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2018-05 21

[Alumni]Capturing the World in a Photo

From the 1st to the 15th of April, a photo exhibition called ESSE was held at the Incheon Art Platform by a photographer, Lee Jung-hyun (English Language and Literature, ’13). Lee is a photographer full of willpower who traveled around 18 countries for 654 days, starting with less than 100,000 won. Through just 27 pictures out of the 20,000 pictures he edited, he developed a storyline of his journey, and successfully finished his photo exhibition. Starting from scratch News H met Lee in a quiet cafe, on a sunny weekend. Lee lived his life as an English instructor in his early and mid-twenties, earning more than seven million won per month. After his military service, however, he felt despondent about his life, and decided to escape from his initial life. “I just didn’t want to search for a normal job, nor did I think I was suited to an organizational environment as I learned during my military experiences,” said Lee. He had interest in photography, and wished to test whether he wholeheartedly liked this hobby through the trip. Therefore, he booked his ticket to China, got his visa, and blindly started off on his journey. “I had exactly 73,432 won in my bank account when I got on the plane,” reminisced Lee. He received 500 dollars of support in Beijing, as it was his second hometown since he had lived there for nine years to study. Then he left to Southeast Asia, barely surviving every single day. He traveled with three promises to himself. First, not to earn money directly from photography; second, to receive sponsorship with gratitude; and lastly, to keep this promise for at least a year. “I believed that I could be certain I loved photography if I could love this for over a year, without any relations of loss or gain,” explained Lee. He would live in a guesthouse as a staff member, so that he could solve his accommodation issues. Then, he took pictures of all guests visiting the guesthouse, thoroughly edited them, and gave printed copies of the pictures with a sincere note. He didn’t receive any payment for these actions, but he frequently received financial support from the people who were deeply impressed by his pictures after they left the guesthouse. Lee would receive questions from his acquaintances asking why he put all his effort into the pictures. “If I couldn’t do my best in something I believe I love the most, I thought that I wouldn’t be able to do anything else,” said Lee. Focusing on the goal After his 654 day journey, he successfully finished his photo exhibition. He had millions of photos, but could easily select the 27 pictures he wanted to use in his exhibition. “There are a lot more people who take better photos than me. However, I believe that the people who can successfully have exhibitions are the people who have their own sincere story to tell through their photos,” explained Lee. The name of his exhibition, ESSE, is a Latin word for "being present," which leads to the word essence. He believes that living life as itself, possessing and dividing when needed, without obsession is the best method to live one’s life’s essence. Now Lee is living his life as a wedding photographer and a photography lecturer. However, while he takes wedding photos, he dislikes made-up concept photos. “The couples might not like the photos made naturally, since they probably don’t look as pretty as they wished to. However, these photos would be the ones that have the most to talk about in the future, since they have unique episodes in each cut,” said Lee. Lee will continue to take photos with stories and a firm subject in each cut now, and in the future, to tell everyone about each and every story in all photos. On Jung-yun jessica0818@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Kang Cho-hyun

2018-04 23

[Alumni]Algorithm for Everyone’s Inactive Health

The word "IoT" is no longer an unfamiliar technological notion anymore. Standing for the "Internet of Things," we are in control of various everyday devices even without making physical contact. Nowadays, it’s not solely "devices" that are in control. Pieces of furniture are also being included to the list of IoT compatible objects. Cha Gil-hwan (Physics, 06’), the CEO of Algorigo, is leading this area by designing chairs that fit into the world of IoT. For better inactive life “We spend the majority of the day being inactive – sleeping, sitting down, or even doing a slight action like walking,” started off Cha. Cha’s startup company, Algorigo, is trying to help this very problem. “Algorigo is a company that has designed an algorithm that can help us live our lives in a more effective, healthier way.” This company, unlike other businesses, concentrates not on materialistic objects but on the algorithm - an unambiguous specification of how to solve a class of problems - required to improve our lives with the assistance of technology. News H met Cha in his office which held a variety of eye-catching chairs. As the first project of Algorigo, Cha entered into a partnership with the well-known chair company, Duoback, to incorporate their products with Algorigo’s technology. The Duoback On is a smart chair that they invented for children. By analyzing body pressure distribution measurements read inside the seat board of the chair, Algorigo allows users to have detailed knowledge of our bodies when we sit. Through the sensors in the chair, data is sent to an IoT platform named Smart Home which is managed by SK Telecom. This chair is the first piece of furniture listed on this platform. Once this data is sent to the platform, the user, or the child’s parents in this case, can view details about this inactive motion of sitting down. They can not only be informed about the length of time their child was in the chair, but also her or his sitting position. The sensors records whether the user is sitting down straight or slouching in any direction. Through continued use of this chair, the user can find out the most frequently made posture, and can use their awareness to change it later on if necessary. “Healthy posture is extremely important for growing children – not only for their physical growth, but also for their mental abilities such as concentration. Being able to receive detailed scientific feedback would definitely be helpful in this regard,” said Cha. A picture explaining the platforms this chair is connected to (Photo courtesy of Duoback) The algorithm of Cha’s growth Cha’s challenge in beginning his startup was planning it out ahead of time, just like an algorithm. “Unlike other people who start their own businesses right away, I realized I needed more knowledge and practical business experience to better run my company,” reminisced Cha. He studied overseas to improve his English as well as studying intensively in his major. Even though a lot of physics majors fail to study abroad, Cha was proudly accepted to an exchange program and experienced what his friends couldn’t. As he certainly had a definite goal with a detailed roadmap, he was able to work hard for his career. He graduated with honors, worked in a major firm for three years, and eventually started his company, Algorigo. Now he is planning to expand his company to include chairs for teenagers and adults, and eventually plans to design a standard Algorigo that can directly help improve people’s quality of life and health. Although this concept of sensors is still unfamiliar to most people, Cha continuously emphasized the health derived from still actions. “For a lot of students and businessman, almost two-thirds of the day is spent sitting or lying down. However, most health-related platforms are currently only concentrated on physical activity and sports. Solutions for the actions we spend the most time doing are not concrete, so I hope that I can offer help in this field,” said Cha. Cha still has endless passion to develop Algorigo. Cha also had his ups and downs as he pursued his career. However, through firm trust in himself, he is making it through with increasing realization in his work. He emphasized being desperate and urgent in what one plans to achieve. “To anyone who is planning a startup and also for those who are not, I wish all Hanyangians have a goal and reach for it with a mindset that it’s the only goal you wish to achieve!” On Jung-yun jessica0818@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Lee Jin-myeong

2018-02 27

[Alumni]Introducing Ajaeng to the World

A jazz and ajaeng cross over recital named ‘the Moon’ was held on the 19th of January, in the chamber hall of the Sejong Center for the Performing Arts to commemorate her release of a new album. ‘Ajaeng,’ being an instrument a lot of people aren’t familiar with, earned great attention between the audiences. The ajaeng player, Jung Mi-jung (M.S. in Music, ‘16), successfully finished her recital with positive remarks and is now preparing for the next step. News H met with her in a quiet café to hear more about her life as a unique instrument player. ‘Moon’ Ajaeng is a seven-stringed Korean traditional instrument commonly used in court music. It has a unique, low-toned pitch, that charms all who listen to it. However, not a lot of people are aware of this instrument. Jung is therefore working hard to introduce this instrument to the world. Moon, the name of her new album and her latest concert, included crossover and her own music to fascinate people, which resulted in great success. The album titled ‘Moon’ contains 8 different songs: four songs that were written on her own and four already-existing songs combined with ajaeng’s unique tone. News H met Jung in an artistic cafe which is associated with her. Jung had a meaningful intention to her first crossover music album. “I once took a taxi with my ajaeng. However, the driver didn’t even know the existence of the instrument. After then, I decided I should work harder to introduce ajaeng to the world,” reminisced Jung. She combined different genres and instruments to her music and released an album. Mixing various genres allowed the audience to have more interest in her songs. In her commemoration concert, she added improvisation on stage and gave another atmosphere to the hall. Various players who are talented in their own areas participated in the concert, giving liveliness to the hall. The concert finished with great success, recording over three hundred, non-professional audiences, and a step toward the publicity of ajaeng. Living with a unique instrument “My father loved Korean traditional music. He used to play the drums every night for his hobby. Even though it might seem small, that greatly motivated me to pursue Korean traditional music as my career,” reminisced Jung. She first started with Haegeum, which is also a similar instrument to ajaeng, only with a much higher tone. However, ajaeng seemed to fit her much better. “I think each and every person has an instrument that fits him or her. I tend to have a lower voice than others, and I think it was the same for my instrument,” said Jung. She was more ‘fit’ to ajaeng than any other instrument and was therefore able to become a professional even though she first started ajaeng when she was in the second grade of high school. After her degree in university and after a few years of her life as a professional ajaeng player, she decided to continue on with her studies. Restarting her academic life in Hanyang University for a master’s degree, she was able to improve herself in both theory and practice. “This experience raised me to become a better person in the society of Korean traditional music. I definitely have more chances and situations to prove myself after graduation. With the field of ajaeng being so small, I want to help boost the field as much as I can, and I wish to use the chances I have,” commented Jung. For years to come Throughout her life of ajaeng, she has already been to various countries and has spread not only the knowledge of the instrument but Korean culture itself. She said she is still learning the value of her instrument through these incidents. “After the accompanied performance in Russia, an elderly woman burst out in tears, and the firm director hugged me saying I did well. I can still remember that scene even that time has passed,” reminisced Jung. Jung wishes to introduce ajaeng to the whole world. Jung is still continuing her life as an ajaeng player. “I am currently working on another Korean traditional music collection, writing solo pieces. I wish to make more literary music through my abilities,” said Jung. She showed her passion to perform more in foreign countries and become an educator in the future. “I want to be able to take part in a change of this cultural field, and it’s going to be difficult if I don’t become a leader. I wish I could become a leader to better improve the field of Korean traditional music.” Jung--without a doubt--is walking her way to becoming another leader of her generation. On Jung-yun jessica0818@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Choi Min-ju

2018-01 17

[Alumni]Passion to Learn After the War, Landing in America

Hanyang University(HYU) is now in its 79th year of establishment. Throughout these years, countless students have graduated from our school and are shining in their own positions all over the world. Lee Jong-hyeok (Industrial management, ’65) is one of these students, working in America as the representative of Lee Accountancy Group. Last November, Lee made his first visit to HYU since 1965 to receive an honorary graduation certification. An honorary graduation certificate and a development fund After attending HYU as an architecture major for three years since 1958, he passed an exam by the ministry of Education to study abroad. He then voluntarily enlisted himself in the Marine Corps before moving to another country. He changed his major to industrial management after he was discharged from military service, and therefore graduated from HYU as a industrial management major. After almost 60 years, Lee received an honorary graduation certificate of an architecture major last November. As Lee received his honorary graduation certificate, he commented, “I only wandered around the alumni of architecture since I graduated with another major. Now I can proudly call myself an alumnus of architecture to my colleagues.” Lee received an honorary graduation certificate in the office of the president in November, 2017. Lee also made a 40 thousand dollar development fund contract for HYU. 10 thousand dollars is being planned to be donated every year, for four years. He had a special reason he decided to donate this money to HYU. “I received help from the school in various areas and was occasionally exempted from tuition fees. I was the very refugee who moved from Hamgyong province to South Korea immediately after Korea was emancipated from Japan. I therefore decided to donate this money, counting this fund as my tuition fee for four years,” explained Lee. He also conveyed his words that he wishes his money to be spent on students with willpower to pioneer their own path. As a foreigner, as a pioneer With peculiar interest to learn, he not only graduated HYU, but continued on his degrees in America. He has a bachelor’s degree in California Sonoma State University’s School of Business and Economics, a master’s degree in Golden Gate Graduate School Business Administration major and a doctor’s degree in Argosy University Graduate School Business Administration major. He had his reasons for his passion to study. “After I fled for refugee after liberation, I was left alone during the Korean war. I continued my studies alone, to be accepted as a member of the society,” reminisced Lee. He first entered HYU’s architecture department with hopes to set up Seoul again after the Korean war, which ended in 1953. However, after he was discharged from military service, he changed his major with his interest in industrial psychology. Lee therefore continued on his studies in America, to study deeper into industrial psychology. In Sonoma State University School of Business and Economics, he had to study accounting in order to proceed on his major. Although it was then an unfamiliar field, he was captivated by the systematic and organized trait of accountancy. Afterwards, he received a Certified Public Accountant (CPA) in California, and worked as an adjunct professor in various universities such as Armstrong State University, San Francisco State University and East Bay California State University. Lee also worked as an economic consultant in California State Government and Oakland, and is now the representative of Lee Accountancy Group. Lee is now a proud representative of a corporation in America. (Photo courtesy of The Korea Times) The power of determination Oakland led the Thanksgiving Day for the lower-income group and the homeless, with over 2 thousand volunteers each year. However, the state asked Lee to support this event, as various problems occurred when the state led this event. “Due to the lack of budget, I had to ask for help from various corporations, social organizations, my fellow compatriots and the Marine Corps back in Korea. A lot of people lent their hands and gave donations to us. The basketball team, the Golden State Warriors also participated as volunteers and helped us out,” explained Lee. Oakland, therefore, announced ‘The Day of Lee Jong-hyeok’ on the fifth of May, 2004, to thank his contribution to the state. "Race is not important in achieving what you wish to do!" (Photo courtesy of Lee) “Some might say it’s just a lifelong regret of my adolescence. However, I wanted to show that anything is possible once you try it, even in the white society. More frankly, I solely wanted to reach the goal I had set for myself,” answered Lee, to the question of his motivation to achieve such a variety of results. He emphasized the word ‘enthusiasm’ to all Hanyangians during his interview. Lee explained that it’s important to set one’s goal straight and to stick to them. He also emphasized to hold on to self-actualization with a distinct willpower to achieve their goal. “Live hard, love hard, learn hard, and share hard!” On Jung-yun jessica0818@hanyang.ac.kr

2018-01 11

[Alumni]Proud International Students of Hanyang

The number of international students in Hanyang University(HYU) are increasing year after year, and now they consists of a certain portion of the school. Over 400 students entered HYU in one semester, from 43 different countries. The international students not only learn the curriculum from our school, but are also giving large outputs as proud Hanyangians. News H met 3 students who came from overseas to study in HYU and decided to continue their career in Korea. A desire to do what I want “I first came to HYU just because it was a sister school of my university in China,” started off Jiao Liu (Mechanical Engineering, ’17). He was interested in the area of computational analysis, and therefore took lectures related to his interests. He had to start off with the basic theories of math, epidemiology, and so on to interpret and analyze data processing professionally. “I had an ardent wish to study in the Applied Aerodynamics Laboratory run by professor Cho Jin-soo. As I exerted my time in his lab, I was able to gain practical experience for my career,” reminisced Liu. Liu is now working in the Hyundai Motors Technology lab of China, working in the Computer Aided Engineering(CAE) department. He analyzes the static stiffness and vibration noise through CAE interpretation, to develop motor vehicles. As a foreigner in Korea, Liu had his own difficulties. “I only had a few friends in Korea as an international student. However, as I stayed in the lab, my professors and colleagues helped me whenever I was sick or in troubles. I sincerely want to thank them for their kindness,” explained Liu. He is now in his second year of work, and thanked HYU for letting him successfully seeking a career in Korea. “I graduated a school which empowers talented people, I will also strive to become a great Hanyangian myself!” "I want to invite my parents to Korea and live together." (Photo courtesy of Liu) Having my own unique outfit “I realized I liked and was talented in designing clothes through after-school activities in China,” said Yuan Ying (Clothing and textiles, Doctoral program 4th year). Yuan achieved her dream of majoring clothing design in an overseas university through HYU. Yuan entered HYU in 2010, majoring in clothing and textiles and continued on her doctoral degree in 2014. In 2016, she entered a start-up club to actualize her dream. Yuan explained “Specific clothing trends change in two weeks term. However, this term is too short to design, produce and commercialize clothing by myself. That’s why I came up with creating a ‘production automation’ platform.” Yuan created an application named ‘Design U’, which includes the functions of production automation. Product automation is an idea which all procedures before the actual sewing could be completed automatically, with anyone’s own idea. Through this application, Yuan allows customers to create their own design, collect people who wish to purchase the same design, and finally receive the clothes individually. “I wanted to provide a method for individuals to purchase clothes with whatever design, colors or fabric. I wish I could better systemize this platform in the near future and extend this to my home country,” commented Yuan. Yuan showing a page of her application, 'Design U'. For the better me ‘Hallyu’ was a major reason that enticed a student to enter a Korean university. “I studied Korean as I entered university, and started to dream of studying in Korea since then,” explained Han Ximeng (Accounting, Doctoral program ’17). Financial accounting was a familiar area for Han, as one of her family members was engaged in the field. She had been preparing for her Chinese Certified Public Accountant(CPA) after acquiring a private accountant license in China. She decided her career in HYU to better specialize in this area. Han not only concentrated in her studies, but tried out various part-time jobs and interns. “I taught undergraduate students on basic accounting theories. I also had a part-time job in a cosmetic trading firm as a translator, and worked in Korean cosmetic shops to improve the Korean nuance,” reminisced Han. After her various experiences, she realized financial accounting was what she truly wished to do. In order to be a Chief Financial Officer(CFO), she decided to look for a job in Korea. She is now working in the Accounting department of SK innovation affiliation SK General Chemical, writing settlement of accounts and annual reports. “It’s only my fifth month, and still have a lot more to learn. The actual task itself isn’t as new as the culture of companies. I had more hardships with speaking honorific words according to the position,” explained Han. She showed her aspiration to improve her abilities to be able to work in any country she happens to face. Han is achieving her dream step by step to become a CFO. (Photo courtesy of Han) On Jung-yun jessica0818@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Kang Cho-hyun

2017-08 07

[Alumni]A Sincere Teacher of Music

The members of a choir are standing in line on stage, singing while exchanging eye signals, presenting graceful harmony. They finish their performance with a big applause. Finally, the conductor turns around and gives a big bow as he listens to the cheers getting louder. In the center of the stage as a conductor, there is Lee Eun-suk (Department of Vocal Music, ’95), who tries his best to live as a true musician. He is not only a conductor of two choirs and two orchestras, but also a singer, and the founder of a choir, Goyang Mixed Choir. An open choir for amateurs Lee is currently the founder and the conductor of Goyang Mixed Choir, which is a choir open for all amateurs encompassing different genders and ages. This choir welcomes anyone who has a passion to sing. However, the choir was not something Lee had planned ahead. “To be honest, I didn’t have a particular vision to make a choir by myself. An acquaintance of mine was planning on a chorus tournament held by Goyang Culture Foundation, and was in need of three choirs. They suggested me to create a choir. I thought it was a great chance and started it since 2014," reminisced Lee. Now, he has great affection towards this choir, and explained that they are preparing for their third subscription concert this year. Lee is explaining the traits of his choir, Goyang Mixed Choir. As the conductor of Goyang Mixed Choir, Lee put great effort into his choir and therefore now has over 60 members. Lee showed great appreciation of the process of teaching the amateurs in his choir. It was his first time teaching people who didn’t have any professional skills, but found it charming. “It was actually fun to set up the people’s voices in the right way. They were curious on the vocalization methods, and were highly interested since my voice was different from theirs. I also felt thankful as they concentrated so much to sing better, and to be a better member of the choir," said Lee. Lee also mentioned of challenges he face as a leader of a choir. “Singing in chorus is a lot different from singing alone. Unlike solos who only have to focus on their own techniques, each individual in a choir has to control their voice and achieve a harmony the conductor intends. However, this is difficult for amateurs since they can easily be swept away by the different voices around them,” Lee explained. He emphasized that conductors in amateur choirs should give the members motivation and a sense of purpose, instead of making a forceful atmosphere. “Fully understanding their situation is one of the virtues a conductor should have,” Lee asserted. Living the life of an artist Lee was more of a painter than a musician when he was a high school student. The school choir he attended as a hobby was the only music life he encountered. However, through his senior who performed in an opera, Lee saw the backstage of an opera by chance. He was fascinated by the actions going on behind the scenes. After that, his senior suggested him to sing after listening to his song and Lee eventually worked on it for 3 more extra years before he ended up in the Department of Vocal Music in Hanyang University. After graduation, Lee made a debut in Rome. He applied for various contests and auditions to make a living overseas, and was scouted by Santa Cecilia Conservatory of Music. He entered the school to extend his study in songs and received a better result. Despite his age and racial disadvantages, he was scouted by Cecilia Theatre even before he graduated. As the school did not allowed a debut while attending school, Lee resolutely gave up his diploma and stood on stage. After a few years, Lee had to come back to Korea due to personal issues, but he did not give up. He found his way through his talents, continuing his opera life and even working as a conductor of choirs and orchestras at the same time. "Music should be enjoyable to both professionals and non-professionals." Now Lee is both an outstanding singer and a conductor in Korea. However, he is still modest when he describes himself. “I am fully aware that I am not perfect. Therefore, I just try to do the best I can, testing my limits everyday”, Lee adverted. He also mentioned he wants to work in a more professional organization, but still wholeheartedly showed his passion towards his work. He constantly emphasized the interests he has towards assisting the members to achieve what they want. “I’m curious how long I can maintain this harmonization with the members. I don’t have a lot of intention to fulfill something in terms of music. I simply wish to maintain this positive relationship with my members for a long time,” said Kim. On Jung-yun jessica0818@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Choi Min-ju

2017-07 31

[Alumni]Constructing Korea’s Food Culture

An ordinary food critic wouldn’t use a phrase ‘overturning tables’ in their reviews. However, a special food critic did. In the era where various social contexts influence all criticism, Lee Yong-jae (Department of Architectural Engineering, ’01) bravely expressed his opinions solely based on his thoughts through a book, The Dignity of Korean Dishes. Through his book, he emphasized his unique thoughts desiring for an improvement in Korean dishes. The dignity of Korean food On the 16th of June, a new book full of criticism on Korean dishes was released. “To make it simple, I just wanted to live a better life with better food.”, mentioned Lee. After living abroad and experiencing a different culture towards food, he felt the flaws of traditional Korean dishes. He started having doubts on traditions of Korean food. Lee asked himself, “Do we really have to drink hot soup in a ttukbaegi (an earthen bowl) when it’s obvious that you’ll burn the roof of your mouth? Is this truly a tradition or is it just a habit we never cared to question?” He came up with such unique questions and studied the fundamentals of cooking himself, extending his studies into the book, The Dignity of Korean Dishes. In his book, he points out the shortcomings of Korean dishes explicitly as a true food critic. Throughout his book, he uses expressions other critics wouldn’t commonly use. Lee defines his words as straightforward rather than provocative. “I dislike modifying and making up opinions for my own interests. When interests of people are intertwined, it’s hard to fully deliver the opinions of the food itself.” Lee explained. "Korean food is tasteless" is one of his comments that caught a lot of people’s attention in his recent publication. He explained that there are a number of meanings in this sentence. He asserted that "delicious" doesn’t stand solely for the food itself. “It’s not only the food on the plate I’m trying to assess. The service, plate settings or formality are the aspects that should be considered when assessing food.” The cover of Lee's book The Dignity of Korean Dishes. This is his second book, criticising the problems of Korean dishes. (photo courtesy of Banbi) A born critic Although Lee is currently a food critic who has reputation for having his own firm beliefs, his major can be seen less relevant. He did have an interest in cooking and even ran a blog on it since he started to cook for himself. However as his passion still lied in architecture, Lee left abroad to study further in 2002. He initially wanted to be a critic in architecture, so he had a job in America as an architectural designer. Lee came back to Korea in 2009, with determination to write as a living. He sent articles to numerous magazines, and started a column on architecture. However, as his interests toward food grew more than ever, he started writing various articles on food and came to the position where he is now at, solely concentrating on assessing food. “I continued writing on my blog and tried lots of Korean food, consequentially leading myself into a food critic. I would enter a random restaurant and write on my blog about the food. Then I would experiment on various methods and make the food for myself.”, Lee reminisced. Food = Architecture Lee commented that a plate of food is equivalent to an outcome of construction. “Food and architecture has a lot in common. They both require quite accurate information before they start, and have a three-dimensional visual result. The only difference would come from their durability", explained Lee. He asserted that the two subjects are incommensurable as they are important parts of uisiku (three basic elements of human life in Korea, standing for clothing, and shelter). Lee emphasized the importance of having an objective perspective point of view when evaluating a particular dish. “You have to stay away from the outer, social elements that could affect your judgement. Once you maintain a certain distance, you would be able to solely concentrate on the food you are eating.” Lee pointed out the weaknesses of Korean dishes through this point of view. “Korean food usually doesn’t make a good use of salt. They tend to season the food only through seasonings. Salt and seasonings have their own roles but Korean dishes don’t use this classification.” Lee wishes to promote the food culture of Korea. (photo courtesy of Lee) Changing the perception of food criticism is what Lee wishes to achieve through his career. “A lot of people don’t even realize food can be a subject of criticism. I wish people would be able to break this prejudice and live in a better food culture.” Moreover, he wishes to write more books related to food, such as food for people eating alone. “Food culture isn’t something sophisticated. It’s all about making a better quality of life with better quality of food, and that’s what really matters. I hope I could assist the development of Korean food throughout my career.” On Jung-yun jessica0818@hanyang.ac.kr

2017-07 03

[Alumni]A Shining Star in Operas and Musicals

A Verdi opera ‘Rigoletto’ came to an end on the 30th of June with loud applause from the audience. A renowned vocalist, Kim Soon-yeong (Department of Vocal Music, ’06), famous for both musicals and operas, caught the attention through the character named ‘Gilda’. She acted out the pure and innocent girl through her voice, leading the opera to a great hit. A soprano, stepping into a musical Opera vocal performers would frequently think that they would not be able to perform again in operas once they expand thier activities to musicals. However, Kim completely broke the stereotype through the character ‘Christine’ in the musical ‘Phantom’, which was premiered in 2015. She was casted by EMK music company through the music video ‘First Love’, composed by Kim Hyo-geun (Click to listen). “A lot of acquaintances tried to persuade me not to do it since they thought I wouldn’t be able to perform again in operas. But I didn’t want to miss an opportunity of new experiences," said Kim. Kim explaining her opportunity of starting musicals Of course, Kim was not a perfect actress from the beginning. She faced extreme hardships as she had to step into an entirely different area. The tempo of the musical was much faster than that of operas along with the increased number of acting scenes. “I wasn’t able to keep up with the other actors at first. The choir even ridiculed me during the practices. However, as I got better through persistent practice, the pure, passionate character of Christine became soundly mine and I gained more confidence.” Kim reminisced. She also mentioned that she was able to understand the character more deeply because of the fact that Christine came from the countryside, just like Kim who moved from Daejeon to Seoul to achieve her dream. As a result, Kim attained absolute success and became the only actress who took the role of Christine again in the second presentation of ‘Phantom’ this year. She remarked that she was able to act in a much more relaxed manner throughout the second presentation as she was extremely tensed up in the first one. Kim praised the features of musicals through her own experience. “I was never bored of acting even though I played the role of Christine numerous times. It felt new everytime with different actors of ‘Phantom’. They allowed me to feel different emotions each time I act on stage.” Kim performed as Christine 98 times in total, but she is confident that she enjoyed each and every performance. A scene of the musical 'Phantom'. The phantom of the opera 'Eric' is teaching songs to 'Christine' in the picture. (Photo courtesy of Kim) Kim’s significance of operas and musicals “I would never be able to choose between operas and musicals. They both have their own charming points.” said Kim. Formally, even when both performances practice for the same amount of time, operas usually have only 2 or 3 plays while musicals have much more plays; 50 for each presentation in the case of ‘Phantom’. Therefore, Kim pointed out that she can fully absorb the character of musicals throughout the acts but only feels like rehearsals with operas. Kim also pointed out the different focuses of each plays. Operas focus more deeply into music, while musicals put their priorities on acting. Therefore, Kim puts every ounce of her energy into her songs in operas. She explained that she can reach a state of catharsis through the concentration of her voice in the music. On the other hand, as musicals focus more in actions, Kim felt that they tend to be more energetic, diverse and colorful. Kim praised both areas for their own unique traits. "No one told me to sing. I just loved singing so much I searched for chances to sing." Kim anticipated that she would continue performing in both areas of operas and musicals. Her aspiration is later to be referred an all-rounder. “I’m not the best in any area. However, I think that’s the very reason I was able to try both of them, and make satisfying results.” Kim wished that she could inspire more of her junior colleagues to broaden their views and to challenge themselves in various areas. “Performances nowadays show a collaboration of various areas. Fitting to the trend, I wish opera vocal performers can also show active performances in areas other than just from their own.” Kim concluded. On Jung-yun jessica0818@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Moon Ha-na