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2018-02 12

[Alumni]A Proud and Blissful Architect

“At the age of 85, looking back at my life, I am very happy and thankful,” began Yu. Yu Hi-jun (Department of Architecture, ’58) is a Hanyang alumnus and an emeritus professor who taught at Hanyang for 34 years. Having experienced, learned, and achieved a lot in his long journey of life as an architect, Yu has a shining story to share. An architect and an artist Almost every day, Yu goes to a coffee shop nearby his house alone and enjoys a cup of coffee for a good two hours. “I like to look back at my life to recall my deeds and ponder whether I’ve led a good life or not.” It all started with Yu’s hobby of drawing a continuous pattern on paper every weekend, which gladly and willingly imprisoned Yu in his room. Since he was in middle school, Yu unconsciously showed his talent in art. “One time, when I was a first grader in middle school, my teacher told us to draw a sketch of the school building. Afterwards, he would put every piece of work on the front board and let it be evaluated openly by all of his classmates. When he saw mine, he said it wasn’t just a mere sketch,” remembered Yu. From this and several other incidents, Yu began to discover his talent in art and architecture. There had been many ups and downs in Yu’s life before entering Hanyang’s Department of Architecture, such as being captured by the military troop, the Korean War on the 25th of June in 1950, and following months of starvation. Due to the war, Yu was not able to make it to highschool graduation. However, this did not stop him from going to university. During his years in Hanyang, his talent in drawing and architecture became more prevalent and outstanding that it attracted popularity and attention from in and out of the school. Eventually, during the days when going abroad to study was as rare as being nearly impossible, Yu went to America to extend his studies in architecture for graduate school in Iowa. He attempted to earn his tuition fee by getting a job in a design office. “When I was walking in Hanyang campus one day, I was determined to make Hanyang University a better school with my own hands," commented Yu. One thing that triggered Yu’s desire for studying further was the frustration he received when his professor frequently remarked, ‘there’s something great about this work.’ Yu was more than desperate to find out what that “something” was, which he quenchingly found the answer to after his research and studies in America and during his long years of teaching in Hanyang. The answer was brought to Yu by his accumulation of knowledge and skills as an artist and an architect. Building up on his talent, his hunger for studying and ambition for the future enabled Yu to overcome his past hardships, and that drove him forward. Having studied abroad, Yoo's fluency in English is not surprising. Built in the past, stands through the future “My philosophy in architecture is creativity. Regardless of the type of art, once seen, it should ring a pounding beat to one’s heart at the first sight. I was once requested to design a cathedral. After completing it, I imagined the situation where I had to put rows of mattresses because I was afraid people who saw it for the first time would scream and fall back,” said Yu, half jokingly. He revealed that his source of inspiration is his knowledge and all the theories he has studied. Yu takes a shower before starting his work to freshen up his body and mind. “The theories and concepts I’ve studied have become a great stimulus, and that’s where my inspiration comes from.” Being the receiver of the 21st Catholic Art Special Prize this week, Yu’s notable list of achievements goes on and on. Starting with the former president Park Jung-hee’s office, Yu turned out to be the one who designed the architecture of the Blue House’s (the Korean Presidential Residence) Reception Hall. In addition, after president Park’s wife had become deceased, Yu was requested to remodel her bedroom. He was even requested to design the office of the Minister of Foreign Affairs by the president. It was evident that Yu’s sense of architecture was at the level of wide recognition and appreciation, even by the president, so much so, that he was almost single-handedly responsible for such tasks. From designing several cathedrals to numerous buildings and from writing a number of books, there have been countless achievements Yu has accomplished in his life. Yu remembers the day when he was in a bookstore in Canada looking for books related to architecture and feeling inexplicably happy. He was so happy that he was able to study and learn and be who he was. His passion for studying and architecture has never seemed to dwindle. From December of 2015 to December of 2016, Yu’s private exhibition by the name of ‘Passion’ was held, expressing his happiness and thankfulness of his life. His passion and devotion to art and architecture will remain enthusiastic in his works. The Reception Hall of Cheongwadae, the Korean Presidential Residence (Photo courtesy of enacademic.com) Three of the paintings from Yu's 'Passion' (Photo courtesy of galleryro.net) "You need to discover your own path. Otherwise, it won't open." Jeon Chae-yun chaeyun111@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Kang Cho-hyun

2018-02 11

[Alumni]Touching the Hearts of Children

When asked what she aspires to become, Yoon Na-hyo (Media Communication, ’17), a young yet well-experienced voice actress of over 10 years replied, “I’ve always wanted to become ‘Santa Clause.' Simply because giving out ‘presents’ always makes people happy. Seeing a smile on their face means a whole lot to me.” Yoon continued to unfold the story of her passion in the small yet intriguing voice acting industry. A natural Yoon is currently a children’s voice acting content specialist who also works at a company for digital content marketing. Having graduated from Hanyang University (HYU) quite recently, she is already a well-known voice actress in the field as the voice of the “Catch the Mouse” song (KBS Happy Sunday: 쥐를 잡자) as well as over 500 different works, including animation dubbing, textbook CD covers, and so on. She also took part in the songs of ‘Pororo the Little Penguin’ (뽀로로) and ‘Tayo the Little Bus’ (타요), two of the most popular kids shows. Yoon at the recording studio (Photo courtesy of Yoon) While it is a rare case to find something you both love and have natural talent for, Yoon was fortunate to have found both at such an early age of 12. According to Yoon, she always loved singing in front of other people and with the support of her parents and teachers, she was able to perform on various stages as well as television shows as a part of the Children’s Choir. She had even won a long list of prizes at singing contests as well. As her voice received more and more attention from different producers, she was scouted and introduced to take part in voice acting roles. “The voice acting industry in Korea is pretty small, so everybody pretty much knows each other. In particular, once you start specializing in a certain role such as, a young girl of about 3 to 7, or a teenage girl’s voice, like me, then most of the time you’re given the opportunity to try out for that role.” Where true passion lies Although Yoon had started working and gaining experience from a very young age, becoming a voice actress wasn’t her dream from the very start. However, she says that she has never gotten tired of it before and wants to continue working in this industry. “It’s because I truly enjoy what I do. My life motto is to do everything I want to do. So no matter how challenging the task is, and because I genuinely love my work, I’m always happy and can continue to push myself to achieve my goals.” "My love and passion for my work is what motivates me in the end." Of course, even for Yoon, whose passion lies in the heart of her drive, an inspirational mentor had always been there to guide her along the path. A renowned children’s song composer, Kim Bang-ok (composer of “그대로 멈춰라”) has worked together with Yoon ever since Yoon took her first step as a voice actress. “We still talk and sometimes work together. She is my model because she is always passionate about her work no matter how big or small it is and never fails to give it her all. I always learn something from her and respect her very much.” A dream to accomplish When asked what she thinks her greatest achievement is so far, Yoon answered, “when I randomly catch children watching Pororo or Tayo, I feel proud. Also, knowing that a lot of children will grow up listening to my voice, especially through educational content, that is when I find meaning in my work.” As a voice actress, it is an inevitable fact that her voice will change with age. Yoon also admitted that she is well aware that her job as a voice actress specializing in children’s voice will not last forever. However, because her passion lies in working for children, she wishes to continue working in the children’s content field by expanding her capacity to content creation, marketing, and distribution through diverse media channels such as Youtube, Naver, and so on. That is why she is currently learning the whole process at her current company, in order to combine this knowledge with her first-hand experience in the field of production. According to Yoon, “especially, nowadays, where media is inseparable from our lives, I think the type of media content we've been exposed to plays a greater role of influence on all our lives. Since I am particularly interested in working for children, I wish to be able to reach out to them more and hopefully put a smile on their faces with the content I produce.” Pororo song (Video courtesy of Yoon) Park Joo-hyun julia1114@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Choi Min-ju

2018-02 06

[Alumni]Ekklesia: Under the Sound of Music

In today's competitive society, our lives tend to be labeled as either a failure or a success--two contrasting concepts that one wishes to completely avoid or achieve. But the simple truth that people fail to recognize is that there can be no great success without failure. A model example of this is Kim Jae-bin (Vocal Music, '13), the lead singer of a popera group called Ekklesia. On the rise Holding a long list of stage experience and media exposure, Kim is an active, rising star in the popera field continuously working his way up to success as the leader as well as the CEO of Ekklesia (Ekklesia Enterprise). Now a well-known popera group, it consists of three members including Kim himself. The term “Ekklesia” itself is a Greek word defined as “an assembly under God’s calling." It well incorporates Kim’s dream to perform songs that both singers and the audience can emotionally relate to and return with a bit of peace and happiness. However, it was not always a path full of bliss for Kim to get to where he is today. In particular, back when he first started out as a popera singer, it was one bumpy road that not many wanted to risk taking. “Popera,” also known as operatic pop, is a subgenre of pop music that is performed in an operatic singing style or a song. As it is a more popularized version of classic opera among the public, one would think that it is a positive trend in the classical music industry. However, in the beginning, it was perceived as some sort of heresy and received heavy criticism from the field. Likewise, Kim was also skeptical before taking this path until his life mentor and professor in charge at that time strongly suggested that he try out for a popera group called “UAngel Voice,” which would then provide him with abundant stage experience and financial support. After two years as a ‘Uangel Voice’ member, he did not want to quit as “it allows me to feel the instant connection with the audience as it has more interaction than classical opera performances. This ultimately led me to create Ekklesia," said Kim. UAngel Voice stage rehearsal, 2012 (Photo courtesy of Kim) Walking down the rough path Kim's background story was surprisingly full of rough patches that started out with “I had nothing more to lose as I was starting from scratch. Whatever I challenged myself with, even if there was a huge chance of failing, I knew that there could only be a way up for me.” At one point, Kim even had to work as a salesman in an insurance company to financially support Ekklesia. Despite these hardships, he never refrained from challenging himself to try new things. “I like the term ‘전화위복’ (转祸为福; misfortune turns into a blessing). My years of experience at the insurance company allowed me to truly understand all the hardships these people were going through everyday at work. I then incorporated it in my message to these people through the songs I performed for them. It was quite successful, and I was able to sign long-term contracts with other large companies to perform at their workshops and seminars.” Fear of failure: the only hindrance to reaching your dream For Kim, one of the most meaningful performances was from back when his group gave hour-long performances on stages in the metro stations. "One time, this mother and a child who had been watching our entire performance bought a huge cake and coffee for us. The mother thanked us for our performance and told us that her daughter who actually hated music, insisted that they stay and watch till the end. She had never seen her so happy. This was the moment when it really hit me, that I was doing something meaningful. From then on, my passion for music grew, and I have never hesitated to try something new.” Kim with a mother and her child after performing at Sadang station, 2014 (Photo courtesy of Kim) When asked if he thinks he is now successful, Kim said yes without a doubt. Kim’s definition of success was being able to proudly perform a piece that is not only the collaboration of pop and opera, but a collaboration of everybody’s heart: mix and intercommunication of our dreams and feelings. He added that, right now, he is truly happy only because he knows the starting point of his path – how it was before, his past experiences and so on, and also because he has a lifelong goal. “I hope that my popera successors will dream big but fear less. If we look carefully, there are many stages we can perform on although it may not be as financially rewarding or live up to one’s expectations. Don’t let your fear of failure blind you from all those chances out there and end up only looking for short-cuts to success.” Ekklesia performing "Love" (Video courtesy of Kim) Kim Jae-bin - Le Temps des Cathédrales (Video courtesy of Kim) Park Joo-hyun julia1114@hanyang.ac.kr

2018-01 17

[Alumni]Passion to Learn After the War, Landing in America

Hanyang University(HYU) is now in its 79th year of establishment. Throughout these years, countless students have graduated from our school and are shining in their own positions all over the world. Lee Jong-hyeok (Industrial management, ’65) is one of these students, working in America as the representative of Lee Accountancy Group. Last November, Lee made his first visit to HYU since 1965 to receive an honorary graduation certification. An honorary graduation certificate and a development fund After attending HYU as an architecture major for three years since 1958, he passed an exam by the ministry of Education to study abroad. He then voluntarily enlisted himself in the Marine Corps before moving to another country. He changed his major to industrial management after he was discharged from military service, and therefore graduated from HYU as a industrial management major. After almost 60 years, Lee received an honorary graduation certificate of an architecture major last November. As Lee received his honorary graduation certificate, he commented, “I only wandered around the alumni of architecture since I graduated with another major. Now I can proudly call myself an alumnus of architecture to my colleagues.” Lee received an honorary graduation certificate in the office of the president in November, 2017. Lee also made a 40 thousand dollar development fund contract for HYU. 10 thousand dollars is being planned to be donated every year, for four years. He had a special reason he decided to donate this money to HYU. “I received help from the school in various areas and was occasionally exempted from tuition fees. I was the very refugee who moved from Hamgyong province to South Korea immediately after Korea was emancipated from Japan. I therefore decided to donate this money, counting this fund as my tuition fee for four years,” explained Lee. He also conveyed his words that he wishes his money to be spent on students with willpower to pioneer their own path. As a foreigner, as a pioneer With peculiar interest to learn, he not only graduated HYU, but continued on his degrees in America. He has a bachelor’s degree in California Sonoma State University’s School of Business and Economics, a master’s degree in Golden Gate Graduate School Business Administration major and a doctor’s degree in Argosy University Graduate School Business Administration major. He had his reasons for his passion to study. “After I fled for refugee after liberation, I was left alone during the Korean war. I continued my studies alone, to be accepted as a member of the society,” reminisced Lee. He first entered HYU’s architecture department with hopes to set up Seoul again after the Korean war, which ended in 1953. However, after he was discharged from military service, he changed his major with his interest in industrial psychology. Lee therefore continued on his studies in America, to study deeper into industrial psychology. In Sonoma State University School of Business and Economics, he had to study accounting in order to proceed on his major. Although it was then an unfamiliar field, he was captivated by the systematic and organized trait of accountancy. Afterwards, he received a Certified Public Accountant (CPA) in California, and worked as an adjunct professor in various universities such as Armstrong State University, San Francisco State University and East Bay California State University. Lee also worked as an economic consultant in California State Government and Oakland, and is now the representative of Lee Accountancy Group. Lee is now a proud representative of a corporation in America. (Photo courtesy of The Korea Times) The power of determination Oakland led the Thanksgiving Day for the lower-income group and the homeless, with over 2 thousand volunteers each year. However, the state asked Lee to support this event, as various problems occurred when the state led this event. “Due to the lack of budget, I had to ask for help from various corporations, social organizations, my fellow compatriots and the Marine Corps back in Korea. A lot of people lent their hands and gave donations to us. The basketball team, the Golden State Warriors also participated as volunteers and helped us out,” explained Lee. Oakland, therefore, announced ‘The Day of Lee Jong-hyeok’ on the fifth of May, 2004, to thank his contribution to the state. "Race is not important in achieving what you wish to do!" (Photo courtesy of Lee) “Some might say it’s just a lifelong regret of my adolescence. However, I wanted to show that anything is possible once you try it, even in the white society. More frankly, I solely wanted to reach the goal I had set for myself,” answered Lee, to the question of his motivation to achieve such a variety of results. He emphasized the word ‘enthusiasm’ to all Hanyangians during his interview. Lee explained that it’s important to set one’s goal straight and to stick to them. He also emphasized to hold on to self-actualization with a distinct willpower to achieve their goal. “Live hard, love hard, learn hard, and share hard!” On Jung-yun jessica0818@hanyang.ac.kr

2018-01 15

[Alumni]The New Head Coach of the School Basketball Team Expresses Confidence

Once upon a time, there was a shooting guard on the Hanyang University’s (HYU) basketball team who led the team to win the competition. Twenty-three years later, the player returned to his home team to teach his pupils. This week, News H met the new head coach of HYU's basketball team, Chung Jae-hun (Business, ’96). "I am deeply honored to come back home for teaching." About the coach himself A shooting guard is one of the five positions in a basketball game. He or she is the one who mainly attempts long range shots such as Stephen Curry in the modern NBA. Chung used to play as a shooting guard when he was in college. One of the moments that he remembers playing was his turn around shot against the Korea University team. 1995 was the year when HYU shared the top spot with Korea and Chungang University. After graduation, Chung became the founding member of Daegu Orion Orions, which is now called Goyang Orion Orions. The newly appointed head coach further explained his long passion towards leadership. “The frustration became bigger for me to lose a game as a coach, than to lose as a player,” said Chung. That is why he decided to retire from the court in 2002 after winning the 2001 season with the Orions. Now coming back to his home school as a head coach, Chung is inspired to grow the players as big as the alumnus already on the court. “I feel greatly honored and pressured at the same time,” smiled Chung. Hanyang's proud basketball team from last season. We ended up in 8th place last year. (Photo courtesy of HY-Ball) Prospects for the team Chung sees that the biggest strength of the team is speed. However he also recognizes its weakness which is the lack of height and defense. “We have many offensive options on the team but we lack defensive strategies.” Therefore he is planning to focus on improving the defense by emphasizing the centers to get more involved in boxing out, overcome the physical attributes by engaging in zone defense strategies and attempting to trap the opposition in the corners. Boxing out refers to blocking the opposition players from getting involved in rebounds, which is when the ball bounces back from the rim. Zone defense is when players mark the players according to their own respective areas. “Practice makes perfect,” said the head coach, looking determined. The only way to make up such shortcomings is to practice day and night. In the morning, the team is scheduled for weight lifting, defensive strategies in the afternoon, and personal skill training during the night. As Chung remembers his team back in the days in HYU, most players were able to do shoots, passes, dribbles and drives. Nevertheless, he feels like the students nowadays are less impressive, in terms of their abilities. “Still, by working to improve ourselves little by little, we will be able to have competitiveness through the use of various strategies,” mentioned Chung, with hope in his eyes. "Instead of fancy plays that catch the attention of the crowd, I will defend and rebound more to improve the team," said Bae Kyung-sik (Sports Industry, 4th year), the captain of the team. When asked what his goal is for next season, Chung replied with humbleness: “We aim to make it to the play-offs." A playoff is a competition played after the regular season by the top competitors to determine the league champion or a similar accolade. Once our team makes it to the playoffs, Chung believes that the team can possibly reach the final four. “Me and the whole team shares the goal of reaching the final four. Although people might think that we are not a strong team, we aim high,” Chung aspires. The new season starts from March. Let us keep our eyes on the upcoming games and the progress Chung will bring to the team. Kim So-yun dash070@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Choi Geun-baik

2018-01 11

[Alumni]Proud International Students of Hanyang

The number of international students in Hanyang University(HYU) are increasing year after year, and now they consists of a certain portion of the school. Over 400 students entered HYU in one semester, from 43 different countries. The international students not only learn the curriculum from our school, but are also giving large outputs as proud Hanyangians. News H met 3 students who came from overseas to study in HYU and decided to continue their career in Korea. A desire to do what I want “I first came to HYU just because it was a sister school of my university in China,” started off Jiao Liu (Mechanical Engineering, ’17). He was interested in the area of computational analysis, and therefore took lectures related to his interests. He had to start off with the basic theories of math, epidemiology, and so on to interpret and analyze data processing professionally. “I had an ardent wish to study in the Applied Aerodynamics Laboratory run by professor Cho Jin-soo. As I exerted my time in his lab, I was able to gain practical experience for my career,” reminisced Liu. Liu is now working in the Hyundai Motors Technology lab of China, working in the Computer Aided Engineering(CAE) department. He analyzes the static stiffness and vibration noise through CAE interpretation, to develop motor vehicles. As a foreigner in Korea, Liu had his own difficulties. “I only had a few friends in Korea as an international student. However, as I stayed in the lab, my professors and colleagues helped me whenever I was sick or in troubles. I sincerely want to thank them for their kindness,” explained Liu. He is now in his second year of work, and thanked HYU for letting him successfully seeking a career in Korea. “I graduated a school which empowers talented people, I will also strive to become a great Hanyangian myself!” "I want to invite my parents to Korea and live together." (Photo courtesy of Liu) Having my own unique outfit “I realized I liked and was talented in designing clothes through after-school activities in China,” said Yuan Ying (Clothing and textiles, Doctoral program 4th year). Yuan achieved her dream of majoring clothing design in an overseas university through HYU. Yuan entered HYU in 2010, majoring in clothing and textiles and continued on her doctoral degree in 2014. In 2016, she entered a start-up club to actualize her dream. Yuan explained “Specific clothing trends change in two weeks term. However, this term is too short to design, produce and commercialize clothing by myself. That’s why I came up with creating a ‘production automation’ platform.” Yuan created an application named ‘Design U’, which includes the functions of production automation. Product automation is an idea which all procedures before the actual sewing could be completed automatically, with anyone’s own idea. Through this application, Yuan allows customers to create their own design, collect people who wish to purchase the same design, and finally receive the clothes individually. “I wanted to provide a method for individuals to purchase clothes with whatever design, colors or fabric. I wish I could better systemize this platform in the near future and extend this to my home country,” commented Yuan. Yuan showing a page of her application, 'Design U'. For the better me ‘Hallyu’ was a major reason that enticed a student to enter a Korean university. “I studied Korean as I entered university, and started to dream of studying in Korea since then,” explained Han Ximeng (Accounting, Doctoral program ’17). Financial accounting was a familiar area for Han, as one of her family members was engaged in the field. She had been preparing for her Chinese Certified Public Accountant(CPA) after acquiring a private accountant license in China. She decided her career in HYU to better specialize in this area. Han not only concentrated in her studies, but tried out various part-time jobs and interns. “I taught undergraduate students on basic accounting theories. I also had a part-time job in a cosmetic trading firm as a translator, and worked in Korean cosmetic shops to improve the Korean nuance,” reminisced Han. After her various experiences, she realized financial accounting was what she truly wished to do. In order to be a Chief Financial Officer(CFO), she decided to look for a job in Korea. She is now working in the Accounting department of SK innovation affiliation SK General Chemical, writing settlement of accounts and annual reports. “It’s only my fifth month, and still have a lot more to learn. The actual task itself isn’t as new as the culture of companies. I had more hardships with speaking honorific words according to the position,” explained Han. She showed her aspiration to improve her abilities to be able to work in any country she happens to face. Han is achieving her dream step by step to become a CFO. (Photo courtesy of Han) On Jung-yun jessica0818@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Kang Cho-hyun

2018-01 02

[Alumni]A Doctor at an Art Museum

What does the field of medicine and art have in common? To that question, doctor Park Kwang-hyuk (Department of Medicine, ’00) answers that they both revolve around the life and death of humans. While the field of medicine works strenuously to lengthen human lives by finding the cause and remedies for diseases, art strives to capture the essence from various moments in a person’s life. Having found this intriguing factor, Park has devoted his life equally to each of these fields. He works as a physician before noon, and gives art lectures in the afternoon. The audience of his lectures are somewhat varied, from corporations to public offices and schools. One lecture that he gives on a regular basis is through his weekly art gathering, the Mona Lisa Smile. The Mona Lisa Smile The name 'Mona Lisa Smile', suggested by one of the members, has a dual meaning. The first is quite literal, referring to the mysterious smile of Mona Lisa, one of the most symbolic works of art in the Louvre Museum. The second meaning is derived from the movie, The Mona Lisa Smile. In the film, the protagonist is an art instructor who attempts new approaches to art lectures. Park expressed satisfaction with the name, as it well captures the values that his gathering strives for: the love for art and the desire for new things. The Mona Lisa Smile is a social gathering that welcomes anyone who shares a love for art. (Photo courtesy of Park) When asked how the Mona Lisa Smile came to being, Park replied that he originally began with docent lectures, which is a type of lecture that handles art facts and history when some of his audiences approached him with a suggestion to begin a regular lecture. Intrigued by his lecture contents, they formed a regular social gathering for art lovers, where Park could give regular lectures. For Park, it was a great opportunity as he liked nothing more than to study art under various themes and prepare lectures to share his findings. Some of his most popular themes were “The plague in classical art”, “Gambling in classic art”, “Jealousy in classic art” and so on. The classes are held every Friday, from 7pm to 9pm, in Yeoksam-dong. About 30 to 40 people from a total of 70 members attend, where classical art is approached in a variety of perspectives, such as medicine, humanities, and so on. Not only are there lectures but also group museum tours from time to time on weekends. Although most of the members are artists and doctors, Park mentioned that he was surprised to find out the diverse professions of his audience, such as lawyers, pharmacists, accountants, and public servants. A Doctor at an Art Museum Park also published a book titled, “A Doctor at an Art Museum.” It is part of a series in which different fields are applied as windows to perceive classical art. There are books such as “A Chemist at an Art Museum,” “A Lawyer at an Art Museum,” and such. Park explained that the book was actually a collection of his lecture notes from the Mona Lisa Smile. Some of his members asked for a review note of his lectures to organize their contents, so he began sharing his analysis on internet communities. The notes had so great a reaction that people nudged him to organize them into a book. Park also wrote columns for art magazines from time to time, and some of them were also used for the book. Although his lectures revolve around a large number of themes, he was asked specifically to extract contents related to the field of medicine to emphasize his characteristic as a doctor. Park answered that he was surprised to find out that "A Doctor at the Art Museum" had a decent sales number. (Photo courtesy of Park) The story of Park Park recalls that he had been mesmerized by Greek Mythology as a child. As an introverted kid, he often turned to mythology books during his free time. However, his ideas and concept of various gods and myths were only in his imagination. It was when he encountered his first classical art piece that the ideas in his head were portrayed in real life. He realized that a picture really did speak a thousand words, and that there were details that he had never thought of before. It was in that moment when he realized his love for art. Later in his high school years, he witnessed the death of a protestor during a demonstration in Shinchon. Such a close encounter to death was a traumatic event for him, and he recalled that he was even physically ill for a few days. He had spent the rest of his life trying to forget the memory of what he had seen on that day. Then, during his second year in medical school, he went on a trip to Europe. He visited the Louvre Museum in Paris, where he was mysteriously drawn to the Liberty leading the People, drawn by Eugene Delacroix. He stood in front of the piece and shed tears for a long time. “I saw myself in that drawing. Among the protesters leading the rally, there was a frightened looking child, whom I found myself in.” He felt as if his old trauma was fading away and realized that there is a power in art which can heal people. Throughout the interview, Park was excited about his next lecture regarding the piece, The Girl with the Pearl Earrings Now Park is living a happy life pursuing his interests and his profession. He jokingly added that many people think that he must make a lot of profit from his activities, but as a father of five daughters, he has to work very hard to maintain his life balance of both fields. He plans to lead this lifestyle for as long as he can, and when asked about any of his long term goals, Park answered that he hopes to publish another book in the future. In his last comments, Park wanted to tell the readers that there are many domestic artists who are extremely talented but have a hard time maintaining their professions. Just like the late artist Vincent Van Gogh, artists cannot keep up with their living expenses and only draw. He expressed deep sympathy, as domestic art museums such as Hangaram Museum, Somang Museum, and many small galleries in Insa-dong carry a number of art works from talented artists who haven’t had a chance to get any spotlight. Although he himself holds small auctions to raise support funds for unknown artists, he hopes to see many more opportunities and events to promote talented, yet unknown Korean artists. Lee Chang-hyun pizz1125@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Kang Cho-hyun

2017-11 20

[Alumni]Flower Blossomed Belatedly, but Firmly

On November 7 of 2017, the Ministry of Justice has announced the final 55 successful candidates of the last National Bar Exam of South Korea. Due to the alternation in the way of selecting judicial officials from the bar exam to law school, the 59th National Bar Exam will be the last bar exam in Korean history. One of the 55 successful applicants was Park Jong-hyun (Law, '96), the oldest of all. News H met Park to hear his passionate story of his 15 year journey in becoming a judicial officer. Park is the oldest of all successful candidates of the 59th National Bar Exam. “The bar exam was my youth” It was Park’s 15th year of studying for the bar exam. When he found out with his wife and family that one of the crowns for the last bar exam was his, he could not restrain his overflowing joy. “I do not know whom to thank, but I am happy that I was finally allowed to achieve my dream at the last possible chance,” said Park. When Park graduated from the Department of Law at Hanyang University, he joined the army. When he finished his two years of military service, he married his wife and began his journey of passing the bar exam. “After my discharge from military service, I pondered upon the importance of law in a civil society and concluded that law is the bridgehead of the country which made me challenge the exam,” revealed Park. For 15 years, Park has regarded goshichon (area around Shilim-dong where people preparing for national exams live and study) as his home. Park’s studying pattern for the bar exam was organized and incessant. Park woke up at six in the morning to study at both the academy and the private group studying session. In the midst of studying, Park never skipped working out for 30 minutes to an hour. “This pattern was my life for 15 years and I was sometimes scared that I will not be able to get off this routine forever. At these times, my wife always stood by me, and I tried to cope with my fear because I didn't wanted her to see my vulnerability,” reminisced Park. Patience with dignity sees the light Park’s life motto is “Even if the world does not give me a chance, that is still my life.” With this in mind, Park always tried to patiently study and wait for his glory to come. “I thought being professional at knowing the world is one of the most imperative criteria in becoming a judicial officer. Thus, I sometimes worked at part-time jobs, and this also prevented me from considering myself a pity,” said Park. With such bright energy and attitude, Park tried to relieve his family and also root for his mates at the academy. “I think my family and friends at the goshichon were the main reasons that kept me on track, even when I had failed the second-round of the bar exam for six times,” smiled Park. Park’s attitude as a judicial officer is a Hanyangian ideology- “love in deed.” “I will know what kind of officer I will become only after I graduate from the Judicial Research and Training Institute. But, this is one thing I know- that I should be assisting my service even for the smallest part of the society,” emphasized Park. Beginning next year, the National Bar Exam is being abolished, and the law school system is being adopted. “I feel extremely sorry for those who tried out for the last bar exam like me. I am sure that they will be able to gleam light on their life, with other paths too,” said Park. "It may take a short or maybe a long time to achieve your dream. But, do not hesitate to follow your passion, and please do not give up." Park is now going to enter the Judicial Researching and Training Institute to learn which kind of judicial part he is best suited for. “I hope that all my Hanyang juniors will never forget the spirit of love our prestigious school stresses, and if you are truly devoted to your role at Hanyang and the society, you will be able to bloom your distinguished flower,” said Park. “Keep fighting with your passion and with your youth. Please try to remind yourself that youth is not about time, but about your attitude and heart!” Kim Ju-hyun kimster9421@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Lee Jin-myung

2017-11 19

[Alumni]A Civilian-Friendly Band of Police

There are many pairs of words that make sense as an oxymoron such as a silent scream, only choice, military intelligence, and so on. How about police and music? The police is an established body that enforces the law, limits civil disorder, and protects property, whereas music is a form of art and cultural activity that gives people joy and satisfaction. In the Police Academy Band, the officers select, arrange, and practice music to perform in a variety of occasions, adjusting to their duty. Park Nam-yong (String and Wind Instruments, Majored in Trumpet, ‘02) is a sergeant of Seoul Metropolitan Police Agency and the leader of Golden Crown Ensemble of the Police Academy Band who connects the police and the civilians through music. Beauty but a beast Park wanted to major in physical education until he became a high school student. The turning point of his life that sent him to the College of Music of HYU was when he entered the Wind Orchestra, which had no string instruments and consisted mainly of wind and percussion instruments. Among the others, the trumpet stood out as the main melody, which called Park’s attention. “Trumpet can leave a strong and masculine impression to the audience but at the same time, it contains warm and soft melody in its sound. Its appearance looks robust and tough but it produces sound that suggests otherwise,” described Park. Learning the instrument led Park to gear his career path towards music, not physical education. Wanting to find a promising occupation as a musician, Park decided to become a member of the Police Academy Band. Golden Crown Ensemble is principally a quintet, consisting of two trumpets, a horn, a trombone, and a tuba. However, due to the frequent need of a drum, the band more often performs as a sextet. “A quintet without a drum has a limited range of performable music. For instance, when we played The Pirates of the Caribbean, it was essential to include the drum. Sometimes, more than five instruments are a requisite.” In other words, Golden Crown Ensemble’s number of its members could range from 5 to 12, making it a brass ensemble instead of a quintet. “Since we’ve performed in countless places and times, it’s hard to recall every episode. But the most memorable performance I’d had was the World Police Band Concert, which was held in October in Japan. We played Frontier by Yang Bang-ean and Arirang and other pieces by arranging them into one.” In every performance, Golden Crown Ensemble considers the audience and their age, selecting the most adequate songs. If the audience is elderly, the band would choose the music from decades ago and if the performance is held in a middle school, music like pop songs would be the choice. The band occasionally performs as a bigger group than a quintet. (Photo courtesy of Park) The band's performance has been putting focus on domestic and school violence. (Photo courtesy of Park) Civilian-friendly? civilian-oriented! The band, as it is not an ordinary music band but a police-officer music band, has to fulfill its duty by performing in congruity with the national policy. Up to quite recently, the band has been performing with the theme of wiping out the four wickednesses of the society for the safety of citizens: rape, domestic violence, bullying, and junk food. Besides, public performances such as that near the Korean presidential residence had been held every Thursday for seven years. Through these approachable performances, Golden Crown Ensemble tries to give the citizens the impression that they are always close and attentive, providing cultural entertainment at the same time. One cordial fact about the band is that they tour around and visit every corner of the country. Their schedule is determined by calls or by their voluntary visits. “If we are called, we go without hesitation. But more importantly, we open concerts for anyone and everyone, including the socially neglected or disadvantaged. We even opened a small music concert in a park of homeless people.” The band gets calls from outside organizations, government, schools, and most meaningfully, from the citizens. Wherever there is a need, the band goes! "We will always be citizen-friendly!" Jeon Chae-yun chaeyun111@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Kang Cho-hyun

2017-11 13

[Alumni]88 Ways of Speaking: To Keep Myself

“Tigers die and leave their skins: People die and leave their names.” This is a famous proverb that points a great master’s name that lives on. Son Hwa-shin (Korean Language & Literature, ’09) as a high school student thought she also wanted to pass her name down, especially through her writing. “The idea that you eventually die, but your work lives for eternity is so fascinating,” said Son, with her eyes glowing with enthusiasm. News H met Son, a beginning essayist who just published her first book through Daum Kakao’s amateur writing platform, ‘brunch beta’. "I wish to write an essay that can be called a masterpiece." “He was a person who knew exactly what he wanted.” Son always had a passion for writing, and that led her to major in Korean language and literature. Nevertheless, she did not realize that writing can also be a breadwinning career. While having a minor identity crisis, Son went to an exhibition to clear her head during the summer of 2015. That is when she read the quote: “He was a person who knew exactly what he wanted.” “I was genuinely stunned by the words,” said Son. That was the moment when she realized that the root of her crisis starts from ignorance of her own wills. Son said what comes between ‘I am just a’ and a period truly represents oneself. Son thought ‘writer’ fills her blank. "I am just a _____ ." What fills your blank? Luckily enough, she encountered the notice for ‘brunch project’ online which promised its first-place winner with an opportunity to publish his or her book through Kakao. “This is it,” thought Son. She wanted the blue ribbon so bad to quit her job and focus on writing. “It would be a lie if I say I was never worried, but I had faith. The blue ribbon felt like mine, and I wanted to turn my life around with this award,” mentioned Son. However, life gave her a lemon. She did not make it to the first place but to second. Son, however, turned it into a lemonade instead. Second-place, unlike the first, is awarded with some funds to support the writer to publish a book on one's own. The process of writing a book proposal, sending them to several dozens of publishers, and having meetings taught her a lot. “Come to think of it, I feel lucky to win the second-place instead of first,” reminisced Son. The book 88 Ways of Speaking: To Keep Myself (2016). Click the image to purchase the book. (Photo courtesy of Sam and Parkers) Writing as a way to love oneself Son’s book ’88 Ways of Speaking: To Keep Myself (2016)’ contains 88 brunch posts that tell everyone to ‘talk like oneself’. “I felt like in this fast-changing world, people keep losing and forgetting who they are. In that context, I perceive life as battle to keep who you are.” Son strongly asserted that in order to talk like yourself, you first have to know yourself, which can be accomplished through writing. For most of the people who are afraid of writing due to various reasons, Son recommends them to write about what you like. It might lighten your burden by writing on an external subject, but in the end, all writings encompass the thoughts and logic of the writer. Once you get used to writing, Son emphasizes having one’s own style is also important. Left is Amedeo Modiglian's 'Portrait of Jeanne Hebuterne in a large hat (1918)', and the right piece is Edvard Munch's 'The Scream(1893)'. Both paintings uncover the essence through distortion. (Photo courtesy of Wikipedia) Wanting to have excellence in writing, Son also studiously develops her own writing style. She aims at highly connotative, contextual writings through writing less. “I often think of art when I write,” said Son. Amedeo Modigliani or Edvard Munch reveals the essence of a subject not through depicting it in a realistic and specific way, but rather through simplifying and distorting it. Son also enjoys adding her literary touch to her news articles. “If you think of an article, it feels cold and simply informative. But an article can ironically provide a better understanding through literary approaches,” mentioned Son. This technique is called ‘not tell but show’. For instance, Son could simply write ‘the reporter met actor Hong at a café in Samchung-dong’, but by adding ‘a café with a beautiful chandelier’, readers can instantly picture the place where the interview took place. Son is a young dreamer with an affection and enthusiam for writing. Son definitely plans to publish more essays in the future. “I’ve never really thought of myself as an essayist, but by being called as one, I am even more motivated to write more essays,” said Son with excitement. Throughout the interview, Son turned into a young dreamer whenever she talked about her writing. With such passion and diligence, News H is looking forward to reading more of her works. To catch up what has already been uploaded, click HERE. Kim So-yun dash070@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Choi Min-ju