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2019-03 12

[Alumni]From an Architect to an Illustrator

While some university students choose their double majors in accordance with their academic preferences and passions, others only apply for the majors that correspond to certain conditions such as grades. For the latter group, it is important that they find their true interest during their college years. Jung Jin-ho (Department of Architecture, ’13) is an illustrator from the Department of Architecture who went through such a situation. His life-long dream of becoming an architect changed into the dream of being an illustrator who inspires and pleases young readers. Jung Jin-ho (Department of Architecture, ’13) is an illustrator who is an alumnus of the Department of Architecture. He is reading his award-winning picture book Wall. Originally, Jung’s dream was to become a renowned architect, which is why he chose the Department of Architecture. During his 4th year, he signed a contract for a year-long internship at the architecture company he always wanted to join. However, the reality was considerably different from his expectations, and this internship experience became the turning point of reconsidering his original dream. Jung struggled to find a job that genuinely suited his passion during his 5th year of college, since his life-long goal to become a successful architect had suddenly collapsed due to the experience of the frustrating reality of the field. While he was contemplating his future, Jung recalled that since his childhood he had always liked reading picture books. Due to a serious burn he had received, Jung had to spend most of his time in the hospital. “I made a lot of friends at the hospital. Some of them were seriously ill. I remember a friend who had lost an arm. However, I had no prejudice against them. They were just like ordinary people and I felt no sense of difference between us. Through this experience at the hospital, I learned that having such bias was meaningless,” Jung stated. As activities for children are quite limited in the hospital, it was natural that he read a lot of picture books, which eventually became a major hobby that lasted to his adulthood. Considering his childhood background, Jung decided to create a picture book that also included a story of his 5th year of university life. Jung made four pieces in total that year. An Elephant Living in My House illustration (우리집에 코끼리가 산다) by Jung Jin-ho (Photo courtesy of Jung's Grafolio) The books Look up! (위를 봐요!), Wall (벽), Soil and a Worm (벽과 지렁이), and Owl (부엉이), received great attention and love from the public, and also won Jung an award. The piece Look up! was especially highly evaluated in terms of architecture. He applied what he had learned in university over four years to his book, and this challenging spirit and refreshing attempt gained recognition from experts. Jung notes, “Whereas many authors get inspiration from other peoples’ stories, I focus on my past experiences. In Wall I reflected the knowledge I learned from my major, and in 3 Second Diving I reflected on my elementary school life. Since my first piece, which was the primary momentum to become an illustrator-author, reflects the most about my personal story, I feel the greatest attachment to it.” After receiving several awards, he gets numerous calls from interested libraries and schools. Jung also has been giving lectures to both teenagers and adults since 2015. The content of the lectures differs depending on the audiences' level of understanding level about art. For younger generations, he prepares a variety of activities such as building blocks and drawing simple pictures, while giving theoretical explanations of picture books to adults. While he travels around giving lectures, he plans to write one or two books a year at the same time. Jung hopes university students find their genuine interest. It was lucky for him to debut in the field of illustration and novels, as Professor Kang Min-kyung from the College of Humanities sent Jung’s pieces to several publishing companies, all of which offered a positive response. Jung’s goal is not grand. He just wants to maintain his career in this field for a lifetime; however, many illustrators are unable to due to inconsistent income. Jung said, “There was one respectable professor that I really liked. He always insisted that becoming a master is achieved when you constantly put forth a strong effort without craving for it. I just want to survive in this field and work for my true interest.” Jung adds, “Many people work in a different area that is irrelevant to their major, but it’s okay. By doing so, they can make their own attractive story. Broaden your perspective and be confident. Everything you have learned can always be helpful to what you will be in the future.” Kim Min-jae fhffl5781@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Lee Hyeon-seon

2019-03 11

[Alumni]The 2019 Icon of Korean Tradition

The Brand Prize Award, hosted by The Korean Herald, is given to those who have made a significant achievement in their field over the year. Having been recognized for her efforts with the gayageum, also known as the Korean harp, Park Ji-yun (Department of Korean Traditional Music, Doctorate, '16) was awarded the Grand Prize for the Arts Sector of the 2019 Brand Prize Award. As a traditional musician who has played the gayageum for over 30 years, Park's new goal has been to pass her knowledge on to her students, starting her life as a teacher. As a musician Starting with playing the piano during her early years, Park showed a talent for music. She first encountered the gayageum as a hobby, having been attracted by its monophonic features. Switching from the piano to the gayageum when she was 13, it has been over 30 years since Park has played the traditional Korean instrument. During her long years of devotion, Park has managed to make major achievements within the field. Park successfully put on a concert last December with the Seocho Philharmoniker, being the first to have an accompanied performance with a symphony orchestra. (Click to go to the video of Park's accompanied performance) “The gayageum is often regarded as a boring and dull form of music by many. I wanted to overcome this wrong belief that many carry, and in order to do so, I had to take some new departures,” explained Park. She further explained how the orchestra is often considered main stream within the musical field and, thus, she wanted to show how the gayageum can be successfully collaborated with other more popular forms of music. Park is also preparing two albums which she is planning to release by next year at the latest. Park has long put in efforts towards making the gayageum closer to the public. (Photo courtesy of Park) Park stated that her first album is one that is going to focus on the traditional features of the gayageum. Having entered her forties, Park explained that she wanted to record and share her recitals, which have now been accumulated with over 30 years of practice. On the other hand, the second album is to be a duet with the electone, an electronic organ that has features of automatic accompaniments and tone modulation, which is a new challenge to the gayageum. Such efforts show Park’s long desire of bringing the gayageum closer to the public through various innovations, while still stressing its traditional features. As a professor Having majored in the gayageum during her high school and college years, Park further pursued her studies at Hanyang University, receiving both her master's and doctorate degrees in the field of traditional Korean music. Park first focused on gaining practical experience by joining an orchestra after her college graduation. After playing with the orchestra until her early thirties, however, Park decided to change her career path towards becoming an instructor and sharing her knowledge of the gayageum. First starting her teaching career at Gugak National High School, it was during these years that Park became determined to pursue her studies within the field. While studying for her doctorate, Park was also given the opportunity to teach at Hanyang University. In addition to having lessons with the students majoring in Korean traditional music, Park has also taught courses for other majors such as the Department of Composition, as they had to widen their scope of music. During her teaching career, Park stated that it is when her students are praised by others that she feels the most worthwhile. Park is now focusing on transferring her deep knowledge of the gayageum along to her students as a professor. (Photo courtesy of Park) Now holding an additional post as a professor for the Department of Korean Traditional Music in Hanyang University, Park maintained that her main goal as a professor is to bring honor to both the department and the school. In order to do so, she stated that she will not only pursue her own career in the field of the gayageum, but also help her students become musicians of higher levels within their own field. More than thirty years have passed since she first started playing the gayageum, and it seems as if Park’s passion is filled both as a musician and a professor. Choi Seo-yong tjdyd1@hanyang.ac.kr

2018-12 10

[Alumni]Passing the 41st Actuaries Examination

The new International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS17) will be implemented for insurance companies by 2022, which will change the debt evaluation standard from a prime cost to a market price. This means more actuaries are in need in order to prevent an increase in debt and reduction in capital for insurance companies. Under such conditions, a banner that congratulated those who passed the 41st actuaries examination at the ERICA campus put a smile on many. Two students among the three listed are among the first accepted from the Department of Actuarial Science. (From left) Kim Bo-geun (Department of Actuarial Science, 4th hear), Seo Ye-ji (Department of Actuarial Science, '17), and Joo Hyung-min (Master's Degree in Insurance and Finance) The first-round exam scores out of a 100, and all subjects except English must be above 40 points with the average being above 60 in order to pass. Those who passed the first round exam are qualified to take the second round exam within the next 5 years, including the year that they passed the first exam. All 5 subjects must achieve a score of 60 or higher in order to pass the final exam. The first-round exam consists of 5 subjects: The first subject includes insurance contract law, insurance business acts, and employee retirement benefit security act. The rest are insurance mathematics, principles of economics, accounting principles, and English, which is a subject that can be replaced by official English test scores. In the first-round exam, Kim Bo-geun and Seo Ye-ji both found accounting difficult because they usually study the subject by writing out descriptive answers to problems, whereas the exam had multiple choice questions. They repeatedly practiced solving various questions and tried to memorize the format. The subjects covered in the second-round exam are actuarial risk management, actuarial mathematics, pension science, actuarial model theory, and lastly, financial management and financial engineering. The interviewees all agreed that financial management and financial engineering was the toughest part to study. “You only need a 100 in order to pass the exam, but the examination covers 300,” said Kim Bo-geun. Seo Ye-ji (Department of Actuarial Science, ’17) and Joo Hyung-min (Master's Degree in Insurance and Finance) prepared for the exam while working at an insurance company, and Kim Bo-geun (Department of Actuarial Science, 4th year) is currently attending the last semester before his early graduation and has already found a position at an insurance company. Seo and Kim began to learn more about what an actuary does when they were sophomores in college, and the department of Actuarial Science actively supported the career paths of students in becoming actuaries. The interviewees emphasized that becoming an actuary gives you pride that you have a specialized job. As for their struggles for the exam, Kim said he did not go through a slump, thanks to the timely trips that he took once in a while, and an hour of daily exercise that helped him stay healthy inside and out. Seo prevented any slumps by trying not to be shaken by her emotions and having enough sleep. Joo agreed that he was not stressed much during the exam preparation period. He said that he had fun studying for the Society of Actuaries (SOA), which is an American actuaries exam because it felt as if he was studying English. “The passing of the SOA exam was a big motivation for me to do better in the Korean actuaries exam.” The SOA exams cover a lot of content that the Korean exam is tested on. All three of them passed the SOA exam as well. Although there are unexpected fluctuations in actuaries exams each year, the exam is gradually becoming easier. A total of 124 people passed the exam this year, which is 62 more people than last year. Studying for the exam is important, but business practice and work experience is what gives you an advantage when looking for a job, said Seo Ye-ji. “I was surprised at first by the gap between the real work and the things I studied. Company work is much more complicated than just finding an answer in a book. I recommend you to look for work experience whether it is part time work or working as an intern at a company. You need to have an idea of how things work around here.” Seo Ye-ji went on to say that she wants to thank the school and the professors for making a department that majors in actuarial science and for building an atmosphere where students could effectively chase a dream of becoming an actuary. Kim Hyun-soo soosoupkimmy@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Kang Cho-hyun

2018-12 04

[Alumni]Onestar on a Steady Rise

BTS, TWICE, Super Junior – these are only a few of the K-pop idol groups that enjoy global attention. Before influencers became a thing, becoming an idol was one of the top dreams of young Korean teenagers. However, as many have tried, it is extremely hard to pass through cut throat competitions, let alone hit the charts with a song loved and supported by the public. Lim Han-byul (Department of Information Sociology, ERICA campus, '15) was one of the exceptional cases that proved that years of hard work and a sprinkle of talent can get you to places. Ever since Lim was young, he had a strong passion for singing. Naturally, he wanted to become a singer and was officially able to become a trainee at the age of 19. Luckily for Lim, he was able to make his debut in just a year as the main vocal in an idol group called “Monday Kiz.” “My trainee period wasn’t that long as it only took me a year to debut. I don’t think I was that good, but I’m guessing they saw some potential in me. The group also needed a main vocalist, so I was lucky. Of course, life as a trainee and a student wasn’t easy. I had to take many breaks from school because the training itself was strenuous." “I've worked so hard to earn my nickname as a 'vocal-textbook,' and I will always strive to do so.” Lim Han-byul (Department of Information Sociology, ERICA campus, '15) (Photo courtesy by Most Contents) After five years of his life as an idol, Lim made the decision to stand out as a solo artist. On his first few attempts during practice, he realized how difficult it was to finish one song. “After years of on-stage experience, I never thought finishing one song by myself would be a problem. It hit me hard that I was basically formulated into singing as a group member, not a solo artist. It took me a year or two just practicing until I finally got on track. That’s also when I started my YouTube channel,” said Lim. Lim's cover on M.C THE MAX - No Matter Where (Video courtesy of Lim's YouTube channel) Lim is not only known as an ex-member of Monday Kiz, but also as a YouTuber with over 157 thousand subscribers. “I think it was around 2015 when I opened my channel. Back then, YouTube hadn't gained its popularity yet, and there weren’t that many covers on it either. I wasn’t looking for fame. I was simply looking for a platform where I could share my progress with my fans, and YouTube seemed like a great opportunity,” said Lim. As an interesting fact, 97 percent of Lim’s viewers are known to be male. To this fact, Lim commented, “I think it’s because I mostly sang pieces that guys would like. I don’t think I’m the best singer out there so they see how hard I try and feel that vicarious satisfaction. Some also practice with me.” “Multiple failures actually made me stronger. I was able to make many valuable artist friends and focus on studying music." (Photo courtesy of Lim) Lim is also an acknowledged and steady-growing singer-songwriter as well as a vocal guide. He was known for having participated in numerous songs of V.O.S., JYJ, Sunnyhill, Super Junior, NCT Dream and many more. “I didn’t have anything to lose. After Monday Kidz disbanded, I started from the very bottom again and worked as a trainer and a vocal guide. Right now, I am working with Mono Tree, a global music production and publishing company also known for working with a lot of SM artists. My new digital single, “The Way to Say Goodbye” is also with that company,” said Lim. “I'm trying to find the right balance as a singer and a songwriter. My experience as an artist in such broad fields has taught me how to look at the bigger scheme of things over the years and to think from a staff member's perspective." “The Way to Say Goodbye” is a song that depicts the story of a person on his way to end his relationship. As it is Lim’s first digital single, it took a special place in his heart. According to Lim, since he is not a genius, he gets his inspiration after hours of focusing, contemplating, and editing. His new single was also a product of many weeks of listening to numerous “good” music on top of a rough sketch that fairly reflects his turbulent twenties. Lim plans on releasing his next single album early next year. Despite the continuous build-up of success as a solo artist, Lim was astonishingly humble. Throughout the interview, he did not stop mentioning how much he needed to improve. When asked if such manner of speech could indirectly bring negative influence on his self-respect, Lim chuckled and said, “I am the type of person to easily feel proud and maybe even a bit conceited. If you really think about it, I had years of experience as an idol, as a vocal trainer, a guide, and a singer-songwriter. But this is also because I had failed as an idol which left me in a place to keep pushing myself. In my case, there’s only a fine line between failure and success. The moment I think I’m actually doing great, I start slacking off and be well on my way to failure again.” "Good music is whatever sounds good to you." (Photo courtesy by Lim) “We all have different values, so I don’t really believe in giving advice. However, there is one thing I do want to say and that’s to get your priorities straight, and act upon it accordingly. Don’t be afraid to make mistakes because opportunities do come and when they do, make sure to take it.” The Way to Say Goodbye - Onestar / Lim Han-byul (Video courtesy by Lim's YouTube channel) Hee Jae - Lim Han-byul Cover (Video courtesy by Lim's YouTube channel) Mono Tree's Facebook Page Most Contents (Lim's management company) Park Joo-hyun julia1114@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Lee Jin-myung

2018-11 26

[Alumni]Byungsin Chum: the Dance of the Handicapped

Originating from ancient shamanistic rituals thousands of years ago, the Korean traditional dance later evolved into various forms, such as the court dance performed for the royal family and court officials, the folk dance including Talchum (mask dance), and the renowned Buchaechum (fan dance). Korean traditional dance has many attributes in common, mainly focused on conveying the emotions of the people along with the flow of Pansori (Korean genre of musical storytelling usually performed by a singer and a drummer). This is in sharp contrast with contemporary music, resulting in something that people only see on rare occasions. Yoon Han-sol (Department of Sociology, '90), a play director renowned for his past reinterpretation pieces of traditional art, produced another reinterpreted masterpiece on Byungsin chum (the dance of the handicapped) which has brought about both acclaim and criticism. Yoon at Seoul National Theater Byungsin chum (the dance of the handicapped), is a Korean folk dance that was performed by lower class peasants to satirize the yangban (Korean nobility). Although the dance depicts the yangban as the handicapped such as midgets, hunchbacks, the deaf, and the blind, it does not simply mimic and ridicule them. Back in the days, the handicapped were basically any individual who did poorly in society, and it gave the audience innocuous laughter. Now the times have changed with just the name of the dance being offensive enough to many people, and Yoon’s remake of it has brought about criticism in this respect. To this, Yoon did not think much of it as he has said that the dance was simply a way of storytelling in the past when there was less sensitivity on the terminology. "Directing plays acts as a self-reflecting opportunity for me. If I want to deal with topics on the unjust and corrupt, it’s impossible without keeping myself in check. It allows me to live a bit more as a righteous person." Prior to working on the “Byeongshin Chum,” Yoon directed “Ways of Storytelling, Ways of Singing” in 2014. According to Yoon, it was not because he was solely interested in Pansori or Korean tradition itself, but rather, he wanted to know why people could not personally relate to it. “We all know that it’s important that some of our tradition must be succeeded to the future generation. Quite a lot of money is being spent for this purpose, but people just don’t seem to be able to relate nor form any kind of connection to it much. So I decided to learn all about the Pansori and our tradition myself. In my plays, I showed the audience the whole process of learning Pansori, which luckily allowed the audience to understand more about the play and the songs being performed. Then I decided to move on to traditional dance.” Greenpig (name of the group that performed "Byungshin Chum") actors (Photo courtesy by Green Pig Facebook page) That is how “The Byeongshin Dance” came to be. Originally, this dance was designated as an intangible cultural asset by the government, but it was later cancelled because there was simply no successor. “I chose to work on this dance because it was not included in the genealogy of Korean traditional dance. The fact that I’m trying to interpret the dance in the name of tradition and culture may offend some traditional dancers, but I just wanted to focus on how we can all systematically pass on our culture in this modern society,” said Yoon. That is why Yoon incorporated a Kinect sensor in his play. The Kinect sensor captures full-body 3D motion, facial and voice recognition, and can be seen in games such as Xbox. Just like how one can play dance battles with Xbox, one would be able to copy and learn traditional dances. “If you go on YouTube nowadays, you see so many tutorials on all kinds of dances. This boosts the accessibility for people which I think is one of the most important conditions in passing on a culture.” Yoon was not always about producing innovative reinterpretations of plays. According to Yoon, he initially wanted to become a renowned producer. “In 2000, I went to study in the States, and that’s when 9/11 happened. It was just around the block and it really shocked me. How could anyone have that much hatred to kill thousands of people? I just couldn’t understand, and that’s when I started to question more about our society. My perspective on the world completely changed and so did my path as a play director,” said Yoon. "I’ve been looking into migration issues for quite a while now. I’ve dealt with it in some of my previous plays but want to focus on migrants and refugees in Korea and Korean refugees abroad next year." “Another incident that influenced me was after interviewing a father of the Sewol Ferry victim. When people watch devastating stories of another person like this on television, they empathize and maybe even shed tears. But the problem is the human theater effect. When the show is over, people think they are fully empathizing with society’s issues and are not turning a blind eye on them. It helps them to justify themselves for not acting on the issue. That’s why I think as a director, we shouldn’t just create content that brings light upon these issues, but it should be so that the audience is thrown with good questions that they can take back home and really think about it.” When asked for his advice and tips for students interested in his field, Yoon said, “from time to time, I hear students saying that I’m a role model. I don’t really know if this is a job that I can easily recommend. However, I can say that what’s important is that you have to have a story you want to tell, and this doesn’t just appear out of the blue. There needs to be a special relationship. A relationship with a person or an issue doesn’t just happen as well. You need to be truly interested in them, and this isn’t something you can fake.” Check out Greenpig Facebook page Park Joo-hyun julia1114@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Lee Jin-myung

2018-11 12

[Alumni]From a Windsurfer to a Sports Commentator

Watching a live sports broadcast is thrilling at times, but it may be difficult to keep track of the flow of the match and the movements of the participating players without some explanation. This is where the role of a sports commentator comes into place. Sports commentators work to deliver accurate information to spectators with a running commentary of the game and play a crucial part in all live sports broadcasts. Hanyang University alumnus, Kim Woo-jin (Sport Coaching Major, ’11) has been working as a sports commentator for STN SPORTS channel starting from the beginning of 2018 and has commentated live broadcasts such as the 2018 Asian Para Games held in Jakarta, Indonesia, and the K-Leave FA Cup in South Korea. Kim Woo-jin (Sport Coaching Major, '11) stated that taking sports related courses in his major greatly contibuted to his career as a sports commentator. Prior to his career as a sports commentator, Kim was a windsurfer representing Hanyang University. Kim started windsurfing in middle school largely due to his parents’ recommendation, as they also enjoyed the sport as a hobby in the past. During his university years as a windsurfer, Kim competed in various competitions and even received a gold medal in a national windsurfing competition hosted by Gachon University. After graduating in 2011 with a major in Sport Coaching, Kim became a windsurfing coach for Gwangnam High School and prepared student players for the Asian Cup. However, while concentrating on player development for three years, Kim began to gain interest in the field of broadcasting as he had always enjoyed watching live sports matches. “While preparing to become a sports commentator, I was deeply inspired by the SBS announcer, Bae Kee-wan, also a Hanyang University alumnus renowned for his commentary of past figure skater, Kim Yuna’s performances. I monitored a lot of his commentaries because he was well aware of the current trends in broadcasting,” stated Kim. (Left) Kim Woo-jin (Sport Coaching Major, '11) is commentating during Round 27 of the K-League Football National League. The road to becoming a sports commentator was not an easy one. Not only are a few sports commentators selected by broadcasters but also a thorough understanding of various sports is required to deliver swift commentaries to viewers. However, he was able to succeed and began his career at STN SPORTS channel. Although there is always a tacit pressure not to make mistakes during the live broadcast, Kim said that he gets more energetic after hearing the crowd cheer on near the broadcasting booth. One of the most memorable moments as a sports commentator was when the South Korean swimmer Cho Won-sang earned a silver medal during the live 2018 Asian Para Games. “It was surreal to see the South Korean flag go up during the medal ceremony,” said Kim. When asked about what important aspects sports commentators should have, Kim emphasized that loving all kinds of sports and enjoying the different atmospheres of the games is important. Moreover, having a deep knowledge of football, basketball, and baseball is crucial. “I recommend getting a referee certificate to those preparing to become a sports commentator because it will act as an advantage,” advised Kim. Kim Woo-jin (Major in Sport Coaching, '11) hopes to commentate live matches of South Korean players in the future Olympic Games. Kim is currently striving to become a sports commentator in a wide range of sports. The main goal for Kim is to be able to effectively deliver South Korea’s winning moments in international sports events, and he hopes to be able to broadcast the future Olympic games live. Seok Ga-ram carpethediem@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Lee Jin-myung

2018-10 29

[Alumni]Carrying Out “Love in Deed” as a Researcher in Korean Dance

Dance is a form of art at a holistic and advanced stage, and it can have an enormous social influence. Also known as a “moving poem,” it can be difficult to translate a dance into solid writing because there are countless expressions connoted in it. However, Hanyang University alumnus, Kim Yoon-ji (Department of Dance, '01), has continued to put her efforts into promoting the excellence of Korean dance in various research. She has succeeded in conducting both independent and joint research converging the concept of dance and the contemporary issues on the rise. Kim’s passion for dance has led her to become the biggest research fund beneficiary in the field of dance in the last five years, receiving 16.4 million won. Hanyang University's Department of Dance alumnus, Kim Yoon-ji stated that when an artist’s spirit and technique are added to the comprehensive and intrinsic human movements, it becomes a dance. After entering the Department of Dance to major in Korean dance at Hanyang University in 1997, the IMF financial crisis hit hard and brought about some hardships. Kim had no choice but to study and dance diligently. Her efforts paid off as she graduated with honors. “I received a lot from Hanyang University, which made me the person I am today, and I want to give the pleasure back to the university in any way possible as gratitude,” stated Kim. Kim Yoon-ji (middle) on her Hanyang University graduate school graduation day in 2013. Reading books and regularly going to Paiknam Library were part of her daily routine and deeply contributed to choosing her career as a researcher and adjunct professor after university graduation. “Whenever I had hardships, I turned to reading, which the words gave me wisdom on how to live through my studies,” maintained Kim. She decided to enter graduate school and went on to receive her master’s degree and doctoral degree from the Department of Dance. Hanyang University alumnus, Kim Yoon-ji (Department of Dance, '01) asserted that doing research is interesting as it requires combining various information to come to a creative yet logical conclusion. Some of Kim’s research projects, both independent and joint, are currently ongoing. One of her independent research projects titled, “Application of Korean Dance Contents Module on Extension of the Trans-Media Storytelling Area," was selected by the National Research Foundation of Korea. The research is based on the effects of trans-media storytelling on Korean dance by converging various digital media platforms to convey the story of the performances more efficiently. Furthermore, the three year joint research project titled, “Comprehensive Database Project for Lexicography Informations” gathers researchers from numerous fields to build up data in order to grant the public access to good knowledge. Kim is currently responsible for the intangible performances and folklores section. “I want to become a humble intellectual who can carry out love in deed, especially to Hanyang University, and I wish for all Hanyang University students to pursue their own happiness,” Kim concluded. She plans on continuing her study of converging Korean dance with society as a researcher and promote the artistry of Korean dance to the international community. Seok Ga-ram carpethediem@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Kang Cho-hyun

2018-08 30 Important News

[Alumni]Hanyang Alumni in WFUNA

From a young age, many students dream of working for an international organization such as the United Nations (UN) . Lee Young-jin (International Studies, ’12) has been actively engaging in spreading the goals of the UN and educating civil society as part of the World Federation of United Nations Associations (WFUNA) since 2016, as a Training and Education Associate. He shared his experience and tips to his fellow dreamers at Hanyang this week. News H interviewed Lee Young-jin (International Studies, '12) at the World Federation of United Nations Associations office, a sister organization of the United Nations. Is WFUNA part of the UN? “Many people get confused about whether WFUNA is part of the United Nations, but it’s more like a sister organization,” smiled Lee. While the UN works with countries and facilitates relationships and cooperation among its member nations, WFUNA is more focused on the relationship between people and the UN. The organization also functions as the head of more than a hundred United Nation Associations all over the world. Lee is working in the Seoul branch, which is one of three secretariats of WFUNA: New York, Geneva, and Seoul. As the only secretariat in Asia, the Seoul office works to spread their Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), especially focusing on the young. Lee, as a Training and Education Associate, is in charge of educational programs that promote and strengthen the UN's values and educate the participants to help them become global citizens in the form of the Model United Nations (MUN). He came back just last week from New York, with the Youth Program at the UN: Korea. Lee Young-jin (top right, International Studies, '12) with his students from the Youth Program at the UN: Korea. (Photo courtesy of Lee) Focusing on specialty When asked what made him work for a global nonprofit organization, Lee mentioned his long experience with the MUN. Lee has been participating in numerous MUN programs since the first year of high school, and he once even hosted Hanyang's MUN when he was the vice president of the Division of International Studies. He also worked as part of the United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) in Korea to organize Model UNESCO in his junior year. “One has to have his or her own specialty in order to work with international organizations,” Lee emphasized. With his abundant experience with MUNs, he was offered a position as a trainer in the WFUNA Youth Camp, which he is now in charge of. That was the beginning of his career in the field. His fluency in Korean, English, and French is also a strength when it comes to working in such an organization. “Working in WFUNA Seoul requires excellence in both English and Korean, and if one wishes to work in Geneva, French would be important too,” mentioned Lee. He pointed out that good scores and so-called "specifics" required to work in major corporations in Korea is not valued as much in the field. Rather, Lee encouraged students to focus on their work experience and specialty. Kim So-yun dash070@hanyang.ac.kr

2018-07 09

[Alumni]Different Paths Toward the Same Dream

Becoming a police officer is not a common career path that students from the Division of International Studies (DIS) pursue. However, two students, Suh Joon (DIS ’15) and Chong Hyun-joong (DIS ’16), have fulfilled their dream of wearing the blue police officer's uniform that they always dreamed of. Chong Hyun-joong (DIS' 16) and Suh Joon (DIS' 15) shared their experience of becoming and working as a police officer. Suh is currently working in the International Cooperation Division. He became a police officer through a special employment system, which is for foreign language specialists. As the practicality examination takes a large portion of the special employment system, Suh mainly focused on enhancing his language proficiency and translation skills. “Matching the time limit was my main concern when preparing for the exam. Solving sample questions from previous tests and reading the English newspaper were a great help for me,” recalled Suh. Referred to as the ministry of foreign affairs within the Korean National Police Agency (KNPA), the International Cooperation Division has the main purpose of maintaining a strong relationship with foreign police agencies. Maintaining such relationships allows the KNPA to provide protection to the many Korean citizens who are currently abroad and outside of its jurisdiction. Suh provided an example of Korean citizens being detained for false accusations and how the cooperation with foreign police agencies is crucial in tackling such situations. Suh is translating for Lee Chul-sung, the former Chief of the Korean National Police Agency, during a meeting with the Philippine president Rodrigo Duterte. (From left, Lee, Suh, and Duterte) (Photo Courtesy of Suh) On the contrary, unlike Suh, Chong joined the KNPA through open recruitment. Fulfilling his military service as an conscripted policeman, it was his experience as an officer that allowed him to become aware of the recruitment examination. Taking time off from school to focus on the recruitment process, Chong prepared for the exam with his back against the wall. Managing to achieve a successful result with a single year of preparation, Chong is currently working at the Recruitment Bureau of the Education Policy Department as an inspector. The Recruitment Bureau has the biggest focus on the overall recruitment system of the KNPA. It is responsible for not only the formal, open recruitment system but also many special employment systems, which are consulted on with other departments that need new personnel. Additionally, the legislation related to recruitment is also managed and revised by this division. According to Chong, Hanyang University has agreed to provide a location for the recruitment examination of the second half of this year. Chong explained how he first became aware of the KNPA recruitment examination during his military service as a conscripted police officer. Both Suh and Chong mentioned that studying in the DIS gave them a definite advantage when preparing for the police test. Suh mentioned how the interdisciplinary approach of the DIS curriculum covers a wide span of subjects that helped him with not only the recruitment examination but also with his current work at the KNPA. Chong emphasized the police administration course in DIS, which helped him understand the fields of international law and foreign police affairs. As for advice to those who are preparing for the police recruitment examination, both officers maintained the importance of asking for guidance from predecessors rather than being troubled alone. They also mentioned that one must be prepared to accept hard working hours and high levels of stress. Chong explained that as their work is open to the press, one must be skillful in controlling his or her own emotions. Suh added, "Meeting with the dark side of society is not a pleasurable experience, and thus, it is important that one be prepared both physically and emotionally. Still there is no doubt that the work itself is worthwhile and highly rewarding." Choi Seo-yong tjdyd1@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Park Kuen-hyung

2018-07 09

[Alumni]Woo In-chul, the Former Mayoral Candidate of Seoul

Although the importance of politics is well-known, it Is hard to see young Koreans actively and directly involved in the field. Former mayoral candidate of Seoul, Woo In-chul (Department of Molecular and Life Science, ERICA '12), unfolded his story of diving into politics soon after his graduation. Despite his major being rather unrelated to politics, Woo has always been interested in political issues regarding Korean youth, such as the 2011 Korean university tuition crisis. As a senior in 2011, Woo became actively involved in youth forums, debates and seminars that dealt with various problems that degraded the living standards of Korean youth. “I think being able to participate in politics regardless of your major, age, or background, is the fundamental aspect of having a democratic society. I wanted to become more directly involved in politics, so I decided to take action.” Woo In-chul (Department of Molecular and Life Science, ERICA '12) at the Woori Mirae office on June 6th, 2018. Woo strongly believed that as a democratic citizen, changes in our lives must be made through politics. Together with his friends, he formed the Youth Party in 2011. This wasn’t easy as they needed to gather at least 5,000 party members. They also needed a candidate, and Woo stepped up to take assume that role. Even after they successfully formed the party, there were more mountains to overcome as they needed a deposit of at least 15-million-won, in addition to other election campaign fees. “I didn’t run for the election to win. I at least wanted to spread the awareness that we, as young people of Korea have problems to solve, and should take matters into our own hands.” After the impeachment of former President Park, Woo decided that it was their chance to start an era of new politics where the young would be the main actors. This led to the formation of Woori Mirae (우리미래당), which is a developed version of the Youth Party. Many university students in Korea are still financially struggling to keep up with high tuition fees, living expenses, housing expenses and more. All the politicians who hadincluded such youth related issues in their campaign promises, seemed to completely forget about them after winning their elections. “It’s because it’s not their priority. That’s why we ourselves need to take action, because nobody else will do it for us,” said Woo. Woo protesting in the "youth tent" for the youth rental house project on April 21st . After running for the general election, Woo’s Party failed to receive enough votes and was forced to disband. However, this did not stop Woo from re-forming the party in 2017. “Our society needs to heal, and I believe this can be done through politics. Forming a party is not just a form of representation. It’s to try to change the policies, systems, institutions, and to give political hope to young people,” said Woo. He also noted that the majority of Korean politicians are from an older generation, which naturally creates a weaker bond of empathy with the younger generation. Although not saying that all politicians must be from the younger generation, he emphasized that most people fail to realize that youth issues are directly linked to societal issues and issues of all generations, due to lack of empathy. Recently Woo ran for the office of mayor of Seoul. He noted that he wanted to first and foremost ask the young Koreans, if they are doing well. The reality for youth is harsh as most take the first step into the society with heavy student loans and the struggles of keeping up with other expenses. This prevents them from challenging themselves and trying out new things, as they are so caught up with just trying to make ends meet. Woo re-emphasized how empathy is key here. “Empathy allows people to take an interest in others. We need that sort of interest because that’s where change starts. The spread of awareness and addressing of problems will lead to changes in policies in the long run. Other institutional changes will follow.” Woo hopes for the future of many young Korean "elites." After the elections, Woo is now a chair in the party, hosting various programs and sessions for not just youth but also for those from older generations as well, in hopes of creating a bond and fostering more understanding between generations. With four party representatives, the Woori Mirae will run for future elections with hopes of changing the political culture. “All those who are interested in social political issues, or trying to take action are "elites." I hope more of the current younger generation will become elites,” said Woo. Woori Mirae official website: http://makeourfuture.kr/%EC%86%8C%EA%B0%9C/#intro Park Joo-hyun julia1114@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Lee Jin-myung