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2017-07 31

[Alumni]Introducing Tyle, a Card News Designing Tool

Card news is a combination of texts and images in one sight, visualizing the message with the goal of enabling easy reading and understanding. Concise condensation of information in the form of storytelling could be effective when used properly, giving rise to the new contents format of card news. As it looks brief and simple on the surface, production of card news is sometimes undervalued, despite of efforts needed from planning and organization to designing. Skills, of course, would help to make a distinguished card news, but designing is another story which requires more than just technical abilities. Lee Hueng-hyun (Department of Advertising and Public Relations, 10’), has created a card news designing service for those who are nonprofessional marketers and dubbed it Tyle. Lee Heung-hyun is the creator of card news desining tool, Tyle. Two defeats, one victory “I was expecting a great hit, because I had a good feeling with my business partner. However, miracle didn’t happen that easily,” he sighed. Lee and his friend Woo Hyuk-jun first started a small joint business by the name of Tubloo in 2014, which was a small enterprise developing application software. The first two software business Tubloo launched were failures, as Lee boldly expressed. The first business was of children’s animation and the next one of contents platform—neither of which was successful. However, their third one Tyle was different. Tyle is a card news creating service where by simply entering texts and choosing designs, the user could reap a finished outcome of desired card news. It is geared towards people who are non-professional in designs, lessening the trouble of appealing to the aesthetic. Automation of production greatly increases usefulness and practicality, not to mention convenience and ease. The name Tyle was derived after a long contemplation of looking for an uncommon word, as an attempt to exclude all other services in the search engine when searched. Though it contains no extraordinary meaning, the significance is that it suits the service and the businessmen are satisfied. “Me and my partner were so enthusiastic at first that we thought anything we create could be a big success. However, after the two previous failures, we realized the two of us aren’t that special,” confessed Lee. The duo wanted to provide a service that was original and out of box, with the ambition of starting a new trend. They focused on what the market demanded, instead of focusing on what they want to do. The two defeats taught them that they should chase their abilities. In the interim, the idea that designing belongs solely to the professionals occurred to them, providing a raw scheme. This developed into the idea of Tyle, which targeted marketers who are not professional designers. "Not all combination of texts and images become a good card news." Still on the journey “We were on our own when planning for the project but we had a lot of help from professional designers with their counseling when creating the designs of the card news,” explained Lee. The current Tyle is said to be the sixth prototype model, because it was far from perfect in the beginning. It is hard to tell how long it took to create Tyle because rough sketch was virtually done in one day and it could be the finished product. It is all about improving and adding extra function to make the service better afterwards, which still goes on even today. In order to create an effective, more compelling card news, Lee pointed out a few tips. First, it is important to understand the true advantage of card news to reach its full potential. As it is a visualized message conveyer, using too much texts is absolutely not recommended. Moreover, choosing appropriate topic is crucial. If the content requires long texts and sentences, putting them in card news can be pointless. It should always be concise and easily readable. Lastly, understanding the main objective of creating card news must be fully identified. It will help to bring up the intended effect. “Jumping from 1 to 95 is achievable, but that last leap of 5 is never-reaching. I want Tyle to be outstandingly exceptional and superior, not just cool to use. I want to improve the service and fill up the remaining gap to reach 100 by adding and upgrading the quality of designs,” planned Lee. "Tyle is ever-improving!" Jeon Chae-yun chaeyun111@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Choi Min-ju

2017-06 20

[Alumni]Impassioned teacher of love

As third graders in high school, students often bear precarious agitation in their minds when choosing career, picking majors, or entering universities. Heartfully understanding this distress and sincerely wanting to lessen the load of unease, Kim Kyung-hoon (Department of education, ‘01), a teacher at Haneul Academy, has composed a song with meaningful lyrics for his apprehensive students. Bringing students to tears and causing a touching sensation in their hearts, the song sure seems to last in the students’ mind for their entire life and be a valuable memento of their high school times. As a teacher and a musician As a teenager, Kim always dreamed of becoming a teacher, as much as he aspired to become a musician. Not being able to pick one of the two, he concluded that he would be both at the same time: a teacher who composes music. “I was motivated by my high school teacher who also wrote and published several books. His main job was teaching and his side job was writing. That was the exact lifestyle that I pursued.” He began to compose songs when he was a teenager and nurtured the other dream concurrently. "High school students today bear much more stress than we did in the past in our school days." With his first music album released in 2008, by the name of Acoustic Project as a solo artist, Kim intermittently composed songs dedicated to other people. The name Acoustic Project, does not only mean unplugged music, but also means to include all acoustic matters, all sounds of music. The digital single album he released last month, titled ‘To the Sky’(Click to listen) is a song dedicated to his third-year students at his school, with the music video featuring his students. Witnessing what his student are going through and understanding how tough it is, Kim was determined that he would write a song for them. As a teacher, Kim always tries to teach students how to live happily, not stressfully. Though it may seem as if entering a good university is the greatest hardship and the most important step of achieving success, it is only a stepping stone which last only temporarily. “I tell students to look beyond and find what will bring them happiness in the long run. Life is not an equation that needs perfect calculation answers and,” remarked Kim. Kim is working on his song in the workroom. (Photo courtesy of Kim) Kim recording his song with his own voice. (Photo courtesy of Kim) Be brave and not timid, To the Sky The title ‘To the Sky’ epitomizes the lyrics of the song, coinciding with the name of the school—Hanuel in Korean is sky. Students who do not know about their potentials consider themselves as the ugly duckling and remain close to the ground but I wanted to make them aware that they will one day soar to the sky like a beautiful swan. “When I sit my students individually for counseling, the first thing they do is crying. It shows how frustrated and anxious they are. I wanted to reflect their mood and portray it in a song with a hopeful message in hopes of encouraging them.” The lyrics are largely divided into two parts: the first half of the song from the perspective of the students, and the remaining half of the teacher’s. The intention of doing so was to reach the students’ heart more directly and to sound as if the song was reading their minds. In that way, bigger wave of sympathy and emotion could be aroused in students’ hearts. Each line of the lyrics is meant to resonate with the mood of the students in the first half of the song, when it is describing their feelings from their very perspective. In the second half, cheerful messages from the perspective of a teacher, from Kim’s perspective, is delivered, heartening each students who is struggling amidst her angst. "To the sky, my dear students!" Jeon Chae-yun chaeyun111@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Moon Ha-na

2017-03 20

[Alumni]Passion, Love, and Yacht

Not all university students are able to formulate a definite life goal or create a systematic plan for an ideal future. In fact, most struggle to find out what they truly want to do as they mature and complete their studies while at university. As an ordinary university student, Chang Jae-ik (Department of Sports Industry ’09) went on a trip to Europe when he was in his 4th year at Hanyang and discovered what he aspired to do all his life: sailing all over the world on a yacht. A dream in the Netherlands ▲ Chang (left) made it to the finish line. Chang visited Marseille, France, when he was a senior at Hanyang and witnessed a sight that touched his soul: hundreds of white yachts floating beautifully on an emerald ocean. At the time, he merely thought it would be nice to own one of those yachts and then forgot about it. But when Chang visited Amsterdam in the Netherlands, he caught sight of another mesmerizing view that shattered his prejudice. “I always thought that going on a cruise aboard a yacht was a privilege only for the rich because of its extravagant cost. That was how the prototypical image of yachting is portrayed in movies and dramas,” confessed Chang. What he saw at the port was about 20 yachts getting ready to sail off at midnight, all of which were occupied by individual families. Parents were preparing the yacht for sail and the little children on each yacht were waving from afar to people on land. That sight taught him that yachts are accessible to ordinary people. After coming back to Korea and being discharged from military service, Chang was determined to learn how to sail a yacht and become a yachtmaster. Chang accumulated a small fortune while he was in the army, which he had gladly spent on a working holiday to the Netherlands. Chang settled in Rotterdam and became a member of Rotterdamse Studenten Zeil Vereniging, a student yacht club in Rotterdam. In the process of becoming a yachtmaster under the Royal Yachting Association, Chang had sailed about 5000km, stopping off at a number of countries including the Netherlands, Belgium, England, France, Spain and Portugal. ▲ "I wish yachting was more easily accessible to ordinary people in Korea." Entering the 2016 Rolex Sydney Hobart Yacht Race in a team named 'Sonic', Chang acquired another valuable experience. Sonic came 24th out of 88 teams, some consisting of prominent professionals who took part in the race several times in the past. His was the very first to have participated as a Korean team which made Sonic even more special. “Given that there were many amazing yacht professionals participating in the race, I think our accomplishment is impressive and remarkable. I am honored to have participated in such a big-scale competition and thankful to have had a crew composed of wonderful people,” exclaimed Chang. Journeying aboard a yacht “On the voyage, I was engulfed by soot-black nights with millions of stars studded in the sky, even shooting stars on occasion. The yacht was suspended on a bottomless ocean, accompanied by countless dolphins,” reminisced Chang. He stated that the most charming aspect of sailing on a yacht is the advantage of being able to visit every little unknown ports and docks, allowing you to experience the indigenous and uninfluenced culture of any given region. “I stopped at so many countries, giving myself the opportunity to encounter people of all ages who came from a sundry of unique cultures.” Chang gained priceless memories and experiences during his expeditions, which he hopes to treasure throughout his life. ▲ "One day, I'm going to go on an around-the-world journey with my wife." Jeon Chae-yun chaeyun111@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Moon Ha-na

2016-12 05

[Alumni]Dance as a Protest Medium

Professor Jang Soon-hyang is committed to combining dancing and protesting to build a proper relationship between society and manifestations of art. She received a doctorate degree from the Department of Dance and is currently a professor at the Social Education Center at Hanyang University. Often referred to as the “dancer of life, peace, and unification who always agonizes with the social roles of dancing”, Jang has been participating in numerous demonstrations and protests in attempts to bring societal reform. Dancing and the society When asked to interpret the societal role of dancing in terms of her experiences, Jang’s answer was equivocal. “I’m still looking for the significance and the specific role of dancing as a form of art in our society. One thing I can say is, if the dancing conveys a message that the audience could sympathize with, it will naturally attract more audiences. As for me, dancers do not always need to gain spotlight on a fancy stage, but rather, where their dancing is really needed is their appropriate stage,” remarked Jang. She added that as long as the dancer can express the connotations of their movements, the minimal objective is fulfilled. In 2005, Jang received an invitation from the Geumgangsan opera troupe, North Korea’s one and only performance group that travels abroad to perform, to learn South Korea’s traditional dance. Gladly accepting the request, Jang made contacts with the group and was surprised to find out that some of the members of the performance group were originally from South Korea. If dancing, along with other forms of art, could be the methods to communicate with people from different places, then the societal role of art would be to connect the subjects of social issues and the society. Jang noted that active participation in the society through artwork such as dancing could prevent them from being isolated and alienated from the national community, reiterating her point on the relationship between art and the society. Jang thinks dancers should be more concerned about social issues. Jang's past protest, objecting to the placement of THAAD in South Korea. (Photo courtesy of Jang) A socially conscious dancer Jang has been playing a vital role in resolving social issues in Korea, giving performances that implicate problematic aspects. One of the most recent activities she took part in was the 'Remember the 4.16 Sewol Shipwreck campaign', in which citizens infuriated with the Sewol ferry accident gathered at Gwanghwamun Gate to manifest their rage. Jang joined the group by expressing the people's fury by dancing on their behalf. In addition, she appeared at Gwanghwamun Gate again for the fierce demonstration for current president’s resignation. Since this affair continues to overwhelm the country these days, more people came to join the protest and appreciated Jang's efforts. “After my performance, one of the protesters gave me encouraging hug, expressing her melancholy about the situation of Korea. It was a very worthy moment, because from this, I was able to unite people with my dancing and they showed compassion in return,” recalled Jang. Jang protests for President Park's resignation at Gwanghwamun. (Photo courtesy of Ohmynews) Jang’s ultimate goal is to play a role in achieving the unification of North and South Korea. She hopes to see artworks, including dancing, acting as the constructive force that helps to build an interactive relationship between the two Koreas by reaching out and communicating bilaterally. “I want future dancers to be aware of social issues and try to think about what their role is as dancers within the society. Dancing is not only about being famous for one's beauty and elegance but also about carrying out necessary societal functions as a message conveyer,” expressed Jang. Jeon Chae-yun chaeyun111@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Kim Youn-soo