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2017-09 26

[Alumni]True Educator of Korean Arts

Always dreaming of becoming the best pansori performer, Wang has always pictured himself being on the stage, under bright spotlights highlighting his every movement ever since he was a student. Although he now performs on the stage, Wang dreams of something different. “We not only try to raise the students as artists, but as a person with righteous manners before being glamorous artists,” said Wang. From student to being a teacher Wang was the first student in Hanyang University (HYU) to have majored in Korean traditional song, pansori. Since it was the first year that HYU started the curriculum for Korean traditional music majors, there was much chaos. Wang recalls, “There was no pansori performer who could teach me in my freshman year. The curriculum just wasn’t ready at the time. Still, we did have some great professors from my second year.” Since Wang’s family was not affluent at the time, he could have stopped his career from his second year. “My teacher, Park Gui-hee took me to the Korean Culture and Arts Foundation and asked the dean for a scholarship herself,” commented Wang. "Overcoming diverse obstacles in life will lead to growth somehow." As Park was the mentor for Wang and a former founder of the National Middle & High School of Traditional Korean Arts, Wang was able to work as a part time teacher during his fourth year at HYU. “I didn’t have many classes to take in my last year at school and I had to do something to earn money,” added Wang. Right after his graduation from HYU, Wang was offered to teach at the School of Traditional Korean Arts as a proper teacher since he completed a course in teaching. “I couldn’t let her down. After all the things she had done for me,” commented Wang. Although he wanted to enter The National Changguk Company of Korea and perform as a pansori performer, the dream had to wait for a while. From performer to being a principal After 13 years of teaching at the National Middle & High School of Traditional Korean Arts, Wang finally got the chance to enter the National Changguk Company of Korea in 1999. “I always had that craving for performance inside me. Even when I was the teacher at the school, I would take my students to see the performances or go to watch it on my own,” chuckled Wang. Due to his talents, Wang has starred in diverse traditional Korean operas as the main actor and produced a lot of his own as well. After 15 years of performances, Wang returned to the school to as a principal. “I think I took my tests to prove that I was worthy of becoming the principal of this school. That is why I am so proud to be here,” commented Wang. Although he could have asked for better treatment of being a professor or to not agree to take the tests for becoming the principal, Wang accepted the terms suggested from the school to be proud of himself. Moreover, it was the school that Wang had spent his early career which made it more emotionally attaching for him. “I felt the necessity to return to this school to lead my students into the world of Korean arts. I would love to be the role model for them,” added Wang. “Since I have diverse experiences from the past to the present, I wish to be the type of principal that students can always lean on.” "I wish to be the type of principal that students can always lean on.” Kim Seung Jun nzdave94@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Choi Minju

2017-09 17

[Alumni]Peru’s Finest Dessert

Just as the conquistadors have set their foot on South America in search of gold bars, Pyo Ji-do (Business, ’16) has opened up his own dessert café in Peru and named it Mister Bingsu (ice flakes with syrup). Peru is known to be very warm all around the year that even in the winter, temperatures would only fall to 17 to 19 degrees. After experiencing Peru during an exchange student program, Pyo has immediately fallen in love with the country. Ice flakes where no snow falls In 2014, Pyo had the opportunity to live in Peru for a year during his exchange student program. With his mind focused on starting his own business, Pyo started looking for items that would catch the eyes of Peruvians. “They love ice cream due to the warm weather, but there were not a lot of choices to choose from,” recalled Pyo. Ice flakes with syrup along with diverse types of fresh fruits were what Pyo came up with immediately. “At the moment, we only have five types of bingsu; strawberry, mango, chocolate, cheese, and melon. We are planning to expand our menu choices later on,” added Pyo. Kim (left) and Pyo (right) taking pictures with customers. (Courtesy of Pyo) After returning to Korea, Pyo contacted his high school friend and started preparing to open Mister Bingsu. “We were planning to open up our business in December 2016 but due to the delay in paperwork, we were able to start in April 2017,” commented Pyo. As Pyo has experienced, South American culture always maintains its leisurely manner which was one of the hardships that Pyo has faced. “Sometimes, I faced problems with translating formal paperwork, but I was able to achieve all this thanks to my homestay family.” Success in Peru “Peruvians loved experiencing bingsu for the first time in their lives. We were able to become successful through TV programs,” chuckled Pyo. Right after 2 weeks of starting Mister Bingsu, Peru’s biggest national broadcasting team have filmed Pyo’s store. In addition, a lot of Peruvians have advertised Mister Bingsu through social network services as well. “I think we were quite lucky to have such great opportunities,” mentioned Pyo. Before starting up the business in Peru, Pyo studied about diverse bingsu while working in Sulbing, one of the biggest bingsu franchise stores in Korea. “A lot of the recipes, famous in Korea, could not be used due to the high cost. Instead, we decided to localize our menus.” Peruvians line up to experience Mister Bingsu. (Courtesy of Pyo) Pyo is preparing to expand his business all around South America. “We are receiving diverse love calls from other regions in Peru and even neighboring countries,” explained Pyo. Yet there are some obstacles that Pyo has to overcome. “Our sales dropped during the winter which is why we are preparing to diversify our menus,” added Pyo. As Pyo enjoys cooking from time to time, he has further wishes of opening Korean restaurants as well. “We are far from a success yet. We will work harder to spread our Korean culture and food.” Kim Seung Jun nzdave94@hanyang.ac.kr

2017-08 13

[Alumni]To the Next Victoria's Secret of Asia

“80 % of women don’t know their right bra size and face difficulty wearing it,” explained Kim. Sara’s Fit is a custom-made underwear brand that has been established about one and a half year ago and is gaining great support from a lot of women due to its comfortable and modern design. With its 24 different types of categorization method and one-on-one consulting with every customer that takes from half an hour to an hour, Sara’s Fit tries to deliver the right type of underwear for women. Challenges to find a career Although Kim’s initial dream was to become a professor, her dream has changed completely after experiencing exchange student programs in her junior year. “I started to realize that my dream of becoming a professor was to show off to other people that I have been diligent all my life,” said Kim. After the exchange student program, Kim was attracted to other programs that gave her more chance to interact with foreign countries. Still, even upon her graduation, she could not find what she really wanted to become. After graduation, Kim was studying MBA program at the United States, when she realized that there was a lot of start-up booms in the country. “People were not afraid of starting their own business. In Korea, start-ups were yet to be popular then,” explained Kim. Kim is explaining about the difficulties of finding her dreams. Through Kim’s memories of openness of people regarding underwear in the United States, she started to think that accumulating data of customers would become a huge industry in Korea. Since Kim did not major in fashion design, there were a lot to learn from the beginning. “Underwear design is a very secretive field with high entry barriers. It takes years to learn the critical knowledge since there are only a few designers that could make the right designs,” explained Kim. After recruiting one of the best underwear designers in Korea, Kim and her partner have established Sara’s Fit. “Sara seemed to be a very friendly name in Asia which we decided to name for our clients and the consultants at the same time.” Being the Boss Kim has experienced diverse types of careers from MBA, Samsung SDS to KOTRA after graduation. “There was little that an employee could do in terms of making decisions although there were some good things about belonging in such a huge corporation,” recalled Kim. Since Kim has to take care of the funding to expenditure, there is a lot at stake which gives her the motivation and responsibility at the same time. Algorithms that match customers to their perfect-fit underwear is on its way to put to action. Investments are also on its way. Kim has the dream of making Sara’s Fit into the next custom-made Victoria’s Secret of Asia. “Europe and America has a huge market of custom-made underwear. Asia, however, is on its way of developing at the moment,” added Kim. Expanding to overseas market would be the next step for Sara’s Fit. “It’s all planned out at the moment and we are on our way to open up different line-ups for customers of diverse age groups as well,” said Kim. Heartwarming moments exist when Kim’s customers with different body shapes return to the shop and thank her. “It’s not just what you wear. It’s how you wear it that’s also important and a lot of people don’t know it yet so we will try our best to provide the best for the customers.” Guidelines to how to use Sara's Fit (Courtesy of sarasfit.com) "We want Sara's Fit to be the Victoria's Secret of Asia." (Courtesy of Kim) Kim Seung-jun nzdave94@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Kim Youn-soo

2017-02 27

[Alumni]Collecting Coins as Investment

People have their own appetite for broadening their personal fields of interest. Kim Hee-sung (Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, '08) has been collecting money for over 10 years. A wide array of commemorative coins, gold coins, silver coins, and bills are all part of Kim’s interests and his collection business called Power Coin. Reporters of News H interviewed Kim to get a closer insight into how his money market operates. Gaining interest It all started off when Kim was in his first year of college. Having had the opportunity to live in the US for about a year, Kim had the chance to participate in various coin shows. These exhibitions were held quite often in most big counties, and at the time, it was challenging to afford collecting coins. “I was just a student then, and for a student, it's very hard to buy gold coins for leisure.” Kim explains about the market prices of coins. After graduating from college, Kim looked up on some of the coins that he had seen in the coin fairs, and discovered that the price had soared higher than when he first saw it. “This was when I realized that coin collection could be a real investment, and started collecting coins one by one,” said Kim. Through the civil engineer certification academy that he opened up in Busan, Kim was able to collect most of the coins that he had wanted. Kim and his wife could not stand the long distance, which is why he started his business in Korea. Fostering insight When going abroad or buying coins through eBay, Kim was sometimes tricked into buying fake ones. After accumulating experiences and learning the know-hows through books, Kim has now developed his own outlook on which are real, and are of more value. “Most people in this field don’t explain the reasons behind why a certain monetary product is an imitation. It’s probably their own know-how that they’re trying to guard,” he added. Kim claims that money auctions tell a lot about reading the market price. Attending money exhibitions that are held in China and Hong Kong also helps to realize the trend for him, as well. Various shapes and sizes of commemorative coins exist. Not all commemorative coins rise in value. Factors that determine the rise and fall of prices are popularity, quantity and quality. For instance, the 1988 Seoul Olympics coin was issued at about 85,000 won, but now it is being traded at around 70,000 won even after almost 30 years has passed. This is because it has been issued in such large quantities that it only holds material value. As for bills, the quality matters a lot. Even if a tiny part of an edge is worn out, the price would drop 10 to 20%. Kim also says that buying gold or silver coins is better investment compared to buying actual gold or silver bars. “Coins are a bit like limited edition items. The price of the materials themselves, plus the scarcity, creates the price. Gold or silver bars can be made in limitless quantities but not the coins,” said Kim. Studying coins are not only good for investment but also monetary insight. Kim claims that pursuing an interest not only in college studies but something beyond it, is more important. As Kim's interest in coins made it possible for him to become the CEO of Power Coin, Kim wishes that more people could expand on the area they like. Kim Seung-jun nzdave94@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Choi Min-ju

2017-01 15

[Alumni]A Writer that Reads the World

“Do you know when you feel hunger the most? It’s not the moment right before you eat your food on the table. After having the first bite, that is when you feel hunger the most,” started Chun. Writer Chun, who graduated from Department of Journalism & Mass Communication recently opened up a Spanish restaurant called 'Table of Don Quixote' after having lived in Spain for her studies. Part 1. Being a writer Chun has started her writing in order to become a journalist and to let the world know about the stories that are yet to be unveiled. Due to her convictions in that writing for newspapers would do justice when it comes to unfair treatments that people get, she wanted to become a journalist. “I couldn’t keep up to the standards that have been set up to become a journalist and that is why I majored in literature again,” said Chun. After carrying out her studies in the field of literature, she naturally felt that it was just the work for her. “I would agree that writers actually write for a living, but I would say that it is more of reading the world and recreating it into one of the languages,” added Chun. She stresses that writing is about how she portrays the world that she sees through her eyes. “Back in the days when we were students, it was hard to even have a dream of our own. I have read probably all the books that I would read during my lifetime while I was studying literature,” said Chun. Since her dream was never set on being a writer, she says that she devoured the knowledge better and faster than others. “I had my hard times as well. I have always paid for my own tuition fees and worked in academies and publishing companies while writing my own novel,” she said. After 6 years of her studies in literature, she has started her literary career with the novel, 'Needle' which depicts about the characters that are actually around her. One of the most important things that Chun thinks when it comes to writing is being absorbed into the work itself and the characters until the she understands the person both on the mind and the body. Chun tells her stories about what it was like learning literature. Part 2. Being a cook “It was not only about being a cook but more of starting up a business. The whole process had to be chosen and I had to learn about all the interior designs to electric wiring to set up my own restaurant,” said Chun. She has always had her passion about cooking for other people and during a residence program at the University of Malaga, she obtained the chance to learn how to cook Spanish food. Although she started learning how to cook in order to be acquainted with the language itself, she later admits that she has got to understand the lives of Spanish people a little. “I learned how to cook in the morning and helped out as a teaching assistant for American tourist programs. At night, I did my writing once I got back to the dormitory,” recalls Chun. She says that she had one of the most comfortable and dreamy lives during her stay in Malaga. Her restaurant only opens up during the night time due to her fear of literature being further apart from her. “I used to open up full time but since I work on my own, I got exhausted during the weekends and didn’t have any time of my own,” says Chun. In addition to having an individual time, she says that it is the thing about the Spanish food that fits in well at night time. “There’s a lot of Spanish food that goes well with alcohol. ‘Serve little and more dishes’ is how you eat Spanish food which is why it should fit in better at night,” added Chun. Gazpachuelo is one of her favorite Spanish dish since it is a traditional Malaga regional food. It is hard to find anywhere else and Chun has promised her friends in Malaga that when they visit her restaurant, she would serve them the special dish of gazpachuelo. "Cooking is a part of the adventure itself." Chun wishes that she could write during her whole life time and stay awake. Enlightenment and adventure is what she seeks all the time and cooking is a part of the adventure itself. She also added that there was no better name other than 'Table of Don Quixote' in that it is the table and the menus that she is venturing on. As there are no guidelines as to where and how one should live their lives, Chun’s adventure is something that people could refer to. Kim Seung-jun nzdave94@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Moon Hana

2016-10 24

[Alumni]Yoyoma’s Kitchen, a music-filled restaurant

Cervantes, the Spanish writer, once said that “Where there’s music, there can be no evil”. Music with positive vibes has strong impacts on people. Do Boo-min (Department of String and Wind Instruments, '82), a cellist and businessman, runs the famous restaurant 'Yoyoma’s Kitchen' in Seocho-dong, Seoul. Although Do is currently more in the field of business than orchestral music, he has successfully combined the two to create a unique restaurant. Opening the Restaurant In Yoyoma’s Kitchen, Do owns a workshop with string musical instruments such as the violin and the cello in the basement. He retained this workshop for 15 years and before that, he used to play for the Korean Symphony Orchestra, one of the most renowned orchestras in Korea, as a cellist. After Do retired from the orchestra, he started wondering about what to do next and went traveling to Hong Kong. While looking around there, he saw some cellos from a shop window and went inside. While talking with the owner of the shop, Do was offered a business partnership. Although he got back and researched musical instrument shops, waiting to be contacted, the anticipated call never came. Do Boo-min, cellist and restaurant owner Do started off small 15 years ago, just opening up an instrument workshop on his own. Because the business did better than expected, he thought of starting up a new workshop along with it. “I thought my business would continue to sell this many instruments until the end,” said Do. However, he was faced with the global economic crisis around the year 2008, and could not keep maintaining his workshop only as it was. “Since there was too much space in the workshop, I thought of starting a café for efficiency.” After having opened up his café and run it for over a year, Do was given the idea to change it into a restaurant. “An interior designer came up to me and commented that it would be great for a restaurant and workshop to be combined in the same space instead of a café, and I agreed to that idea,” said Do. Since Do admired the famous cellist Yoyoma, Do named the new restaurant after him. That is how Yoyoma’s Kitchen came to be. Music and Restaurant After opening up Yoyoma's Kitchen, the restaurant became very famous for its interior, as well as the food it served. Because a restaurant with a music workshop was not a common concept, it worked quite well business-wise. “My place was filled with customers who wanted to enjoy their meals and gaze at the musical instruments around them,” said Do. It is located in Seocho-dong, close to the Seoul Arts Center (SAC), which is a frequented spot for many musicians. “A lot of musicians come to my restaurant to and from their way to the SAC, and others just stop over to look around the place,” explained Do. Do, proud of the interior of Yoyoma's kitchen Yoyoma’s Kitchen has a special distinction from other restaurants, in that small music performances are held there. House concerts, meaning concerts held inside the restaurant, takes place twice a month. Sometimes the profits made through the concerts are used for helping the needy. Performers are mostly professors from universities and musicians who are affiliated with Do from orchestras or through recommendations. Sometimes Do also plays the cello himself as a performer. Do mentioned that the cello has its charm in creating sounds similar in tone to the human voice. “It has the vibration that resonates inside people. The deep sound of it draws me in every time I hear it,” said Do. Do, as a musician, plans to volunteer through his amateur orchestra, and as a businessman, wishes that his restaurant becomes more widely known. Due to the love that he has for music, Do says that his future businesses will also be somehow related to music. Do has practical suggestions for students in the music department. “It is a blessing to be a musician, but often economic circumstances do not allow many to become or stay as one. You must become the best in the field or it would be better to just enjoy music as a hobby, since it is realistically very hard to live as a professional musician,” said Do. Kim Seung-jun nzdave94@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Choi Min-ju