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2018-10 29

[Alumni]Carrying Out “Love in Deed” as a Researcher in Korean Dance

Dance is a form of art at a holistic and advanced stage, and it can have an enormous social influence. Also known as a “moving poem,” it can be difficult to translate a dance into solid writing because there are countless expressions connoted in it. However, Hanyang University alumnus, Kim Yoon-ji (Department of Dance, '01), has continued to put her efforts into promoting the excellence of Korean dance in various research. She has succeeded in conducting both independent and joint research converging the concept of dance and the contemporary issues on the rise. Kim’s passion for dance has led her to become the biggest research fund beneficiary in the field of dance in the last five years, receiving 16.4 million won. Hanyang University's Department of Dance alumnus, Kim Yoon-ji stated that when an artist’s spirit and technique are added to the comprehensive and intrinsic human movements, it becomes a dance. After entering the Department of Dance to major in Korean dance at Hanyang University in 1997, the IMF financial crisis hit hard and brought about some hardships. Kim had no choice but to study and dance diligently. Her efforts paid off as she graduated with honors. “I received a lot from Hanyang University, which made me the person I am today, and I want to give the pleasure back to the university in any way possible as gratitude,” stated Kim. Kim Yoon-ji (middle) on her Hanyang University graduate school graduation day in 2013. Reading books and regularly going to Paiknam Library were part of her daily routine and deeply contributed to choosing her career as a researcher and adjunct professor after university graduation. “Whenever I had hardships, I turned to reading, which the words gave me wisdom on how to live through my studies,” maintained Kim. She decided to enter graduate school and went on to receive her master’s degree and doctoral degree from the Department of Dance. Hanyang University alumnus, Kim Yoon-ji (Department of Dance, '01) asserted that doing research is interesting as it requires combining various information to come to a creative yet logical conclusion. Some of Kim’s research projects, both independent and joint, are currently ongoing. One of her independent research projects titled, “Application of Korean Dance Contents Module on Extension of the Trans-Media Storytelling Area," was selected by the National Research Foundation of Korea. The research is based on the effects of trans-media storytelling on Korean dance by converging various digital media platforms to convey the story of the performances more efficiently. Furthermore, the three year joint research project titled, “Comprehensive Database Project for Lexicography Informations” gathers researchers from numerous fields to build up data in order to grant the public access to good knowledge. Kim is currently responsible for the intangible performances and folklores section. “I want to become a humble intellectual who can carry out love in deed, especially to Hanyang University, and I wish for all Hanyang University students to pursue their own happiness,” Kim concluded. She plans on continuing her study of converging Korean dance with society as a researcher and promote the artistry of Korean dance to the international community. Seok Ga-ram carpethediem@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Kang Cho-hyun

2018-08 30 Important News

[Alumni]Hanyang Alumni in WFUNA

From a young age, many students dream of working for an international organization such as the United Nations (UN) . Lee Young-jin (International Studies, ’12) has been actively engaging in spreading the goals of the UN and educating civil society as part of the World Federation of United Nations Associations (WFUNA) since 2016, as a Training and Education Associate. He shared his experience and tips to his fellow dreamers at Hanyang this week. News H interviewed Lee Young-jin (International Studies, '12) at the World Federation of United Nations Associations office, a sister organization of the United Nations. Is WFUNA part of the UN? “Many people get confused about whether WFUNA is part of the United Nations, but it’s more like a sister organization,” smiled Lee. While the UN works with countries and facilitates relationships and cooperation among its member nations, WFUNA is more focused on the relationship between people and the UN. The organization also functions as the head of more than a hundred United Nation Associations all over the world. Lee is working in the Seoul branch, which is one of three secretariats of WFUNA: New York, Geneva, and Seoul. As the only secretariat in Asia, the Seoul office works to spread their Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), especially focusing on the young. Lee, as a Training and Education Associate, is in charge of educational programs that promote and strengthen the UN's values and educate the participants to help them become global citizens in the form of the Model United Nations (MUN). He came back just last week from New York, with the Youth Program at the UN: Korea. Lee Young-jin (top right, International Studies, '12) with his students from the Youth Program at the UN: Korea. (Photo courtesy of Lee) Focusing on specialty When asked what made him work for a global nonprofit organization, Lee mentioned his long experience with the MUN. Lee has been participating in numerous MUN programs since the first year of high school, and he once even hosted Hanyang's MUN when he was the vice president of the Division of International Studies. He also worked as part of the United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) in Korea to organize Model UNESCO in his junior year. “One has to have his or her own specialty in order to work with international organizations,” Lee emphasized. With his abundant experience with MUNs, he was offered a position as a trainer in the WFUNA Youth Camp, which he is now in charge of. That was the beginning of his career in the field. His fluency in Korean, English, and French is also a strength when it comes to working in such an organization. “Working in WFUNA Seoul requires excellence in both English and Korean, and if one wishes to work in Geneva, French would be important too,” mentioned Lee. He pointed out that good scores and so-called "specifics" required to work in major corporations in Korea is not valued as much in the field. Rather, Lee encouraged students to focus on their work experience and specialty. Kim So-yun dash070@hanyang.ac.kr

2018-07 09

[Alumni]Different Paths Toward the Same Dream

Becoming a police officer is not a common career path that students from the Division of International Studies (DIS) pursue. However, two students, Suh Joon (DIS ’15) and Chong Hyun-joong (DIS ’16), have fulfilled their dream of wearing the blue police officer's uniform that they always dreamed of. Chong Hyun-joong (DIS' 16) and Suh Joon (DIS' 15) shared their experience of becoming and working as a police officer. Suh is currently working in the International Cooperation Division. He became a police officer through a special employment system, which is for foreign language specialists. As the practicality examination takes a large portion of the special employment system, Suh mainly focused on enhancing his language proficiency and translation skills. “Matching the time limit was my main concern when preparing for the exam. Solving sample questions from previous tests and reading the English newspaper were a great help for me,” recalled Suh. Referred to as the ministry of foreign affairs within the Korean National Police Agency (KNPA), the International Cooperation Division has the main purpose of maintaining a strong relationship with foreign police agencies. Maintaining such relationships allows the KNPA to provide protection to the many Korean citizens who are currently abroad and outside of its jurisdiction. Suh provided an example of Korean citizens being detained for false accusations and how the cooperation with foreign police agencies is crucial in tackling such situations. Suh is translating for Lee Chul-sung, the former Chief of the Korean National Police Agency, during a meeting with the Philippine president Rodrigo Duterte. (From left, Lee, Suh, and Duterte) (Photo Courtesy of Suh) On the contrary, unlike Suh, Chong joined the KNPA through open recruitment. Fulfilling his military service as an conscripted policeman, it was his experience as an officer that allowed him to become aware of the recruitment examination. Taking time off from school to focus on the recruitment process, Chong prepared for the exam with his back against the wall. Managing to achieve a successful result with a single year of preparation, Chong is currently working at the Recruitment Bureau of the Education Policy Department as an inspector. The Recruitment Bureau has the biggest focus on the overall recruitment system of the KNPA. It is responsible for not only the formal, open recruitment system but also many special employment systems, which are consulted on with other departments that need new personnel. Additionally, the legislation related to recruitment is also managed and revised by this division. According to Chong, Hanyang University has agreed to provide a location for the recruitment examination of the second half of this year. Chong explained how he first became aware of the KNPA recruitment examination during his military service as a conscripted police officer. Both Suh and Chong mentioned that studying in the DIS gave them a definite advantage when preparing for the police test. Suh mentioned how the interdisciplinary approach of the DIS curriculum covers a wide span of subjects that helped him with not only the recruitment examination but also with his current work at the KNPA. Chong emphasized the police administration course in DIS, which helped him understand the fields of international law and foreign police affairs. As for advice to those who are preparing for the police recruitment examination, both officers maintained the importance of asking for guidance from predecessors rather than being troubled alone. They also mentioned that one must be prepared to accept hard working hours and high levels of stress. Chong explained that as their work is open to the press, one must be skillful in controlling his or her own emotions. Suh added, "Meeting with the dark side of society is not a pleasurable experience, and thus, it is important that one be prepared both physically and emotionally. Still there is no doubt that the work itself is worthwhile and highly rewarding." Choi Seo-yong tjdyd1@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Park Kuen-hyung

2018-07 09

[Alumni]Woo In-chul, the Former Mayoral Candidate of Seoul

Although the importance of politics is well-known, it Is hard to see young Koreans actively and directly involved in the field. Former mayoral candidate of Seoul, Woo In-chul (Department of Molecular and Life Science, ERICA '12), unfolded his story of diving into politics soon after his graduation. Despite his major being rather unrelated to politics, Woo has always been interested in political issues regarding Korean youth, such as the 2011 Korean university tuition crisis. As a senior in 2011, Woo became actively involved in youth forums, debates and seminars that dealt with various problems that degraded the living standards of Korean youth. “I think being able to participate in politics regardless of your major, age, or background, is the fundamental aspect of having a democratic society. I wanted to become more directly involved in politics, so I decided to take action.” Woo In-chul (Department of Molecular and Life Science, ERICA '12) at the Woori Mirae office on June 6th, 2018. Woo strongly believed that as a democratic citizen, changes in our lives must be made through politics. Together with his friends, he formed the Youth Party in 2011. This wasn’t easy as they needed to gather at least 5,000 party members. They also needed a candidate, and Woo stepped up to take assume that role. Even after they successfully formed the party, there were more mountains to overcome as they needed a deposit of at least 15-million-won, in addition to other election campaign fees. “I didn’t run for the election to win. I at least wanted to spread the awareness that we, as young people of Korea have problems to solve, and should take matters into our own hands.” After the impeachment of former President Park, Woo decided that it was their chance to start an era of new politics where the young would be the main actors. This led to the formation of Woori Mirae (우리미래당), which is a developed version of the Youth Party. Many university students in Korea are still financially struggling to keep up with high tuition fees, living expenses, housing expenses and more. All the politicians who hadincluded such youth related issues in their campaign promises, seemed to completely forget about them after winning their elections. “It’s because it’s not their priority. That’s why we ourselves need to take action, because nobody else will do it for us,” said Woo. Woo protesting in the "youth tent" for the youth rental house project on April 21st . After running for the general election, Woo’s Party failed to receive enough votes and was forced to disband. However, this did not stop Woo from re-forming the party in 2017. “Our society needs to heal, and I believe this can be done through politics. Forming a party is not just a form of representation. It’s to try to change the policies, systems, institutions, and to give political hope to young people,” said Woo. He also noted that the majority of Korean politicians are from an older generation, which naturally creates a weaker bond of empathy with the younger generation. Although not saying that all politicians must be from the younger generation, he emphasized that most people fail to realize that youth issues are directly linked to societal issues and issues of all generations, due to lack of empathy. Recently Woo ran for the office of mayor of Seoul. He noted that he wanted to first and foremost ask the young Koreans, if they are doing well. The reality for youth is harsh as most take the first step into the society with heavy student loans and the struggles of keeping up with other expenses. This prevents them from challenging themselves and trying out new things, as they are so caught up with just trying to make ends meet. Woo re-emphasized how empathy is key here. “Empathy allows people to take an interest in others. We need that sort of interest because that’s where change starts. The spread of awareness and addressing of problems will lead to changes in policies in the long run. Other institutional changes will follow.” Woo hopes for the future of many young Korean "elites." After the elections, Woo is now a chair in the party, hosting various programs and sessions for not just youth but also for those from older generations as well, in hopes of creating a bond and fostering more understanding between generations. With four party representatives, the Woori Mirae will run for future elections with hopes of changing the political culture. “All those who are interested in social political issues, or trying to take action are "elites." I hope more of the current younger generation will become elites,” said Woo. Woori Mirae official website: http://makeourfuture.kr/%EC%86%8C%EA%B0%9C/#intro Park Joo-hyun julia1114@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Lee Jin-myung

2018-06 11

[Alumni]Following a True Career Path

Bang Hyun-soo (Mechanical Engineering, '08), the founder of Photographic BKOON, was invited as a guest speaker at the recently held relay talk-show hosted by the Women in Engineering at Hanyang Center on June 4th. Due to many students showing high concerns about their future career paths, the talk-show aimed to enable students to approach their career from a much more reasonable perspective. Just before the talk-show, Bang was able to share his ideas about career paths through an interview with NewsH. Bang Hyun-soo (Mechanical Engineering, '08) is giving a lecture at the relay talk-show, held on the 4th of June, on the theme of finding one's true career path. Bang explained how he managed to become a photographic lecturer, which is completely irrelevant to his major of mechanical engineering. Bang first established Photographic BKOON in 2015, which is a one-man business that focuses on photography lectures using smart-phones. His lectures consist of two big parts: photography and editing, and have the goal of allowing everyone to become artists in their everyday lives simply by using a smartphone. Irrelevant to his major of mechanical engineering, Bang explained how he managed to pursue this particular career path. First entering Hanyang University with the dream of becoming a professor, Bang was a student whose dreams changed often. In 2010, due to his father’s recommendations, Bang followed the path of becoming a lecturer. However, after finishing second in a photographic audition in November 2011, his dream changed. It was not until he gave his first lecture at Frip, a business platform that arranges various lectures, that Bang was able to put these two dreams together. Bang recalled his first lecture at Frip as an ever-lasting memory. To start, Frip was supposed to arrange the overall location and setting of the lecture, yet the location was suddenly changed on short notice. When Bang arrived at the newly changed location there was nothing prepared for his lecture. Still, Bang did not give up and successfully finished his lecture only with what was available. He recalled that if he had given up at that time with the excuse that nothing was readily prepared, the current Bang who makes photographic lectures would not exist. Bang explained how one should not be worried about failure even before trying. He shared his experience of his first lecture, where nothing was prepared, yet he seized the opportunity by at least doing something that he could. He stated that this was an important decision to his current career path. “There are over 200,000 registered jobs currently, yet only about 20 of them are somewhat familiar,” commented Bang. He noted that in order to create a job, there has to be a cyclical process in which one delivers certain values and others are willing to pay for the value provided. In this sense, Bang first concentrated on the values that he delivered and came up with the idea of putting lectures and photography together, becoming the busiest photographic lecturer today. Now, successfully settling down as a lecturer with his photographic lectures, Bang has future plans of developing a newly coined lecture theme that he can deliver. He has three stages of his lifetime plans, which are earning an hourly wage of 100,000 Korean Won by age 29, 1 million Korean Won by 39 and 10 million Korean Won by 49. Meeting his first stage goal, he is now focusing upon attaining his second goal. Rather than simply targeting monetary figures, Bang explained that he set such goals to come up with a lecture that would deliver values suitable to the stated amounts. Bang ended the interview by offering some advice for students who are concerned with their future career path. "It is important to take the first step along your future path," remarked Bang. He explained that it is never too late to make a decision when meeting another crossroad, yet being afraid to follow the path even before walking on it is meaningless. Bang also added, “University is a good place to find your dreams without being concerned about failure. Rather than worrying if you are walking on the right path, simply experiencing the path you choose is much more important.” Choi Seo-yong tjdyd1@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Kang Cho-hyun

2018-06 04

[Alumni]Dance What Words Cannot Describe

One of the two modern dance companies in Korea, Daegu Contemporary Dance Company, is greeting its seventh art director Kim Sung-yong (Dance, '00). News H interviewed Kim at a café near Suseo station on Saturday, June 2nd. Kim Sung-yong (Dance, ’00) in his recent repertoire Taking. Kim defined creation as "taking something that already exists and putting a meaning to it' in this particular choreography. (Photo courtesy of Kim) Kim started his career in an arts high school, through a teacher’s recommendation from middle school. As a young performer, Kim dreamed of one day being the director of Daegu Contemporary Dance Company. “I couldn’t believe it,” said Kim, reminiscing the moment he got the final offer from the company. He was as excellent a dancer as he is as a choreographer. With "Chaconne in G Minor" by Tomaso Antonio Vitali, Kim won 1st prize at the Dong-A Dance Competition at the age of 20. Winning in 1997, he is still the youngest winner in the history of the competition. After graduation, Kim became a semi-finalist in the third Japan International Ballet and Modern Dance Competition. That led to endless job offers from Japan, and later from Europe and North America. When asked what the hardest part of such a long and ongoing career of dancing was, Kim replied "personal relations." He explained, “Dancing itself was never too hard or exhausting. I never thought of quitting dancing in my life,” smiled Kim. The foremost value of dancing for Kim is to express what words cannot. He described dancing as metaphoric and intangible but stronger than physical objects or words. Through such visual expression, Kim wishes people, including the audience, dancers, and himself to discover feelings that they did not know existed before. That was the idea at the core of the more than 130 routines he coreographed. For instance, in his most recent and the first piece as the director of Daegu Contemporary Dance Company, Goon-joong (The Crowd), he tried to convey his contemplation on the idea of violence. Why are some people violent? Are all offenders simply offenders, or are they also victims? In the end, he came to the conclusion that the bystanders doing nothing about the violence are the worst people. Kim’s term ends in two years, and it seems like his schedule is fully booked for the coming years. He and his team have various festivals and performances to participate in both in Korea and abroad. Despite the busy schedule and the hectic life he is leading, Kim’s eyes shined with passion and interest throughout the interview. Kim So-yun dash070@hanyang.ac.kr

2018-05 21

[Alumni]The Asian Romeo

Shin Sang-keun (Voice, '94), also known as Andrea Shin, has successfully made his debut at the New York Metropolitan Opera House (New York Met) as Romeo. Being the first Asian to perform at the New York Met, Shin has opened a new road for future potential opera singers who wish to perform on a more global scale. His successful debut at the New York Met Although this is his second season at the New York Met, it was this season that he was referred to as making his official debut at the Met, being able to perform on the opening stage of Romeo and Juliet. It is exceptional for an Asian opera singer to lead the whole stage as a main character, as there have been certain glass ceilings that have existed against non-white singers. Shin showed his satisfaction towards this particular performance due to the fact that there were two more Asian opera singers who were able to share the stage with him. Shin Sang-keun (Voice,'94) starring as Romeo in Romeo and Juliet held at the New York Metropolitan Opera House. Having a successful debut this season, Shin is the first Asian to be staged on the New York Met (Photo courtesy of Shin). “Out of ten total Opera performers, even two Asian singers are considered to be too many. Likewise, the proportion of Asian opera singers who have been able to stand on foreign stages has been relatively low,” maintained Shin during the interview. For this reason, Shin was even more touched at the audiences’ high applause after his performance as Romeo at the New York Met. The applause and fiery response from the audience allowed Shin to feel that he had succeeded in actually giving "some kind of inspiration" to the audience. He explained his most touching experience of when he moved from the Karlsruhe Theater to the Hanover Theater in Germany. After his last concert at the Karlsruhe Theater, the executive of the theater popped open a bottle of champagne on stage. The audience responded with enthusiastic applause and shouted out for Shin to stay longer at the Karlsruhe Theater. It is this kind of experience that Shin finds most rewarding, in that he has succeeded in inspiring and communicating with his audience. Hardships to overcome Despite his successful career as a tenor, Shin has had to overcome many difficulties. Loneliness was a main hardship that he had to overcome, especially when performing in foreign countries. Although he had two Asian companions this season at the Met, he talked about how he had to become used to the sense of being alone when performing in other global theaters. This was also related to Shin having to stay away from his family for long time periods. Shin, being a successful tenor who performs on many stages worldwide, only has around three months to stay with his family. Even these three months are usually split into weekly terms, making them feel even shorter. Uncertainty was another factor that hindered Shin during his career. Majoring in the musical field has relatively higher risks when searching for a stable position. Even after barely finding his first job, it was strenuous for Shin to be cast at a fine theater doing opera. “The time and cost input are met with high levels of uncertainty that hinder potential opera singers from following their path,” added Shin during the interview. In order to overcome such hardships, Shin provided advice to his potential colleagues. “Instead of pouring everything into a short-term plan, you have to look at the long-term goal. It is more like running a marathon,” advised Shin. He talked about the importance of being able to maintain one’s fitness rather than exhausting oneself in a short period of time. As for those who have the goal of performing in foreign theaters, Shin stated the importance of understanding the foreign culture and delivering the correct text to the audience. He explained that Korean opera singers are already highly accomplished in technical aspects, yet in order to deliver the right text, studying the verbal sense and details of the particular language is also important. Shin's poster of the Un Ballo in Maschera (A Masked Ball), which was held during his career at the Karlsruhe Theater in Germany (Photo Courtesy of Shin) Shin ended the interview by sharing his future goals as an opera singer. Already following a successful path as a tenor, Shin now has the aim of showing higher quality performances to the audience. He also wishes to see an increased number of Korean opera singers in the major global opera theaters. Shin wrapped up by saying that “Korea is often referred to as a major country in the field of opera. In order to enhance its stance, it is now the details that have to be concentrated on. By focusing on the details, Korea will see its opera singers expanding into major global opera theaters.” Choi Seo-yong tjdyd1@hanyang.ac.kr

2018-05 21

[Alumni]Capturing the World in a Photo

From the 1st to the 15th of April, a photo exhibition called ESSE was held at the Incheon Art Platform by a photographer, Lee Jung-hyun (English Language and Literature, ’13). Lee is a photographer full of willpower who traveled around 18 countries for 654 days, starting with less than 100,000 won. Through just 27 pictures out of the 20,000 pictures he edited, he developed a storyline of his journey, and successfully finished his photo exhibition. Starting from scratch News H met Lee in a quiet cafe, on a sunny weekend. Lee lived his life as an English instructor in his early and mid-twenties, earning more than seven million won per month. After his military service, however, he felt despondent about his life, and decided to escape from his initial life. “I just didn’t want to search for a normal job, nor did I think I was suited to an organizational environment as I learned during my military experiences,” said Lee. He had interest in photography, and wished to test whether he wholeheartedly liked this hobby through the trip. Therefore, he booked his ticket to China, got his visa, and blindly started off on his journey. “I had exactly 73,432 won in my bank account when I got on the plane,” reminisced Lee. He received 500 dollars of support in Beijing, as it was his second hometown since he had lived there for nine years to study. Then he left to Southeast Asia, barely surviving every single day. He traveled with three promises to himself. First, not to earn money directly from photography; second, to receive sponsorship with gratitude; and lastly, to keep this promise for at least a year. “I believed that I could be certain I loved photography if I could love this for over a year, without any relations of loss or gain,” explained Lee. He would live in a guesthouse as a staff member, so that he could solve his accommodation issues. Then, he took pictures of all guests visiting the guesthouse, thoroughly edited them, and gave printed copies of the pictures with a sincere note. He didn’t receive any payment for these actions, but he frequently received financial support from the people who were deeply impressed by his pictures after they left the guesthouse. Lee would receive questions from his acquaintances asking why he put all his effort into the pictures. “If I couldn’t do my best in something I believe I love the most, I thought that I wouldn’t be able to do anything else,” said Lee. Focusing on the goal After his 654 day journey, he successfully finished his photo exhibition. He had millions of photos, but could easily select the 27 pictures he wanted to use in his exhibition. “There are a lot more people who take better photos than me. However, I believe that the people who can successfully have exhibitions are the people who have their own sincere story to tell through their photos,” explained Lee. The name of his exhibition, ESSE, is a Latin word for "being present," which leads to the word essence. He believes that living life as itself, possessing and dividing when needed, without obsession is the best method to live one’s life’s essence. Now Lee is living his life as a wedding photographer and a photography lecturer. However, while he takes wedding photos, he dislikes made-up concept photos. “The couples might not like the photos made naturally, since they probably don’t look as pretty as they wished to. However, these photos would be the ones that have the most to talk about in the future, since they have unique episodes in each cut,” said Lee. Lee will continue to take photos with stories and a firm subject in each cut now, and in the future, to tell everyone about each and every story in all photos. On Jung-yun jessica0818@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Kang Cho-hyun

2018-05 14

[Alumni]Healing Hearts and Minds

The psychological realm of human beings has always been full of unsolved mysteries that attract people in attempts to figure out what goes on in the hearts and minds of others. One’s mental state can affect one’s life to the point where it becomes necessary to see a consultant just like how we need doctors for health checkups. Kim Ji-in (Department of Art Psychotherapy, ’17) works as a psychotherapist through artistic measures to touch the hearts of those in need. The root of Kim's passion According to Kim, working as a therapist has long been her dream, as she has been interested in psychology since she was a high school student. Unfortunately, the field was not well-known in Korea, which discouraged her from boldly diving into it. Instead, she read many books related to psychology and philosophy to quench her thirst. Things all changed when she went on a trip to Nepal with her husband as a volunteer in 2009. She was there as an educator, and while teaching the kids, she felt that they were psychologically pressured. “It was heartbreaking to see young children who are supposed to be innocent and carefree suppressed like that. However, there were no professionals to help these children. I was also in a bad place back then, so I decided that I should take on that role.” In 2012, Kim started studying educational psychology as soon as she returned to Korea. Kim Ji-in (Department of Art Psychotherapy, ’17) at Korea Art Treatment Association, 2016 (Photo courtesy of Kim) When she first started out, psychology was not a field that interested many people. It was relatively hard to find a specific major that dealt with psychology. Many people found it peculiar that she was even interested in such a thing. However, this did not stop Kim from giving it a try. “While I was interested in psychology, I was also into music so I studied music composition when I was a senior in high school. Studying music allowed me to meet many different people, to whom I would always recommend different musical pieces to depending on their current psychological state.” Art psychotherapy During her masters as an art psychotherapy student, Kim recalls that most of her professors were art majors. They introduced her to numerous works of art that allowed her to somehow understand, relate, and analyze the psychology of the artists. She says that it was the most helpful thing she had discovered in university, since it was a skill that was not only based on foundational psychological theories, but was also always applicable to real life situations, even today. Aside from being academically passionate, she was also an active volunteer which allowed her to meet many different people in many types of situations. “The session always has to be client-oriented. I’m not afraid to prescribe medication along with the artistic therapy sessions, because I think it is of utmost importance to try to find realistic ways to help these clients.” Upon graduation, Kim started working as a psychotherapist who treats clients using artistic measures. Her clients include a wide range from children to adults, but most of them are children around the age of five, who show symptoms of separation anxiety from their mothers. There are also quite a few teenagers who also show signs of anxiety, depression, and disruptive behavior who sometimes personally reach out to her for help. Kim would use different artistic measures, such as drawing, role-play, working with play dough, storytelling, and listening to music to help these clients build trust and toheal. “Back in the 90s I used to use classical music, but nowadays people just can’t relate to it. Some people much prefer drawing over talking, while some much prefer creating their own music. I even provide raps from High School Rappers, a popular Korean TV program, so that her teenage patients can change the lyrics to them, or use the beats to create their own pieces. Then I try to analyze their works to better understand them.” As a therapist Currently, Kim is working at a Good Neighbors (NGO) center. She also has experience in working in public sectors, psychiatric wards, and as a therapist giving lectures and therapy sessions to teenagers. Kim recalls her proudest moments to be whenever a mother or the head of a center decides that the child is now free to end therapy sessions. “Upon the end of the session, the child who had been suffering from separation anxiety has now completely changed so that he doesn’t need his mother to be next to him all the time. He trusts other people and can actually have fun like any other child does on the playground.” She notes that after the sessions have ended, the parents also go through a major change with the help of her constant advice, as it is crucial for the parents to change in order for the children to change as well. “All the moments – from the beginning till the very end of the session, fly before my eyes like a film.” When asked about some of her hardships, Kim instantly said, “whenever I meet a child with a devastating background.” “This child I remember, her parent couldn’t really take care of her and her drawings always broke my heart. Knowing what her mother was also going through, also pained me because there was nothing I could do to realistically help them out of the situation.” Kim mentioned how she sometimes cried while driving home and felt the need to practice separating her life as a therapist and her personal life, because it was just too emotionally consuming. “In the end though, it’s all still worth it and I am very happy with my work. People always said that I’m a very hopeful person, and they’re right because I always had a dream or a goal. I strongly believe in returning what you’ve learned. I would love to learn more even in the future, to put my knowledge to good use for society.” Park Joo-hyun julia1114@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Lee Jin-myung

2018-05 06

[Alumni]Reinterpreting Korean Culture Through Fashion

“I love my design style because it is so direct,” smiled Jang Yoon-kyung (Jewelry & Fashion Design, ERICA, '18). News H met Jang, who is the designer for SET SET SET, on a chilly spring day. She was recognizeable even before she entered the café because of her unique earrings of her own creation and their catchy look. It was as if she was silently screaming, "I’m a fashion designer!" "The brand name means three things; the three members (three in Korean, pronounced 'set'), the set clothes as we often design, and Sse-sse-sse (a Korean traditional hand-clapping game)," explained Jang Yoon-kyung, in a café near her office on Sunday, May 6th. A Vancouver Fashion Week participating designer When asked how she felt about receiving the invitation to Vancouver Fashion Week in 2017, Jang replied “I thought it was a scam at first,” with a playful smile. Jang and her brand SET SET SET were invited to the Vancouver Fashion Show for two seasons in a row - 2018 Spring/Summer season and 2018 Fall/Winter season. SET SET SET is a designer brand that launched on July 28th, 2016. As the founder and the only designer for the brand, Jang places the emphasis of Korean culture as their core identity. “We use cultural aspects of Korea in making the textiles of our clothes. For example, our theme for last season was the new year’s blessing (bok) culture in Korea,” mentioned Jang. After receiving the dreamlike invitation to the international stage, Jang and her crew worked day and night for two months to complete the collection of 46 pieces. SET SET SET definitely made an impression on the fashion world, receiving love calls from Tokyo and Seoul after their debut. Nonetheless, it has not all been such an easy road for Jang. SET SET SET started out as a start-up club on ERICA campus with two other friends. Hanyang University provided a lot of help and supplies before they launched the brand, but after the business registration, it was all up to Jang. “The biggest issue was money, of course.” Despite of the precarious situation, Jang did not want to make clothes that would just "sell well." She emphasized that SET SET SET was and still is a brand that pursues her design spiri: kitsch and direct. “The invitation to Vancouver arrived when I was devastated and had almost given up,” reminisced Jang. Pursuing her identity through the brand, telling the story of Korean culture through clothes, Jang was able to seize this big opportunity. Left: Jang's personal favorite from the recent 2018 F/W collection. Right: A skirt and a t-shirt from the 2018 S/S collection. The theme was Samul-nori, a Korean traditional instrument, so the pattern of the skirt (enlarged in the bottom right corner) has traditional musical instruments such as Jang-gu or Book. (Photo courtesy of Jang) Do it to know it “I was only able to discover my aptitude for business after I actually started,” smiled Jang. She recommends people "go out and do something" to experience for themselves what they like - and even more importantly - what they don't like. Jang herself was able to realize that she fancies designing more than actually making the clothes after joining the ELAB (Erica Lab) club that required her to intensely make clothes. Her thought on this matter became even clearer when she took a yearlong break from school after her first year and studied fashion design skills in depth. The same applied to her entrepreneurship. Jang mentioned that she was only able to venture into the fashion business because she was so young and naïve. Her friends and seniors advised against her launching the brand without experiencing the industry as part of a company, but she thinks that a loss of innocent brought about by experience in the industry would have kept her from actually starting her own business. Is it for her experience-based career? Jang seemed like a person with ambition. She did not hide her passion and trust in her design style throughout the interview. “I want SET SET SET to be the first thing that comes into people’s minds when they think of Korean culture...I believe that my brand will grow big sometime in the future.” While striving to provide a unique and new standpoint in recreating Korean culture, Jang aims to debut in Tokyo, London, and New York in two years. News H also wishes Jang and SET SET SET success to thrive on a bigger stage. Kim So-yun dash070@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Kang Cho-hyun