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2017-11 13

[Alumni]88 Ways of Speaking: To Keep Myself

“Tigers die and leave their skins: People die and leave their names.” This is a famous proverb that points a great master’s name that lives on. Son Hwa-shin (Korean Language & Literature, ’09) as a high school student thought she also wanted to pass her name down, especially through her writing. “The idea that you eventually die, but your work lives for eternity is so fascinating,” said Son, with her eyes glowing with enthusiasm. News H met Son, a beginning essayist who just published her first book through Daum Kakao’s amateur writing platform, ‘brunch beta’. "I wish to write an essay that can be called a masterpiece." “He was a person who knew exactly what he wanted.” Son always had a passion for writing, and that led her to major in Korean language and literature. Nevertheless, she did not realize that writing can also be a breadwinning career. While having a minor identity crisis, Son went to an exhibition to clear her head during the summer of 2015. That is when she read the quote: “He was a person who knew exactly what he wanted.” “I was genuinely stunned by the words,” said Son. That was the moment when she realized that the root of her crisis starts from ignorance of her own wills. Son said what comes between ‘I am just a’ and a period truly represents oneself. Son thought ‘writer’ fills her blank. "I am just a _____ ." What fills your blank? Luckily enough, she encountered the notice for ‘brunch project’ online which promised its first-place winner with an opportunity to publish his or her book through Kakao. “This is it,” thought Son. She wanted the blue ribbon so bad to quit her job and focus on writing. “It would be a lie if I say I was never worried, but I had faith. The blue ribbon felt like mine, and I wanted to turn my life around with this award,” mentioned Son. However, life gave her a lemon. She did not make it to the first place but to second. Son, however, turned it into a lemonade instead. Second-place, unlike the first, is awarded with some funds to support the writer to publish a book on one's own. The process of writing a book proposal, sending them to several dozens of publishers, and having meetings taught her a lot. “Come to think of it, I feel lucky to win the second-place instead of first,” reminisced Son. The book 88 Ways of Speaking: To Keep Myself (2016). Click the image to purchase the book. (Photo courtesy of Sam and Parkers) Writing as a way to love oneself Son’s book ’88 Ways of Speaking: To Keep Myself (2016)’ contains 88 brunch posts that tell everyone to ‘talk like oneself’. “I felt like in this fast-changing world, people keep losing and forgetting who they are. In that context, I perceive life as battle to keep who you are.” Son strongly asserted that in order to talk like yourself, you first have to know yourself, which can be accomplished through writing. For most of the people who are afraid of writing due to various reasons, Son recommends them to write about what you like. It might lighten your burden by writing on an external subject, but in the end, all writings encompass the thoughts and logic of the writer. Once you get used to writing, Son emphasizes having one’s own style is also important. Left is Amedeo Modiglian's 'Portrait of Jeanne Hebuterne in a large hat (1918)', and the right piece is Edvard Munch's 'The Scream(1893)'. Both paintings uncover the essence through distortion. (Photo courtesy of Wikipedia) Wanting to have excellence in writing, Son also studiously develops her own writing style. She aims at highly connotative, contextual writings through writing less. “I often think of art when I write,” said Son. Amedeo Modigliani or Edvard Munch reveals the essence of a subject not through depicting it in a realistic and specific way, but rather through simplifying and distorting it. Son also enjoys adding her literary touch to her news articles. “If you think of an article, it feels cold and simply informative. But an article can ironically provide a better understanding through literary approaches,” mentioned Son. This technique is called ‘not tell but show’. For instance, Son could simply write ‘the reporter met actor Hong at a café in Samchung-dong’, but by adding ‘a café with a beautiful chandelier’, readers can instantly picture the place where the interview took place. Son is a young dreamer with an affection and enthusiam for writing. Son definitely plans to publish more essays in the future. “I’ve never really thought of myself as an essayist, but by being called as one, I am even more motivated to write more essays,” said Son with excitement. Throughout the interview, Son turned into a young dreamer whenever she talked about her writing. With such passion and diligence, News H is looking forward to reading more of her works. To catch up what has already been uploaded, click HERE. Kim So-yun dash070@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Choi Min-ju

2017-11 06

[Alumni]Blocks of Opinions Making the Hall of Fame, Glowpick

The cosmetic market in Korea has been booming for a long time, releasing numerous new brands and products. Unlike in the past, where ‘road shop products’ and ‘department store products’ had a clear division in their quality and price, many consumers are now lost in the wide array of choices available. CEO of GLOWDAYZ, Kong Jun-sik (Journalism & Mass Communication, ’11) proposed a solution in this confusing era. Kong wanted to make Glowpick as a medium of wise cosmetics shopping for consumers. Honest reviews as road signs “Glowpick is a mobile application that provides information to consumers in the form of a ranking, 100 percent based on their reviews,” said Kong. Realizing the fact that people are lost in the sea of information, Kong decided to collect reviews from ordinary people, the actual consumers of makeup. “Making a choice must have been difficult, especially when many beauty shows or blogs have accepted paid advertisements in order to flourish, without providing straightforward suggestions” lamented Kong. Therefore, unlike many review applications, Glowpick does not sensor customer reviews, even if they may seem extreme or contain swear words. Kong mentioned that he wants to create a comfortable environment as if the users are talking to their friends offline. The standard of a ‘good cosmetic product’ may differ for every person and every beauty application. Some value the components, and others value the professional’s opinion. In Glowpick’s case, Kong believes the product that has been recommended the most by the largest number of people is the best product. That is why Kong had striven to collect more than 2 million frank opinions from the past. Through such effort, Kong was able to bring the attention of major brands and marketing operators on the importance of consumer reports. “Now we can process and provide the information to cosmetic companies so that they can consider the public opinion in developing new products,” said Kong, proudly. A screen capture of the Glowpick (Photo courtesy of Glowpick) Now more than just a ranking application When the two reporters from News H had congratulated him on making Glowpick’s first offline store in Shinsegae Gangnam, Kong waved his hands with modesty. Now GLOWDAYZ has made its first step in the offline distribution channel, but Kong has bigger dreams. “It’s only part of the plan,” said Kong. The ultimate goal of the company, he mentioned, is to equip its own distribution channel. He aims to develop Glowpick to provide accurate information that fits with individual skin type, and the consumers can conveniently purchase the product without having to leave the application. Behind all the glowing success, Kong has experienced two times the bitter failures. Kong first grew his interest in IT business in his first job at a media company. Media trend at that time was changing from traditional newspapers to mobile news, so Kong created new media contents in the company. Then, after graduation, Kong started his own venture both in Korea and in the States. “Both didn’t really work out too well for various reasons. But thinking back, those experiences became stepping stones for me,” recalled Kong. He also asserted that Korean society has to be more open to failures. "That way, more people, including the younger generation, should feel safer to bring their ideas into the world, which they should. I myself wouidn't be able to overcome the obstacles I faced," said Kong with a warm smile. The offline store of Glowpick in Shinsegae Gangnam (Photo courtesy of Glowpick) Kim So-yun dash070@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Kim Youn-soo

2017-11 05

[Alumni]Sound of the Regional Idiosyncrasies

Pansori is a genre of Korean musical storytelling performed in a duet by a vocalist and a drummer. The vocalist or the singer is called the sorikkun, and the drummer is called the gosu. The term pansori is a derivation of two words pan and sori, meaning a place where many people gather and sound, respectively. Kim Ji-hee (Department of Traditional Korean Music, ‘96) is a sorikkun who never hesitates to go to a pan where she can hear new sori. Having moved to the countryside to explore the undisclosed sori of the elderly, Kim has been accumulating unrecognized sori of the people from the Gangwon-do Province and has performed on a stage on the first day of November. New place, new sound The title of the concert was “Walking on a Path”, which connotes multiple aspects of Kim’s life and the paths that she has been walking on. The concert, consisting of 10 songs Kim composed from the sori she gathered while staying close to the people of Gangwon-do Province, speaks for Kim’s life as a sorikkun. After graduating from Hanyang, Kim spent busy days engaging herself in various musical dramas, traditional Korean outdoor performances (madangnori), and musicals. A pivotal point in her busy life that diverted her path was at the age of 30 when Kim moved down to Gangwon-do Province and married her farmer husband, after which she experienced and discovered the true charm of rural sounds carried by the elderly. As she spent her life in this new place, Kim had plenty of opportunity to approach rural area sounds, from the elderly Kim worked side by side with on the farm. Picking up the lines of work songs that the locals sang and collecting the idiosyncratic facets of the music, Kim acquainted herself with the true sori of the rural area and decided that she would dedicate her life as a sorikkun to preserve and propagate the endangered, beautiful sound of the people. “It’s truly pitiful how this unique style of sound is disappearing, as more and more elderly pass away without leaving a record of them. As a sorrikun, I believe my role is to get myself familiar with their sori and produce music so that people can recognize them,” remarked Kim. "I found myself pursuing happiness that was driven by giving the elderly enjoyment." The path of one’s life The title of the concert, “Walking on a Path” has a special meaning to it, which is associated with Kim’s life. The path refers to her life path, which has been varying in its direction. “I sometimes look back and wonder if I’m walking on the right path. But I think believing that you are on the right road and continue moving forward is the goal of life. On this path of my life so far, I’ve met many different people and their sori, all of which I have wanted to compile in my songs.” Everyone has their own path in life, and Kim wanted to convey the message that pursuing a dream from one's heart is the essence of life. Kim felt a different kind of happiness when she saw the smiles on the faces of the elderly after performing in front of them, which was different from the round of applause she had received after performing in a big theater. The candy that an old lady gave and a can of Sprite the other offered meant a lot to her. “I’ve felt the uniqueness of this happiness through my life in Gangwon-do Province. There are too many sorikkun who can flawlessly perform Chunhyangga and Shimchungga, the representative pansori songs. I believe doing the sori is the best path for my life.” "Doing what I can is the right direction for my life path." (Photo courtesy of Kim) Jeon Chae-yun chaeyun111@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Kim Youn-soo

2017-10 31

[Alumni]Introducing the Mastermind Behind the Prime Lounge Project

In celebration of the construction of the Prime Lounges in the Hanyang ERICA Campus, News H interviewed the mastermind behind the many lounges enthusiastically used by the students of the campus. Park Euna (Industrial Design, '04), led a one-person design firm called Design EU, passionately pursuing her calling for design. Park runs a single-person interior architecture firm. Designing her alma mater Her first step in designing her old school began when the LINC+ Foundation, requested the design of the Knowledge Factory in 2012. The construction, with the purpose to facilitate start-up ideas, was such a success that it was expanded to “Knowledge Studio” in 2014. This served as the next step in the relationship. It was generally unusual for a school to focus on the design of its interiors. Nevertheless, it was a small beginning that she was happy to take part of. Then, she took charge of the Prime Lounge Project for the development of the student environment. For the last two years, she has designed lounges for various department buildings. She did not have this type of environment as a student and felt great empathy to the cause--providing a better studying environment for students. A crucial purpose of the project was to move the students, who usually studied in cafes, into the campus by providing a similar environment. In designing different lounges, her goal was to understand and utilize the unique characteristics of each department. She wanted to provide diversity to the students. For every project, there were key words such as ‘expansion’, ‘expression’, ‘change’, and so on. The lightings and space design were done with these concepts in mind. In retrospect, Park views the project as a fresh and stimulating experience. She jokingly added that it was exciting just to be back on campus as it had been nearly 10 years since her graduation. Park emphasized that she never turned down a new opportunity. The journey to starting a one-person firm Park had a clear purpose since her university years. She considers herself lucky to have had the calling and environment. She sought a job that she could have fun and learn. After working in a domestic design company for five years, she felt the necessity to find her own color and voice in her designs. Thus, she took all of her savings and went to New York in 2008 with the purpose to learn, relax, and find inspiration. According to Park, she had studied straight through college, eager to begin her career, but she suddenly felt the need to pack things up and leave. New York was different in that she was more respected as a professional despite her lack of English proficiency. The fact that her initial plans for a project came out exactly how she had intended showed that her views in design were highly reputed. This was not so common in Korea, where the clients are considered to be the “king” or the ultimate decision makers. However, despite her freedom to create, one limitation that she felt while working in New York was that she did not have enough time to study. She eventually returned to Korea to satisfy her thirst for learning and proceeded to a graduate program in Hanyang soon after her return. She never had the idea of running a firm in mind, but as she began to receive numerous project proposals, it just seemed natural to do so. The realization that she could make others truly happy through her work was a big influence on her decision. The name of her firm, Design EU, stands for the reason for her designs, as well as the message that every design has a reason and purpose. Philosophy and advice Park believes that there is a right time for everything. She advises students, “Don’t try to extend your status as a student. You can always come back and study. You can learn much more when you realize the reason and purpose for studying.” For her, going to New York, proceeding to graduate school, and starting her firm all came as natural; it was always the “right time” to do so. One affirmation she had was that the purpose of her life was to design, and the purpose of her design was to spread happiness. This provided a firm ground for all of her decisions. "Nothing is easy. Every aspect of it has a process. Just know this: If you persist, anything is really impossible. Also, don’t stay in one place. Knock on doors, travel, and grab opportunities." Lee Chang-hyun pizz1125@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Kim Youn-soo, Kang Cho-hyun

2017-10 30

[Alumni]Discovery on the Beauty of Imperial Wallpapers

Changdeokgung Palace Complex is a landmark of Korea built in the Joseon Dynasty and is currently designated as a UNESCO (the United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization) World Heritage site. The world has been captivated by the beauty of the palace’s outlook and Confucian values inherent in the architecture. However, one thing that all architects omitted was the wallpaper and its values. Chang Soon-yong, (Architectural Engineering,'72) has displayed his past collection of imperial wallpapers at the “Act Facing Act” exhibition hosted by artist Yeon Ki-baek to underscore the importance of royal wallpapers that are rare and novel to the architectural history. Chang is an expert in papering architecture study of Korean royal palaces. Time to restore dignity Chang has spent his entire life devoting his passion to architecture, especially in the royal papering area. The interest stemmed from his 1973 field investigation on Unhyeongung Palace after graduation. “I have read in the Joseon Dynasty’s uigye (royal protocols) that there were more than 70 different kinds of wallpapers used for royal palaces. However, the restored version of palaces these days only utilized hanji (Korean traditional paper made of mulberry trees) with no distinctive characteristics, and I began to wonder what the past wallpapers were like,” explained Chang. At the site investigation, Chang fortunately received a sample of a royal wallpaper about to be discarded. “I macerated the sample inside the bathtub with warm water and discovered that there are more than 10 papers stacked and repapered to forge plywood like walls,” said Chang. Chang’s passion for royal wallpapers was augmented as he carried out more site explorations. He received samples from Changdeokgung Palace Complex maintenance work and and Deoksugung Palace and researched the roots, papering method, and patterns of the wallpapers that were about to be deserted. “The most impressive discovery I found in the piles of paper dumps was the Yongbongmun pattern (Korean traditional pattern of dragons and phoenix) that was mentioned in the uigye, but has never been spotted,” said Chang. Chang's data on imperial wallpapers is displayed at Amado Art Space. Chang has always hoped that the Korean architectural society and the government would be concerned with even the small part of architecture--papering. He has been working excessively hard in the field to promote the importance of royal wallpapers, but the governmental authority has denied his efforts. “I realized that papering may not be considered vital for official authorities. But, this is a shame in that World Heritage palaces have anachronously monotonous papering after all,” said Chang. This concern has led Chang to allow artist Yeon to utilize his past collection to display the importance of imperial papering. Attention for the indifference In order to restore the dignity of grand palaces built in the Joseon Dynasty, Chang collected samples out of dumps in every field investigation he went on. “I was shocked when the government official visited my office for advice to reconstruct Changdeokgung Palace five years ago. He told me that he is going to paper the walls with luxurious silk, and I was startled because the Joseon Dynasty’s Confucian places emphasized frugality,” explained Chang. The moment Chang realized that there is a deficient amount of data on royal papers, he decided to create his own data on them. However, Chang had to face a tragic moment when he favorably provided his data to an official in charge of reconstruction of Unhyeongung Palace. When the repair was finalized, the official lost all the data Chang had lent them. “Out of frustration, I wrote how I felt about that moment in my diary along with my decision to collect even more data on royal papering,” reminisced Chang. Currently, the diary is also displayed at Yeon’s exhibition along with his collection of imperial papers. Chang's diaries are displayed at the exhibition. The left was written on the day Chang found out about the loss of his data, and the right is on the papering method of Joseon Dynasty. Chang has an unusual family history in regards to architecture. His father was a professor at Hanyang University’s Department of Architecture while Chang’s son is also an architect. “I can guarantee that my family has devoted our life and passion to architecture. I hope our efforts will pay off with the public’s attention on royal papering and their preservation,” said Chang. Chang is rooting for the youth of Hanyang University to believe in their path. “Sometimes, all humans feel that the path they're walking on may be wrong. But, when your walk is not rooted from money but from passion, it will pay off one day,” advised Chang for the students of Hanyang University. Chang’s collection and diaries are displayed at artist Yeon Ki-baek’s exhibition at Amado Art Space. Kim Ju-hyun kimster9421@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Choi Min-ju

2017-10 02

[Alumni]Don’t be Afraid to Follow Your Values

The third top box office hit in the history of Korean documentary films, Our President (2017) is directed by a Hanyang alumni, Lee Chang-jae (Policy Studies, ’94). He studied engineering before coming to Hanyang, and studied law in our school. After graduation, he worked in the field of journalism, then media. Now he is a documentary movie director, a writer, and a professor. News H visited Lee this week to have a closer look into his past and recent work. Lee is enthusiastically explaining how leading one's life by oneself is important. What seems like a winding path “If I look back, it was not all so meaningless after all,” said Lee, thinking back to his past. Lee studied law because of his parent’s will. He originally wanted to study history, but his parents told him he would never get a job majoring in history. During his college years, he wanted to discover and prove what he liked and was good at. He figured writing was his path, and applied for numerous competitions, all of which he did not win. Dramatically, he won first place in the Hanyang Literature Competition. “Thinking ‘I wanted to walk this path’ in my mind only seemed like it would fly away so easily. I had to prove myself before really going into the other direction.” After being discharged from the military, Lee felt that he must climb the tree to eat the fruit. Hoping to study journalism, he desperately felt the need for more information. There were not a lot of graduates, nor peers to help him. Therefore, he knocked on the doors of the Executive Vice President and Head of the Office of Planning. He demanded a preparation group for the press exam, which is now the preparation course for the press examination. In his first and second job, he felt he lost the dominance over his life once again. Leading a hectic life and being promoted fast, time flew, and he had sipped his bridle away. Hence, he went to Chicago to learn film. Poster of Lee's latest movie, Our President (2017) One step forward at the edge of a cliff There is a saying in Buddhism, ‘百尺竿頭進一步’. It means to take a step forward at the edge of a hundred ‘chuck’ (a traditional measure length of a hand, 33.3cm.) cliff. Going to Chicago and coming back to Korea was a big step for Lee. Making a movie took about three years, and with him having nothing left in Korea made him feel heavy. That’s when he was offered a position with the school. Lee makes movies on the topics he is interested in. The movie, On the Road (2013) was based on the reflection he had 20 years ago, seriously considering entering the Buddhist priesthood. The latest movie, Our President (2017) started on Lee’s hope to remind Korean citizens that we once had a time when people chose their own presidential candidates and the president. “Just like superheroes go and save the world when they are told of their super-power, I wanted to give our citizens a reminder that they own their country.” Lee mentioned that because another documentary movie on the late Roh’s life was released just a few months before Lee’s movie, he had to look for the clips that were not used in the other movie. Looking through the 60 hour long material, the last moment when Roh says, “I am Roh Moo-hyun” and turns his back caught Lee’s eyes. “It felt like the clip was left unused for me.” That’s when he decided the ending moment of the entire film. “Out of 9000 minutes of the interview, only 40 minutes are used in the documentary. That’s why I need to look back at the materials and take some time for myself to contemplate.” Lee always notices himself being changed after a film. “I have to be completely immersed into one’s life in order to make a documentary film. Change in my perspective is almost inevitable,” said Lee. He pointed that introspection and learning has to be balanced to form a truly dimensional self. That is why he always writes a book after a film. Lee plans to start on another project around the upcoming December. “Whenever I make a new movie, external success is not my goal. Only my inner values that I pursue truly fulfills me,” said Lee with a peaceful smile on his face. Kim So-yun dash070@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Kim Youn-soo

2017-09 26

[Alumni]True Educator of Korean Arts

Always dreaming of becoming the best pansori performer, Wang has always pictured himself being on the stage, under bright spotlights highlighting his every movement ever since he was a student. Although he now performs on the stage, Wang dreams of something different. “We not only try to raise the students as artists, but as a person with righteous manners before being glamorous artists,” said Wang. From student to being a teacher Wang was the first student in Hanyang University (HYU) to have majored in Korean traditional song, pansori. Since it was the first year that HYU started the curriculum for Korean traditional music majors, there was much chaos. Wang recalls, “There was no pansori performer who could teach me in my freshman year. The curriculum just wasn’t ready at the time. Still, we did have some great professors from my second year.” Since Wang’s family was not affluent at the time, he could have stopped his career from his second year. “My teacher, Park Gui-hee took me to the Korean Culture and Arts Foundation and asked the dean for a scholarship herself,” commented Wang. "Overcoming diverse obstacles in life will lead to growth somehow." As Park was the mentor for Wang and a former founder of the National Middle & High School of Traditional Korean Arts, Wang was able to work as a part time teacher during his fourth year at HYU. “I didn’t have many classes to take in my last year at school and I had to do something to earn money,” added Wang. Right after his graduation from HYU, Wang was offered to teach at the School of Traditional Korean Arts as a proper teacher since he completed a course in teaching. “I couldn’t let her down. After all the things she had done for me,” commented Wang. Although he wanted to enter The National Changguk Company of Korea and perform as a pansori performer, the dream had to wait for a while. From performer to being a principal After 13 years of teaching at the National Middle & High School of Traditional Korean Arts, Wang finally got the chance to enter the National Changguk Company of Korea in 1999. “I always had that craving for performance inside me. Even when I was the teacher at the school, I would take my students to see the performances or go to watch it on my own,” chuckled Wang. Due to his talents, Wang has starred in diverse traditional Korean operas as the main actor and produced a lot of his own as well. After 15 years of performances, Wang returned to the school to as a principal. “I think I took my tests to prove that I was worthy of becoming the principal of this school. That is why I am so proud to be here,” commented Wang. Although he could have asked for better treatment of being a professor or to not agree to take the tests for becoming the principal, Wang accepted the terms suggested from the school to be proud of himself. Moreover, it was the school that Wang had spent his early career which made it more emotionally attaching for him. “I felt the necessity to return to this school to lead my students into the world of Korean arts. I would love to be the role model for them,” added Wang. “Since I have diverse experiences from the past to the present, I wish to be the type of principal that students can always lean on.” "I wish to be the type of principal that students can always lean on.” Kim Seung Jun nzdave94@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Choi Minju

2017-09 17

[Alumni]Peru’s Finest Dessert

Just as the conquistadors have set their foot on South America in search of gold bars, Pyo Ji-do (Business, ’16) has opened up his own dessert café in Peru and named it Mister Bingsu (ice flakes with syrup). Peru is known to be very warm all around the year that even in the winter, temperatures would only fall to 17 to 19 degrees. After experiencing Peru during an exchange student program, Pyo has immediately fallen in love with the country. Ice flakes where no snow falls In 2014, Pyo had the opportunity to live in Peru for a year during his exchange student program. With his mind focused on starting his own business, Pyo started looking for items that would catch the eyes of Peruvians. “They love ice cream due to the warm weather, but there were not a lot of choices to choose from,” recalled Pyo. Ice flakes with syrup along with diverse types of fresh fruits were what Pyo came up with immediately. “At the moment, we only have five types of bingsu; strawberry, mango, chocolate, cheese, and melon. We are planning to expand our menu choices later on,” added Pyo. Kim (left) and Pyo (right) taking pictures with customers. (Courtesy of Pyo) After returning to Korea, Pyo contacted his high school friend and started preparing to open Mister Bingsu. “We were planning to open up our business in December 2016 but due to the delay in paperwork, we were able to start in April 2017,” commented Pyo. As Pyo has experienced, South American culture always maintains its leisurely manner which was one of the hardships that Pyo has faced. “Sometimes, I faced problems with translating formal paperwork, but I was able to achieve all this thanks to my homestay family.” Success in Peru “Peruvians loved experiencing bingsu for the first time in their lives. We were able to become successful through TV programs,” chuckled Pyo. Right after 2 weeks of starting Mister Bingsu, Peru’s biggest national broadcasting team have filmed Pyo’s store. In addition, a lot of Peruvians have advertised Mister Bingsu through social network services as well. “I think we were quite lucky to have such great opportunities,” mentioned Pyo. Before starting up the business in Peru, Pyo studied about diverse bingsu while working in Sulbing, one of the biggest bingsu franchise stores in Korea. “A lot of the recipes, famous in Korea, could not be used due to the high cost. Instead, we decided to localize our menus.” Peruvians line up to experience Mister Bingsu. (Courtesy of Pyo) Pyo is preparing to expand his business all around South America. “We are receiving diverse love calls from other regions in Peru and even neighboring countries,” explained Pyo. Yet there are some obstacles that Pyo has to overcome. “Our sales dropped during the winter which is why we are preparing to diversify our menus,” added Pyo. As Pyo enjoys cooking from time to time, he has further wishes of opening Korean restaurants as well. “We are far from a success yet. We will work harder to spread our Korean culture and food.” Kim Seung Jun nzdave94@hanyang.ac.kr

2017-09 04

[Alumni]White Rabbit Guiding You to the Musical Wonderland

“Oh dear! Oh dear! I shall be too late!” mutters the white rabbit in Lewis Carroll’s book Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland. The rabbit eventually leads Alice down into the rabbit hole where the wonderland begins. Cho Chung-hee of the Department of Korean Language and Literature, is currently a jazz vocalist of the Band “Rabbit of March,” and a professor at the Department of Applied Music. Let’s follow Cho to the wonderland of jazz music! Cho is a solo jazz vocalist and also a leader of band "Rabbit of March." Fearless 20’s and music “I had no fear for my dreams in my 20’s,” said Cho. After four years of studying Korean language and literature at college, Cho made a decision to follow her heart towards music. “I always knew that deep inside me, I wanted to become a musician,” reminisced Cho. Once Cho made up her mind, she wanted to be told that this path is right so she sang a song in front of her senior. “Although my senior told me to give up on music, my decision was still firmly set," laughed out Cho. Without any support from her parents who wished her to become Korean language teacher, Cho began to build up her music career and worked for part-time jobs for living. “My favorite music was not fixed at that time. I explored for various genres and songs, wandered from time to time, and then found out that jazz is the one that I was looking for when I became 30,” explained Cho. Cho then was absorbed into the attractiveness of jazz. “Whilst my practice, my acquaintance suggested me musicians who could amplify the music together. Harmony with Hwang Sung-yong and John Vasconcello through our band has always been one of the luckiest moments in my life,” smiled Cho. Cooperation of the trio produced popular jazz music that opened up for the public. Jazz through “Rabbit of March” was no more a ‘league of their own,’ but a music everyone can enjoy. Song of Wind is one of the most popular songs by "Rabbit of March." (Video courtesy of Darichaola1's Youtube) Your roles in the cyclical life Cho is also a professor at the Department of Applied Music at Hanyang University, ERICA. Bearing responsibilities rising from various roles may give lemons to Cho. However, she rather enjoys the large spectrum of her life. “The job called professor taught be to become a better person before teaching students. Teaching requires my ability to know and explain from the very fundamental knowledge, which I was always unaware of,” said Cho. Her another dream is to become a performance producer. “Jazz was a hard music for the public to access, which I disliked about. So I want to design jazz performances that can be popular among people’s everyday lives,” explained Cho. Until now, Cho followed her own hope to become a jazz musician. “Jazz has no restrictions. Within a given frame of music, I can do whatever I wish to by playing with the rhythm, melody, improvisation, and more. However, this general audience might find such elements difficult,” said Cho. Thus, Cho wishes to create a jazz performance that includes intricate explanation of music to the audience and conversation between the audience and musicians. Within this, Cho can become an emcee, producer, song writer, and a musician. Cho encourages Hanyangians to find out their own definition of happiness. Cho is now planning to make jazz a present. “I wish my music can become presents representing four seasons for the audience. For example, when its Christmas, listeners can open the winter CD. Also, I want to make jazz music based on lullabies. I have so many dreams!” Cho says that it’s never cliché to tell others to pursue what they want. “Things you can do and want to do are correlated and cyclical. Look at me! I majored in Korean literature and it helps my music. I hope students of Hanyang will try out everything their hearts desire!” Kim Ju-hyun kimster9421@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Kim Youn-soo

2017-08 15

[Alumni]Voice Out Your Voice!

In the beauty of women’s pregnancy and infant care, there’s the sorrow of mother’s impossibility to return to their career. In South Korea, the issue of career break has been a hot potato, which commonly refers to a period out of employment for women to raise their children. Despite the fact that South Korea’s gender inequality is slowly, but constantly being assuaged, there are still barriers to overcome. Lee Jae-eun (German Language and Literature, '02 and Ph.D. in Educational Technology) is a leader of Women’s Life School who suggests the novel ways to view and resolve the problems women face in Korea. Lee is currently a CEO of Women's Life School to counsel and help out women with low self-esteem. As a mother, CEO, writer, wife, and a woman Lee’s college years were full of joy and love with her friends and a lover. However, after her graduation, she had to face parting words from many relationships. “I realized that the main reason why I was hurt so much by the break ups is my tendency to rely on others, just because I was a woman. So, I decided to amend this problem,” reminisced Lee. The first door she knocked on after graduation was a feminist magazine company. As her major had no connection with feminism, she had to appeal her passion to be employed. “I began with becoming a fan of the magazine by commenting on every article posted with the nickname of Ho-Ho Girl,” laughed out Lee. After a few years of working as an official reporter, Lee decided to become a writer to connect scholar feminism to cultural feminism. Then, her first book Women’s Life Dictionary, which is divided into seven chapters to guide healthy mind and lifestyle for women, become one of the bestsellers in South Korea. Its profit was used to found her company- Women's Life School (Click). “I began to have interest in counseling women from university students to married women to have courage. This eventually led me to major in educational technology for my Ph.D. degrees,” said Lee. Women's Life School provides counselling services for women in various situations and ages. (Photo courtesy of wlifeschool) Now, Lee is a mother of one daughter, wife, and even a professor at a Korean university. “Having many roles is arduous, I realized that distribution of time to each role isn’t that much important. Understanding the core philosophy of each role while not losing my own philosophy is the most imperative factor,” said Lee. Lee can be benevolent as a mother and a wife, acute as a CEO, and considerate as a professor. However, she still does not forget that the most important entity to her is herself. Not a career break off, but a career changeover In Korea, there are two words that describe the occupation of mothers- working mom and a housewife. This means, when a working mom gets pregnant and has to quit work either by maternity leaves or resignation for longer infant care, the working mom becomes a housewife. However, Lee points out the flaw of this dichotomous view of portraying mothers. “Working moms and housewives aren’t two different occupations, but coexisting ones. Whenever working mom wants to become a housewife for kids or the housewife wishes to work again as their kids grows older, the career changeover in this aspect should be cyclical,” emphasized Lee. When Lee first set up Women’s Life School, the social reaction wasn’t exactly supporting her. The concept of a life school has not been popularized and feminism was a difficult subject. However, Lee did not gave up on the hope that feminism could become a popular idea and women with low self-respect in the society could gain their courage. “Even in the research, women have lower self-regard than men in Korea. Also, when we do the survey, numbers of young women pick strong, strict female leaders as their role model. But, we all should understand that feminine style can also be strong,” emphasized Lee. Women’s soft and delicate way of talking and caring could also impact the world, and Lee’s ultimate purpose is to bring out this quality to the world. Cover page of Lee's newly published book When You Miss Your Career Again has pictures of blooming flowers and flying butterflies to symbolize the new life of women. Based on her four years of memories at Hanyang University, Lee advised the female youth at the campus. “Many female students often give up on their friendship for their love and GPA. But learning how to balance friendship, economic ability, and love can be the true success of your life!” Kim Ju-hyun kimster9421@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Choi Min-ju