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2018-07 09

[Alumni]Woo In-chul, the Former Mayoral Candidate of Seoul

Although the importance of politics is well-known, it Is hard to see young Koreans actively and directly involved in the field. Former mayoral candidate of Seoul, Woo In-chul (Department of Molecular and Life Science, ERICA '12), unfolded his story of diving into politics soon after his graduation. Despite his major being rather unrelated to politics, Woo has always been interested in political issues regarding Korean youth, such as the 2011 Korean university tuition crisis. As a senior in 2011, Woo became actively involved in youth forums, debates and seminars that dealt with various problems that degraded the living standards of Korean youth. “I think being able to participate in politics regardless of your major, age, or background, is the fundamental aspect of having a democratic society. I wanted to become more directly involved in politics, so I decided to take action.” Woo In-chul (Department of Molecular and Life Science, ERICA '12) at the Woori Mirae office on June 6th, 2018. Woo strongly believed that as a democratic citizen, changes in our lives must be made through politics. Together with his friends, he formed the Youth Party in 2011. This wasn’t easy as they needed to gather at least 5,000 party members. They also needed a candidate, and Woo stepped up to take assume that role. Even after they successfully formed the party, there were more mountains to overcome as they needed a deposit of at least 15-million-won, in addition to other election campaign fees. “I didn’t run for the election to win. I at least wanted to spread the awareness that we, as young people of Korea have problems to solve, and should take matters into our own hands.” After the impeachment of former President Park, Woo decided that it was their chance to start an era of new politics where the young would be the main actors. This led to the formation of Woori Mirae (우리미래당), which is a developed version of the Youth Party. Many university students in Korea are still financially struggling to keep up with high tuition fees, living expenses, housing expenses and more. All the politicians who hadincluded such youth related issues in their campaign promises, seemed to completely forget about them after winning their elections. “It’s because it’s not their priority. That’s why we ourselves need to take action, because nobody else will do it for us,” said Woo. Woo protesting in the "youth tent" for the youth rental house project on April 21st . After running for the general election, Woo’s Party failed to receive enough votes and was forced to disband. However, this did not stop Woo from re-forming the party in 2017. “Our society needs to heal, and I believe this can be done through politics. Forming a party is not just a form of representation. It’s to try to change the policies, systems, institutions, and to give political hope to young people,” said Woo. He also noted that the majority of Korean politicians are from an older generation, which naturally creates a weaker bond of empathy with the younger generation. Although not saying that all politicians must be from the younger generation, he emphasized that most people fail to realize that youth issues are directly linked to societal issues and issues of all generations, due to lack of empathy. Recently Woo ran for the office of mayor of Seoul. He noted that he wanted to first and foremost ask the young Koreans, if they are doing well. The reality for youth is harsh as most take the first step into the society with heavy student loans and the struggles of keeping up with other expenses. This prevents them from challenging themselves and trying out new things, as they are so caught up with just trying to make ends meet. Woo re-emphasized how empathy is key here. “Empathy allows people to take an interest in others. We need that sort of interest because that’s where change starts. The spread of awareness and addressing of problems will lead to changes in policies in the long run. Other institutional changes will follow.” Woo hopes for the future of many young Korean "elites." After the elections, Woo is now a chair in the party, hosting various programs and sessions for not just youth but also for those from older generations as well, in hopes of creating a bond and fostering more understanding between generations. With four party representatives, the Woori Mirae will run for future elections with hopes of changing the political culture. “All those who are interested in social political issues, or trying to take action are "elites." I hope more of the current younger generation will become elites,” said Woo. Woori Mirae official website: http://makeourfuture.kr/%EC%86%8C%EA%B0%9C/#intro Park Joo-hyun julia1114@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Lee Jin-myung

2018-05 14

[Alumni]Healing Hearts and Minds

The psychological realm of human beings has always been full of unsolved mysteries that attract people in attempts to figure out what goes on in the hearts and minds of others. One’s mental state can affect one’s life to the point where it becomes necessary to see a consultant just like how we need doctors for health checkups. Kim Ji-in (Department of Art Psychotherapy, ’17) works as a psychotherapist through artistic measures to touch the hearts of those in need. The root of Kim's passion According to Kim, working as a therapist has long been her dream, as she has been interested in psychology since she was a high school student. Unfortunately, the field was not well-known in Korea, which discouraged her from boldly diving into it. Instead, she read many books related to psychology and philosophy to quench her thirst. Things all changed when she went on a trip to Nepal with her husband as a volunteer in 2009. She was there as an educator, and while teaching the kids, she felt that they were psychologically pressured. “It was heartbreaking to see young children who are supposed to be innocent and carefree suppressed like that. However, there were no professionals to help these children. I was also in a bad place back then, so I decided that I should take on that role.” In 2012, Kim started studying educational psychology as soon as she returned to Korea. Kim Ji-in (Department of Art Psychotherapy, ’17) at Korea Art Treatment Association, 2016 (Photo courtesy of Kim) When she first started out, psychology was not a field that interested many people. It was relatively hard to find a specific major that dealt with psychology. Many people found it peculiar that she was even interested in such a thing. However, this did not stop Kim from giving it a try. “While I was interested in psychology, I was also into music so I studied music composition when I was a senior in high school. Studying music allowed me to meet many different people, to whom I would always recommend different musical pieces to depending on their current psychological state.” Art psychotherapy During her masters as an art psychotherapy student, Kim recalls that most of her professors were art majors. They introduced her to numerous works of art that allowed her to somehow understand, relate, and analyze the psychology of the artists. She says that it was the most helpful thing she had discovered in university, since it was a skill that was not only based on foundational psychological theories, but was also always applicable to real life situations, even today. Aside from being academically passionate, she was also an active volunteer which allowed her to meet many different people in many types of situations. “The session always has to be client-oriented. I’m not afraid to prescribe medication along with the artistic therapy sessions, because I think it is of utmost importance to try to find realistic ways to help these clients.” Upon graduation, Kim started working as a psychotherapist who treats clients using artistic measures. Her clients include a wide range from children to adults, but most of them are children around the age of five, who show symptoms of separation anxiety from their mothers. There are also quite a few teenagers who also show signs of anxiety, depression, and disruptive behavior who sometimes personally reach out to her for help. Kim would use different artistic measures, such as drawing, role-play, working with play dough, storytelling, and listening to music to help these clients build trust and toheal. “Back in the 90s I used to use classical music, but nowadays people just can’t relate to it. Some people much prefer drawing over talking, while some much prefer creating their own music. I even provide raps from High School Rappers, a popular Korean TV program, so that her teenage patients can change the lyrics to them, or use the beats to create their own pieces. Then I try to analyze their works to better understand them.” As a therapist Currently, Kim is working at a Good Neighbors (NGO) center. She also has experience in working in public sectors, psychiatric wards, and as a therapist giving lectures and therapy sessions to teenagers. Kim recalls her proudest moments to be whenever a mother or the head of a center decides that the child is now free to end therapy sessions. “Upon the end of the session, the child who had been suffering from separation anxiety has now completely changed so that he doesn’t need his mother to be next to him all the time. He trusts other people and can actually have fun like any other child does on the playground.” She notes that after the sessions have ended, the parents also go through a major change with the help of her constant advice, as it is crucial for the parents to change in order for the children to change as well. “All the moments – from the beginning till the very end of the session, fly before my eyes like a film.” When asked about some of her hardships, Kim instantly said, “whenever I meet a child with a devastating background.” “This child I remember, her parent couldn’t really take care of her and her drawings always broke my heart. Knowing what her mother was also going through, also pained me because there was nothing I could do to realistically help them out of the situation.” Kim mentioned how she sometimes cried while driving home and felt the need to practice separating her life as a therapist and her personal life, because it was just too emotionally consuming. “In the end though, it’s all still worth it and I am very happy with my work. People always said that I’m a very hopeful person, and they’re right because I always had a dream or a goal. I strongly believe in returning what you’ve learned. I would love to learn more even in the future, to put my knowledge to good use for society.” Park Joo-hyun julia1114@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Lee Jin-myung

2018-04 11

[Alumni]Jinbo, the 'Super Freak'

Bangtan Boys (BTS), Red Velvet, Twice, Beenzino, Shinee - these are all pretty successful and globally famous idols in the K-pop industry. What they have in common is that they have all had Jinbo (Economics and Finance, ‘09) feature in some of their popular songs. Jinbo is a talented producer and vocalist whose curiosity and passion keeps him open to all music genres and trends. Jinbo, to progress Jinbo is one of those musicians who has both talent and perseverance that has led him to where he is now. Luckily, he was born into a musical family where he was constantly exposed to different genres and trends of music throughout his childhood. He was heavily influenced by his two older brothers, who enjoyed both classical and revolutionary selections at the time. He was also made their practice partner, which got him used to performing in front of others from a very early age. What really got him to decide to take a musician's path was when he first listened to the song "Happy" by Pharrell Williams. “Farrell Williams may not be exceptionally good at singing, rapping or playing an instrument, but he is fearless and daring as a producer and an artist. This inspired me to take on the challenge of being a producer and an artist as well.” (Photo courtesy of Jinbo) Although he graduated with an economics and finance degree due to his parents’ strong suggestion, it did not stop him from pursuing his dream as a producer and a vocalist. That was when he took on his stage name “Jinbo,” which in Korean means “to progress.” “I have five working principles. It is to be global, positive, futuristic, romantic, and progressive. I always want to stay open and be flexible, moving forward along with the changing times and trends. Hence, the name Jinbo.” Jinbo and Super Freak After diving into the industry, Jinbo successfully pushed his sense and style of music which later grabbed the attention of many different artists. He even created his own recording company called "Super Freak." His main focus genre may be R&B, but he is never hesitant when it comes to trying out or mixing different genres as well. As a result, many reached out to either collaborate with him, or even have him feature in their songs. “I’m not as interested in creating a whole new genre of music. Rather than creating something from the scratch, I’m more interested in creating a new mix from a variety of styles or genres that already exist.” “Music is like a language I am fluent in. But I hope one day I can proudly say that it is a toy that I can handle with fun and flexibility.” (Photo courtesy of Jinbo) Of course, even Jinbo went through some hardships. In his case, it was his health problems that got in the way. “I used to work overnight. But when I started having health issues resulting from it, even if I had a brilliant idea that I needed to quickly work on before losing it, the excruciating neck and back pain would prevent me. Now I try to have a more stable daily routine.” To the next step Having been awarded with Korean Music Awards (KMA) in both R&B record and song in 2011 and 2014 respectively, Jinbo wishes to continue working as an acknowledged producer and vocalist until the very end like Quincy Jones and James Brown did. “My dream is to have this name “Jinbo” become iconic so that people will think of it as a milestone in music history, rather than simply thinking of it as some political term.” When asked if he had any last words for his fellow Hanyang students, he said that as a university student, networking is important. As time goes by, the new generation will always experience something different and unprecedented. With that, combined with the experience and knowledge of the older generation, we will always be able to create something novel. That is why even he himself is always open to people regardless of ethnicity or age, so that whoever wishes to contact him, even just to share ideas with him, should not be hesitant. "봄이 오는 소리" - Jinbo (Video courtesy of youtube.com) Jinbo (SuperFreak Records) Instagram: jinbosuperfreak Park Joo-hyun julia1114@hanyang.ac.kr

2018-02 11

[Alumni]Touching the Hearts of Children

When asked what she aspires to become, Yoon Na-hyo (Media Communication, ’17), a young yet well-experienced voice actress of over 10 years replied, “I’ve always wanted to become ‘Santa Clause.' Simply because giving out ‘presents’ always makes people happy. Seeing a smile on their face means a whole lot to me.” Yoon continued to unfold the story of her passion in the small yet intriguing voice acting industry. A natural Yoon is currently a children’s voice acting content specialist who also works at a company for digital content marketing. Having graduated from Hanyang University (HYU) quite recently, she is already a well-known voice actress in the field as the voice of the “Catch the Mouse” song (KBS Happy Sunday: 쥐를 잡자) as well as over 500 different works, including animation dubbing, textbook CD covers, and so on. She also took part in the songs of ‘Pororo the Little Penguin’ (뽀로로) and ‘Tayo the Little Bus’ (타요), two of the most popular kids shows. Yoon at the recording studio (Photo courtesy of Yoon) While it is a rare case to find something you both love and have natural talent for, Yoon was fortunate to have found both at such an early age of 12. According to Yoon, she always loved singing in front of other people and with the support of her parents and teachers, she was able to perform on various stages as well as television shows as a part of the Children’s Choir. She had even won a long list of prizes at singing contests as well. As her voice received more and more attention from different producers, she was scouted and introduced to take part in voice acting roles. “The voice acting industry in Korea is pretty small, so everybody pretty much knows each other. In particular, once you start specializing in a certain role such as, a young girl of about 3 to 7, or a teenage girl’s voice, like me, then most of the time you’re given the opportunity to try out for that role.” Where true passion lies Although Yoon had started working and gaining experience from a very young age, becoming a voice actress wasn’t her dream from the very start. However, she says that she has never gotten tired of it before and wants to continue working in this industry. “It’s because I truly enjoy what I do. My life motto is to do everything I want to do. So no matter how challenging the task is, and because I genuinely love my work, I’m always happy and can continue to push myself to achieve my goals.” "My love and passion for my work is what motivates me in the end." Of course, even for Yoon, whose passion lies in the heart of her drive, an inspirational mentor had always been there to guide her along the path. A renowned children’s song composer, Kim Bang-ok (composer of “그대로 멈춰라”) has worked together with Yoon ever since Yoon took her first step as a voice actress. “We still talk and sometimes work together. She is my model because she is always passionate about her work no matter how big or small it is and never fails to give it her all. I always learn something from her and respect her very much.” A dream to accomplish When asked what she thinks her greatest achievement is so far, Yoon answered, “when I randomly catch children watching Pororo or Tayo, I feel proud. Also, knowing that a lot of children will grow up listening to my voice, especially through educational content, that is when I find meaning in my work.” As a voice actress, it is an inevitable fact that her voice will change with age. Yoon also admitted that she is well aware that her job as a voice actress specializing in children’s voice will not last forever. However, because her passion lies in working for children, she wishes to continue working in the children’s content field by expanding her capacity to content creation, marketing, and distribution through diverse media channels such as Youtube, Naver, and so on. That is why she is currently learning the whole process at her current company, in order to combine this knowledge with her first-hand experience in the field of production. According to Yoon, “especially, nowadays, where media is inseparable from our lives, I think the type of media content we've been exposed to plays a greater role of influence on all our lives. Since I am particularly interested in working for children, I wish to be able to reach out to them more and hopefully put a smile on their faces with the content I produce.” Pororo song (Video courtesy of Yoon) Park Joo-hyun julia1114@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Choi Min-ju

2018-02 06

[Alumni]Ekklesia: Under the Sound of Music

In today's competitive society, our lives tend to be labeled as either a failure or a success--two contrasting concepts that one wishes to completely avoid or achieve. But the simple truth that people fail to recognize is that there can be no great success without failure. A model example of this is Kim Jae-bin (Vocal Music, '13), the lead singer of a popera group called Ekklesia. On the rise Holding a long list of stage experience and media exposure, Kim is an active, rising star in the popera field continuously working his way up to success as the leader as well as the CEO of Ekklesia (Ekklesia Enterprise). Now a well-known popera group, it consists of three members including Kim himself. The term “Ekklesia” itself is a Greek word defined as “an assembly under God’s calling." It well incorporates Kim’s dream to perform songs that both singers and the audience can emotionally relate to and return with a bit of peace and happiness. However, it was not always a path full of bliss for Kim to get to where he is today. In particular, back when he first started out as a popera singer, it was one bumpy road that not many wanted to risk taking. “Popera,” also known as operatic pop, is a subgenre of pop music that is performed in an operatic singing style or a song. As it is a more popularized version of classic opera among the public, one would think that it is a positive trend in the classical music industry. However, in the beginning, it was perceived as some sort of heresy and received heavy criticism from the field. Likewise, Kim was also skeptical before taking this path until his life mentor and professor in charge at that time strongly suggested that he try out for a popera group called “UAngel Voice,” which would then provide him with abundant stage experience and financial support. After two years as a ‘Uangel Voice’ member, he did not want to quit as “it allows me to feel the instant connection with the audience as it has more interaction than classical opera performances. This ultimately led me to create Ekklesia," said Kim. UAngel Voice stage rehearsal, 2012 (Photo courtesy of Kim) Walking down the rough path Kim's background story was surprisingly full of rough patches that started out with “I had nothing more to lose as I was starting from scratch. Whatever I challenged myself with, even if there was a huge chance of failing, I knew that there could only be a way up for me.” At one point, Kim even had to work as a salesman in an insurance company to financially support Ekklesia. Despite these hardships, he never refrained from challenging himself to try new things. “I like the term ‘전화위복’ (转祸为福; misfortune turns into a blessing). My years of experience at the insurance company allowed me to truly understand all the hardships these people were going through everyday at work. I then incorporated it in my message to these people through the songs I performed for them. It was quite successful, and I was able to sign long-term contracts with other large companies to perform at their workshops and seminars.” Fear of failure: the only hindrance to reaching your dream For Kim, one of the most meaningful performances was from back when his group gave hour-long performances on stages in the metro stations. "One time, this mother and a child who had been watching our entire performance bought a huge cake and coffee for us. The mother thanked us for our performance and told us that her daughter who actually hated music, insisted that they stay and watch till the end. She had never seen her so happy. This was the moment when it really hit me, that I was doing something meaningful. From then on, my passion for music grew, and I have never hesitated to try something new.” Kim with a mother and her child after performing at Sadang station, 2014 (Photo courtesy of Kim) When asked if he thinks he is now successful, Kim said yes without a doubt. Kim’s definition of success was being able to proudly perform a piece that is not only the collaboration of pop and opera, but a collaboration of everybody’s heart: mix and intercommunication of our dreams and feelings. He added that, right now, he is truly happy only because he knows the starting point of his path – how it was before, his past experiences and so on, and also because he has a lifelong goal. “I hope that my popera successors will dream big but fear less. If we look carefully, there are many stages we can perform on although it may not be as financially rewarding or live up to one’s expectations. Don’t let your fear of failure blind you from all those chances out there and end up only looking for short-cuts to success.” Ekklesia performing "Love" (Video courtesy of Kim) Kim Jae-bin - Le Temps des Cathédrales (Video courtesy of Kim) Park Joo-hyun julia1114@hanyang.ac.kr