Total 2Articles
News list
Content Forum List
2017-10 02

[Alumni]Don’t be Afraid to Follow Your Values

The third top box office hit in the history of Korean documentary films, Our President (2017) is directed by a Hanyang alumni, Lee Chang-jae (Policy Studies, ’94). He studied engineering before coming to Hanyang, and studied law in our school. After graduation, he worked in the field of journalism, then media. Now he is a documentary movie director, a writer, and a professor. News H visited Lee this week to have a closer look into his past and recent work. Lee is enthusiastically explaining how leading one's life by oneself is important. What seems like a winding path “If I look back, it was not all so meaningless after all,” said Lee, thinking back to his past. Lee studied law because of his parent’s will. He originally wanted to study history, but his parents told him he would never get a job majoring in history. During his college years, he wanted to discover and prove what he liked and was good at. He figured writing was his path, and applied for numerous competitions, all of which he did not win. Dramatically, he won first place in the Hanyang Literature Competition. “Thinking ‘I wanted to walk this path’ in my mind only seemed like it would fly away so easily. I had to prove myself before really going into the other direction.” After being discharged from the military, Lee felt that he must climb the tree to eat the fruit. Hoping to study journalism, he desperately felt the need for more information. There were not a lot of graduates, nor peers to help him. Therefore, he knocked on the doors of the Executive Vice President and Head of the Office of Planning. He demanded a preparation group for the press exam, which is now the preparation course for the press examination. In his first and second job, he felt he lost the dominance over his life once again. Leading a hectic life and being promoted fast, time flew, and he had sipped his bridle away. Hence, he went to Chicago to learn film. Poster of Lee's latest movie, Our President (2017) One step forward at the edge of a cliff There is a saying in Buddhism, ‘百尺竿頭進一步’. It means to take a step forward at the edge of a hundred ‘chuck’ (a traditional measure length of a hand, 33.3cm.) cliff. Going to Chicago and coming back to Korea was a big step for Lee. Making a movie took about three years, and with him having nothing left in Korea made him feel heavy. That’s when he was offered a position with the school. Lee makes movies on the topics he is interested in. The movie, On the Road (2013) was based on the reflection he had 20 years ago, seriously considering entering the Buddhist priesthood. The latest movie, Our President (2017) started on Lee’s hope to remind Korean citizens that we once had a time when people chose their own presidential candidates and the president. “Just like superheroes go and save the world when they are told of their super-power, I wanted to give our citizens a reminder that they own their country.” Lee mentioned that because another documentary movie on the late Roh’s life was released just a few months before Lee’s movie, he had to look for the clips that were not used in the other movie. Looking through the 60 hour long material, the last moment when Roh says, “I am Roh Moo-hyun” and turns his back caught Lee’s eyes. “It felt like the clip was left unused for me.” That’s when he decided the ending moment of the entire film. “Out of 9000 minutes of the interview, only 40 minutes are used in the documentary. That’s why I need to look back at the materials and take some time for myself to contemplate.” Lee always notices himself being changed after a film. “I have to be completely immersed into one’s life in order to make a documentary film. Change in my perspective is almost inevitable,” said Lee. He pointed that introspection and learning has to be balanced to form a truly dimensional self. That is why he always writes a book after a film. Lee plans to start on another project around the upcoming December. “Whenever I make a new movie, external success is not my goal. Only my inner values that I pursue truly fulfills me,” said Lee with a peaceful smile on his face. Kim So-yun dash070@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Kim Youn-soo

2017-08 07

[Alumni]Engineer Publishing a Dictionary

Living in a country where you do not speak the language can be one of the most challenging things in the world. There is a proud Hanyangian who overcame the difficulty and even made a dictionary of the foreign language. Kim Woo-taek (Department of Automotive Engineering, '02) published ‘Cambodian-Korean- English Korean-Cambodian- English Dictionary’ which contains more than 40,000 vocabularies in September 2014. First person in the world to publish Korean-Cambodian dictionary “I never dared to make a dictionary from the beginning,” said Kim. Coming to Cambodia without speaking the language, he had to study hard to communicate with the locals. As private education was not an option at the moment, Kim chose to learn the language by himself and started reading newspapers. Kim symbolized the letters in his head while reading the paper. “I still get some pronunciations wrong because I learned the langauge through reading”, reminisced Kim. After a while, he was able to read documents without having to look for dictionaries. He kept notes on the vocabularies he does not know while studying in such way, and his notes became a valuable asset in publishing the dictionary. Kim and his wife, Som Sopheap is holding Kim's three publications. (Photo courtesy of Kim) One day, he wanted to make a good use of all the data he has. He visited every bookstore in Cambodia and bought 20 dictionaries, then typed them page by page for four years. It took much longer than his initial estimation, but with passion he invested his nights in the work. For a person who has no professional background knowledge, it was not easy to match Korean and Cambodian dictionaries with the accurate nuances. One of the most arduous works in the progress was writing pronunciations of Cambodian words in Korean because the two languages are phonetically different. Kim and his friend are standing infront of a church in Kampot, Cambodia. (Photo courtesy of Kim) ខ្ញុំស្រឡាញ់អ្នកកម្ពុជា។ (I Love you, Cambodia!) As an answer to the question ‘Who helped the most in publishing the dictionary?’, Kim told it was his wife without any hesitation. Kim’s wife, Som pronounced the words and edited the dictionary with Kim for about a year. “She helped me with all the hard works,” said Kim. It is not only his wife he loves about Cambodia. Kim explained the country as the place where you “give and help, instead of fight and win”. Leading a happy life being his utmost goal, he has been living in the country since January of 2009. From the love of the country, Kim published three other books ‘Cambodia Tour Guidebook (2005)’, ‘Cambodian Tourist Attractions Through The Lens (2017)’, and ‘Guidebook on Cambodian Agriculture (2014)’. His publications are popular in both countries, and the dictionary is considered as a must-have among Koreans in Cambodia, and Cambodians who are aiming to get a job in Korea. Transferring agricultural technology While running a tourism business in Phnom Penh, Kim is also keeping himself busy with KOPIA (Korea Program on International Agriculture). He works as a PR agent in the organization, transferring advanced Korean agricultural technology to Cambodia. Also, under KOPIA, Kim operates Cambodia Agriculture Information Center. “I am happy that there is something to do and someone who needs me” said Kim. As an engineer, CEO, husband, PR agent and publisher, Kim blueprints a future where he can be a bridge between Korean and Cambodian agriculture. Kim So-yun dash070@hanyang.ac.kr