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2017-02 20 Important News

[Alumni]Three Hanyangian Stars from Phantom Singer

The long march of Phantom Singer, a musical crossover audition program broadcast by JTBC, officially ended on 27 January. In the final round, the teams “Popularity Phenomenon" (Ingi-Hyunsang) and “Hyungspresso" (deep-hearted espresso) carried on the baton after the champion team “Forte di Quatro”. Despite the loss of the crown, both Popularity Phenomenon and Hyungspresso have shown that classical vocal music can intrigue the public and gain popularity. From Popularity Phenomenon, tenor Yoo Seul-gi (Department of Voice, ‘13) and tenor Paek In-tae (Department of Voice, ‘10) shed fresh light on the traditional genre of vocal music, as well as baritone Kwon Seo-kyoung (Department of Voice, 2nd year) from Hyungspresso. News H met the three proud alumni to hear the behind stories and beyond. Seizing the opportunity through Phantom Singer Q1. Congratulations on finishing the long adventure of Phantom Singer. How do you feel now it's over? Paek: I'm sad I can’t watch my favorite weekly program any more. But I feel freed from the burden of selecting and practicing songs for the performances. I'm also anticipating the future that I'll face. Yoo: It was such an honor for me to ornament these grand performances, and the experience will become a dominating page of my history. As many say, the culmination of one thing leads to another beginning. I hope that the fans will look forward to my upcoming expedition. It is also my wish to contribute to elevating the pride of Hanyang University. Kwon: The past six months with Phantom Singer have been full of busy and dramatic moments. Feelings of sadness engulf me, but my gratitude for the program and the audience is the greatest. As a baritone singing vocal music, I was so happy that many people were drawn the attractiveness of this genre of music. I hope that many will look on for further activities of mine. Q2. How did you come to know this auditioning program, and how did you decide to participate in Phantom Singer? Paek: Our friend, Seul-ki, suggested that we participate this program together. Without Seul-ki, I wouldn't be where I am today. Kwon: Seul-ki also brought me into this program, which I thank him a lot for. I seized the opportunity the moment it was offered, because the program seemed so attractive to me. Yoo: The purpose of this program, Phantom Singer, drew me in. Fusing various musical genres is an adventure, and I thought that it should be tried out. I'm grateful to the program, because this motive is imperative for hardworking people engaged in music. Q3. Two songs, <Musica> and <Grande Amore>, have received fervent responses from the audience. What do you think are the main reasons behind this ovation? Paek: I think that the reason behind the popularity of <Grande Amore> that Seul-ki and I sang was because we performed the kind of the music that people couldn't easily approach. When we were teamed up as a duo, it was a competition and it was assumed one of us had to ultimately leave the show. However, that rule was yet undecided, and we thought that if we do well enough, we will be able to bring changes. So there we were, successfully finishing up the performance, going onto the next round together. Yoo: <Grande Amore> means “grand love”. As you can see from the performance, In-tae and I lock eyes with one another with strong intent. The emotion that we intended to reveal was fiercely competing against one another to attain "grand love" from one woman. I think the audience understood the vitality of our emotions and that is why our performance was lauded. Kwon: The song <Musica>, which I sang with my partner Ko Eun-sung, wasn't traditional vocal music. Rather, it declared the identity of Phantom Singer’s fusion of music. Crossing over various genres was a great challenge for me. But the original trend of fusing music attracted the audience, which I was extremely glad about. <Grande Amore> sung by Yoo Seul-gi and Paek In-tae <Musica> sung by Kwon Seo-kyoung and Ko Eun-sung Q4. How did the preparation process for the performances go about? Yoo: The entire process takes about two weeks. The song selection for the man-to-man mission wasn't burdensome, until the members accumulated to four people. After spending about 16 hours only to choose what song to sing, for the next few days we'd ponder about how to format the song, and in what style we should amend it. The remaining time was assigned for practice. Paek: Normally, when four people prepare for a performance, you're given at least two months. This was an incredibly pressuring time limit, but it was also a new experience for a singer like me, who works with classical vocal music. Kwon: On television, a lot of the preparation process is edited due to the airing time. In reality, more time and endeavors are spent for each performance. Maintaining the rightful physical condition for singing was also a challenge. Personally, Phantom Singer grew me into a better, stronger baritone. Baek, Yoo, and Kwon (left to right) talk about their adventures on Phantom Singer. Tantalizing charm of vocal music Q1. How did your introduction to vocal music begin? Paek: My musical life began when I was a freshman at high school. Music class was the only time I earnestly paid attention to, and when I was tested for my school’s music exam, I sang “Geunae" (swing). My music teacher sincerely suggested my mother to lead me to a music career. Mom supported me a lot, even though our family wasn't financially abundant. Yoo: I started music when I was four years old, which is a dim past. I found joy in music through piano first. Then, my mother thought that my voice would suit vocal music, which is how I entered the world of singing. Kwon: I was in sixth grade when my voice broke, ahead of my peers, so my voice was naturally louder. When I was preparing for the school’s music festival, my music teacher pulled my musical talent out of me. Going down the road of music was a delightful decision of mine. Q2. If you slumped at any point in your career, how did you surmount them? Yoo: I think I'm the master of slumps. Hardships always come to people who try hard. Through slumps, I grow up into a stronger and a more talented singer. Those who continue trying shouldn't fear pitfalls. Kwon: During the letdowns, I thought that my entire musical life would end. Temptation always allured me to try out easier singing strategies, but singers should always utilize the standard, traditional tactics to find the true voice in oneself. Paek: When a swimmer goes through a slump, he or she usually starts from the beginning and exercises command of the basic fundamentals of swimming. But for singers, the fundamentals of music are within us, in our physical body, and this invisibility sometimes frustrates us. I found that practicing until you forget the frustration you feel is the only way to conquer hardships. The three Hanyangian stars are looking forward to their future, filled with hope for genuine music. Singing Hanyangians’ memories Q1. Why did you decide to apply to Hanyang University? Kwon: Before I came to HYU, I was attending a college of music in Italy. But I decided to come back to Korea just to meet and learn from our professor at the Department of Voice, Ko Sung-hyun. At a great university with a marvelous teacher, I am the happiest student ever. Paek: The College of Music at HYU is renowned for its magnificent history and renowned alumnis. Also, professor Ko Sung-hyun is a teacher that every vocal music student wishes to be taught by. I came to Hanyang University to learn how to become a better singer through Professor Ko’s teaching. Yoo: Just like In-tae, I applied for HYU twice. It was my dream school, with Professor Ko being my admirable teacher. Becoming his student was my main goal then, and even today I am honored to have been a student of Ko's. Q2. Any advice for HYU's music students? Kwon: It's hard to focus on music only, but the day will come for you to see an opportunity and seize it. Try to face the bigger world and do not fear the ups and downs of life. Enduring the present will be valued in a better future. Yoo: It may sound frustrating, but I've learned that the world isn't that easy and hopeful. We will try to pave the hope-filled roads in this world, so follow our paths and try to pave them deeper. Paek: Be happy. Be extraordinarily happy with your career that you can’t even begin to think of giving up. Kim Ju-hyun kimster9421@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Kim Youn-soo

2017-02 13

[Alumni]Synthesizing Pansori With Modern Music

Pansori is a type of Korean traditional music originating from the 17th century of the Joseon dynasty. Designated by the UN as a 'Masterpiece of the Oral and Intangible Heritage of Humanity', pansori is a unique music genre representing Korea, characterized by its sad melody and beautiful storytelling lyrics. However, nowadays, young Koreans are more exposed to modern music, with pansori often being misjudged as outdated and boring. Ko Young-yul (Korean Traditional Music, ‘16) is a pansori singer (a sorikkun), and is an individual who tries to resolve this problem and deliver pansori more compellingly to the general public. Ko is a sorikkun who modernizes pansori by collaborating with other genres of music. The enchanting charm of pansori Ko pursues an innovative music style, merging pansori with contemporary music such as a piano or a guitar piece. Breaking from tradition, he is trying to make pansori music that can better satisfy the tastes of the younger generation. Ko is currently working with two fusion music bands, Dubeonjjae Dal (The Second Moon) and Eastern Most, and performed in several modern changgeuks, a genre of Korean traditional musical, such as Great Detective Hong Sullok of Korean Empire and The Romance of the Unhyeon Palace. He is gaining fame by making appearances on TV, in the program Gugak Hanmadang, singing a sarangga (love song) from Chunhyangjeon, a famous love story performed in pansori, with a piano accompaniment performed by himself. Although Ko is a young professional in pansori, it has been about ten years since Ko started it. "I used to swim when I was young, and I aimed to become a professional in it. To increase my lung capacity, I began practicing pansori under the influence of my mother, who was learning it at that time. I came to be enthralled by the music as I practiced more and more,” said Ko. Ko explains the unique features of pansori. (Click on the link to listen to Ko's sarangga. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TOQDE7l98BA) According to Ko, one of the most charming aspects of pansori is its vocalization. Pansori singers generally use the abdominal muscles to produce sound, which is why each note contains depth. Jireugi, a singing style that is similar to belting, is the most prominent vocalization method of pansori. Vibration is also different. Nongeum is a way of vibrating by moving the note itself with voice, not by controlling breathing like other Western singing techniques. “A skilled sorikkun is not only equipped with the basics, such as mastering vocalization, but can also ‘draw’ the story and convey the feelings of the lyrics well. This is because lyrics are more important than melody in pansori." Ko’s strengths as a sorikkun are producing low-pitched tones and the knowledge of the concept of melody. “Because I play the piano, I understand chords well. I know what I'm doing when I'm working crossovers with different genres of music.” Harmony of past and present, East and West Ko’s music gives off a characteristic fragrance that morphs indigenous pansori into a delicate and refined style which makes him a recognized pansori musician to the public. This marked attribute of his music is the fruit of the musical concern Ko had in his high school years. “People went ‘wow’ when I tell them that I sing pansori but they don’t seem to know what is so ‘wowy' about it. I felt a great urge to make pansori music that my generation could understand,” Ko reminisced. “It is not easy arranging pansori and merging it with diverse genres of music, such as Western jazz and various musical instruments, due to differences in melody and style,” Ko explained. As difficult as it is, though, the results are highly satisfactory and pleasing to the ear. Ko is not only interested in writing and arranging songs, playing the piano, guitar, and the trumpet but also studies other genres of music. This is to broaden his knowledge on the musical styles of the East and the West, the past and the present. “I want to become a leading sorikkun who can show Koreans and anyone around the world that pansori is an outstanding genre. I started pansori with this belief and will try everything to make Korean music take another leap forward in its development.” Ko's dream is to convey pansori's greatness to ears of the general public. (Photo courtesy of Ko) Jang Soo-hyun luxkari@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Kim Youn-soo

2017-02 06

[Alumni]Singing Guardian of the Korean Gesang

Gesang, a German word meaning ‘a musical structure of a lyrical poem that acquired music’, can be created with any poems due to its unconstrained property of composition. A host of western gesangs are well known to a large spectrum of audiences, such as The Poet’s Love by Robert Schumann or Schwanegesang (Song of a Swan) by Franz Schubert. Despite the grand number and the beauty of many Korean poems, the Korean gesangs are neither well-known nor composed often. To spread the beauty of the Korean Gesangs, Jang Eun-hun (Department of Voice, '87), an alumnus of Hanyang University, took the lead for its betterment. Dynamic graph of life As a little boy living in an isolated countryside, Jang was unaccustomed to what made Jang today- music. All of a sudden, an opportunity came to Jang, when he began going to church, which was the only place with a piano in Jang’s village. “I enjoyed singing and playing piano at church when I was young. Because my village was mountainous, I strolled around a park every day, singing or mumbling poems that I knew,” recalled Jang. During his teenage years, he spent his days practicing and learning music in earnest at a mission school. When Jang applied to Hanyang University, he was selected as a scholarship student for the Department of Voice. “I never went to school festivals or parties, but I only practiced opera at school. Although I don’t regret it, I do reminisce the past and think that my youth should have been more reckless,” added Jang. However, his endless endeavors achieved results. After graduation, Jang was able to go to Italy to study music. ▲ Jang's passion for music began in his earlier years. Even after his four years at university, Jang thought that he still had an unnatural vocalization method. So, at the home of Vivaldi, Venice, Jang hammered harder with music. When he returned to Korea, his efforts paid off. Jang gained recognition in the field and worked as an established, eminent lecturer and a musician. “In my late 30s, I decided to change the route of my life. It was deep in my heart that the Korean gesang is a beauty, and that I had to disseminate this allure out for others to realize it, too." Because Korean history embodies emotions of sorrow, fury, bliss, and cherish, Jang posits that Korean poems written on Western manuscript would bewitch the audience, if popularized. Telling the world of the beauty in Korean Gesang To uplift the status of Korean gesang, there were two main checklists on Jang's agenda- improving the vocalization and composition of Korean gesang's structure, and building art halls to perform it. However, it was a long road for Jang to build two art halls without any financial sponsors. “My work is rare in our community, and I did not want to outstand from the beginning which may backfire." Jang started off by researching vocalization types that would suit the emotions and language of Korean poems. At last, he found that the Korean poems had stronger sense of emotions and soft pronunciation, which harmonize well with hymn-like melodies. Further, Jang also began to publish Korean gesang collections for children, so that gesangs can move out among all generations. Representative gesangs that Jang composed are Ouga (The Song of Five Friends) written by a poet called Yun Seon-do, and Nagunae (Traveler) by the poet Park Mok-wol. ▲ Jang composes melodies that suit the pronunciation of the Korean language, and strike a chord with the emotions of Korean poems. In building the art hall process, Jang, his wife, and two children became laborers and architects. For about 15 years, Jang and his family worked hard to design and build the halls and as a result, two Korean gesang art halls were created- Naeum Art Hall in Seoul and Korean Gesang Memorial Hall in Suncheon. “Both art halls offer stages performed by nationally famous musicians free of charge. The difference between the two halls is that one in Seoul was made for the convenience of musicians distance-wise, and the one in Suncheon was built to harmonize with nature,” said Jang. The Korean Gesang Memorial Hall in Suncheon, where Jang came from, is surrounded by mountains, Suncheonman Bay, and farms. “Surrounded by the beauty of nature, audiences can rest and immerse into Korean gesangs performed. I also decided to produce and host the International Korean Gesang Festival in the Suncheon Memorial Hall monthly, so that audiences may visit at any time they want for performances,” added Jang. ▲ Photo of Naeum Art Hall located in Seoul, Gangnam-gu. (Photo courtesy of Jang) ▲ Photo of Korean Gesang Memorial Hall located in Suncheon (Photo courtesy of Jang) The Naeum Art Hall has a special meaning behind its title. Naeum is an acronym for ‘love for nation, love for music’ in Korean (Nara sarang, Eumak sarang). In every step he is taking, there is a will of Jang to cherish Korean art. According to Jang, he is still on the move. ▲ Nagunae (composed by Jang Eun-hun, lyrics by Park Mok-wol) Kim Ju-hyun kimster9421@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Moon Ha-na

2017-01 16 Important News

[Alumni]Finding One’s Own Image

Personal color trend still continues in Korea. Personal color refers to the hues that would best match one’s natural colors of complexion, hair, and eyes. According to the color theory, finding one’s personal colors can help people discover their best-suited ways of tyling and makeup. While the concept of personal color originates from Europe, it is now very popular in Korea as well. There are an increasing number of people who would like to receive advice from professional image consultants as that can later make their shopping more cost-effective. This week, News H met with an image consultant from Hanyang University (HYU), Chon YeaSeul (Korean Literature, ’12). Life as an image consultant Chon was interviewed in a small yet very cozy and relaxing studio, ‘YEASEUL IMAGE’. “I started working as an image consultant since 2012 and opened up this studio in 2016,” said Chon. “There can be different services image consultants can provide to its customers. I focus on analyzing colors and the body proportion of a customer. Then, I would organize what I have found to tell what colors look best on them and what kind of styling of clothes and hair they should go for, which can greatly help them on special occasions,” said Chon. Chon is demonstrating how to find the best colors for a client. “My working days are from Wednesday to Sunday, which are the days when I meet with clients.” There are roughly four kinds of services Chon provide in her studio. It includes color consulting, color, face and body consulting, personal shopping, and makeup lessons. The first two consultations all start off from examining the best and worst color match for a customer. “I use about 50 to 120 color drapes to see what kind of color, different in its brightness, looks best to with a customer,” explained Chon. In a full consultation service, befitting to one’s body shape and ratio, Chon suggests specific shapes of glasses and eyebrows. Also, the styles of clothes and tips are given to customers. During non-working days, Chon focuses on market researching. “I wander around stores and test on new makeup products or clothes that I can suggest to my customers. I also visit different online communities to see what people like, and why they like it,” said Chon. From a crew member to a magazine assistant Before Chon started to work as an image consultant, she had some very unique and different careers. “I loved to be engaged in different out-of-school activities when I was attending HYU. I loved meeting new people and interacting with them and it led me to go on a trip as an exchange student to London. At London, I focused on learning English which allowed me to communicate with even more people and it was like the opening of new world to me,” said Chon. Such experience led her to spend a year prepare for a job in a Qatar airline. After a year of working as a crew member, Chon decided to move on and come back to Korea for a new challenge, being a magazine assistant she wished for since she was very young. “Unfortunately, I had to quit the job in the middle due to the internal affairs of the company. I was very depressed at the time what I should do in my life,” said Chon. Some of the failures at different magazine companies didn’t stop Chon from keep trying. She soon found out that a lot of the past crew members try out to become what is called a ‘CS lecturer’ in Korea, which refers to lecturers who give lectures at corporates with subjects like how to give proper service to its customers. “In one of the courses, there was a class called ‘image making’ which dealt about how to make oneself more attractive by combining proper colors and stylings. The class itself was very intriguing to me and I realized my past careers go along quite well to become an image consultant,” said Chon. Lessons at London Image Institute gave Chon the power to consult her clients with logic. (Photo courtesy of Chon) Continues to challenge New goal put her right into an action to become a qualified image consultant. To deepen her learning, she again went to London to take courses in London Image Institute. “I thought it was essential for me to go to the place where the concept of personal color is originated,” said Chon. For a month at London Image Institute, with famous Image consultant Lynne Marks, she focused more on learning colors. “At London, I kept practiced categorizing colors and styling different models. I was surprised to see that no two people have same image, everyone looks attractive when their charming points are most emphasized.” “I think all my different experience added up as a firm base to help me become a better image consultant. At the airline, I learned how to communicate well and treat people more kindly. As a magazine assistant, I learned how even the same products can give contrasting images with different settings, which are all needed qualifications for an image consultant,” said Chon. There is no settling for Chon, she is still dreaming and preparing for new challenges. “If given an opportunity, I want to participate in styling and image making for K-pop stars, as I always wanted to work for SM Entertainment,” said Chon. "I was more fearless because i had nothing to lose," said Chon. Yun Ji-hyun uni27@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Kim Youn-soo

2017-01 15

[Alumni]A Writer that Reads the World

“Do you know when you feel hunger the most? It’s not the moment right before you eat your food on the table. After having the first bite, that is when you feel hunger the most,” started Chun. Writer Chun, who graduated from Department of Journalism & Mass Communication recently opened up a Spanish restaurant called 'Table of Don Quixote' after having lived in Spain for her studies. Part 1. Being a writer Chun has started her writing in order to become a journalist and to let the world know about the stories that are yet to be unveiled. Due to her convictions in that writing for newspapers would do justice when it comes to unfair treatments that people get, she wanted to become a journalist. “I couldn’t keep up to the standards that have been set up to become a journalist and that is why I majored in literature again,” said Chun. After carrying out her studies in the field of literature, she naturally felt that it was just the work for her. “I would agree that writers actually write for a living, but I would say that it is more of reading the world and recreating it into one of the languages,” added Chun. She stresses that writing is about how she portrays the world that she sees through her eyes. “Back in the days when we were students, it was hard to even have a dream of our own. I have read probably all the books that I would read during my lifetime while I was studying literature,” said Chun. Since her dream was never set on being a writer, she says that she devoured the knowledge better and faster than others. “I had my hard times as well. I have always paid for my own tuition fees and worked in academies and publishing companies while writing my own novel,” she said. After 6 years of her studies in literature, she has started her literary career with the novel, 'Needle' which depicts about the characters that are actually around her. One of the most important things that Chun thinks when it comes to writing is being absorbed into the work itself and the characters until the she understands the person both on the mind and the body. Chun tells her stories about what it was like learning literature. Part 2. Being a cook “It was not only about being a cook but more of starting up a business. The whole process had to be chosen and I had to learn about all the interior designs to electric wiring to set up my own restaurant,” said Chun. She has always had her passion about cooking for other people and during a residence program at the University of Malaga, she obtained the chance to learn how to cook Spanish food. Although she started learning how to cook in order to be acquainted with the language itself, she later admits that she has got to understand the lives of Spanish people a little. “I learned how to cook in the morning and helped out as a teaching assistant for American tourist programs. At night, I did my writing once I got back to the dormitory,” recalls Chun. She says that she had one of the most comfortable and dreamy lives during her stay in Malaga. Her restaurant only opens up during the night time due to her fear of literature being further apart from her. “I used to open up full time but since I work on my own, I got exhausted during the weekends and didn’t have any time of my own,” says Chun. In addition to having an individual time, she says that it is the thing about the Spanish food that fits in well at night time. “There’s a lot of Spanish food that goes well with alcohol. ‘Serve little and more dishes’ is how you eat Spanish food which is why it should fit in better at night,” added Chun. Gazpachuelo is one of her favorite Spanish dish since it is a traditional Malaga regional food. It is hard to find anywhere else and Chun has promised her friends in Malaga that when they visit her restaurant, she would serve them the special dish of gazpachuelo. "Cooking is a part of the adventure itself." Chun wishes that she could write during her whole life time and stay awake. Enlightenment and adventure is what she seeks all the time and cooking is a part of the adventure itself. She also added that there was no better name other than 'Table of Don Quixote' in that it is the table and the menus that she is venturing on. As there are no guidelines as to where and how one should live their lives, Chun’s adventure is something that people could refer to. Kim Seung-jun nzdave94@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Moon Hana

2017-01 08

[Alumni]New Leader of the Korean Advertising & PR Practitioners’ Society (1)

Many Korean students from middle to high school dream of becoming a righteous-minded advert maker after coming across public service advertisements. However, when they begin their academic career at university and face a grander society, their dreams tend to fade away and economic boon becomes the main goal of their life. In order to usher in students and prospective advertisement makers to the right places, the Korean Advertising and PR Practitioners’ Society (KCI) has been pursuing various projects and seminars for a period of 10 years. In the midst of those steps, Kim Bong-cheol (Department of Journalism & Mass Communication, ERICA Campus, '83), a professor at Chosun University, is determined to lead the Society on as its new leader. Values of society The Korean Advertising and PR Practitioners’ Society is differentiated from other advertisement-related seminars or societies. The Society distinguishes itself by learning and getting involved in the practical insight of advertisements, rather than studying and developing numbers of research papers that are sometimes full of logical fallacies and nonfactual theories. The KCI is composed of 500 PR (Public Relations) and advertisement experts from academia and business. “Mass communication and advertisements require not only educational knowledge, but also direct hands-on experiences, the Society maintains the balance of having educators and practitioners among its members,” said Kim. The Korean Advertising and PR Society hosts various contests and symposiums for the prosperity of the field. (Photo courtesy of Kim) The society hosts biannual symposiums and special seminars that cover new ideas and just, ethical methods of advertisements. “There are a host of projects designed and put into action. Two of these include academic journals published for the National Research Foundation of Korea and the Sarangbang sessions that call together university students in China to participate in the making of Korean tourism advertisements. They also include debates that discuss the future of advertisements,” explained Kim. Even though there is half a year left for Kim to become the de facto president of the society, he is preparing hard to lead the grand Society to the right path. Journey to the mass communication expert Kim emphasized the importance of both academic and practical experiences in advertisements. (Photo courtesy of Kim) When Kim was young, his dream was to become a consummate literary artist and to major in Korean language and literature. However, when Kim questioned himself of his gift as a writer, he realized that it wouldn’t bring much opportunity for him to succeed. So Kim decided to major in communication studies, even though he lacked professional knowledge or passion for the field. “I was a senior when I happened to apply for the Advertisement Research Paper Contest hosted by Jaeil Worldwide Incorporation- I received the grand prize. I felt proud and came to know my capabilities, which is why I decided to pursue a career in the advertisement field,” added Kim. After graduation, Kim worked for an advertising company in South Korea. However, adversity came when he decided to become a professor at Chosun University. “I got my doctoral degree in South Korea and I have never been educated abroad. In Korea, it is hard to be admitted as a qualified educator without any academic experience abroad. So, I thought that my effort will determine my future and I decided to write a host of qualified research papers and spread by work in many societies,” said Kim. His endeavor paid off when the fruit of his labor shined bright as a professor and the new president of the Korean Advertising and PR Practitioners’ Society. Kim is also the vice president of the Korean Advertising Society and a standing member of the Press Arbitration Committee. To the question of how he could stand so successful, Kim stressed academic knowledge that entails experience. “The field of advertisement and public relations can't be mastered with a ‘study hard’ attitude. It requires experience that expand the practical knowledge of binding academics with reality,” Kim professed. Although he feels burdened to become the president of a national society, Kim is ready to step up further. "Because the advertisement and PR are in close connection with social attitudes and trends, the economy needs to prosper in order for this branch to survive. Economically flourishing companies can support and utilize advertisements, so Kim hopes for a better economy for South Korea. “As an alumnus of Hanyang University, I was always proud of my school. Despite the harsh employment conditions that Korean university students currently face, I hope that they will always step forward with courage and anticipation. Enjoying what one does is the key to success,” concluded Kim. Kim Ju-hyun kimster9421@hanyang.ac.kr

2016-12 05 Important News

[Alumni]Exclusive Values of Interpretation

September 27th, 2016 was the first day of the televised presidential debate between Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump. Their dispute was broadcast and interpreted in different languages all around the world. Choi Hyun-jin (English Language and Culture, ERICA Campus, ‘05) is the interpreter who interpreted the debate for Korean viewers. Choi has not only interpreted all three debates of the US presidential candidates, but also aided famous VIPs, including prime ministers of Australia, Canada, Finland, ASEAN's Security General L. Minh, and various Korean ministers. News H met Choi to hear about the life of an interpreter, and the value of their work. Choi is a veteran interpreter who has worked in the field for seven years. The interpreter who translated Presidential Debates The US presidential debates were sources of great interest for viewers but they were intense battles for Choi, who was the one and only interpreter for every round of debates. “There was no time for preparation in the first round, so I focused on the main points and tried not to misinterpret,” she explained. Unlike normal occasions, there was no booth for the interpreters, nor soundproof walls or microphones available. Even so, Choi succeeded in this nearly impossible setting with utmost concentration, and was praised for her performance. Choi also participated in the lasting rounds of the debate. This time she could do even better because she had some time to prepare. She searched for pledges of the candidates, every world issue and news related with America and its politics, from economy, business, to climate change and Korea-related issues. After she was finished she herself felt great pride and honor as an interpreter, and she became known for her work to other translators as well. Climbing up to the summit of her dreams Though Choi is a professional interpreter, strenuous efforts were needed to become one. She first learned that there was an actual job of interpreting in her freshman year. ”I learned the concept of interpreting language in the teenage years I spent in Canada, because I had to aid in communication between my parents and my Canadian teachers. However, I never knew that I could be educated and thus be qualified to interpret in events such as international conferences, ” Choi said. Her professor and mentor, Lee Tae-young, introduced her about how she could enter graduate schools that teach translation and consequently become an interpreter. Since then, she decided on her career path as that. Choi immersed in interpretation work in her booth. (Photo courtesy of Choi) Although Choi was determined to become an interpreter, studying to be qualified for the job was very difficult indeed. “I studied two years at a specialized graduate school for interpreting. The work was so tough that I moved to a house near the school, and even studied during meals, ” Choi reminisced. Her endeavors surely paid off, because she passed the graduation exam and earned a Master's degree in interpretation which is necessary to become a professional interpreter. Now, her daily life consists of attending and preparing for big scale conferences and events from Monday to Friday. Before every occasion, she receives a thick packet of papers, containing information about the event that she has to learn beforehand in order to interpret well. “Language is like a baseline for being able to interpret. One should be equipped with the knowledge of what he or she would interpret, as well as being proficient in the native language, so that the content is delivered to the audience in the best way,” explained Choi. Choi (middle) translating during an ASEAN conference. (Photo courtesy of Choi) An aura of sophistication “Interpreting is not a job that stands out and shines. The work is more like a glow- I’m not the heroine, but more like a light that shines, or an aura behind heroes that always exists to do the job of brightening them,” Choi elaborated. She promised herself in the past to use her talents and skills to volunteer and help people when she becomes an interpreter. “Working as a translator is not easy, but if you like to meet global leaders and create a huge values for yourself and others, it is the job for you. The work really makes you want to improve yourself and pushes you to keep on trying. The work we interpreters do is simply a one-of-a-kind, ” Choi emphasized. Choi’s first dream was to become an interpreter, and the second is to teach students how to change one language from another. Thanks to the dean of her department she graduated from at HYU, she could procure the opportunity to lecture about consecutive interpretation (CI). CI differs from simultaneous interpretation in that the interpreter speaks after the actual speaker has finished speaking a segment. “I want to approach the field of language interpretation academically, such as obtaining a Ph.D. But also, as a lover of HYU, I would be in much delight to teach more of what I know if possible.” Choi's motto is 'an aura of sophistication', meaning that she wants to become a skilled interpretor who emanates a beneficent glow. Jang Soo-hyun luxkari@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Kim Youn-soo

2016-12 05

[Alumni]Dance as a Protest Medium

Professor Jang Soon-hyang is committed to combining dancing and protesting to build a proper relationship between society and manifestations of art. She received a doctorate degree from the Department of Dance and is currently a professor at the Social Education Center at Hanyang University. Often referred to as the “dancer of life, peace, and unification who always agonizes with the social roles of dancing”, Jang has been participating in numerous demonstrations and protests in attempts to bring societal reform. Dancing and the society When asked to interpret the societal role of dancing in terms of her experiences, Jang’s answer was equivocal. “I’m still looking for the significance and the specific role of dancing as a form of art in our society. One thing I can say is, if the dancing conveys a message that the audience could sympathize with, it will naturally attract more audiences. As for me, dancers do not always need to gain spotlight on a fancy stage, but rather, where their dancing is really needed is their appropriate stage,” remarked Jang. She added that as long as the dancer can express the connotations of their movements, the minimal objective is fulfilled. In 2005, Jang received an invitation from the Geumgangsan opera troupe, North Korea’s one and only performance group that travels abroad to perform, to learn South Korea’s traditional dance. Gladly accepting the request, Jang made contacts with the group and was surprised to find out that some of the members of the performance group were originally from South Korea. If dancing, along with other forms of art, could be the methods to communicate with people from different places, then the societal role of art would be to connect the subjects of social issues and the society. Jang noted that active participation in the society through artwork such as dancing could prevent them from being isolated and alienated from the national community, reiterating her point on the relationship between art and the society. Jang thinks dancers should be more concerned about social issues. Jang's past protest, objecting to the placement of THAAD in South Korea. (Photo courtesy of Jang) A socially conscious dancer Jang has been playing a vital role in resolving social issues in Korea, giving performances that implicate problematic aspects. One of the most recent activities she took part in was the 'Remember the 4.16 Sewol Shipwreck campaign', in which citizens infuriated with the Sewol ferry accident gathered at Gwanghwamun Gate to manifest their rage. Jang joined the group by expressing the people's fury by dancing on their behalf. In addition, she appeared at Gwanghwamun Gate again for the fierce demonstration for current president’s resignation. Since this affair continues to overwhelm the country these days, more people came to join the protest and appreciated Jang's efforts. “After my performance, one of the protesters gave me encouraging hug, expressing her melancholy about the situation of Korea. It was a very worthy moment, because from this, I was able to unite people with my dancing and they showed compassion in return,” recalled Jang. Jang protests for President Park's resignation at Gwanghwamun. (Photo courtesy of Ohmynews) Jang’s ultimate goal is to play a role in achieving the unification of North and South Korea. She hopes to see artworks, including dancing, acting as the constructive force that helps to build an interactive relationship between the two Koreas by reaching out and communicating bilaterally. “I want future dancers to be aware of social issues and try to think about what their role is as dancers within the society. Dancing is not only about being famous for one's beauty and elegance but also about carrying out necessary societal functions as a message conveyer,” expressed Jang. Jeon Chae-yun chaeyun111@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Kim Youn-soo

2016-11 28 Important News

[Alumni]Ko Kang-min, the Leader of Mabangzen

The history of theatrical plays traces back to Ancient Greece. Since then, different forms of entertainment emerged. From private films to musicals, the demand for performance arts have increased rapidly in the modern era, overpassing a number of theatrical plays. Yet, there is work to retrieve from the golden age of plays, and Ko Kang-min (Business and Administration ’01, ERICA Campus) is one individual who supports it as the CEO and producer of the theater company, Mabangzen. It is also known as a 'playfactory' where original plays are created from scratch in order to promote the theatrical plays of Korea. For Shakespeare, the world was a stage, and all the men and women were actors. For Ko, the stage is his life, bringing life to Korean theatrical plays. Ko developed the company successfully based on his experiences. Q1. Can you tell us more about Mabangzen and its origin? Ko: "Mabangzen is a company that produces and performs plays for the public. Our plays are all original plays where we develop everything, from the script to the stage setting, from the beginning to the end. The company was first established in 2005 by the play director, Ko Sung-wong. And it was named after the Korean traditional game Mabangzen, similar to Sudoku, in hopes of promoting the importance of teamwork. Like a game of Mabangzen where all the numbers added on each side must equal in sum, when all the members of the team cooperate to put together a play, the results will follow. Today, there are 46 members in the company including actors, producers, and directors." Q2. What is your role in the theater company? What do you like about your work? Ko: “Currently, I work as the CEO and producer in the company. I like to say that I am a supporter who manages the financial aspects, renting theaters, and finding sponsors, as well as practical aspects such as making the final call of which play to perform. I totally love my job here because I get to interact with the actors and the staff which reminds me of the days when I was just like them. I came to Mabangzen in 2010 after Ko Sung-wong convinced me to collaborate with him in the small theater company. It was a tough decision but when I believed that the goals we had as playwrights matched - forming a systemic method to generate quality plays - I agreed to it. I was also a big fan of Ko Sung-wong’s theatrical pieces. I think we work very well together.” Mabangzen produces original plays based on Korean culture. (Photo courtesy of Mabangzen) Q3. Can you tell us about the company’s work? Ko: “The most well-known piece of our company is called 'Hongdo', a play first introduced to the Korean public in 1936. It is a melodrama and a tragedy. The basic synopsis is about a woman, Hongdo, who is a gisaeng, or Korean geisha, who lives in a melancholic life after a heartbreaking incident with a man. This piece was very popular back in the mid-21st century; however, the writer of the play defected to North Korea which resulted in the public to shut off interest. We have performed this play since 2014 in major venues like the Seoul Arts Center and the Coex Arts Hall, as well as on the international stage in places such as the United Arab Emirates (UAE), Belarus, Turkey, and Chile.” Q4. You have also acted onstage. When did you first get involved in theater arts? Ko: “Yes. I have experience on stage as an actor as well. I don’t recall the exact year, but when I was in high school, I saw a poster that recruited members for the theatrical play club. I took part in it. It was a small-scale play but from that moment on, I developed my passion for plays. I desired to major in theater and film at university, but my father, who was an officer in the military, was strongly against it. Even though I studied business at Hanyang University (HYU), as soon as I entered HYU, I went straight to the theater club to take part. Then, I began to get involved in all-round plays by acting onstage, building stages, writing scripts, and producing performances. I think the lengthy experiences that I had in theater clubs helped me to acquire the know-how to become a CEO and producer.” Q5. When was the toughest time of your life as a producer? Ko: “I think the toughest time was definitely when we went overseas to perform 'Hongdo'. Out of all the international performances, I remember the first one, in China, as the one that I consider unforgettable. It was the first time our crew went abroad for performance, which was why the preparation process, which depended entirely on my abilities, was a burden. From getting visas to controlling the excessive exhilaration of young members, I even remember crying one night in the hotel bed! Aside from this trip, though, the job as a producer is always hard-hitting. The company has to receive financial support from external sponsors, and the concern regarding the successes and failures of each plays are something I must endure every day.” A scene from 'Hongdo', one of the masterpieces of Ko's production. (Photo courtesy of Mabangzen) Q6. Adversely, when was the most memorable moment? Ko: “I feel like I've focused too much on the depressing parts, but there is a reason why I still love my job and theatrical plays. Generally, after the end of each performance, I sit at the back of the room and watch the faces of the audience as they walk out of the venue. When I see their faces explicitly showing awes, I am the happiest person alive then. I didn't foresee the success of our plays internationally. Traditional plays are about Korea and we, the members of Mabangzen, are the bridge that links the our culture and a foreign one. It is arduous, but it brings me joy and great memories.” Q7. What makes theater arts special? Why do you think the public should enjoy watching theatrical plays? Ko: “For me, I loved watching plays because it was like taking a break from mundane life as a student. I used to watch about few hundred plays back in the old days. The funny thing is that I recently watched a blockbuster film at a cinema after years of not watching movies. Honestly, I was shocked to see the spectacular scenes and action that captivated most movie-watchers. That’s when I understood why people go crazy about these films. Even so, plays are not movies or musicals. It has its own 'something' to it. Even for me, it's extremely difficult to say which factors make plays valuable. All I can say is that there is that 'something' that only plays can portray and deliver to the audience. And our job is to continue to seek out the exclusive style of our plays, to let the audience know what plays are all about.” Q8. What are your goals for the future? Ko: “Practically, I want to enhance the quality of plays by improving the conditions of our company members. I am planning on building a villa near Seoul to create an effective practicing space for the entire crew. Members run under tight schedule and to practice in a typical training space requires immense amounts of energy but no time. I think establishing a system like camp training will increase efficiency and teamwork among the members. Other than that, I hope to produce plays that many will enjoy watching." Q9. Any last comments for the readers? Ko: “To be honest, I wasn't a bookish student when I was in college. Even though I majored in business, I attended more of the general classes that included literature and theater arts. Still, I stood strong to my passion and to what I wanted at the time, which naturally led me to where I am today. Right now, I don't know for sure how I will run this company in the next few years. It’s not like I don't have a plan, but usually, nothing happens according to plan. So I think it's important to enjoy the moment you have now and to have full faith in the work you do. We must let our lives flow just like the flow of dialogues in a play.” Under the leadership of Ko, Mabangzen is preparing for a new play. Park Min-young manutdmin@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Kim Youn-soo

2016-11 21 Important News

[Alumni]Creativity Never Sleeps

In a capitalistic society, commercials play a great influence on people’s consumption. Within a film that lasts about 30 to 60 seconds, a commercial gives a certain image to a product or a service. How to make one is a quite complex task and News H asked Kim Jeong-hoon (Theater & Film ‘87), commercial director and the representative of the production group, THE HAPPY about more details. 30 Years Career Devoted to Commercial Making Kim's interest in movies from his years of middle school grew large enough to apply to the Department of Theater & Film of Hanyang University (HYU). Kim mentioned how he was eagle to study movies more in depth. As it was his major, Kim was more associated with activities related to plays and movies than advertising. “I was deeply into plays. During my years at the university. I experienced various roles in plays, from acting, planning, to directing,” said Kim. ▲ Kim is currently the representative of the production company, THE HAPPY. As he was very much devoted to studying movies and plays, his life was irrelevant to commercials until he graduated. “I was even planning to apply to foreign university to study further about the field but little shortage of scores needed was bugging me at the time,” said Kim. It was rather a radical choice for Kim to apply for a producer (PD) position at a commercial agency at his 4th year, when he had to make a decision about his future. Although it was highly competitive to take the postion as it was desired by a lot of the advertisement majors, Kim proudly passed 6 exams and interviews to make a first step in his commercial career. “I think I was able to adjust well as producing commercials share common essence with making movies and plays. They both require ‘creativity’. The name of the two work is different, but people in both fields are ultimately trying to ‘create’ something in ways that is out of the box,” explained Kim. Starting from the PD, Kim’s career steadily went on the rise as he later become a major directors in two different commercial agencies. Finally at 1996, Kim decided to move out from his last company and to establish his own production company, THE HAPPY, which remarked its peak in his 30 years career. Magic through Logic The company is composed of Kim, as a representative director, and several employees, which is smaller than some of the big agencies. “I wanted my work environment to be flexible and free by keeping it small. That is why I decided to make my own company. I, myself do work when I am willing to, so I wanted to provide free and comfortable working environment for my employess as well," said Kim. While the company’s working environment is free and flexible, it does not mean the job is without any stress. Kim said that his daily cycle is mainly composed of brainstorming. “To me, advertisement is like 24 hours. Every day, every moment, I think about advertisement. How to make it and to direct it. I even did a presentation in front of advertisers in my sleep. The psychiatrist I visited 5 years ago explained to me that my light sleep shows how stressful I can be before important meetings,” said Kim. ▲ The photo on the left (front row), is the most recent ad 'Hot Hot' which was a great hit. On its left was the ad that featured public campaign. The bottom two ads were among the most popular ones as well, which popularized tropical fruit drinks (right) to kids soda drinks (left). (Photo courtesy of THE HAPPY production) Even though being a commercial director can be one of the stressful jobs in the world, Kim said he is still enjoying his job as it is adventurous. “To me, there is no one commercial to consider at a certain period. When it is the busiest time of the month, I even had to plan 19 ads simultaneously,” said Kim. There are various commercials Kim have directed. It ranges from food, drinks to public campaigns. Kim said one of the key priority to consider when he is directing, is perfect planning. “I try hard not to make any exceptions when I am filming. When filming the scene with actors and other staffs, I consider it a process of ‘editing’. I draw all the scenes in my head and follow it exactly,” said Kim. “Every scenes should be made with logic, it is made due to significant reason agreed by the whole team beforehand.” In the New Era of Advertisement There were several turning points in his 30 years career but Kim said one of the most important time is now. “A lot of the advertisement nowadays is changing its form into mobile ads, which spreads quicker. As the change is quite vast, a lot of the domestic commercial directors tend to work with foreign companies because of the lack of the number of conventional ads they can work on,” explained Kim. Kim said it is important to jump on the new bandwagon to survive in the field. “Old days were good, but I think change is what makes one improve oneself.” “Moreover, I could be one of the oldest among commercial directors. There are a lot of directors quitting because of their age, but I don’t think creativity is something that is confined to one’s age,” said Kim. “Creativity never sleeps, one of my goal is film in the day of my 60th birthday party.” ▲ Kim's passion toward advertisement will be continued. Yun Ji-hyun uni27@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Kim Youn-soo