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2017-09 04

[Alumni]White Rabbit Guiding You to the Musical Wonderland

“Oh dear! Oh dear! I shall be too late!” mutters the white rabbit in Lewis Carroll’s book Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland. The rabbit eventually leads Alice down into the rabbit hole where the wonderland begins. Cho Chung-hee of the Department of Korean Language and Literature, is currently a jazz vocalist of the Band “Rabbit of March,” and a professor at the Department of Applied Music. Let’s follow Cho to the wonderland of jazz music! Cho is a solo jazz vocalist and also a leader of band "Rabbit of March." Fearless 20’s and music “I had no fear for my dreams in my 20’s,” said Cho. After four years of studying Korean language and literature at college, Cho made a decision to follow her heart towards music. “I always knew that deep inside me, I wanted to become a musician,” reminisced Cho. Once Cho made up her mind, she wanted to be told that this path is right so she sang a song in front of her senior. “Although my senior told me to give up on music, my decision was still firmly set," laughed out Cho. Without any support from her parents who wished her to become Korean language teacher, Cho began to build up her music career and worked for part-time jobs for living. “My favorite music was not fixed at that time. I explored for various genres and songs, wandered from time to time, and then found out that jazz is the one that I was looking for when I became 30,” explained Cho. Cho then was absorbed into the attractiveness of jazz. “Whilst my practice, my acquaintance suggested me musicians who could amplify the music together. Harmony with Hwang Sung-yong and John Vasconcello through our band has always been one of the luckiest moments in my life,” smiled Cho. Cooperation of the trio produced popular jazz music that opened up for the public. Jazz through “Rabbit of March” was no more a ‘league of their own,’ but a music everyone can enjoy. Song of Wind is one of the most popular songs by "Rabbit of March." (Video courtesy of Darichaola1's Youtube) Your roles in the cyclical life Cho is also a professor at the Department of Applied Music at Hanyang University, ERICA. Bearing responsibilities rising from various roles may give lemons to Cho. However, she rather enjoys the large spectrum of her life. “The job called professor taught be to become a better person before teaching students. Teaching requires my ability to know and explain from the very fundamental knowledge, which I was always unaware of,” said Cho. Her another dream is to become a performance producer. “Jazz was a hard music for the public to access, which I disliked about. So I want to design jazz performances that can be popular among people’s everyday lives,” explained Cho. Until now, Cho followed her own hope to become a jazz musician. “Jazz has no restrictions. Within a given frame of music, I can do whatever I wish to by playing with the rhythm, melody, improvisation, and more. However, this general audience might find such elements difficult,” said Cho. Thus, Cho wishes to create a jazz performance that includes intricate explanation of music to the audience and conversation between the audience and musicians. Within this, Cho can become an emcee, producer, song writer, and a musician. Cho encourages Hanyangians to find out their own definition of happiness. Cho is now planning to make jazz a present. “I wish my music can become presents representing four seasons for the audience. For example, when its Christmas, listeners can open the winter CD. Also, I want to make jazz music based on lullabies. I have so many dreams!” Cho says that it’s never cliché to tell others to pursue what they want. “Things you can do and want to do are correlated and cyclical. Look at me! I majored in Korean literature and it helps my music. I hope students of Hanyang will try out everything their hearts desire!” Kim Ju-hyun kimster9421@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Kim Youn-soo

2017-08 15

[Alumni]Voice Out Your Voice!

In the beauty of women’s pregnancy and infant care, there’s the sorrow of mother’s impossibility to return to their career. In South Korea, the issue of career break has been a hot potato, which commonly refers to a period out of employment for women to raise their children. Despite the fact that South Korea’s gender inequality is slowly, but constantly being assuaged, there are still barriers to overcome. Lee Jae-eun (German Language and Literature, '02 and Ph.D. in Educational Technology) is a leader of Women’s Life School who suggests the novel ways to view and resolve the problems women face in Korea. Lee is currently a CEO of Women's Life School to counsel and help out women with low self-esteem. As a mother, CEO, writer, wife, and a woman Lee’s college years were full of joy and love with her friends and a lover. However, after her graduation, she had to face parting words from many relationships. “I realized that the main reason why I was hurt so much by the break ups is my tendency to rely on others, just because I was a woman. So, I decided to amend this problem,” reminisced Lee. The first door she knocked on after graduation was a feminist magazine company. As her major had no connection with feminism, she had to appeal her passion to be employed. “I began with becoming a fan of the magazine by commenting on every article posted with the nickname of Ho-Ho Girl,” laughed out Lee. After a few years of working as an official reporter, Lee decided to become a writer to connect scholar feminism to cultural feminism. Then, her first book Women’s Life Dictionary, which is divided into seven chapters to guide healthy mind and lifestyle for women, become one of the bestsellers in South Korea. Its profit was used to found her company- Women's Life School (Click). “I began to have interest in counseling women from university students to married women to have courage. This eventually led me to major in educational technology for my Ph.D. degrees,” said Lee. Women's Life School provides counselling services for women in various situations and ages. (Photo courtesy of wlifeschool) Now, Lee is a mother of one daughter, wife, and even a professor at a Korean university. “Having many roles is arduous, I realized that distribution of time to each role isn’t that much important. Understanding the core philosophy of each role while not losing my own philosophy is the most imperative factor,” said Lee. Lee can be benevolent as a mother and a wife, acute as a CEO, and considerate as a professor. However, she still does not forget that the most important entity to her is herself. Not a career break off, but a career changeover In Korea, there are two words that describe the occupation of mothers- working mom and a housewife. This means, when a working mom gets pregnant and has to quit work either by maternity leaves or resignation for longer infant care, the working mom becomes a housewife. However, Lee points out the flaw of this dichotomous view of portraying mothers. “Working moms and housewives aren’t two different occupations, but coexisting ones. Whenever working mom wants to become a housewife for kids or the housewife wishes to work again as their kids grows older, the career changeover in this aspect should be cyclical,” emphasized Lee. When Lee first set up Women’s Life School, the social reaction wasn’t exactly supporting her. The concept of a life school has not been popularized and feminism was a difficult subject. However, Lee did not gave up on the hope that feminism could become a popular idea and women with low self-respect in the society could gain their courage. “Even in the research, women have lower self-regard than men in Korea. Also, when we do the survey, numbers of young women pick strong, strict female leaders as their role model. But, we all should understand that feminine style can also be strong,” emphasized Lee. Women’s soft and delicate way of talking and caring could also impact the world, and Lee’s ultimate purpose is to bring out this quality to the world. Cover page of Lee's newly published book When You Miss Your Career Again has pictures of blooming flowers and flying butterflies to symbolize the new life of women. Based on her four years of memories at Hanyang University, Lee advised the female youth at the campus. “Many female students often give up on their friendship for their love and GPA. But learning how to balance friendship, economic ability, and love can be the true success of your life!” Kim Ju-hyun kimster9421@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Choi Min-ju

2017-07 17

[Alumni]Life of Living in a Movie

The movie <Edward Scissorhands(1990)> was a sensation when it first came to the public with its realistic computer graphics in the early 1990’s. Among the captivated audience, there was Choi Dae-chul, an alumnus of the Department of Dance, who dreamed of being an actor just like Scissorhands. After years of training and praciting, Choi made his appearance in various musicals, movies, and TV shows and now has grown up to an actor with a nickname called the “fairy of broadcasting ratings”. Choi at the 2015 MBC Drama Awards Acting with endurance Besides the nickname of “the fairy of ratings,” Choi is also referred to the prince of Ajumma. Ajumma means middle aged women in Korean. It was because some of his most popular TV shows were targeted to the middle aged women viewers. Choi’s intricate actions and good-looking appearance mesmerized the audience. “I feel really thankful to such nicknames. I think was I was lucky enough to have opportunities to be on the television,” said Choi. Choi was passionate in both dancing and acting, as he loved art. “After some time of contemplation, I decided to major in dance. However, I hurt my arm in my senior year, and I decided to change my goal, to become an actor,” reminisced Choi. For eight years, Choi looked for places at musicals where he got to act from minor to major roles. “With the dancing skills that I have, I thought musical wouldn't be a whole new world to me. However, it did took me a long time for me to get a major role,” said Choi. During such arduous course of trainings, rather than being frustrated, Choi always tried to learn more. "I would often watch other senior actors at the backstage to see how they move and act to make my own acting better." All his efforts did not betray Choi overall. “As I was waiting for my opportunity to come, I always asked my seniors about acting. Thanks to their advice, and especially to actor Oh Man-suk, whom I respect the most, I was able to successfully portray the major roles,” said Choi. Life like a movie Even when talking about the darkest moments of his life, Choi never lost his smiles. “I consider my life as a movie, there must be ups and downs. Without them, the movie would be boring,” emphasized Choi. Because he always know that life can be thrown into waves of difficuties and it can eventually make him stronger, Choi was able to cope with the difficulties composedly. As an actor, Choi thinks that setting limits to capable roles is the demise of his occupation. “I always try to take different and unique roles to expand my spectrum of acting. I have acted a rich, gang, ascetic, father, and more, but there are still more roles that I want to try on, especially a disabled patients that need subtle expressions, movements, and understanding,” said Choi. According to Choi, the most imperative factor in acting is sincerity. “There’s only one of me in the whole world which makes my acting unique. If I put my sincerity into actions, that becomes the role that a person called Choi Dae-chul is acting, which is very important,” explained Choi. Choi's large spectrum of acting is what makes him a stronger actor. One of the biggest motivation for Choi's passion, is his family. “I have a family that always supports my acting career. Also, because every offer that production companies provides me is precious, I always try to take the job,” said Choi. Also, whenever Choi feels like popularity can overwhelm himself, he always reminds of his 20s and 30s when every little chance seemed like a rain in a desert. Such efforts and sincerity made what Choi has become now. Epilogue “In a movie called life, the director, actor, and producer are all me. I am the one who knows myself the best and thus, I shouldn’t be ashamed of myself by being untruthful,” emphasized Choi. To him, being sincere is not only important in acting, but in general life. He hopes that students of Hanyang University will always try to put efforts into everything they do. “My movie will end with the epilogue of myself closing the eyes before facing death. There, all the good and bad things I have done will flash by my memories, and I hope the good deeds of mine will be remembered more,” said Choi. Kim Ju-hyun kimster9421@hanyang.ac.kr

2017-06 12

[Alumni]Groundbreaking English Tutoring

'English nausea' is a buzzword in South Korea, which refers to the fear of English communication and education. In 2016, a mobile application called Tutoring was launched by co-CEOs Choi Kyung-hee (Division of Journalism and Mass Communication, ‘04) and Kim Mi-hee (Division of Advertising and Public Relations, ‘06). After its release, Tutoring began to engage attention from numbers of users with English nausea, attaining 55,000 charged clients in June 2017. News H met CEO Choi Kyung-hee to analyze the success and future of Tutoring. Novel platform of English education Choi’s original occupation was developing teaching materials at the Chosun Ilbo Corporation. Choi's ultimate dream was contributing to the educational revolution in South Korea. While Choi was travelling around the globe for diverse experiences to achieve her goal, Kim reached her with a business idea. “Kim was an engineer at Samsung and I was an educator, which made me contemplate over the business. However, with these two contrary dispositions, we reached an agreement that this could work out,” reminisced Choi. "Our ultimate goal is to create a sensation like 'Uber' in the educational mobile application field," said Choi. In the mobile application market where success and failure are borderless, the two CEOs presented decisive strategy- ‘lower the cost, increase the pay’. Since the business model is online operation system, Tutoring can offer low costs for the users and high pay for the contracted instructors by reducing human labor costs and offline management costs. “Attractive cost allows the clients to be involved into our application easily. However, the constant updates of English contents are also what draw attention from the users,” said Choi. Tutoring offers more than 80 different themes and various teachers that clients can choose and based on that, they practice English communication through phone calls. The philosophy behind Tutoring is that education should not be carried out in the perspective of a teacher, but in the eyes of a student. Thus, conversational contents are steadily developing and increasing based on current trends. Also, the imperative criteria for choosing the on-demand instructors are their witness and active voice. “Since English education is based on phone call conversation, active voicing and charming communication skills are extremely significant along with the educational contents,” emphasized Choi. Tutoring has more than 55,000 charged users, and is consistently augmenting its popularity. (Photo courtesy of Tutoring) Becoming a future-oriented analyst Since the on-demand mobile learning platform is fast-changing, intricate analyses of the market, competitors, and its products are momentous. “All businesses nowadays involve artificial intelligence to comprehend its market. Since it wouldn't be odd if a business in this market suddenly collapses or succeeds tomorrow, strategies like growth hacking is vital,” said Choi. Growth hacking is a process of rapid experimentation across marketing channels and product development to identify the most efficient ways to grow a business. By using AI, workers at Tutoring consistently confirm their growth and weakness. “When we think of marketing, people usually associate with PowerPoint presentations and SWOT (Strength, Weakness, Opportunity, and Threat of a firm) analyses. However, those days are over with the advent of AI. All we, the marketers, need is sensible adaptation to numbers that AI provides and making correct decisions stemming from that process,” explained Choi. Choi emphasizes the value of experiences in order to stand fearless before failure. When Choi was at Hanyang University, she was an unconstrained student who found the meaning of her life in travelling and experiencing things. However, through those invaluable experiences, she is able to confront the fear the word ‘failure’ gives off. “I want to advise the Hanyangian students that starting a business will automatically bring failure and pain. However, it’s important to know that an accumulation of experiences will take over the fear.” Kim Ju-hyun kimster9421@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Kim Youn-soo

2017-04 25

[Alumni]CEO of Design Egg

Among fierce competition in the entertainment and design industry, there came a glittering 'star' company: Design Egg. With the launch of the program “Tap Tap Como” on the Seoul Broadcasting System, the CEO of Design Egg, Jung Je-won (Department of Entertainment Design, ERICA Campus, '07), is working on his creative design tasks more ardently. News H met him to hear the path he has taken, and the future he is paving for. Jung is explaining the path he has taken to found Design Egg. When others break an egg, it is fried egg, but when you break it, it is a chick Company Design Egg has been founded on 2007 and its task force is divided into two spheres: commercial and contents. The commercial part concentrates on the tasks handed over by other subcontracting companies, while the contents part focuses on its creative self-development. “With the financial surplus earned from the commercial sector, we invest all our ability to develop new animations, designs, and contents within our creativity. Thus, the contents part is what we value the most,” said Jung. The name 'Design Egg' was founded 10 years ago, when Jung and three of his fellow colleagues gathered round. “There’s a saying that when an egg is broken by others, it becomes fried egg, but when it is broken by itself, it becomes a chick. We tried to embed this meaning in our company- blooming prosperity and creativeness,” emphasized Jung. Design Egg's booth at a character fair is boomed by children. (Photo courtesy of Jung) Due to Jung’s experience at the Designing industry, he cherished the hope to ameliorate the poor environment. “After the graduation, I worked at the designing company to build wider personal connections and experiences. But, the low income and harsh welfare made me grasp the magnitude of this industry,” said Jung. In the attempt the set the better example and path to his juniors, he decided to found a company of just environment with his colleagues. When you’re lonely and tired, Como will tap-tap you Animation created by Design Egg “Tap Tap Como” brought Jung and his crew a significant amount of opportunity and fortune. However, the production process was a continuous adversity. The target was children and the animation itself was six to seven minutes long, which was immensely longer than what Design Egg has been producing for their commercial goods. Even so, they made steady progress. “To define children’s tastes, we aired an incomplete piece in kindergartens and tried to communicate often with moms around us,” noted Jung. As a result, the heart of the animation was born: the Tap-Tap dance of Como. <Tap-Tap Dance of Como, Video courtesy of Design Egg> Como in the animation is the main character and a baby chick. Como’s friends are Toto, who came from the urban area, Wormy, a worm whom Como did not eat but became friends with, and Uba, who is a warm-hearted baby duck. Together, they learn the goodness in life, solicitude, and love. “Babies are the kindest beings. I have a faith that this purity in animation will remind adults of the innocence and naivety they once had.” Jung strives for the betterment of the entertainment design industry for his juniors. Jung’s ultimate goal is not limited- it adds up as he seeks betterment. “It is the most blissful moment when my babbling baby giggles when Como is being played.” Developing Design Egg into a sustainable and welfare-based company like Disney or Zebra is now propelling Jung onwards. Kim Ju-hyun kimster9421@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Kim Youn-soo

2017-03 27 Important News

[Alumni]Effort as the Mother, Modesty as the Father

“In a universe of ambiguity, this kind of certainty comes only once, and never again, no matter how many lifetimes you live.” Ardent love story from the movie “The Bridges of Madison County” has been reborn as a musical in South Korea. Fateful memories that Francesca and Robert recall, perhaps, is full of emotions that ordinary actors can’t express. There is a musical actor Park Eun-tae, an alumnus of Hanyang University’s Business School, who fully absorbed himself into Robert Kincaid. Acting with passion From ‘Phantom’ and ‘Frankenstein’ to ‘The Bridges of Madison County,’ Park has filled his 11 years with 25 performances. Despite the tight schedule, Park is referred by the media as one of the most improved musical stars in South Korea. One of his most favorable pieces is ‘Frankenstein. Musical ‘Frankenstein’ reveals the brotherhood of characters Victor and Henry, which later becomes defamed due to Henry’s modification into a monster. ’“Switching my role from one musical to another is an emotional burden, because I have to become another me. Leaving Henry from ‘Frankenstein’ behind was especially strenuous,” recalled Park. Another musical that Park feels an affection to is ‘Phantom.’ Along with the charming characteristic and background stories of the role Eric, the musical register perfectly suited Park’s voice. “Escaping from the role Eric was a toil, since I was so captivated by his life and my all emotions were devoted to him,” said Park. Musical <The Bridges of Madison County> raises its curtain on April 15th at Chungmu Art Center. (Photo courtesy of Prain Global Incorporation) Under the breathtaking schedule of the musical world, the most recent musical choice of Park was “The Bridges of Madison County.” The musical is about an ordinary mother Francesca, who reveals the course of discovering woman in herself through Robert’s love. “When I was first offered with the role, I refused it because I knew the original Robert is a persona beyond my capacity. However, the production company dramatized Robert into a younger and frisky man, which intrigued all my interests to apply here,” said Park. The new journey of Park is about to begin, as he is practicing daily at Chungmoo Art Center. Things you give up for what you want In his high school years, Park expected to enter the Korea Military Academy or the Police Institute. “Since I was young, I loved getting attentions from the audience and being praised. So I often volunteered for school presidents and more,” recalled Park. However, Park realized that this does not suit his career. Even when he came to the Business School of Hanyang University, he could not give up on his dream- musical actor. He kept singing at the school club as a vocal, and he finally decided to achieve his long-cherished desire after a long contemplation. Becoming a musical actor was a long road, but maintaining his position was an ordeal. On the day of the interview, americano-lover Park was drinking a banana juice for the health of his vocal cords. “Hearing the audience applauding after the curtain call is the happiest moment in my life. However, after delights follow responsibilities,” stressed Park. The hardest part of managing his body condition is maintaining the voice health, since the vocal muscles are not visible. Along with this, art and emotion should be expressed altogether. “In the early age, I thought there are special methods to managing body conditions, but now I grasped that usual habits are the key,” reminded Park. Getting halted for the ‘Frankenstein’ performance due to vocal cord nodules was the most bitter slump Park experienced. “This is the path I chose. Giving up petty happiness with friends, family, alcohol, and other habits is what I sacrifice. In return, I’m compensated with the accomplishments and joy,” emphasized Park. Park is preparing to become Robert Kincaid. Because Park’s major at college was business studies, it was a dilemma for him to wonder whether his practice and development speed is fast enough, compared to other musical actors. However, he realized that efforts never betray. “Concentrate on your own clock only. Other clocks do not matter,” advised Park for those who agonize over their dreams. Kim Ju-hyun kimster9421@hanyang.ac.kr

2017-02 20 Important News

[Alumni]Three Hanyangian Stars from Phantom Singer

The long march of Phantom Singer, a musical crossover audition program broadcast by JTBC, officially ended on 27 January. In the final round, the teams “Popularity Phenomenon" (Ingi-Hyunsang) and “Hyungspresso" (deep-hearted espresso) carried on the baton after the champion team “Forte di Quatro”. Despite the loss of the crown, both Popularity Phenomenon and Hyungspresso have shown that classical vocal music can intrigue the public and gain popularity. From Popularity Phenomenon, tenor Yoo Seul-gi (Department of Voice, ‘13) and tenor Paek In-tae (Department of Voice, ‘10) shed fresh light on the traditional genre of vocal music, as well as baritone Kwon Seo-kyoung (Department of Voice, 2nd year) from Hyungspresso. News H met the three proud alumni to hear the behind stories and beyond. Seizing the opportunity through Phantom Singer Q1. Congratulations on finishing the long adventure of Phantom Singer. How do you feel now it's over? Paek: I'm sad I can’t watch my favorite weekly program any more. But I feel freed from the burden of selecting and practicing songs for the performances. I'm also anticipating the future that I'll face. Yoo: It was such an honor for me to ornament these grand performances, and the experience will become a dominating page of my history. As many say, the culmination of one thing leads to another beginning. I hope that the fans will look forward to my upcoming expedition. It is also my wish to contribute to elevating the pride of Hanyang University. Kwon: The past six months with Phantom Singer have been full of busy and dramatic moments. Feelings of sadness engulf me, but my gratitude for the program and the audience is the greatest. As a baritone singing vocal music, I was so happy that many people were drawn the attractiveness of this genre of music. I hope that many will look on for further activities of mine. Q2. How did you come to know this auditioning program, and how did you decide to participate in Phantom Singer? Paek: Our friend, Seul-ki, suggested that we participate this program together. Without Seul-ki, I wouldn't be where I am today. Kwon: Seul-ki also brought me into this program, which I thank him a lot for. I seized the opportunity the moment it was offered, because the program seemed so attractive to me. Yoo: The purpose of this program, Phantom Singer, drew me in. Fusing various musical genres is an adventure, and I thought that it should be tried out. I'm grateful to the program, because this motive is imperative for hardworking people engaged in music. Q3. Two songs, <Musica> and <Grande Amore>, have received fervent responses from the audience. What do you think are the main reasons behind this ovation? Paek: I think that the reason behind the popularity of <Grande Amore> that Seul-ki and I sang was because we performed the kind of the music that people couldn't easily approach. When we were teamed up as a duo, it was a competition and it was assumed one of us had to ultimately leave the show. However, that rule was yet undecided, and we thought that if we do well enough, we will be able to bring changes. So there we were, successfully finishing up the performance, going onto the next round together. Yoo: <Grande Amore> means “grand love”. As you can see from the performance, In-tae and I lock eyes with one another with strong intent. The emotion that we intended to reveal was fiercely competing against one another to attain "grand love" from one woman. I think the audience understood the vitality of our emotions and that is why our performance was lauded. Kwon: The song <Musica>, which I sang with my partner Ko Eun-sung, wasn't traditional vocal music. Rather, it declared the identity of Phantom Singer’s fusion of music. Crossing over various genres was a great challenge for me. But the original trend of fusing music attracted the audience, which I was extremely glad about. <Grande Amore> sung by Yoo Seul-gi and Paek In-tae <Musica> sung by Kwon Seo-kyoung and Ko Eun-sung Q4. How did the preparation process for the performances go about? Yoo: The entire process takes about two weeks. The song selection for the man-to-man mission wasn't burdensome, until the members accumulated to four people. After spending about 16 hours only to choose what song to sing, for the next few days we'd ponder about how to format the song, and in what style we should amend it. The remaining time was assigned for practice. Paek: Normally, when four people prepare for a performance, you're given at least two months. This was an incredibly pressuring time limit, but it was also a new experience for a singer like me, who works with classical vocal music. Kwon: On television, a lot of the preparation process is edited due to the airing time. In reality, more time and endeavors are spent for each performance. Maintaining the rightful physical condition for singing was also a challenge. Personally, Phantom Singer grew me into a better, stronger baritone. Baek, Yoo, and Kwon (left to right) talk about their adventures on Phantom Singer. Tantalizing charm of vocal music Q1. How did your introduction to vocal music begin? Paek: My musical life began when I was a freshman at high school. Music class was the only time I earnestly paid attention to, and when I was tested for my school’s music exam, I sang “Geunae" (swing). My music teacher sincerely suggested my mother to lead me to a music career. Mom supported me a lot, even though our family wasn't financially abundant. Yoo: I started music when I was four years old, which is a dim past. I found joy in music through piano first. Then, my mother thought that my voice would suit vocal music, which is how I entered the world of singing. Kwon: I was in sixth grade when my voice broke, ahead of my peers, so my voice was naturally louder. When I was preparing for the school’s music festival, my music teacher pulled my musical talent out of me. Going down the road of music was a delightful decision of mine. Q2. If you slumped at any point in your career, how did you surmount them? Yoo: I think I'm the master of slumps. Hardships always come to people who try hard. Through slumps, I grow up into a stronger and a more talented singer. Those who continue trying shouldn't fear pitfalls. Kwon: During the letdowns, I thought that my entire musical life would end. Temptation always allured me to try out easier singing strategies, but singers should always utilize the standard, traditional tactics to find the true voice in oneself. Paek: When a swimmer goes through a slump, he or she usually starts from the beginning and exercises command of the basic fundamentals of swimming. But for singers, the fundamentals of music are within us, in our physical body, and this invisibility sometimes frustrates us. I found that practicing until you forget the frustration you feel is the only way to conquer hardships. The three Hanyangian stars are looking forward to their future, filled with hope for genuine music. Singing Hanyangians’ memories Q1. Why did you decide to apply to Hanyang University? Kwon: Before I came to HYU, I was attending a college of music in Italy. But I decided to come back to Korea just to meet and learn from our professor at the Department of Voice, Ko Sung-hyun. At a great university with a marvelous teacher, I am the happiest student ever. Paek: The College of Music at HYU is renowned for its magnificent history and renowned alumnis. Also, professor Ko Sung-hyun is a teacher that every vocal music student wishes to be taught by. I came to Hanyang University to learn how to become a better singer through Professor Ko’s teaching. Yoo: Just like In-tae, I applied for HYU twice. It was my dream school, with Professor Ko being my admirable teacher. Becoming his student was my main goal then, and even today I am honored to have been a student of Ko's. Q2. Any advice for HYU's music students? Kwon: It's hard to focus on music only, but the day will come for you to see an opportunity and seize it. Try to face the bigger world and do not fear the ups and downs of life. Enduring the present will be valued in a better future. Yoo: It may sound frustrating, but I've learned that the world isn't that easy and hopeful. We will try to pave the hope-filled roads in this world, so follow our paths and try to pave them deeper. Paek: Be happy. Be extraordinarily happy with your career that you can’t even begin to think of giving up. Kim Ju-hyun kimster9421@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Kim Youn-soo

2017-02 06

[Alumni]Singing Guardian of the Korean Gesang

Gesang, a German word meaning ‘a musical structure of a lyrical poem that acquired music’, can be created with any poems due to its unconstrained property of composition. A host of western gesangs are well known to a large spectrum of audiences, such as The Poet’s Love by Robert Schumann or Schwanegesang (Song of a Swan) by Franz Schubert. Despite the grand number and the beauty of many Korean poems, the Korean gesangs are neither well-known nor composed often. To spread the beauty of the Korean Gesangs, Jang Eun-hun (Department of Voice, '87), an alumnus of Hanyang University, took the lead for its betterment. Dynamic graph of life As a little boy living in an isolated countryside, Jang was unaccustomed to what made Jang today- music. All of a sudden, an opportunity came to Jang, when he began going to church, which was the only place with a piano in Jang’s village. “I enjoyed singing and playing piano at church when I was young. Because my village was mountainous, I strolled around a park every day, singing or mumbling poems that I knew,” recalled Jang. During his teenage years, he spent his days practicing and learning music in earnest at a mission school. When Jang applied to Hanyang University, he was selected as a scholarship student for the Department of Voice. “I never went to school festivals or parties, but I only practiced opera at school. Although I don’t regret it, I do reminisce the past and think that my youth should have been more reckless,” added Jang. However, his endless endeavors achieved results. After graduation, Jang was able to go to Italy to study music. ▲ Jang's passion for music began in his earlier years. Even after his four years at university, Jang thought that he still had an unnatural vocalization method. So, at the home of Vivaldi, Venice, Jang hammered harder with music. When he returned to Korea, his efforts paid off. Jang gained recognition in the field and worked as an established, eminent lecturer and a musician. “In my late 30s, I decided to change the route of my life. It was deep in my heart that the Korean gesang is a beauty, and that I had to disseminate this allure out for others to realize it, too." Because Korean history embodies emotions of sorrow, fury, bliss, and cherish, Jang posits that Korean poems written on Western manuscript would bewitch the audience, if popularized. Telling the world of the beauty in Korean Gesang To uplift the status of Korean gesang, there were two main checklists on Jang's agenda- improving the vocalization and composition of Korean gesang's structure, and building art halls to perform it. However, it was a long road for Jang to build two art halls without any financial sponsors. “My work is rare in our community, and I did not want to outstand from the beginning which may backfire." Jang started off by researching vocalization types that would suit the emotions and language of Korean poems. At last, he found that the Korean poems had stronger sense of emotions and soft pronunciation, which harmonize well with hymn-like melodies. Further, Jang also began to publish Korean gesang collections for children, so that gesangs can move out among all generations. Representative gesangs that Jang composed are Ouga (The Song of Five Friends) written by a poet called Yun Seon-do, and Nagunae (Traveler) by the poet Park Mok-wol. ▲ Jang composes melodies that suit the pronunciation of the Korean language, and strike a chord with the emotions of Korean poems. In building the art hall process, Jang, his wife, and two children became laborers and architects. For about 15 years, Jang and his family worked hard to design and build the halls and as a result, two Korean gesang art halls were created- Naeum Art Hall in Seoul and Korean Gesang Memorial Hall in Suncheon. “Both art halls offer stages performed by nationally famous musicians free of charge. The difference between the two halls is that one in Seoul was made for the convenience of musicians distance-wise, and the one in Suncheon was built to harmonize with nature,” said Jang. The Korean Gesang Memorial Hall in Suncheon, where Jang came from, is surrounded by mountains, Suncheonman Bay, and farms. “Surrounded by the beauty of nature, audiences can rest and immerse into Korean gesangs performed. I also decided to produce and host the International Korean Gesang Festival in the Suncheon Memorial Hall monthly, so that audiences may visit at any time they want for performances,” added Jang. ▲ Photo of Naeum Art Hall located in Seoul, Gangnam-gu. (Photo courtesy of Jang) ▲ Photo of Korean Gesang Memorial Hall located in Suncheon (Photo courtesy of Jang) The Naeum Art Hall has a special meaning behind its title. Naeum is an acronym for ‘love for nation, love for music’ in Korean (Nara sarang, Eumak sarang). In every step he is taking, there is a will of Jang to cherish Korean art. According to Jang, he is still on the move. ▲ Nagunae (composed by Jang Eun-hun, lyrics by Park Mok-wol) Kim Ju-hyun kimster9421@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Moon Ha-na

2017-01 08

[Alumni]New Leader of the Korean Advertising & PR Practitioners’ Society (1)

Many Korean students from middle to high school dream of becoming a righteous-minded advert maker after coming across public service advertisements. However, when they begin their academic career at university and face a grander society, their dreams tend to fade away and economic boon becomes the main goal of their life. In order to usher in students and prospective advertisement makers to the right places, the Korean Advertising and PR Practitioners’ Society (KCI) has been pursuing various projects and seminars for a period of 10 years. In the midst of those steps, Kim Bong-cheol (Department of Journalism & Mass Communication, ERICA Campus, '83), a professor at Chosun University, is determined to lead the Society on as its new leader. Values of society The Korean Advertising and PR Practitioners’ Society is differentiated from other advertisement-related seminars or societies. The Society distinguishes itself by learning and getting involved in the practical insight of advertisements, rather than studying and developing numbers of research papers that are sometimes full of logical fallacies and nonfactual theories. The KCI is composed of 500 PR (Public Relations) and advertisement experts from academia and business. “Mass communication and advertisements require not only educational knowledge, but also direct hands-on experiences, the Society maintains the balance of having educators and practitioners among its members,” said Kim. The Korean Advertising and PR Society hosts various contests and symposiums for the prosperity of the field. (Photo courtesy of Kim) The society hosts biannual symposiums and special seminars that cover new ideas and just, ethical methods of advertisements. “There are a host of projects designed and put into action. Two of these include academic journals published for the National Research Foundation of Korea and the Sarangbang sessions that call together university students in China to participate in the making of Korean tourism advertisements. They also include debates that discuss the future of advertisements,” explained Kim. Even though there is half a year left for Kim to become the de facto president of the society, he is preparing hard to lead the grand Society to the right path. Journey to the mass communication expert Kim emphasized the importance of both academic and practical experiences in advertisements. (Photo courtesy of Kim) When Kim was young, his dream was to become a consummate literary artist and to major in Korean language and literature. However, when Kim questioned himself of his gift as a writer, he realized that it wouldn’t bring much opportunity for him to succeed. So Kim decided to major in communication studies, even though he lacked professional knowledge or passion for the field. “I was a senior when I happened to apply for the Advertisement Research Paper Contest hosted by Jaeil Worldwide Incorporation- I received the grand prize. I felt proud and came to know my capabilities, which is why I decided to pursue a career in the advertisement field,” added Kim. After graduation, Kim worked for an advertising company in South Korea. However, adversity came when he decided to become a professor at Chosun University. “I got my doctoral degree in South Korea and I have never been educated abroad. In Korea, it is hard to be admitted as a qualified educator without any academic experience abroad. So, I thought that my effort will determine my future and I decided to write a host of qualified research papers and spread by work in many societies,” said Kim. His endeavor paid off when the fruit of his labor shined bright as a professor and the new president of the Korean Advertising and PR Practitioners’ Society. Kim is also the vice president of the Korean Advertising Society and a standing member of the Press Arbitration Committee. To the question of how he could stand so successful, Kim stressed academic knowledge that entails experience. “The field of advertisement and public relations can't be mastered with a ‘study hard’ attitude. It requires experience that expand the practical knowledge of binding academics with reality,” Kim professed. Although he feels burdened to become the president of a national society, Kim is ready to step up further. "Because the advertisement and PR are in close connection with social attitudes and trends, the economy needs to prosper in order for this branch to survive. Economically flourishing companies can support and utilize advertisements, so Kim hopes for a better economy for South Korea. “As an alumnus of Hanyang University, I was always proud of my school. Despite the harsh employment conditions that Korean university students currently face, I hope that they will always step forward with courage and anticipation. Enjoying what one does is the key to success,” concluded Kim. Kim Ju-hyun kimster9421@hanyang.ac.kr