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2018-02 26

[Alumni]For Africa, In Africa

What are some of the most common preconceived notions of Africa? You might likely think of it as a place of less development, fatal diseases, and torrid weather. However, people with analytic insight will say that it is a place full of potentially infinite development. Jin Seung-soo (Division of Mechanical Engineering, ’09), dedicating his passion in making Africa a better country, is a member of the African Development Bank (AfDB). Jin shared his story of working in Africa this week. Collaboration is the key AfDB is an intercontinental development finance institution whose objective is to alleviate poverty and improve living conditions in Africa, with aims to develop its social and economic status at large. Currently consisting of 80 member countries, 54 of which are African countries and the rest, non-African countries, the organization is staying faithful to its mission through supporting projects and programs that foster the economic and social development of the country. Counseling and financing for development, the AfDB provides grants, concessional loans, and non-concessional loans which are mainly used to build large-scale infrastructure and for economic policy reformation or empowerment. "In an international finance institute like AfDB, there are people from diverse fields of study." (Photo courtesy of Jin) Upon entering the AfDB in 2013, Jin is currently in the Republic of Cote d’Ivoire where the headquarters is located and is taking charge of developing energy projects for Eastern Africa. He is an energy finance expert, mainly responsible for leading the energy project financing. In other cases, he is a financial specialist who analyzes the profitability and economic validity of the finance project. When the African government or a private sector requests finances for energy projects, the AfDB’s sector expert supports them as a task manager and forms an appraisal team with specialists like Jin in addition to other specialists such as environmental and social specialists, legal specialists, and credit risk specialists. The team would then make decisions regarding the financing for the project. Taking a glimpse into Jin’s career in Africa, there seems to be little connection between his major Mechanical Engineering and his financing work. Jin accounted for this seemingly divergent career path: “since I was an university student, I was interested in other fields outside of the Engineering Department such as management and finance. I once took a course and studied plants, which triggered my interest in project financing. Being a part of the strategy for the planning team of Samsung C&T Corporation and Samsung LED, I added financial knowledge on top of my engineering knowledge. Then, I grew ambitious and wanted to use my competency to do something big.” Afterwards, Jin quit working in Samsung and got his M.A. degree in Business Administration from the Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST). Having studied both engineering and finance, Jin was eager to find the merging point between the two fields. He finally came to the conclusion that he would finance projects, which led Jin to challenge himself in Africa in a sequence. A project for providing clean water (Photo courtesy of AfDB) The potential to create greater impact With its growth rate exceeding that of the world’s rate, Africa is being spotlighted for development investments, displaying an infinitude of possibilities for development around just about every corner of the country. Working for and living in Africa for several years now, Jin has been witnessing the growth of the country while at the same time being involved in its development. “Currently, Africa isn’t a very stable country, which is why many countries are deterred from investing in it. In the case of Korea, it is maintaining its speculative stance toward Africa since it classifies the country as a risk. However, Africa has a very high growth rate and a strikingly low development level, which brings the effect of development to its climax,” commented Jin. As aforementioned, Jin’s job is to analyze the economic validity of a project as a financial analyst. He feels the highest sense of achievement when the project he financed develops into a beneficial one, both financially and economically. He recalled one of his most rewarding performances while financing South Africa’s Concentrate solar power plant project, where earning the approval from the bank was very difficult due to a profitability-related matter. Despite the fact that Jin was a newly recruited member, he was a big help in that situation. “It is always a very good thing to see people’s lifestyle changing due to the changes of development. Providing electricity to the region where there is no electricity, for example, would completely change people’s lives. Furthermore, the electricity could be used to further develop the area. Thinking about all the awaiting developments, it feels very gratifying and valuable. As an energy finance expert, Jin’s goal in the long run is to promote as much investment as possible and contribute in its energy development. Furthermore, he envisions promoting investments to Africa from Korea and building a bridge between the two countries and allowing Korean corporations to enter Africa. “For all the students who dream of working for the promotion of global welfare, there are three things to keep in mind: First, fluency in a second or even a third language and expertise in your field are indispensable. Second, experience is crucial. It is never easy to enter an international organization, which means that in order to increase your competency, having related experience could lift you up and serve as an essential background. Last, suitability and perseverance are required. A large institute is not a place you can get into right after graduating from school. You need a definite goal and supporting plans to eventually achieve your dream. Failure is not to be feared!” "Africa has infinite potential for development." (Photo courtesy of Dong A) Jeon Chae-yun chaeyun111@hanyang.ac.kr

2018-02 25

[Alumni]Catching the Moment of the Act

“A play is an exciting form of art. It exists in each moment, and every performance is different and special.” The celebrated play critic, Kim Ock Ran (Korean Literature, 87'), recently awarded the Yeoseokki Critic Award, showed a visible air of excitement and love for the theatrical art. “I love being part of the moment. Not only do I write about the plot and acting of the play, I watch the audience, observing how their breath changes in reaction to the performance.” Kim confessed that her interests were strictly in plays. She hardly watches movies. (Photo courtesy of Lee Eun Kyeong) Red and Black Winner of the 2017 Yeoseokki award, Kim writes about plays in a wide scope of magazines and journals. “It is an extreme honor to have been awarded this prize. This award is a very special recognition. If no noteworthy piece is published that year, the award isn't given at all.” Named after the late play critic, Yeo Seok-ki, who established the field of play critic, the award is dedicated to continuing his legacy and recognizing great writers in the field. Kim also mentioned that the award was given by Yeo's daughter, which was another great honor. Kim was awarded for her book, Red and Black. The book held piercing criticism towards the government in the years from 2013 to 2015 when the “Black list” scandal had created a huge issue. “Plays are more vulnerable to government censorship since it has to happen on stage. During the black list period, stages would suddenly go under construction blocking plays from even happening.” According to Kim, censorship had become a critical tool for the government, especially after the Sewol Incident. She was surprised to find out the pattern of censorship as she had organized and wrote about the dispersed cases of government intervention. “I realized a lot of things while writing this book. I learned how pervasive censorship is and the role I play as a critic. The book also helped me find and secure my voice.” “My philosophy in writing is to “write easily.” More than anything, the readers should be able to read with ease. I had the privilege to visit the late critic Yeo and asked him how I should write.” His answer was to write in a simple and clear tone, and since then, it has been the guideline for Kim. She confessed that she rewrites her pieces several times, focusing on how she can shorten her sentences. “The key point in critic writing is empathy. Readers need to relate to the message that I aim to deliver. It also needs to be alive. Because plays are very much alive.” Life as a play critic According to Kim, her decision to become a play critic came very naturally. She majored in Korean literature, specializing in Korean plays. Therefore, she had many opportunities to see theatrical performances as a student. Furthermore, personal mediums such as blogs and social networking portals had just come into existence at the time. “I had plenty of things to write about and the perfect place to write on. It all just came very naturally.” During her years as a student, the Department of Theater and Film belonged to the College of Humanities, giving her more opportunities to get involved in the arts. It was also an era of demonstrations, so students spent more time on the streets than in classrooms. According to Kim, there were many seminars back then and many discussions and debates. She received much constructive feedback and ideas during her seminar sessions. Her life as a student was very active, participating in photography clubs and traveling. “I did everything with passion. I don't think I could live so actively if I had the chance to go back.” "I traveled, took photos, wrote, watched performances, and just had so much fun." (Photo courtesy of Lee Eun Kyeong) The future of Korean plays and Kim's role “Up until the 1980's and 90's, the writer held the most power and influence over plays. After that, it was the era of directors. Although the text was given, the manner of delivering the piece unto the stage was most important, a task best suited for directors. The trend these days has turned to production theaters. Until now, theaters were merely hardware. Always rented and reserved.” Now the tide has turned to production theaters. Theaters regularly decide on the themes, adapting the stage to cater to it. Then the directors and writers are casted, creating a line-up for the season. According to Kim, the influence of ideas and social issues has grown stronger. The trend has also begun to provide performance opportunities abroad. She sees it as a development, giving productions more independence and power. “Plays in the past had too much intervention from the Korean National Drama Company." "I think this is the last step of democratization for Korean theaters." (Photo courtesy of Lee Eun Kyeong) Kim sees the field of play productions as going through a period of struggle and development. With the recent scandals concerning sexual harrasment and inequality, the theatrical arts is going through a tough period. Kim has also expressed great remorse over the course of events. “Many people devoted to this form of art are devastated. The pillars that we cherished and celebrated had been rotten from the start.” Nevertheless, Kim was hopeful, as she sees it as a step towards a better society. “It hurts, very much. But it was something unacceptable, and the people are moving towards change." Kim was determined to cover every inch of this change as a person researching this field. “I have an obligation to keep a certain distance, and record this moment in history as objectively as possible. It is a time that requires much wisdom and courage, and I am optimistic for the future we will approach.” Lee Changhyun pizz1125@hanyang.ac.kr Photo by Kang Chohyun

2018-02 22

[Alumni]Demonstrate the academic value of foundation education

Most universities conduct foundation supporting education. In the short term, it presents options other than employment to students, and in the long term, helps to pioneer their own work. However, skeptical views exist as to whether this education, within the framework of education, develops students’ practical, entrepreneurial abilities. Lee Young-gun, a graduate (Business Administration 08), shattered this prejudice to win the grand prize in the foundation thesis through his submission of a paper proving the substantial effects of the foundation supporting education within the university. Passion and commitment bring out achievements "I am incredibly happy that I have received the grand prize in the ‘2018 foundation thesis’ after a year and a half since I began studying Foundation Studies,” said graduage Lee Young-gun, after receiving this prize. While receiving the prize, he became more profoundly affectionate and responsible about previous foundation studies and showed a firm passion and will for his studies. "I would like to make substantial contributions to the growth of Korean small and medium-sized enterprises in the future and become a leading foundation scholar who will strive for further research to make Korea brighter." The conference that gave him the grand prize was ‘USASBE (United States Association for Small Business and Entrepreneurship),’ an annual academic conference hosted by the American Small Business and Foundation Association. This association, established in 1981, and having a history of over 38 years, is the world's largest small enterprise and foundation association, boasting a membership of over 5,000 scholars. As a result of the many competitions and verifications at this academic conference, he was able to receive the prize. "In 2018 Academic Convention, 254 universities in 24 countries participated and submitted more than 400 papers. My thesis was chosen as the grand prize by competing with the winners in the ‘Theory,’ Substantiation,’ and ‘New Entry’ categories. After the nominations for the grand prize, I received the first prize in the ‘Education’ category," reminisced Lee. ▲ "USASBE", an annual academic conference hosted by the American Small Business and Foundation Association, awarded Lee Young-gun (Business Administration 08) the grand prize. (Source: International Council for Small Business) In addition to the award, he was promised to receive scholarships from the Kauffmann Foundation. Lee states, "The Kaufman Foundation is one of the largest organizations to expand the entrepreneurial spirit and entrepreneurial cultivation project. When receiving this scholarship from this organization, I will be so excited that a direct celebration greeting from masters in foundation and business." Better to know in advance and establish You cannot miss the story of the thesis that helped him to be awarded. He explained that he wrote a paper on the theme of ‘the influence of the university foundation supporting education on the improvement of foundation capacities'. "Through this paper, I have studied whether the entrepreneurial ability of a student can be improved through university education. With professor Patrick Kreiser, while my thesis was in progress, I considered the relationship between foundation and education,” explained Lee. ▲ Lee Young-gun (Business Administration 08) received the grand prize in the 2018 Foundation Study Award at "USASBE". (Source: graduate Lee Young-gun) He conducted a questionnaire survey of 927 undergraduates from the State University in the US and analyzed the curriculum and courses offered at the College of Business Administration and the College of Engineering. As a result, the foundation supporting education provided by the university is to improve foundation abilities of university students. "The Foundation Supporting Education has actually helped foster university students' entrepreneurial ability, and there is a tendency to dream more about foundations with family members who have experienced foundations and from the students aiming for foundations to provide higher entrepreneurial abilities." Of course, these studies were not done easily. He cited numerous curricula as the greatest challenge in analyzing each curriculum individually and promote research, while comparing it with the undergraduate classes. I have spent a lot of time analyzing the curriculum provided by the Management University Certification (AACSB) and the Technical University Certification (ABET) and comparing it with actual undergraduate classes from American universities." However, he had reasons to do research on this topic. "As the interest in foundation education increased globally, I felt the necessity to research the substantial effects of foundation-related education. For example, I wanted to release empirically through papers on how foundation should be taught, and whether foundation education is substantially connected to the foundation of the students." His quest and passion for the current issue provided empirical results. To students aiming for foundation There are still Hanyang people who do not have any opinions yet even though they want to start a business and learn how to be educated by the Foundation Supporting Education. To these students, he gives advice to make full use of the support from Hanyang. "As an undergraduate, I was interested in various programs offered by Hanyang. Through the Capstone Design course, I had experienced consulting and had an opportunity to interview a representative of a cosmetic company, directly. Moreover, I visited a local factory in Indonesia through the overseas internship program and was able to experience the actual business environment. In these ways, my experiences gained through various programs of Hanyang University became the foundation for studying foundation. In addition, He said that the mental attitude necessary for entrepreneurship is also important. "According to a survey Lee had conducted last year that was administered to about 1,400 SME Executives, "business managers generally had high initiative, innovation, and challenge to take risks." Quoting these findings, “It is important to foster initiative and spontaneity," he further added. ▶ Believing that the foundation itself can become a discipline, graduate Lee Young-gun has asked juniors to accept the foundation as a discipline that is worth pursuing, not as a difficult task. (Source: Yonhap News)

2018-02 12

[Alumni]A Proud and Blissful Architect

“At the age of 85, looking back at my life, I am very happy and thankful,” began Yu. Yu Hi-jun (Department of Architecture, ’58) is a Hanyang alumnus and an emeritus professor who taught at Hanyang for 34 years. Having experienced, learned, and achieved a lot in his long journey of life as an architect, Yu has a shining story to share. An architect and an artist Almost every day, Yu goes to a coffee shop nearby his house alone and enjoys a cup of coffee for a good two hours. “I like to look back at my life to recall my deeds and ponder whether I’ve led a good life or not.” It all started with Yu’s hobby of drawing a continuous pattern on paper every weekend, which gladly and willingly imprisoned Yu in his room. Since he was in middle school, Yu unconsciously showed his talent in art. “One time, when I was a first grader in middle school, my teacher told us to draw a sketch of the school building. Afterwards, he would put every piece of work on the front board and let it be evaluated openly by all of his classmates. When he saw mine, he said it wasn’t just a mere sketch,” remembered Yu. From this and several other incidents, Yu began to discover his talent in art and architecture. There had been many ups and downs in Yu’s life before entering Hanyang’s Department of Architecture, such as being captured by the military troop, the Korean War on the 25th of June in 1950, and following months of starvation. Due to the war, Yu was not able to make it to highschool graduation. However, this did not stop him from going to university. During his years in Hanyang, his talent in drawing and architecture became more prevalent and outstanding that it attracted popularity and attention from in and out of the school. Eventually, during the days when going abroad to study was as rare as being nearly impossible, Yu went to America to extend his studies in architecture for graduate school in Iowa. He attempted to earn his tuition fee by getting a job in a design office. “When I was walking in Hanyang campus one day, I was determined to make Hanyang University a better school with my own hands," commented Yu. One thing that triggered Yu’s desire for studying further was the frustration he received when his professor frequently remarked, ‘there’s something great about this work.’ Yu was more than desperate to find out what that “something” was, which he quenchingly found the answer to after his research and studies in America and during his long years of teaching in Hanyang. The answer was brought to Yu by his accumulation of knowledge and skills as an artist and an architect. Building up on his talent, his hunger for studying and ambition for the future enabled Yu to overcome his past hardships, and that drove him forward. Having studied abroad, Yoo's fluency in English is not surprising. Built in the past, stands through the future “My philosophy in architecture is creativity. Regardless of the type of art, once seen, it should ring a pounding beat to one’s heart at the first sight. I was once requested to design a cathedral. After completing it, I imagined the situation where I had to put rows of mattresses because I was afraid people who saw it for the first time would scream and fall back,” said Yu, half jokingly. He revealed that his source of inspiration is his knowledge and all the theories he has studied. Yu takes a shower before starting his work to freshen up his body and mind. “The theories and concepts I’ve studied have become a great stimulus, and that’s where my inspiration comes from.” Being the receiver of the 21st Catholic Art Special Prize this week, Yu’s notable list of achievements goes on and on. Starting with the former president Park Jung-hee’s office, Yu turned out to be the one who designed the architecture of the Blue House’s (the Korean Presidential Residence) Reception Hall. In addition, after president Park’s wife had become deceased, Yu was requested to remodel her bedroom. He was even requested to design the office of the Minister of Foreign Affairs by the president. It was evident that Yu’s sense of architecture was at the level of wide recognition and appreciation, even by the president, so much so, that he was almost single-handedly responsible for such tasks. From designing several cathedrals to numerous buildings and from writing a number of books, there have been countless achievements Yu has accomplished in his life. Yu remembers the day when he was in a bookstore in Canada looking for books related to architecture and feeling inexplicably happy. He was so happy that he was able to study and learn and be who he was. His passion for studying and architecture has never seemed to dwindle. From December of 2015 to December of 2016, Yu’s private exhibition by the name of ‘Passion’ was held, expressing his happiness and thankfulness of his life. His passion and devotion to art and architecture will remain enthusiastic in his works. The Reception Hall of Cheongwadae, the Korean Presidential Residence (Photo courtesy of enacademic.com) Three of the paintings from Yu's 'Passion' (Photo courtesy of galleryro.net) "You need to discover your own path. Otherwise, it won't open." Jeon Chae-yun chaeyun111@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Kang Cho-hyun

2018-02 11

[Alumni]Touching the Hearts of Children

When asked what she aspires to become, Yoon Na-hyo (Media Communication, ’17), a young yet well-experienced voice actress of over 10 years replied, “I’ve always wanted to become ‘Santa Clause.' Simply because giving out ‘presents’ always makes people happy. Seeing a smile on their face means a whole lot to me.” Yoon continued to unfold the story of her passion in the small yet intriguing voice acting industry. A natural Yoon is currently a children’s voice acting content specialist who also works at a company for digital content marketing. Having graduated from Hanyang University (HYU) quite recently, she is already a well-known voice actress in the field as the voice of the “Catch the Mouse” song (KBS Happy Sunday: 쥐를 잡자) as well as over 500 different works, including animation dubbing, textbook CD covers, and so on. She also took part in the songs of ‘Pororo the Little Penguin’ (뽀로로) and ‘Tayo the Little Bus’ (타요), two of the most popular kids shows. Yoon at the recording studio (Photo courtesy of Yoon) While it is a rare case to find something you both love and have natural talent for, Yoon was fortunate to have found both at such an early age of 12. According to Yoon, she always loved singing in front of other people and with the support of her parents and teachers, she was able to perform on various stages as well as television shows as a part of the Children’s Choir. She had even won a long list of prizes at singing contests as well. As her voice received more and more attention from different producers, she was scouted and introduced to take part in voice acting roles. “The voice acting industry in Korea is pretty small, so everybody pretty much knows each other. In particular, once you start specializing in a certain role such as, a young girl of about 3 to 7, or a teenage girl’s voice, like me, then most of the time you’re given the opportunity to try out for that role.” Where true passion lies Although Yoon had started working and gaining experience from a very young age, becoming a voice actress wasn’t her dream from the very start. However, she says that she has never gotten tired of it before and wants to continue working in this industry. “It’s because I truly enjoy what I do. My life motto is to do everything I want to do. So no matter how challenging the task is, and because I genuinely love my work, I’m always happy and can continue to push myself to achieve my goals.” "My love and passion for my work is what motivates me in the end." Of course, even for Yoon, whose passion lies in the heart of her drive, an inspirational mentor had always been there to guide her along the path. A renowned children’s song composer, Kim Bang-ok (composer of “그대로 멈춰라”) has worked together with Yoon ever since Yoon took her first step as a voice actress. “We still talk and sometimes work together. She is my model because she is always passionate about her work no matter how big or small it is and never fails to give it her all. I always learn something from her and respect her very much.” A dream to accomplish When asked what she thinks her greatest achievement is so far, Yoon answered, “when I randomly catch children watching Pororo or Tayo, I feel proud. Also, knowing that a lot of children will grow up listening to my voice, especially through educational content, that is when I find meaning in my work.” As a voice actress, it is an inevitable fact that her voice will change with age. Yoon also admitted that she is well aware that her job as a voice actress specializing in children’s voice will not last forever. However, because her passion lies in working for children, she wishes to continue working in the children’s content field by expanding her capacity to content creation, marketing, and distribution through diverse media channels such as Youtube, Naver, and so on. That is why she is currently learning the whole process at her current company, in order to combine this knowledge with her first-hand experience in the field of production. According to Yoon, “especially, nowadays, where media is inseparable from our lives, I think the type of media content we've been exposed to plays a greater role of influence on all our lives. Since I am particularly interested in working for children, I wish to be able to reach out to them more and hopefully put a smile on their faces with the content I produce.” Pororo song (Video courtesy of Yoon) Park Joo-hyun julia1114@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Choi Min-ju

2018-02 06

[Alumni]Ekklesia: Under the Sound of Music

In today's competitive society, our lives tend to be labeled as either a failure or a success--two contrasting concepts that one wishes to completely avoid or achieve. But the simple truth that people fail to recognize is that there can be no great success without failure. A model example of this is Kim Jae-bin (Vocal Music, '13), the lead singer of a popera group called Ekklesia. On the rise Holding a long list of stage experience and media exposure, Kim is an active, rising star in the popera field continuously working his way up to success as the leader as well as the CEO of Ekklesia (Ekklesia Enterprise). Now a well-known popera group, it consists of three members including Kim himself. The term “Ekklesia” itself is a Greek word defined as “an assembly under God’s calling." It well incorporates Kim’s dream to perform songs that both singers and the audience can emotionally relate to and return with a bit of peace and happiness. However, it was not always a path full of bliss for Kim to get to where he is today. In particular, back when he first started out as a popera singer, it was one bumpy road that not many wanted to risk taking. “Popera,” also known as operatic pop, is a subgenre of pop music that is performed in an operatic singing style or a song. As it is a more popularized version of classic opera among the public, one would think that it is a positive trend in the classical music industry. However, in the beginning, it was perceived as some sort of heresy and received heavy criticism from the field. Likewise, Kim was also skeptical before taking this path until his life mentor and professor in charge at that time strongly suggested that he try out for a popera group called “UAngel Voice,” which would then provide him with abundant stage experience and financial support. After two years as a ‘Uangel Voice’ member, he did not want to quit as “it allows me to feel the instant connection with the audience as it has more interaction than classical opera performances. This ultimately led me to create Ekklesia," said Kim. UAngel Voice stage rehearsal, 2012 (Photo courtesy of Kim) Walking down the rough path Kim's background story was surprisingly full of rough patches that started out with “I had nothing more to lose as I was starting from scratch. Whatever I challenged myself with, even if there was a huge chance of failing, I knew that there could only be a way up for me.” At one point, Kim even had to work as a salesman in an insurance company to financially support Ekklesia. Despite these hardships, he never refrained from challenging himself to try new things. “I like the term ‘전화위복’ (转祸为福; misfortune turns into a blessing). My years of experience at the insurance company allowed me to truly understand all the hardships these people were going through everyday at work. I then incorporated it in my message to these people through the songs I performed for them. It was quite successful, and I was able to sign long-term contracts with other large companies to perform at their workshops and seminars.” Fear of failure: the only hindrance to reaching your dream For Kim, one of the most meaningful performances was from back when his group gave hour-long performances on stages in the metro stations. "One time, this mother and a child who had been watching our entire performance bought a huge cake and coffee for us. The mother thanked us for our performance and told us that her daughter who actually hated music, insisted that they stay and watch till the end. She had never seen her so happy. This was the moment when it really hit me, that I was doing something meaningful. From then on, my passion for music grew, and I have never hesitated to try something new.” Kim with a mother and her child after performing at Sadang station, 2014 (Photo courtesy of Kim) When asked if he thinks he is now successful, Kim said yes without a doubt. Kim’s definition of success was being able to proudly perform a piece that is not only the collaboration of pop and opera, but a collaboration of everybody’s heart: mix and intercommunication of our dreams and feelings. He added that, right now, he is truly happy only because he knows the starting point of his path – how it was before, his past experiences and so on, and also because he has a lifelong goal. “I hope that my popera successors will dream big but fear less. If we look carefully, there are many stages we can perform on although it may not be as financially rewarding or live up to one’s expectations. Don’t let your fear of failure blind you from all those chances out there and end up only looking for short-cuts to success.” Ekklesia performing "Love" (Video courtesy of Kim) Kim Jae-bin - Le Temps des Cathédrales (Video courtesy of Kim) Park Joo-hyun julia1114@hanyang.ac.kr

2018-01 17

[Alumni]Passion to Learn After the War, Landing in America

Hanyang University(HYU) is now in its 79th year of establishment. Throughout these years, countless students have graduated from our school and are shining in their own positions all over the world. Lee Jong-hyeok (Industrial management, ’65) is one of these students, working in America as the representative of Lee Accountancy Group. Last November, Lee made his first visit to HYU since 1965 to receive an honorary graduation certification. An honorary graduation certificate and a development fund After attending HYU as an architecture major for three years since 1958, he passed an exam by the ministry of Education to study abroad. He then voluntarily enlisted himself in the Marine Corps before moving to another country. He changed his major to industrial management after he was discharged from military service, and therefore graduated from HYU as a industrial management major. After almost 60 years, Lee received an honorary graduation certificate of an architecture major last November. As Lee received his honorary graduation certificate, he commented, “I only wandered around the alumni of architecture since I graduated with another major. Now I can proudly call myself an alumnus of architecture to my colleagues.” Lee received an honorary graduation certificate in the office of the president in November, 2017. Lee also made a 40 thousand dollar development fund contract for HYU. 10 thousand dollars is being planned to be donated every year, for four years. He had a special reason he decided to donate this money to HYU. “I received help from the school in various areas and was occasionally exempted from tuition fees. I was the very refugee who moved from Hamgyong province to South Korea immediately after Korea was emancipated from Japan. I therefore decided to donate this money, counting this fund as my tuition fee for four years,” explained Lee. He also conveyed his words that he wishes his money to be spent on students with willpower to pioneer their own path. As a foreigner, as a pioneer With peculiar interest to learn, he not only graduated HYU, but continued on his degrees in America. He has a bachelor’s degree in California Sonoma State University’s School of Business and Economics, a master’s degree in Golden Gate Graduate School Business Administration major and a doctor’s degree in Argosy University Graduate School Business Administration major. He had his reasons for his passion to study. “After I fled for refugee after liberation, I was left alone during the Korean war. I continued my studies alone, to be accepted as a member of the society,” reminisced Lee. He first entered HYU’s architecture department with hopes to set up Seoul again after the Korean war, which ended in 1953. However, after he was discharged from military service, he changed his major with his interest in industrial psychology. Lee therefore continued on his studies in America, to study deeper into industrial psychology. In Sonoma State University School of Business and Economics, he had to study accounting in order to proceed on his major. Although it was then an unfamiliar field, he was captivated by the systematic and organized trait of accountancy. Afterwards, he received a Certified Public Accountant (CPA) in California, and worked as an adjunct professor in various universities such as Armstrong State University, San Francisco State University and East Bay California State University. Lee also worked as an economic consultant in California State Government and Oakland, and is now the representative of Lee Accountancy Group. Lee is now a proud representative of a corporation in America. (Photo courtesy of The Korea Times) The power of determination Oakland led the Thanksgiving Day for the lower-income group and the homeless, with over 2 thousand volunteers each year. However, the state asked Lee to support this event, as various problems occurred when the state led this event. “Due to the lack of budget, I had to ask for help from various corporations, social organizations, my fellow compatriots and the Marine Corps back in Korea. A lot of people lent their hands and gave donations to us. The basketball team, the Golden State Warriors also participated as volunteers and helped us out,” explained Lee. Oakland, therefore, announced ‘The Day of Lee Jong-hyeok’ on the fifth of May, 2004, to thank his contribution to the state. "Race is not important in achieving what you wish to do!" (Photo courtesy of Lee) “Some might say it’s just a lifelong regret of my adolescence. However, I wanted to show that anything is possible once you try it, even in the white society. More frankly, I solely wanted to reach the goal I had set for myself,” answered Lee, to the question of his motivation to achieve such a variety of results. He emphasized the word ‘enthusiasm’ to all Hanyangians during his interview. Lee explained that it’s important to set one’s goal straight and to stick to them. He also emphasized to hold on to self-actualization with a distinct willpower to achieve their goal. “Live hard, love hard, learn hard, and share hard!” On Jung-yun jessica0818@hanyang.ac.kr

2018-01 15

[Alumni]The New Head Coach of the School Basketball Team Expresses Confidence

Once upon a time, there was a shooting guard on the Hanyang University’s (HYU) basketball team who led the team to win the competition. Twenty-three years later, the player returned to his home team to teach his pupils. This week, News H met the new head coach of HYU's basketball team, Chung Jae-hun (Business, ’96). "I am deeply honored to come back home for teaching." About the coach himself A shooting guard is one of the five positions in a basketball game. He or she is the one who mainly attempts long range shots such as Stephen Curry in the modern NBA. Chung used to play as a shooting guard when he was in college. One of the moments that he remembers playing was his turn around shot against the Korea University team. 1995 was the year when HYU shared the top spot with Korea and Chungang University. After graduation, Chung became the founding member of Daegu Orion Orions, which is now called Goyang Orion Orions. The newly appointed head coach further explained his long passion towards leadership. “The frustration became bigger for me to lose a game as a coach, than to lose as a player,” said Chung. That is why he decided to retire from the court in 2002 after winning the 2001 season with the Orions. Now coming back to his home school as a head coach, Chung is inspired to grow the players as big as the alumnus already on the court. “I feel greatly honored and pressured at the same time,” smiled Chung. Hanyang's proud basketball team from last season. We ended up in 8th place last year. (Photo courtesy of HY-Ball) Prospects for the team Chung sees that the biggest strength of the team is speed. However he also recognizes its weakness which is the lack of height and defense. “We have many offensive options on the team but we lack defensive strategies.” Therefore he is planning to focus on improving the defense by emphasizing the centers to get more involved in boxing out, overcome the physical attributes by engaging in zone defense strategies and attempting to trap the opposition in the corners. Boxing out refers to blocking the opposition players from getting involved in rebounds, which is when the ball bounces back from the rim. Zone defense is when players mark the players according to their own respective areas. “Practice makes perfect,” said the head coach, looking determined. The only way to make up such shortcomings is to practice day and night. In the morning, the team is scheduled for weight lifting, defensive strategies in the afternoon, and personal skill training during the night. As Chung remembers his team back in the days in HYU, most players were able to do shoots, passes, dribbles and drives. Nevertheless, he feels like the students nowadays are less impressive, in terms of their abilities. “Still, by working to improve ourselves little by little, we will be able to have competitiveness through the use of various strategies,” mentioned Chung, with hope in his eyes. "Instead of fancy plays that catch the attention of the crowd, I will defend and rebound more to improve the team," said Bae Kyung-sik (Sports Industry, 4th year), the captain of the team. When asked what his goal is for next season, Chung replied with humbleness: “We aim to make it to the play-offs." A playoff is a competition played after the regular season by the top competitors to determine the league champion or a similar accolade. Once our team makes it to the playoffs, Chung believes that the team can possibly reach the final four. “Me and the whole team shares the goal of reaching the final four. Although people might think that we are not a strong team, we aim high,” Chung aspires. The new season starts from March. Let us keep our eyes on the upcoming games and the progress Chung will bring to the team. Kim So-yun dash070@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Choi Geun-baik

2018-01 11

[Alumni]Proud International Students of Hanyang

The number of international students in Hanyang University(HYU) are increasing year after year, and now they consists of a certain portion of the school. Over 400 students entered HYU in one semester, from 43 different countries. The international students not only learn the curriculum from our school, but are also giving large outputs as proud Hanyangians. News H met 3 students who came from overseas to study in HYU and decided to continue their career in Korea. A desire to do what I want “I first came to HYU just because it was a sister school of my university in China,” started off Jiao Liu (Mechanical Engineering, ’17). He was interested in the area of computational analysis, and therefore took lectures related to his interests. He had to start off with the basic theories of math, epidemiology, and so on to interpret and analyze data processing professionally. “I had an ardent wish to study in the Applied Aerodynamics Laboratory run by professor Cho Jin-soo. As I exerted my time in his lab, I was able to gain practical experience for my career,” reminisced Liu. Liu is now working in the Hyundai Motors Technology lab of China, working in the Computer Aided Engineering(CAE) department. He analyzes the static stiffness and vibration noise through CAE interpretation, to develop motor vehicles. As a foreigner in Korea, Liu had his own difficulties. “I only had a few friends in Korea as an international student. However, as I stayed in the lab, my professors and colleagues helped me whenever I was sick or in troubles. I sincerely want to thank them for their kindness,” explained Liu. He is now in his second year of work, and thanked HYU for letting him successfully seeking a career in Korea. “I graduated a school which empowers talented people, I will also strive to become a great Hanyangian myself!” "I want to invite my parents to Korea and live together." (Photo courtesy of Liu) Having my own unique outfit “I realized I liked and was talented in designing clothes through after-school activities in China,” said Yuan Ying (Clothing and textiles, Doctoral program 4th year). Yuan achieved her dream of majoring clothing design in an overseas university through HYU. Yuan entered HYU in 2010, majoring in clothing and textiles and continued on her doctoral degree in 2014. In 2016, she entered a start-up club to actualize her dream. Yuan explained “Specific clothing trends change in two weeks term. However, this term is too short to design, produce and commercialize clothing by myself. That’s why I came up with creating a ‘production automation’ platform.” Yuan created an application named ‘Design U’, which includes the functions of production automation. Product automation is an idea which all procedures before the actual sewing could be completed automatically, with anyone’s own idea. Through this application, Yuan allows customers to create their own design, collect people who wish to purchase the same design, and finally receive the clothes individually. “I wanted to provide a method for individuals to purchase clothes with whatever design, colors or fabric. I wish I could better systemize this platform in the near future and extend this to my home country,” commented Yuan. Yuan showing a page of her application, 'Design U'. For the better me ‘Hallyu’ was a major reason that enticed a student to enter a Korean university. “I studied Korean as I entered university, and started to dream of studying in Korea since then,” explained Han Ximeng (Accounting, Doctoral program ’17). Financial accounting was a familiar area for Han, as one of her family members was engaged in the field. She had been preparing for her Chinese Certified Public Accountant(CPA) after acquiring a private accountant license in China. She decided her career in HYU to better specialize in this area. Han not only concentrated in her studies, but tried out various part-time jobs and interns. “I taught undergraduate students on basic accounting theories. I also had a part-time job in a cosmetic trading firm as a translator, and worked in Korean cosmetic shops to improve the Korean nuance,” reminisced Han. After her various experiences, she realized financial accounting was what she truly wished to do. In order to be a Chief Financial Officer(CFO), she decided to look for a job in Korea. She is now working in the Accounting department of SK innovation affiliation SK General Chemical, writing settlement of accounts and annual reports. “It’s only my fifth month, and still have a lot more to learn. The actual task itself isn’t as new as the culture of companies. I had more hardships with speaking honorific words according to the position,” explained Han. She showed her aspiration to improve her abilities to be able to work in any country she happens to face. Han is achieving her dream step by step to become a CFO. (Photo courtesy of Han) On Jung-yun jessica0818@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Kang Cho-hyun

2018-01 02

[Alumni]A Doctor at an Art Museum

What does the field of medicine and art have in common? To that question, doctor Park Kwang-hyuk (Department of Medicine, ’00) answers that they both revolve around the life and death of humans. While the field of medicine works strenuously to lengthen human lives by finding the cause and remedies for diseases, art strives to capture the essence from various moments in a person’s life. Having found this intriguing factor, Park has devoted his life equally to each of these fields. He works as a physician before noon, and gives art lectures in the afternoon. The audience of his lectures are somewhat varied, from corporations to public offices and schools. One lecture that he gives on a regular basis is through his weekly art gathering, the Mona Lisa Smile. The Mona Lisa Smile The name 'Mona Lisa Smile', suggested by one of the members, has a dual meaning. The first is quite literal, referring to the mysterious smile of Mona Lisa, one of the most symbolic works of art in the Louvre Museum. The second meaning is derived from the movie, The Mona Lisa Smile. In the film, the protagonist is an art instructor who attempts new approaches to art lectures. Park expressed satisfaction with the name, as it well captures the values that his gathering strives for: the love for art and the desire for new things. The Mona Lisa Smile is a social gathering that welcomes anyone who shares a love for art. (Photo courtesy of Park) When asked how the Mona Lisa Smile came to being, Park replied that he originally began with docent lectures, which is a type of lecture that handles art facts and history when some of his audiences approached him with a suggestion to begin a regular lecture. Intrigued by his lecture contents, they formed a regular social gathering for art lovers, where Park could give regular lectures. For Park, it was a great opportunity as he liked nothing more than to study art under various themes and prepare lectures to share his findings. Some of his most popular themes were “The plague in classical art”, “Gambling in classic art”, “Jealousy in classic art” and so on. The classes are held every Friday, from 7pm to 9pm, in Yeoksam-dong. About 30 to 40 people from a total of 70 members attend, where classical art is approached in a variety of perspectives, such as medicine, humanities, and so on. Not only are there lectures but also group museum tours from time to time on weekends. Although most of the members are artists and doctors, Park mentioned that he was surprised to find out the diverse professions of his audience, such as lawyers, pharmacists, accountants, and public servants. A Doctor at an Art Museum Park also published a book titled, “A Doctor at an Art Museum.” It is part of a series in which different fields are applied as windows to perceive classical art. There are books such as “A Chemist at an Art Museum,” “A Lawyer at an Art Museum,” and such. Park explained that the book was actually a collection of his lecture notes from the Mona Lisa Smile. Some of his members asked for a review note of his lectures to organize their contents, so he began sharing his analysis on internet communities. The notes had so great a reaction that people nudged him to organize them into a book. Park also wrote columns for art magazines from time to time, and some of them were also used for the book. Although his lectures revolve around a large number of themes, he was asked specifically to extract contents related to the field of medicine to emphasize his characteristic as a doctor. Park answered that he was surprised to find out that "A Doctor at the Art Museum" had a decent sales number. (Photo courtesy of Park) The story of Park Park recalls that he had been mesmerized by Greek Mythology as a child. As an introverted kid, he often turned to mythology books during his free time. However, his ideas and concept of various gods and myths were only in his imagination. It was when he encountered his first classical art piece that the ideas in his head were portrayed in real life. He realized that a picture really did speak a thousand words, and that there were details that he had never thought of before. It was in that moment when he realized his love for art. Later in his high school years, he witnessed the death of a protestor during a demonstration in Shinchon. Such a close encounter to death was a traumatic event for him, and he recalled that he was even physically ill for a few days. He had spent the rest of his life trying to forget the memory of what he had seen on that day. Then, during his second year in medical school, he went on a trip to Europe. He visited the Louvre Museum in Paris, where he was mysteriously drawn to the Liberty leading the People, drawn by Eugene Delacroix. He stood in front of the piece and shed tears for a long time. “I saw myself in that drawing. Among the protesters leading the rally, there was a frightened looking child, whom I found myself in.” He felt as if his old trauma was fading away and realized that there is a power in art which can heal people. Throughout the interview, Park was excited about his next lecture regarding the piece, The Girl with the Pearl Earrings Now Park is living a happy life pursuing his interests and his profession. He jokingly added that many people think that he must make a lot of profit from his activities, but as a father of five daughters, he has to work very hard to maintain his life balance of both fields. He plans to lead this lifestyle for as long as he can, and when asked about any of his long term goals, Park answered that he hopes to publish another book in the future. In his last comments, Park wanted to tell the readers that there are many domestic artists who are extremely talented but have a hard time maintaining their professions. Just like the late artist Vincent Van Gogh, artists cannot keep up with their living expenses and only draw. He expressed deep sympathy, as domestic art museums such as Hangaram Museum, Somang Museum, and many small galleries in Insa-dong carry a number of art works from talented artists who haven’t had a chance to get any spotlight. Although he himself holds small auctions to raise support funds for unknown artists, he hopes to see many more opportunities and events to promote talented, yet unknown Korean artists. Lee Chang-hyun pizz1125@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Kang Cho-hyun