Victor and Henry, which later becomes defamed due to Henry’s modification into a monster. ’“Switching my role from one musical to another is an emotional burden, because I have to become another me. Leaving Henry from ‘Frankenstein’ behind was especially strenuous,” recalled Park. Another musical that Park feels an affection to is ‘Phantom.’ Along with the charming characteristic and background stories of the role Eric, the musical register perfectly suited Park’s voice. “Escaping from the role Eric was a toil, since I was so captivated by his life and my all emotions were devoted to him,” said Park. Musical <The Bridges of Madison County> raises its curtain on April 15th at Chungmu Art Center. (Photo courtesy of Prain Global Incorporation) Under the breathtaking schedule of the musical world, the most recent musical choice of Park was “The Bridges of Madison County.” The musical is about an ordinary mother Francesca, who reveals the course of discovering woman in herself through Robert’s love. “When I was first offered with the role, I refused it because I knew the original Robert is a persona beyond my capacity. However, the production company dramatized Robert into a younger and frisky man, which intrigued all my interests to apply here,” said Park. The new journey of Park is about to begin, as he is practicing daily at Chungmoo Art Center. Things you give up for what you want In his high school years, Park expected to enter the Korea Military Academy or the Police Institute. “Since I was young, I loved getting attentions from the audience and being praised. So I often volunteered for school presidents and more,” recalled Park. However, Park realized that this does not suit his career. Even when he came to the Business School of Hanyang University, he could not give up on his dream- musical actor. He kept singing at the school club as a vocal, and he finally decided to achieve his long-cherished desire after a long contemplation. Becoming a musical actor was a long road, but maintaining his position was an ordeal. On the day of the interview, americano-lover Park was drinking a banana juice for the health of his vocal cords. “Hearing the audience applauding after the curtain call is the happiest moment in my life. However, after delights follow responsibilities,” stressed Park. The hardest part of managing his body condition is maintaining the voice health, since the vocal muscles are not visible. Along with this, art and emotion should be expressed altogether. “In the early age, I thought there are special methods to managing body conditions, but now I grasped that usual habits are the key,” reminded Park. Getting halted for the ‘Frankenstein’ performance due to vocal cord nodules was the most bitter slump Park experienced. “This is the path I chose. Giving up petty happiness with friends, family, alcohol, and other habits is what I sacrifice. In return, I’m compensated with the accomplishments and joy,” emphasized Park. Park is preparing to become Robert Kincaid. Because Park’s major at college was business studies, it was a dilemma for him to wonder whether his practice and development speed is fast enough, compared to other musical actors. However, he realized that efforts never betray. “Concentrate on your own clock only. Other clocks do not matter,” advised Park for those who agonize over their dreams. Kim Ju-hyun kimster9421@hanyang.ac.kr

2017-03 20

[Alumni]Passion, Love, and Yacht

Not all university students are able to formulate a definite life goal or create a systematic plan for an ideal future. In fact, most struggle to find out what they truly want to do as they mature and complete their studies while at university. As an ordinary university student, Chang Jae-ik (Department of Sports Industry ’09) went on a trip to Europe when he was in his 4th year at Hanyang and discovered what he aspired to do all his life: sailing all over the world on a yacht. A dream in the Netherlands ▲ Chang (left) made it to the finish line. Chang visited Marseille, France, when he was a senior at Hanyang and witnessed a sight that touched his soul: hundreds of white yachts floating beautifully on an emerald ocean. At the time, he merely thought it would be nice to own one of those yachts and then forgot about it. But when Chang visited Amsterdam in the Netherlands, he caught sight of another mesmerizing view that shattered his prejudice. “I always thought that going on a cruise aboard a yacht was a privilege only for the rich because of its extravagant cost. That was how the prototypical image of yachting is portrayed in movies and dramas,” confessed Chang. What he saw at the port was about 20 yachts getting ready to sail off at midnight, all of which were occupied by individual families. Parents were preparing the yacht for sail and the little children on each yacht were waving from afar to people on land. That sight taught him that yachts are accessible to ordinary people. After coming back to Korea and being discharged from military service, Chang was determined to learn how to sail a yacht and become a yachtmaster. Chang accumulated a small fortune while he was in the army, which he had gladly spent on a working holiday to the Netherlands. Chang settled in Rotterdam and became a member of Rotterdamse Studenten Zeil Vereniging, a student yacht club in Rotterdam. In the process of becoming a yachtmaster under the Royal Yachting Association, Chang had sailed about 5000km, stopping off at a number of countries including the Netherlands, Belgium, England, France, Spain and Portugal. ▲ "I wish yachting was more easily accessible to ordinary people in Korea." Entering the 2016 Rolex Sydney Hobart Yacht Race in a team named 'Sonic', Chang acquired another valuable experience. Sonic came 24th out of 88 teams, some consisting of prominent professionals who took part in the race several times in the past. His was the very first to have participated as a Korean team which made Sonic even more special. “Given that there were many amazing yacht professionals participating in the race, I think our accomplishment is impressive and remarkable. I am honored to have participated in such a big-scale competition and thankful to have had a crew composed of wonderful people,” exclaimed Chang. Journeying aboard a yacht “On the voyage, I was engulfed by soot-black nights with millions of stars studded in the sky, even shooting stars on occasion. The yacht was suspended on a bottomless ocean, accompanied by countless dolphins,” reminisced Chang. He stated that the most charming aspect of sailing on a yacht is the advantage of being able to visit every little unknown ports and docks, allowing you to experience the indigenous and uninfluenced culture of any given region. “I stopped at so many countries, giving myself the opportunity to encounter people of all ages who came from a sundry of unique cultures.” Chang gained priceless memories and experiences during his expeditions, which he hopes to treasure throughout his life. ▲ "One day, I'm going to go on an around-the-world journey with my wife." Jeon Chae-yun chaeyun111@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Moon Ha-na

2017-03 13 Important News

[Alumni]Director who Sheds Light on the Meaning of Life

The stage boiled with explosive energy and fervor with the dance-like movements the actors made. “In the times of despair and hopelessness, do not be engulfed in the typhoon of rage, but confront the reality that each and everyone is not your competitors, but all the same, scarred souls like yourself. You can find happiness through reconciliation and forgiveness.” Actors threw questions of God, meaning of life, and mankind. Every moment of the seven-hour-play left the opportunity of deep contemplation as the audience slowly digested the meaningful contexts provided by the fiery speech of the actors. This philosophical world of The Karamazov Brothers on stage was weaved by the hands of a theatrical director and a professor of Sungkyul University, Ra Jin-hwan (Department of Japanese Language & Literature, ERICA, ‘91). Theatrical director and professor, Ra Jin-hwan. The seven-hour-play about the human nature The Brothers Karamazov is a story of the conflict about hatred, love, and money between three brothers, Dmitri, Ivan, and Alyosha, Smerdyakov, two women named Katerina, Grushenka, and their father, Fyodor. It is Ra’s third work of the series about humanistic introspection of humans which is based on Fyodor Dostoyevsky’s works, such as Demons and Crime and Punishment. “Dostoyevsky is my favorite author. This is because there is no other author who achieved well-made contemplation and analysis about the inner side of human nature as much as him, and also about the relationship between man and God with such a scale,” Ra explained. Costing three years until full completion, the play is the longest of the aforementioned three plays of Ra. He was determined to produce the play after a near death experience caused by an unfortunate medical accident. “When a human’s body is in loss of strength, one contemplates about the essence of life. I wanted to tell people about the story of life with the masterpiece, The Brothers Karamazov, and decided to go for it after the incident,” Ra reminisced. The Brothers Karamazov observes the nature of human, and the meaning of life. The picture above is the scene where Ivan and Smerdyakov is arguing about who was the real cause of the death of their father. (Photo Courtesy of Ra) Actor to theatrical director Ra first encountered experiences with plays when he was participating as a member of a theater group during his university years. “I joined the group because I did everything from singing in a school choir to drawing in an art club, but never experienced acting before,” he said. Although acting was very enjoyable, the whole process was very overwhelming. However the thought that he could have done better lingered in his heart, and stimulated Ra to continue on his theater group activities. “I decided to focus on studying to enter graduate school, but my friend left me a copy of The Victors by Jean-Paul Sartre on my desk. I read it and was so moved by the critical mindset about justice that I participated in acting in the play once again.” That moment was what led Ra to follow a career path of theatrical arts. He decided to do what he was most confident and interested in. While studying abroad in Paris as an actor, Ra felt that the final decision maker of a play was the director, not the actor. “I wished to create a play that reflected my own ideals and beliefs. That is why I became a director instead of being an actor,” Ra said. Focusing his attention to performing arts and artistic movements, he devised his unique aesthetic style called theater dance. “Theater dance was the effort to harmonize image and narrative together in order to allow Korean audience to better understand new kinds of abstract plays in a more international dimension,” Ra said. Theater dance expands actors' expressions of inner state of the characters and the symbolic, metaphoric meanings of texts through dance and choreography. (Photo courtesy of Ra) According to Ra, the essence of a play is to give resonance to the question of the nature of human. “I want to be a theatrical director who can tell the audience the answer to the question with my own aesthetical expression system,” he said. Ra is planning to create another play that is based on Dostoyevsky’s work called The Idiot. For those who are pursuing a career of acting and directing plays, Ra advised, “Sustain your interests and carry it on for a long period of time. You have to go through audition by audition, play by play. Everything is new, so think incessantly, fight, and be strong. There are no answers, and do what you want to do to be happy.” Curtain call of The Brothers Karamazov. Jang Soo-hyun luxkari@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Choi Min-ju

2017-03 08 Important News

[Alumni]UI Artist at Blizzard Entertainment

Blizzard Entertainment is one of the most famous and popular game companies in the world. Since its establishment in 1994, it has released many game series such as Warcraft, Diablo, and Starcraft, which all gained huge popularity. The company’s most recent work is Overwatch, which is a team-based shooting game. Since its release in last May, it has been gaining an immense number of users in Korea as well. This week, News H interviewed Jung Seong-hak (Entertainment Design, ERICA Campus, ’07), a UI (User Interface) artist for Blizzard in Irvine, California. Blizzard’s UI artist One of the biggest reasons why many of Blizzard’s games became hugely successful is because of user-friendly interface, and easy-to-learn game environment. Such aspects of a given project are what UI artists mainly deal with. “UI refers to the point of contact between the user and the content. Project artist teams deal with the UX (User Experience), which is the real experience that users get while playing the game. It includes the simplest graphic, from animation to prototyping, which is a process that is supplemented from actual users' feedback,” Jung elaborated. Jung (third from the left) and his colleagues. (Photo courtesy of Jung) It has been 9 years since Jung started to work at Blizzard, and there are points he thinks is the most important part of the job as a UI artist. “The UI artist's work constitutes a big part of the main project, so it's always important for them to keep their work consistent with the whole project. As such, it's important for artists to always try to see the big picture. There are always new and existing users, both of whom we have to take good care of, which is the trickiest part,” explained Jung. The boy who loved art and game Jung loved drawing and playing computer games as a child. His interest in these led him to search for majors university with a relation to his hobbies. During the years at HYU, Jung had many chances to develop his abilities as a designer. “I was the leader of the school club ‘Intro’. We used to create a lot of image work and present it in different exhibitions or contests,” Jung recalled. In his senior year, Jung started to search for suitable companies to apply for jobs, just like other students do, and found Blizzard’s recruitment announcement. Jung didn’t hesitate, sending in the resume right off the bat, which soon took him on a flight to California. Overwatch is Jung's favorite game of late. (Photo courtesy of Jung) Until this day, playing computer games is Jung’s favorite hobby. “I played numerous games in the past and it includes those made by Blizzard and others. Personally, I prefer games with good graphics and stories. Recently, I thought ‘The Last of Us’ from Naughty Dog Inc. was impressive,” noted Jung. As both user and artist at Blizzard, Jung said he is happy that the game Overwatch was such a big hit. “Currently, I like to play Overwatch above other computer games. Since I play it at work, I try not to go on it when I’m home, but it’s just too difficult for me,” admitted the game fanatic. New start, new life in California As expected, Jung’s new life in the United States wasn’t without hardship. He tried to record the experience through different means. Jung’s post on his Facebook account, ‘How I was issued a family relation certificate in the States’ went viral and many people sympathized with the arduous process. Jung also thought of drawing his daily life in California into comics. Jung’s short cartoon was posted on the Korean portal site Naver, with the title ‘Welcome, California’. “When I first got here, I had many new experiences that were hard to deal with, so I thought, why not depict it through a cartoon to give people first-hand information. I'm no longer publishing now, but am thinking of continuing it later,” said Jung. On weekends, Jung likes to visit exhibitions or museums with his wife. (Photo courtesy of Jung) According to some of his cartoons, Jung seemed to have adapted to California pretty well. As soon as Jung landed in California, he could easily find Korean grocery stores, restaurants, movie theaters, and even a Korean sauna. What amazed Jung was California’s beautiful view and its coastline. “I didn’t have much chance to visit beaches when I was in Korea. In California, my home is only 10 minutes away from the sea, so I like going to the beaches a lot with my wife,” said Jung. Happiness is what really matters “As a human being, we all like to explore and search for something to feel a sense of accomplishment. I think computer games are the most easily accessible and cost-efficient form of entertainment that attracts people,” said Jung. His four years at HYU was short, but it was definitely one of the most important moments in Jung’s life. “My life at HYU was full of happy moments and good memories as I met my wife and good friends." As of now, Jung is happy with his job. He mentioned how the company welfare and competent colleagues always give him positive motivation. “I don’t have anything specific to say as a final goal in my life- I just want to live happily, doing what I love." Jung hopes to be a UI artist who makes the best game environment possible for users. (Photo courtesy of Jung) Yun Ji-hyun uni27@hanyang.ac.kr

2017-03 06

[Alumni]News Jelly for Data Utilization

About thirty years ago, there were no portable computers but only those that were handled by experts. After affordable personal computers came out, smartphones were developed. Now everyone uses them to surf the Internet or do personal work. Presently, in order to analyze data, expensive programs and specialists such as data scientists are needed. Chung Byoung-jun (M.S. in Electronics and Computer Engineering, ‘11) and Lim Jun-won (Technology & Innovation Management, Doctoral Program), the joint representatives of News Jelly, are the pioneers who are solving this issue and striving for data democratization in Korea. Joint CEOs of News Jelly, Lim (left) and Jung (right). Q. Last time when News H interviewed News Jelly in 2014, it was a new start-up business. Have there been any changes during the last three years? Lim: In the past, we as experts handled data-related operations for our clients from one end to the next. Now, we've created a program called DAISY that makes it easier for people to utilize data as freely as they want. Our customers can use the program by themselves without long, costly training. It automatically visualizes a lot of data at once, combining them into graphs or charts. By utilizing it, data popularization can be accomplished. Lim: Our company is currently focusing on developing DAISY, which is being used by 20 to 30 public institutions, such as the city of Seoul, the National Information Society Agency (NIA), and by various provincial government buildings. In addition to the program, we create interactive content, run data visualization consultations and an education business that teaches students how to solve problems using data. Lim thinks about News Jelly's improvement over the past three years. Jung: We considered whether to raise brand awareness, or develop DAISY during the first year of News Jelly's initiation. We first decided to increase brand recognition by making data journalism content. Then, as we figured out the needs for the program, we started focusing on DAISY from 2015. Q. Tell us the separate areas of business that you are working on as joint representatives of News Jelly. What does the company comprise of? Lim: I work in the management side of the company, such as marketing, business strategy, and sales. Jung is in charge of technological development and services. Jung: News Jelly is comprised of four teams. There is the business development team, which is led by Lim, and the technology team which focuses on R&D, managed by myself. There is also the product development team, and the contents team, which also works on formulating products. Bar graph made by DAISY showing the mortality rate caused by swimming accidents. The color of the graphs -green, yellow, and red- each refers to June, July and August respectively. (Photo courtesy of News Jelly) A line graph made by DAISY. The red line shows the total travel expenses and the green line shows the total tourists' income within Korea. Relevant data was provided by the Korea Tourism Organization. (Photo courtesy of News Jelly) Q. What are News Jelly’s future plans? Lim: Our plan is to include DAISY’s product line-ups that enable easy use of data, not only for public institutions but also for private ones and ordinary people like university students. In addition, we are preparing to expand the program for monetary and medical institutions as well, collecting and analyzing their data to devise specific methods of visualizing data. Jung: We are planning to complete DAISY’s core technology this year. Using that, we can expand our field of business. We need to sophisticate our technology that recommends which visualization method to use, according to what kind of data the program is handling. Right now, we are achieving this by using the logic of Artificial Intelligence (AI) technology that automatically looks into patterns and distinguishes the domain of data. We are going to advance this by applying AI's learning capacity. We will also incorporate Big Data into our data source. Jung explains News Jelly's plans for DAISY's future technological advancements. Q. Any advice to students who are interested in data utilization, and in starting their own businesses? Lim: Nowadays there are many trendy data-related terms like AI and data mining. Before getting too intrigued by those terms, it will be more helpful to study statistics first. Jung: I agree with Lim. I think that following trends that rise and fall in outlook is precarious. What is important is building up an academic foundation before jumping into anything, such as statistics and algorithms. The experience of working for a corporation, and being equipped with knowledge about the operations and the needs of a company are also very important. Other charts and graphs made by DAISY. Click here to visit News Jelly's homepage. (Photo courtesy of News Jelly) Jang Soo-hyun luxkari@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Moon Ha-na

2017-02 27

[Alumni]Collecting Coins as Investment

People have their own appetite for broadening their personal fields of interest. Kim Hee-sung (Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, '08) has been collecting money for over 10 years. A wide array of commemorative coins, gold coins, silver coins, and bills are all part of Kim’s interests and his collection business called Power Coin. Reporters of News H interviewed Kim to get a closer insight into how his money market operates. Gaining interest It all started off when Kim was in his first year of college. Having had the opportunity to live in the US for about a year, Kim had the chance to participate in various coin shows. These exhibitions were held quite often in most big counties, and at the time, it was challenging to afford collecting coins. “I was just a student then, and for a student, it's very hard to buy gold coins for leisure.” Kim explains about the market prices of coins. After graduating from college, Kim looked up on some of the coins that he had seen in the coin fairs, and discovered that the price had soared higher than when he first saw it. “This was when I realized that coin collection could be a real investment, and started collecting coins one by one,” said Kim. Through the civil engineer certification academy that he opened up in Busan, Kim was able to collect most of the coins that he had wanted. Kim and his wife could not stand the long distance, which is why he started his business in Korea. Fostering insight When going abroad or buying coins through eBay, Kim was sometimes tricked into buying fake ones. After accumulating experiences and learning the know-hows through books, Kim has now developed his own outlook on which are real, and are of more value. “Most people in this field don’t explain the reasons behind why a certain monetary product is an imitation. It’s probably their own know-how that they’re trying to guard,” he added. Kim claims that money auctions tell a lot about reading the market price. Attending money exhibitions that are held in China and Hong Kong also helps to realize the trend for him, as well. Various shapes and sizes of commemorative coins exist. Not all commemorative coins rise in value. Factors that determine the rise and fall of prices are popularity, quantity and quality. For instance, the 1988 Seoul Olympics coin was issued at about 85,000 won, but now it is being traded at around 70,000 won even after almost 30 years has passed. This is because it has been issued in such large quantities that it only holds material value. As for bills, the quality matters a lot. Even if a tiny part of an edge is worn out, the price would drop 10 to 20%. Kim also says that buying gold or silver coins is better investment compared to buying actual gold or silver bars. “Coins are a bit like limited edition items. The price of the materials themselves, plus the scarcity, creates the price. Gold or silver bars can be made in limitless quantities but not the coins,” said Kim. Studying coins are not only good for investment but also monetary insight. Kim claims that pursuing an interest not only in college studies but something beyond it, is more important. As Kim's interest in coins made it possible for him to become the CEO of Power Coin, Kim wishes that more people could expand on the area they like. Kim Seung-jun nzdave94@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Choi Min-ju

2017-02 27 Important News

[Alumni]From Aficionado to Expert in Science Fiction

Wouldn’t it be amazing to turn your favorite hobby into a career? There usually exists disparities between hobbies and the realistic livelihood- but it isn't impossible. Park Sang-joon (Earth & Marine Sciences, ’90) made himself a novel example of someone who has succeeded in this. Park, who loved reading science fiction (SF) novels as a kid, became a renowned SF expert in Korea as an adult. An eye-opening experience “It was when I was very young that I started to read SFs summarized and edited for kids. Then when I was about 14, I got the chance to read whole, thicker versions of SF novels written for adults in my cousin’s house who majored in astronomy,” said Park. Childhood’s End (1953), written by Arthur Clarke the SF writer and futurist, shook his world to the core. The book was nothing like he ever knew or imagined. Unlike the books for children that got Park imagining monsters or space heroes, this new encounter enlightened him. It incited Park to ponder about the future of humans and the meaning of their existence in the universe in a wider perspective. Park mentioned that Arthur Clarke is one of his favorite SF writers to this day. Following that, Park became more attracted to SF novels and started to research for more. However, it was hard to find that many books, since at that time, SF wasn’t widely known in Korea yet. “After getting tired of repeatedly reading the same novels, I chose to read the original editions of SFs which were written in English,” reminisced Park. Although all he had was a thick English dictionary, his love for science fiction motivated him to master English on his own. Upon entering Hanyang University, Park's dream was to become a scientist, which was a goal highly influenced by his SF readings. His love for science fiction was the same but there came a change in approach- from perceiving it as science, to literature. “The Korean society during my college years was more oppressed than it is now, with less freedom and protected rights. Such circumstances led me to think of the importance of social science studies.” Park was able to link his new interest of study with science fiction. He realized how some SFs like George Orwell’s 1984 (1949) dealt with problems of a futuristic society. “I thought such novels could give people a heads-up to learn from them and prepare for possible conflict or despotism. Later, I believed it could also allow people to better promote peace. It was a new charming point of science fiction,” said Park. Organizing and maintaining Korean SF history “I thought it was necessary to assemble and classify SF materials before it is forgotten and lost forever,” said Park. It was 1997, when Park officially opened the Seoul SF Archive, to collect and organize data related to Korea’s science fiction and its history. Currently, in a space large enough for an individual office, materials of different forms such as books, films, papers and comics are fully stocked. Park’s collection is ever getting larger as Park searches for SFs in second-hand bookstores online or auction sites that sell old out-of-print books. “I hope my collection helps people researching or writing papers within the field of science fiction,” said Park. Believing that the work he has been doing can be best managed by himself, Park has been organizing the archive on his own. Photo courtesy of Park According to Park, one of the oldest science fiction novels in Korean is Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea (1869) by Jules Verne. “It was translated by Korean exchange students in Tokyo for a magazine called Taegeuk School Newspaper in 1907. I confirm that it is the oldest SF in Korean,” asserted Park. With accumulated materials, Park opened an exhibition in 2007 that featured 100 years of Korean SF history. Father of Korean SF From book translation, science lectures to news columns, Park is actively giving advice, translating, and sharing insight in science fiction. There are around 30 books Park translated, directed, and wrote with other writers. A work most special to Park is the first book of the Following Robinson Crusoe series (2007). Written for kids, the series show how the main character, Robinson, survives on a deserted island by utilizing scientific knowledge. Park worked on parts where scientific knowledge was needed. The book Robinson Crusoe was a hit domestically. It was translated into English as well.Park also writes columns every two weeks for the Hankyoreh newspaper, mainly dealing with Korea’s science and technology of the past. “If we compare two ordinary scenes from the 20th and 21st century respectively, the biggest difference would be found in what people are holding- smartphones. Science fiction visualizes worlds that are to come, which are vouched for by a lot of books and films showing us the IT-oriented world in an approachable and realistic way,” added Park. Park advised HYU students to vary their choices of books. He especially hopes for more attention on science fiction novels. “Books always give people something to learn from. In terms of science fiction, as it readily embodies the future, near and far, it can give students clues as to how to formulate their dreams and develop careers.” As a Korean SF expert, Park is looking forward to SFs that will again surpass his imagination. Yun Ji-hyun uni27@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Kim Yoon-soo

2017-02 20 Important News

[Alumni]Three Hanyangian Stars from Phantom Singer

The long march of Phantom Singer, a musical crossover audition program broadcast by JTBC, officially ended on 27 January. In the final round, the teams “Popularity Phenomenon" (Ingi-Hyunsang) and “Hyungspresso" (deep-hearted espresso) carried on the baton after the champion team “Forte di Quatro”. Despite the loss of the crown, both Popularity Phenomenon and Hyungspresso have shown that classical vocal music can intrigue the public and gain popularity. From Popularity Phenomenon, tenor Yoo Seul-gi (Department of Voice, ‘13) and tenor Paek In-tae (Department of Voice, ‘10) shed fresh light on the traditional genre of vocal music, as well as baritone Kwon Seo-kyoung (Department of Voice, 2nd year) from Hyungspresso. News H met the three proud alumni to hear the behind stories and beyond. Seizing the opportunity through Phantom Singer Q1. Congratulations on finishing the long adventure of Phantom Singer. How do you feel now it's over? Paek: I'm sad I can’t watch my favorite weekly program any more. But I feel freed from the burden of selecting and practicing songs for the performances. I'm also anticipating the future that I'll face. Yoo: It was such an honor for me to ornament these grand performances, and the experience will become a dominating page of my history. As many say, the culmination of one thing leads to another beginning. I hope that the fans will look forward to my upcoming expedition. It is also my wish to contribute to elevating the pride of Hanyang University. Kwon: The past six months with Phantom Singer have been full of busy and dramatic moments. Feelings of sadness engulf me, but my gratitude for the program and the audience is the greatest. As a baritone singing vocal music, I was so happy that many people were drawn the attractiveness of this genre of music. I hope that many will look on for further activities of mine. Q2. How did you come to know this auditioning program, and how did you decide to participate in Phantom Singer? Paek: Our friend, Seul-ki, suggested that we participate this program together. Without Seul-ki, I wouldn't be where I am today. Kwon: Seul-ki also brought me into this program, which I thank him a lot for. I seized the opportunity the moment it was offered, because the program seemed so attractive to me. Yoo: The purpose of this program, Phantom Singer, drew me in. Fusing various musical genres is an adventure, and I thought that it should be tried out. I'm grateful to the program, because this motive is imperative for hardworking people engaged in music. Q3. Two songs, <Musica> and <Grande Amore>, have received fervent responses from the audience. What do you think are the main reasons behind this ovation? Paek: I think that the reason behind the popularity of <Grande Amore> that Seul-ki and I sang was because we performed the kind of the music that people couldn't easily approach. When we were teamed up as a duo, it was a competition and it was assumed one of us had to ultimately leave the show. However, that rule was yet undecided, and we thought that if we do well enough, we will be able to bring changes. So there we were, successfully finishing up the performance, going onto the next round together. Yoo: <Grande Amore> means “grand love”. As you can see from the performance, In-tae and I lock eyes with one another with strong intent. The emotion that we intended to reveal was fiercely competing against one another to attain "grand love" from one woman. I think the audience understood the vitality of our emotions and that is why our performance was lauded. Kwon: The song <Musica>, which I sang with my partner Ko Eun-sung, wasn't traditional vocal music. Rather, it declared the identity of Phantom Singer’s fusion of music. Crossing over various genres was a great challenge for me. But the original trend of fusing music attracted the audience, which I was extremely glad about. <Grande Amore> sung by Yoo Seul-gi and Paek In-tae <Musica> sung by Kwon Seo-kyoung and Ko Eun-sung Q4. How did the preparation process for the performances go about? Yoo: The entire process takes about two weeks. The song selection for the man-to-man mission wasn't burdensome, until the members accumulated to four people. After spending about 16 hours only to choose what song to sing, for the next few days we'd ponder about how to format the song, and in what style we should amend it. The remaining time was assigned for practice. Paek: Normally, when four people prepare for a performance, you're given at least two months. This was an incredibly pressuring time limit, but it was also a new experience for a singer like me, who works with classical vocal music. Kwon: On television, a lot of the preparation process is edited due to the airing time. In reality, more time and endeavors are spent for each performance. Maintaining the rightful physical condition for singing was also a challenge. Personally, Phantom Singer grew me into a better, stronger baritone. Baek, Yoo, and Kwon (left to right) talk about their adventures on Phantom Singer. Tantalizing charm of vocal music Q1. How did your introduction to vocal music begin? Paek: My musical life began when I was a freshman at high school. Music class was the only time I earnestly paid attention to, and when I was tested for my school’s music exam, I sang “Geunae" (swing). My music teacher sincerely suggested my mother to lead me to a music career. Mom supported me a lot, even though our family wasn't financially abundant. Yoo: I started music when I was four years old, which is a dim past. I found joy in music through piano first. Then, my mother thought that my voice would suit vocal music, which is how I entered the world of singing. Kwon: I was in sixth grade when my voice broke, ahead of my peers, so my voice was naturally louder. When I was preparing for the school’s music festival, my music teacher pulled my musical talent out of me. Going down the road of music was a delightful decision of mine. Q2. If you slumped at any point in your career, how did you surmount them? Yoo: I think I'm the master of slumps. Hardships always come to people who try hard. Through slumps, I grow up into a stronger and a more talented singer. Those who continue trying shouldn't fear pitfalls. Kwon: During the letdowns, I thought that my entire musical life would end. Temptation always allured me to try out easier singing strategies, but singers should always utilize the standard, traditional tactics to find the true voice in oneself. Paek: When a swimmer goes through a slump, he or she usually starts from the beginning and exercises command of the basic fundamentals of swimming. But for singers, the fundamentals of music are within us, in our physical body, and this invisibility sometimes frustrates us. I found that practicing until you forget the frustration you feel is the only way to conquer hardships. The three Hanyangian stars are looking forward to their future, filled with hope for genuine music. Singing Hanyangians’ memories Q1. Why did you decide to apply to Hanyang University? Kwon: Before I came to HYU, I was attending a college of music in Italy. But I decided to come back to Korea just to meet and learn from our professor at the Department of Voice, Ko Sung-hyun. At a great university with a marvelous teacher, I am the happiest student ever. Paek: The College of Music at HYU is renowned for its magnificent history and renowned alumnis. Also, professor Ko Sung-hyun is a teacher that every vocal music student wishes to be taught by. I came to Hanyang University to learn how to become a better singer through Professor Ko’s teaching. Yoo: Just like In-tae, I applied for HYU twice. It was my dream school, with Professor Ko being my admirable teacher. Becoming his student was my main goal then, and even today I am honored to have been a student of Ko's. Q2. Any advice for HYU's music students? Kwon: It's hard to focus on music only, but the day will come for you to see an opportunity and seize it. Try to face the bigger world and do not fear the ups and downs of life. Enduring the present will be valued in a better future. Yoo: It may sound frustrating, but I've learned that the world isn't that easy and hopeful. We will try to pave the hope-filled roads in this world, so follow our paths and try to pave them deeper. Paek: Be happy. Be extraordinarily happy with your career that you can’t even begin to think of giving up. Kim Ju-hyun kimster9421@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Kim Youn-soo