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2017-09 17

[Alumni]Peru’s Finest Dessert

Just as the conquistadors have set their foot on South America in search of gold bars, Pyo Ji-do (Business, ’16) has opened up his own dessert café in Peru and named it Mister Bingsu (ice flakes with syrup). Peru is known to be very warm all around the year that even in the winter, temperatures would only fall to 17 to 19 degrees. After experiencing Peru during an exchange student program, Pyo has immediately fallen in love with the country. Ice flakes where no snow falls In 2014, Pyo had the opportunity to live in Peru for a year during his exchange student program. With his mind focused on starting his own business, Pyo started looking for items that would catch the eyes of Peruvians. “They love ice cream due to the warm weather, but there were not a lot of choices to choose from,” recalled Pyo. Ice flakes with syrup along with diverse types of fresh fruits were what Pyo came up with immediately. “At the moment, we only have five types of bingsu; strawberry, mango, chocolate, cheese, and melon. We are planning to expand our menu choices later on,” added Pyo. Kim (left) and Pyo (right) taking pictures with customers. (Courtesy of Pyo) After returning to Korea, Pyo contacted his high school friend and started preparing to open Mister Bingsu. “We were planning to open up our business in December 2016 but due to the delay in paperwork, we were able to start in April 2017,” commented Pyo. As Pyo has experienced, South American culture always maintains its leisurely manner which was one of the hardships that Pyo has faced. “Sometimes, I faced problems with translating formal paperwork, but I was able to achieve all this thanks to my homestay family.” Success in Peru “Peruvians loved experiencing bingsu for the first time in their lives. We were able to become successful through TV programs,” chuckled Pyo. Right after 2 weeks of starting Mister Bingsu, Peru’s biggest national broadcasting team have filmed Pyo’s store. In addition, a lot of Peruvians have advertised Mister Bingsu through social network services as well. “I think we were quite lucky to have such great opportunities,” mentioned Pyo. Before starting up the business in Peru, Pyo studied about diverse bingsu while working in Sulbing, one of the biggest bingsu franchise stores in Korea. “A lot of the recipes, famous in Korea, could not be used due to the high cost. Instead, we decided to localize our menus.” Peruvians line up to experience Mister Bingsu. (Courtesy of Pyo) Pyo is preparing to expand his business all around South America. “We are receiving diverse love calls from other regions in Peru and even neighboring countries,” explained Pyo. Yet there are some obstacles that Pyo has to overcome. “Our sales dropped during the winter which is why we are preparing to diversify our menus,” added Pyo. As Pyo enjoys cooking from time to time, he has further wishes of opening Korean restaurants as well. “We are far from a success yet. We will work harder to spread our Korean culture and food.” Kim Seung Jun nzdave94@hanyang.ac.kr

2017-09 04

[Alumni]White Rabbit Guiding You to the Musical Wonderland

“Oh dear! Oh dear! I shall be too late!” mutters the white rabbit in Lewis Carroll’s book Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland. The rabbit eventually leads Alice down into the rabbit hole where the wonderland begins. Cho Chung-hee of the Department of Korean Language and Literature, is currently a jazz vocalist of the Band “Rabbit of March,” and a professor at the Department of Applied Music. Let’s follow Cho to the wonderland of jazz music! Cho is a solo jazz vocalist and also a leader of band "Rabbit of March." Fearless 20’s and music “I had no fear for my dreams in my 20’s,” said Cho. After four years of studying Korean language and literature at college, Cho made a decision to follow her heart towards music. “I always knew that deep inside me, I wanted to become a musician,” reminisced Cho. Once Cho made up her mind, she wanted to be told that this path is right so she sang a song in front of her senior. “Although my senior told me to give up on music, my decision was still firmly set," laughed out Cho. Without any support from her parents who wished her to become Korean language teacher, Cho began to build up her music career and worked for part-time jobs for living. “My favorite music was not fixed at that time. I explored for various genres and songs, wandered from time to time, and then found out that jazz is the one that I was looking for when I became 30,” explained Cho. Cho then was absorbed into the attractiveness of jazz. “Whilst my practice, my acquaintance suggested me musicians who could amplify the music together. Harmony with Hwang Sung-yong and John Vasconcello through our band has always been one of the luckiest moments in my life,” smiled Cho. Cooperation of the trio produced popular jazz music that opened up for the public. Jazz through “Rabbit of March” was no more a ‘league of their own,’ but a music everyone can enjoy. Song of Wind is one of the most popular songs by "Rabbit of March." (Video courtesy of Darichaola1's Youtube) Your roles in the cyclical life Cho is also a professor at the Department of Applied Music at Hanyang University, ERICA. Bearing responsibilities rising from various roles may give lemons to Cho. However, she rather enjoys the large spectrum of her life. “The job called professor taught be to become a better person before teaching students. Teaching requires my ability to know and explain from the very fundamental knowledge, which I was always unaware of,” said Cho. Her another dream is to become a performance producer. “Jazz was a hard music for the public to access, which I disliked about. So I want to design jazz performances that can be popular among people’s everyday lives,” explained Cho. Until now, Cho followed her own hope to become a jazz musician. “Jazz has no restrictions. Within a given frame of music, I can do whatever I wish to by playing with the rhythm, melody, improvisation, and more. However, this general audience might find such elements difficult,” said Cho. Thus, Cho wishes to create a jazz performance that includes intricate explanation of music to the audience and conversation between the audience and musicians. Within this, Cho can become an emcee, producer, song writer, and a musician. Cho encourages Hanyangians to find out their own definition of happiness. Cho is now planning to make jazz a present. “I wish my music can become presents representing four seasons for the audience. For example, when its Christmas, listeners can open the winter CD. Also, I want to make jazz music based on lullabies. I have so many dreams!” Cho says that it’s never cliché to tell others to pursue what they want. “Things you can do and want to do are correlated and cyclical. Look at me! I majored in Korean literature and it helps my music. I hope students of Hanyang will try out everything their hearts desire!” Kim Ju-hyun kimster9421@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Kim Youn-soo

2017-08 15

[Alumni]Voice Out Your Voice!

In the beauty of women’s pregnancy and infant care, there’s the sorrow of mother’s impossibility to return to their career. In South Korea, the issue of career break has been a hot potato, which commonly refers to a period out of employment for women to raise their children. Despite the fact that South Korea’s gender inequality is slowly, but constantly being assuaged, there are still barriers to overcome. Lee Jae-eun (German Language and Literature, '02 and Ph.D. in Educational Technology) is a leader of Women’s Life School who suggests the novel ways to view and resolve the problems women face in Korea. Lee is currently a CEO of Women's Life School to counsel and help out women with low self-esteem. As a mother, CEO, writer, wife, and a woman Lee’s college years were full of joy and love with her friends and a lover. However, after her graduation, she had to face parting words from many relationships. “I realized that the main reason why I was hurt so much by the break ups is my tendency to rely on others, just because I was a woman. So, I decided to amend this problem,” reminisced Lee. The first door she knocked on after graduation was a feminist magazine company. As her major had no connection with feminism, she had to appeal her passion to be employed. “I began with becoming a fan of the magazine by commenting on every article posted with the nickname of Ho-Ho Girl,” laughed out Lee. After a few years of working as an official reporter, Lee decided to become a writer to connect scholar feminism to cultural feminism. Then, her first book Women’s Life Dictionary, which is divided into seven chapters to guide healthy mind and lifestyle for women, become one of the bestsellers in South Korea. Its profit was used to found her company- Women's Life School (Click). “I began to have interest in counseling women from university students to married women to have courage. This eventually led me to major in educational technology for my Ph.D. degrees,” said Lee. Women's Life School provides counselling services for women in various situations and ages. (Photo courtesy of wlifeschool) Now, Lee is a mother of one daughter, wife, and even a professor at a Korean university. “Having many roles is arduous, I realized that distribution of time to each role isn’t that much important. Understanding the core philosophy of each role while not losing my own philosophy is the most imperative factor,” said Lee. Lee can be benevolent as a mother and a wife, acute as a CEO, and considerate as a professor. However, she still does not forget that the most important entity to her is herself. Not a career break off, but a career changeover In Korea, there are two words that describe the occupation of mothers- working mom and a housewife. This means, when a working mom gets pregnant and has to quit work either by maternity leaves or resignation for longer infant care, the working mom becomes a housewife. However, Lee points out the flaw of this dichotomous view of portraying mothers. “Working moms and housewives aren’t two different occupations, but coexisting ones. Whenever working mom wants to become a housewife for kids or the housewife wishes to work again as their kids grows older, the career changeover in this aspect should be cyclical,” emphasized Lee. When Lee first set up Women’s Life School, the social reaction wasn’t exactly supporting her. The concept of a life school has not been popularized and feminism was a difficult subject. However, Lee did not gave up on the hope that feminism could become a popular idea and women with low self-respect in the society could gain their courage. “Even in the research, women have lower self-regard than men in Korea. Also, when we do the survey, numbers of young women pick strong, strict female leaders as their role model. But, we all should understand that feminine style can also be strong,” emphasized Lee. Women’s soft and delicate way of talking and caring could also impact the world, and Lee’s ultimate purpose is to bring out this quality to the world. Cover page of Lee's newly published book When You Miss Your Career Again has pictures of blooming flowers and flying butterflies to symbolize the new life of women. Based on her four years of memories at Hanyang University, Lee advised the female youth at the campus. “Many female students often give up on their friendship for their love and GPA. But learning how to balance friendship, economic ability, and love can be the true success of your life!” Kim Ju-hyun kimster9421@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Choi Min-ju

2017-08 13

[Alumni]To the Next Victoria's Secret of Asia

“80 % of women don’t know their right bra size and face difficulty wearing it,” explained Kim. Sara’s Fit is a custom-made underwear brand that has been established about one and a half year ago and is gaining great support from a lot of women due to its comfortable and modern design. With its 24 different types of categorization method and one-on-one consulting with every customer that takes from half an hour to an hour, Sara’s Fit tries to deliver the right type of underwear for women. Challenges to find a career Although Kim’s initial dream was to become a professor, her dream has changed completely after experiencing exchange student programs in her junior year. “I started to realize that my dream of becoming a professor was to show off to other people that I have been diligent all my life,” said Kim. After the exchange student program, Kim was attracted to other programs that gave her more chance to interact with foreign countries. Still, even upon her graduation, she could not find what she really wanted to become. After graduation, Kim was studying MBA program at the United States, when she realized that there was a lot of start-up booms in the country. “People were not afraid of starting their own business. In Korea, start-ups were yet to be popular then,” explained Kim. Kim is explaining about the difficulties of finding her dreams. Through Kim’s memories of openness of people regarding underwear in the United States, she started to think that accumulating data of customers would become a huge industry in Korea. Since Kim did not major in fashion design, there were a lot to learn from the beginning. “Underwear design is a very secretive field with high entry barriers. It takes years to learn the critical knowledge since there are only a few designers that could make the right designs,” explained Kim. After recruiting one of the best underwear designers in Korea, Kim and her partner have established Sara’s Fit. “Sara seemed to be a very friendly name in Asia which we decided to name for our clients and the consultants at the same time.” Being the Boss Kim has experienced diverse types of careers from MBA, Samsung SDS to KOTRA after graduation. “There was little that an employee could do in terms of making decisions although there were some good things about belonging in such a huge corporation,” recalled Kim. Since Kim has to take care of the funding to expenditure, there is a lot at stake which gives her the motivation and responsibility at the same time. Algorithms that match customers to their perfect-fit underwear is on its way to put to action. Investments are also on its way. Kim has the dream of making Sara’s Fit into the next custom-made Victoria’s Secret of Asia. “Europe and America has a huge market of custom-made underwear. Asia, however, is on its way of developing at the moment,” added Kim. Expanding to overseas market would be the next step for Sara’s Fit. “It’s all planned out at the moment and we are on our way to open up different line-ups for customers of diverse age groups as well,” said Kim. Heartwarming moments exist when Kim’s customers with different body shapes return to the shop and thank her. “It’s not just what you wear. It’s how you wear it that’s also important and a lot of people don’t know it yet so we will try our best to provide the best for the customers.” Guidelines to how to use Sara's Fit (Courtesy of sarasfit.com) "We want Sara's Fit to be the Victoria's Secret of Asia." (Courtesy of Kim) Kim Seung-jun nzdave94@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Kim Youn-soo

2017-08 07

[Alumni]A Sincere Teacher of Music

The members of a choir are standing in line on stage, singing while exchanging eye signals, presenting graceful harmony. They finish their performance with a big applause. Finally, the conductor turns around and gives a big bow as he listens to the cheers getting louder. In the center of the stage as a conductor, there is Lee Eun-suk (Department of Vocal Music, ’95), who tries his best to live as a true musician. He is not only a conductor of two choirs and two orchestras, but also a singer, and the founder of a choir, Goyang Mixed Choir. An open choir for amateurs Lee is currently the founder and the conductor of Goyang Mixed Choir, which is a choir open for all amateurs encompassing different genders and ages. This choir welcomes anyone who has a passion to sing. However, the choir was not something Lee had planned ahead. “To be honest, I didn’t have a particular vision to make a choir by myself. An acquaintance of mine was planning on a chorus tournament held by Goyang Culture Foundation, and was in need of three choirs. They suggested me to create a choir. I thought it was a great chance and started it since 2014," reminisced Lee. Now, he has great affection towards this choir, and explained that they are preparing for their third subscription concert this year. Lee is explaining the traits of his choir, Goyang Mixed Choir. As the conductor of Goyang Mixed Choir, Lee put great effort into his choir and therefore now has over 60 members. Lee showed great appreciation of the process of teaching the amateurs in his choir. It was his first time teaching people who didn’t have any professional skills, but found it charming. “It was actually fun to set up the people’s voices in the right way. They were curious on the vocalization methods, and were highly interested since my voice was different from theirs. I also felt thankful as they concentrated so much to sing better, and to be a better member of the choir," said Lee. Lee also mentioned of challenges he face as a leader of a choir. “Singing in chorus is a lot different from singing alone. Unlike solos who only have to focus on their own techniques, each individual in a choir has to control their voice and achieve a harmony the conductor intends. However, this is difficult for amateurs since they can easily be swept away by the different voices around them,” Lee explained. He emphasized that conductors in amateur choirs should give the members motivation and a sense of purpose, instead of making a forceful atmosphere. “Fully understanding their situation is one of the virtues a conductor should have,” Lee asserted. Living the life of an artist Lee was more of a painter than a musician when he was a high school student. The school choir he attended as a hobby was the only music life he encountered. However, through his senior who performed in an opera, Lee saw the backstage of an opera by chance. He was fascinated by the actions going on behind the scenes. After that, his senior suggested him to sing after listening to his song and Lee eventually worked on it for 3 more extra years before he ended up in the Department of Vocal Music in Hanyang University. After graduation, Lee made a debut in Rome. He applied for various contests and auditions to make a living overseas, and was scouted by Santa Cecilia Conservatory of Music. He entered the school to extend his study in songs and received a better result. Despite his age and racial disadvantages, he was scouted by Cecilia Theatre even before he graduated. As the school did not allowed a debut while attending school, Lee resolutely gave up his diploma and stood on stage. After a few years, Lee had to come back to Korea due to personal issues, but he did not give up. He found his way through his talents, continuing his opera life and even working as a conductor of choirs and orchestras at the same time. "Music should be enjoyable to both professionals and non-professionals." Now Lee is both an outstanding singer and a conductor in Korea. However, he is still modest when he describes himself. “I am fully aware that I am not perfect. Therefore, I just try to do the best I can, testing my limits everyday”, Lee adverted. He also mentioned he wants to work in a more professional organization, but still wholeheartedly showed his passion towards his work. He constantly emphasized the interests he has towards assisting the members to achieve what they want. “I’m curious how long I can maintain this harmonization with the members. I don’t have a lot of intention to fulfill something in terms of music. I simply wish to maintain this positive relationship with my members for a long time,” said Kim. On Jung-yun jessica0818@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Choi Min-ju

2017-08 07

[Alumni]Engineer Publishing a Dictionary

Living in a country where you do not speak the language can be one of the most challenging things in the world. There is a proud Hanyangian who overcame the difficulty and even made a dictionary of the foreign language. Kim Woo-taek (Department of Automotive Engineering, '02) published ‘Cambodian-Korean- English Korean-Cambodian- English Dictionary’ which contains more than 40,000 vocabularies in September 2014. First person in the world to publish Korean-Cambodian dictionary “I never dared to make a dictionary from the beginning,” said Kim. Coming to Cambodia without speaking the language, he had to study hard to communicate with the locals. As private education was not an option at the moment, Kim chose to learn the language by himself and started reading newspapers. Kim symbolized the letters in his head while reading the paper. “I still get some pronunciations wrong because I learned the langauge through reading”, reminisced Kim. After a while, he was able to read documents without having to look for dictionaries. He kept notes on the vocabularies he does not know while studying in such way, and his notes became a valuable asset in publishing the dictionary. Kim and his wife, Som Sopheap is holding Kim's three publications. (Photo courtesy of Kim) One day, he wanted to make a good use of all the data he has. He visited every bookstore in Cambodia and bought 20 dictionaries, then typed them page by page for four years. It took much longer than his initial estimation, but with passion he invested his nights in the work. For a person who has no professional background knowledge, it was not easy to match Korean and Cambodian dictionaries with the accurate nuances. One of the most arduous works in the progress was writing pronunciations of Cambodian words in Korean because the two languages are phonetically different. Kim and his friend are standing infront of a church in Kampot, Cambodia. (Photo courtesy of Kim) ខ្ញុំស្រឡាញ់អ្នកកម្ពុជា។ (I Love you, Cambodia!) As an answer to the question ‘Who helped the most in publishing the dictionary?’, Kim told it was his wife without any hesitation. Kim’s wife, Som pronounced the words and edited the dictionary with Kim for about a year. “She helped me with all the hard works,” said Kim. It is not only his wife he loves about Cambodia. Kim explained the country as the place where you “give and help, instead of fight and win”. Leading a happy life being his utmost goal, he has been living in the country since January of 2009. From the love of the country, Kim published three other books ‘Cambodia Tour Guidebook (2005)’, ‘Cambodian Tourist Attractions Through The Lens (2017)’, and ‘Guidebook on Cambodian Agriculture (2014)’. His publications are popular in both countries, and the dictionary is considered as a must-have among Koreans in Cambodia, and Cambodians who are aiming to get a job in Korea. Transferring agricultural technology While running a tourism business in Phnom Penh, Kim is also keeping himself busy with KOPIA (Korea Program on International Agriculture). He works as a PR agent in the organization, transferring advanced Korean agricultural technology to Cambodia. Also, under KOPIA, Kim operates Cambodia Agriculture Information Center. “I am happy that there is something to do and someone who needs me” said Kim. As an engineer, CEO, husband, PR agent and publisher, Kim blueprints a future where he can be a bridge between Korean and Cambodian agriculture. Kim So-yun dash070@hanyang.ac.kr

2017-07 31

[Alumni]Introducing Tyle, a Card News Designing Tool

Card news is a combination of texts and images in one sight, visualizing the message with the goal of enabling easy reading and understanding. Concise condensation of information in the form of storytelling could be effective when used properly, giving rise to the new contents format of card news. As it looks brief and simple on the surface, production of card news is sometimes undervalued, despite of efforts needed from planning and organization to designing. Skills, of course, would help to make a distinguished card news, but designing is another story which requires more than just technical abilities. Lee Hueng-hyun (Department of Advertising and Public Relations, 10’), has created a card news designing service for those who are nonprofessional marketers and dubbed it Tyle. Lee Heung-hyun is the creator of card news desining tool, Tyle. Two defeats, one victory “I was expecting a great hit, because I had a good feeling with my business partner. However, miracle didn’t happen that easily,” he sighed. Lee and his friend Woo Hyuk-jun first started a small joint business by the name of Tubloo in 2014, which was a small enterprise developing application software. The first two software business Tubloo launched were failures, as Lee boldly expressed. The first business was of children’s animation and the next one of contents platform—neither of which was successful. However, their third one Tyle was different. Tyle is a card news creating service where by simply entering texts and choosing designs, the user could reap a finished outcome of desired card news. It is geared towards people who are non-professional in designs, lessening the trouble of appealing to the aesthetic. Automation of production greatly increases usefulness and practicality, not to mention convenience and ease. The name Tyle was derived after a long contemplation of looking for an uncommon word, as an attempt to exclude all other services in the search engine when searched. Though it contains no extraordinary meaning, the significance is that it suits the service and the businessmen are satisfied. “Me and my partner were so enthusiastic at first that we thought anything we create could be a big success. However, after the two previous failures, we realized the two of us aren’t that special,” confessed Lee. The duo wanted to provide a service that was original and out of box, with the ambition of starting a new trend. They focused on what the market demanded, instead of focusing on what they want to do. The two defeats taught them that they should chase their abilities. In the interim, the idea that designing belongs solely to the professionals occurred to them, providing a raw scheme. This developed into the idea of Tyle, which targeted marketers who are not professional designers. "Not all combination of texts and images become a good card news." Still on the journey “We were on our own when planning for the project but we had a lot of help from professional designers with their counseling when creating the designs of the card news,” explained Lee. The current Tyle is said to be the sixth prototype model, because it was far from perfect in the beginning. It is hard to tell how long it took to create Tyle because rough sketch was virtually done in one day and it could be the finished product. It is all about improving and adding extra function to make the service better afterwards, which still goes on even today. In order to create an effective, more compelling card news, Lee pointed out a few tips. First, it is important to understand the true advantage of card news to reach its full potential. As it is a visualized message conveyer, using too much texts is absolutely not recommended. Moreover, choosing appropriate topic is crucial. If the content requires long texts and sentences, putting them in card news can be pointless. It should always be concise and easily readable. Lastly, understanding the main objective of creating card news must be fully identified. It will help to bring up the intended effect. “Jumping from 1 to 95 is achievable, but that last leap of 5 is never-reaching. I want Tyle to be outstandingly exceptional and superior, not just cool to use. I want to improve the service and fill up the remaining gap to reach 100 by adding and upgrading the quality of designs,” planned Lee. "Tyle is ever-improving!" Jeon Chae-yun chaeyun111@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Choi Min-ju

2017-07 31

[Alumni]Constructing Korea’s Food Culture

An ordinary food critic wouldn’t use a phrase ‘overturning tables’ in their reviews. However, a special food critic did. In the era where various social contexts influence all criticism, Lee Yong-jae (Department of Architectural Engineering, ’01) bravely expressed his opinions solely based on his thoughts through a book, The Dignity of Korean Dishes. Through his book, he emphasized his unique thoughts desiring for an improvement in Korean dishes. The dignity of Korean food On the 16th of June, a new book full of criticism on Korean dishes was released. “To make it simple, I just wanted to live a better life with better food.”, mentioned Lee. After living abroad and experiencing a different culture towards food, he felt the flaws of traditional Korean dishes. He started having doubts on traditions of Korean food. Lee asked himself, “Do we really have to drink hot soup in a ttukbaegi (an earthen bowl) when it’s obvious that you’ll burn the roof of your mouth? Is this truly a tradition or is it just a habit we never cared to question?” He came up with such unique questions and studied the fundamentals of cooking himself, extending his studies into the book, The Dignity of Korean Dishes. In his book, he points out the shortcomings of Korean dishes explicitly as a true food critic. Throughout his book, he uses expressions other critics wouldn’t commonly use. Lee defines his words as straightforward rather than provocative. “I dislike modifying and making up opinions for my own interests. When interests of people are intertwined, it’s hard to fully deliver the opinions of the food itself.” Lee explained. "Korean food is tasteless" is one of his comments that caught a lot of people’s attention in his recent publication. He explained that there are a number of meanings in this sentence. He asserted that "delicious" doesn’t stand solely for the food itself. “It’s not only the food on the plate I’m trying to assess. The service, plate settings or formality are the aspects that should be considered when assessing food.” The cover of Lee's book The Dignity of Korean Dishes. This is his second book, criticising the problems of Korean dishes. (photo courtesy of Banbi) A born critic Although Lee is currently a food critic who has reputation for having his own firm beliefs, his major can be seen less relevant. He did have an interest in cooking and even ran a blog on it since he started to cook for himself. However as his passion still lied in architecture, Lee left abroad to study further in 2002. He initially wanted to be a critic in architecture, so he had a job in America as an architectural designer. Lee came back to Korea in 2009, with determination to write as a living. He sent articles to numerous magazines, and started a column on architecture. However, as his interests toward food grew more than ever, he started writing various articles on food and came to the position where he is now at, solely concentrating on assessing food. “I continued writing on my blog and tried lots of Korean food, consequentially leading myself into a food critic. I would enter a random restaurant and write on my blog about the food. Then I would experiment on various methods and make the food for myself.”, Lee reminisced. Food = Architecture Lee commented that a plate of food is equivalent to an outcome of construction. “Food and architecture has a lot in common. They both require quite accurate information before they start, and have a three-dimensional visual result. The only difference would come from their durability", explained Lee. He asserted that the two subjects are incommensurable as they are important parts of uisiku (three basic elements of human life in Korea, standing for clothing, and shelter). Lee emphasized the importance of having an objective perspective point of view when evaluating a particular dish. “You have to stay away from the outer, social elements that could affect your judgement. Once you maintain a certain distance, you would be able to solely concentrate on the food you are eating.” Lee pointed out the weaknesses of Korean dishes through this point of view. “Korean food usually doesn’t make a good use of salt. They tend to season the food only through seasonings. Salt and seasonings have their own roles but Korean dishes don’t use this classification.” Lee wishes to promote the food culture of Korea. (photo courtesy of Lee) Changing the perception of food criticism is what Lee wishes to achieve through his career. “A lot of people don’t even realize food can be a subject of criticism. I wish people would be able to break this prejudice and live in a better food culture.” Moreover, he wishes to write more books related to food, such as food for people eating alone. “Food culture isn’t something sophisticated. It’s all about making a better quality of life with better quality of food, and that’s what really matters. I hope I could assist the development of Korean food throughout my career.” On Jung-yun jessica0818@hanyang.ac.kr

2017-07 17

[Alumni]Life of Living in a Movie

The movie <Edward Scissorhands(1990)> was a sensation when it first came to the public with its realistic computer graphics in the early 1990’s. Among the captivated audience, there was Choi Dae-chul, an alumnus of the Department of Dance, who dreamed of being an actor just like Scissorhands. After years of training and praciting, Choi made his appearance in various musicals, movies, and TV shows and now has grown up to an actor with a nickname called the “fairy of broadcasting ratings”. Choi at the 2015 MBC Drama Awards Acting with endurance Besides the nickname of “the fairy of ratings,” Choi is also referred to the prince of Ajumma. Ajumma means middle aged women in Korean. It was because some of his most popular TV shows were targeted to the middle aged women viewers. Choi’s intricate actions and good-looking appearance mesmerized the audience. “I feel really thankful to such nicknames. I think was I was lucky enough to have opportunities to be on the television,” said Choi. Choi was passionate in both dancing and acting, as he loved art. “After some time of contemplation, I decided to major in dance. However, I hurt my arm in my senior year, and I decided to change my goal, to become an actor,” reminisced Choi. For eight years, Choi looked for places at musicals where he got to act from minor to major roles. “With the dancing skills that I have, I thought musical wouldn't be a whole new world to me. However, it did took me a long time for me to get a major role,” said Choi. During such arduous course of trainings, rather than being frustrated, Choi always tried to learn more. "I would often watch other senior actors at the backstage to see how they move and act to make my own acting better." All his efforts did not betray Choi overall. “As I was waiting for my opportunity to come, I always asked my seniors about acting. Thanks to their advice, and especially to actor Oh Man-suk, whom I respect the most, I was able to successfully portray the major roles,” said Choi. Life like a movie Even when talking about the darkest moments of his life, Choi never lost his smiles. “I consider my life as a movie, there must be ups and downs. Without them, the movie would be boring,” emphasized Choi. Because he always know that life can be thrown into waves of difficuties and it can eventually make him stronger, Choi was able to cope with the difficulties composedly. As an actor, Choi thinks that setting limits to capable roles is the demise of his occupation. “I always try to take different and unique roles to expand my spectrum of acting. I have acted a rich, gang, ascetic, father, and more, but there are still more roles that I want to try on, especially a disabled patients that need subtle expressions, movements, and understanding,” said Choi. According to Choi, the most imperative factor in acting is sincerity. “There’s only one of me in the whole world which makes my acting unique. If I put my sincerity into actions, that becomes the role that a person called Choi Dae-chul is acting, which is very important,” explained Choi. Choi's large spectrum of acting is what makes him a stronger actor. One of the biggest motivation for Choi's passion, is his family. “I have a family that always supports my acting career. Also, because every offer that production companies provides me is precious, I always try to take the job,” said Choi. Also, whenever Choi feels like popularity can overwhelm himself, he always reminds of his 20s and 30s when every little chance seemed like a rain in a desert. Such efforts and sincerity made what Choi has become now. Epilogue “In a movie called life, the director, actor, and producer are all me. I am the one who knows myself the best and thus, I shouldn’t be ashamed of myself by being untruthful,” emphasized Choi. To him, being sincere is not only important in acting, but in general life. He hopes that students of Hanyang University will always try to put efforts into everything they do. “My movie will end with the epilogue of myself closing the eyes before facing death. There, all the good and bad things I have done will flash by my memories, and I hope the good deeds of mine will be remembered more,” said Choi. Kim Ju-hyun kimster9421@hanyang.ac.kr

2017-07 10

[Alumni]Until Ballet Can Capture the Heart of Everyone

Three ballerinos were dancing with the utmost concentration. The leader displayed mild charisma, never taking his eyes off the other two dancers who were showing graceful and understated motions. Kim Kil-yong (Department of Dance, ‘92), is the head of Wiseballet Theater who creates and directs ballet performances that the general public can enjoy. Intriguing ballet performances for the public Wiseballet Theater is famous for its unique ballet shows combining b-boy dance, tap dance, tango, and hip-hop, cooperating with other dance crews, such the famous Korean b-boy crew, Last For One. “Each ballet troupe prepares their own version of The Nutcracker during Christmas season. Our performance was complimented for its engrossing and compact organization of choreography that mix-matched ballet with other genres of dances,” Kim said with a proud grin. Kim is the leader who takes responsibility of Wiseballet Theater. (Photo courtesy of Wiseballet Theater) Since Wiseballet Theater focuses on the popularization of ballet, the diverse performances it covers range from creative and contemporary to classic ones with explanations. One of the most inspiring showcases that the troupe presented was Once Upon a Time in Ballet. Kim called the performance, a ‘ballet-cal’, meaning that it combined ballet and musical, with diverse other dance genres as well. In addition, the troupe presented street ballet performances in Hongdae, Hyehwa, and Suwon. “Some dancers were hesitant about the idea that they had to dance on the sidewalk in front of passing bystanders. However, seeing how the people loved the show, they became enthusiastic to participate in the next shows, ” Kim chuckled. A dance competition between two rivaling families is the main plot of Once Upon a Time in Ballet. In this scene, Cheolsu and Yeonghee is dancing together, expressing their secret love. (Photo courtesy of Wiseballet Theater) From a ballet starter, growing to become a professional performer At first Kim did not have an interest in ballet or even dance. After going to technical high school, Kim realized he did not quite fit in so he searched for another path in his future. Since Kim had a taste for art, and his mother once learned ballet, he decided to study ballet. “I can’t say I fell in love with ballet as soon as I first started practicing, especially due to my masculine personality. But as I got to know ballet more and more, I found out ballet was actually very stylish, then I gradually became enthralled in its charm,” Kim reminisced. Possessing both capacity and effort, he eventually became the member of the renowned Korean National Ballet. “But somehow, as I spent four years as the dancer of Korean National Ballet, I felt like there was an empty space in my heart. I was given the best outfit, the most impressive stages, and the admiration of others, but at the same time I felt there was something missing, ” Kim said. The fruitful result of following his heart With such concern, he talked to his professor Cho Seung-mi at HYU about his problem. “Professor Cho is my mentor of my lifetime. After hearing all my troubles she asked me to join her in creating the Cho Seung-mi ballet corporation, ” Kim revealed. “The time I joined in the troupe as a choreographer and performer was one the happiest moments of my life, ” Kim faintly smiled. According to Kim, he learned Cho’s creativity and mindset about giving art performances. “One time I remember is that she made an extra show for people with physical difficulty. At first, because I was the lead dancer I felt too exhausted and tired, but when I saw the audience trying to clap with difficulty with their eyes filled with admiration, I burst into tears, ” Kim reminisced. Kim created Wiseballet Theater with his friend Hong Seong-wook after leaving the Cho Seung-mi ballet corporation. (Photo courtesy of Wiseballet Theater) Unfortunately, Cho faced an early death due to cancer. After her death, He left the troupe and created his first ballet show about the stories of living as a ballerino in Korea, ‘Some things that can happen to you’, with his three friends. The show was a huge success, which made Kim to think of making his own ballet troupe. Consequently, he and his friend, Hong Seong-wook, the art director, initiated Wiseballet Theater in 2005, which continues to this day. Wiseballet Theater gives a great number of inspiring performances even comparing to huge ballet companies. The reason for this is Kim's belief that the troupe is there for the purpose of the enjoyment of its audience. Along with those shows, Kim is currently directing Swans ballet troupe, the first amateur ballet troupe in Korea, to give opportunity to ordinary citizens to perform ballet on stage. To the students dreaming of becoming ballerinas and ballerinos, Kim advised, “Ballet is not an easy road to take in life. I once strived to become the best in ballet, but I now believe that the important thing is to enjoy oneself and find happiness when dancing.” Kim at the inauguration ceremony of Swans ballet troupe in January. According to Kim, the passion of the members of Swans ballet are so great that they give energy to Wiseballet Theater. (Photo courtesy of Wiseballet Theater) Jang Soo-hyun luxkari@hanyang.ac.kr