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2016-12 26 Important News

[Culture]Freshman-Senior Discourse on University Life

After several sleepless nights of studying, final exams are over at universities, and students are greeting their winter breaks. This also means that those who applied to and took exams to enter Hanyang University are receiving either acceptance or rejection letters. Two new freshmen of Hanyang University who are to enter the school in 2017, Kim Ye-hwan (Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Engineering) and Shin Ho-joong (Department of Computer Science and Engineering), had a discourse session with their seniors, Jung Da-eun (Department of Media and Communication, 3rd year), Park Yoo-kyung (Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Engineering, 2nd year), and Won Chang-hee (Department of Computer Science and Engineering, 4th year) and shared their expectations and worries about their upcoming university life. Q1. What are your expectations of university life? What are you curious about? Ye-hwan: I am definitely looking forward to getting one of those department jackets. I have seen a lot of students wear them and I was jealous. Now that I am accepted into Hanyang University, I’m excited to get my own. Ho-joong: Oh, yes. Additionally, I also thought of working on group projects with my friends overnight. To me, that sounds fun. But I heard some people aren't cooperative and are hard to deal with. I have big concerns about that. Da-eun: Actually, there are so many different types of people and it really just depends on who you team up with. It all differs case by case. Ye-hwan: What about making friends? How do you get close with people? I can't drink and I'm worried that not being able to drink will get in the way of socializing with people. Yoo-kyung: You really don’t need to worry about that much, because nobody will force you to drink. There will be a lot of occasions for you to socialize with people and you just need to have a lot of conversations to get to know them and become friends. Even if you go to a social gathering, you wouldn't be pressured to drink. It's all at your will! Chang-hee: I bet you guys are wondering about campus romance. It once was my dream, too. When I first entered university, I was awakened by reality because in engineering departments, the majority of students are guys. Nonetheless, you can still become campus couples if you join clubs or go to a lot of gatherings. Ye-hwan (left) and Ho-joong (middle) are talking about their impressions of Hanyang University. Q2. What were your biggest interests as a high school student? What influenced you to choose your major? Ho-joong: I used to play computer games very often since I was in elementary school. One day, my account was hacked and I was frustrated. I think that was the moment that made me spark an interest in computer science. I want to be skillful with computers so that I can protect my private accounts and prevent such mishaps. Nowadays, my interest is mostly on software and security systems. Ye-hwan: I didn't know what I was interested in, so when I entered high school, I was a bit lost. But I soon developed an interest in natural environment, and I was certain that I didn't belong in the humanities field. This is why I applied to the Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Engineering. Q3. Any ideas on choosing what to eat within or near the campus? Ho-joong: High school food was so-so. What about university cafeterias? Chang-hee: Food isn't so bad here. Since our campus is situated on a pretty steep hill, you will often feel reluctant to go down the campus just for lunch. If you do, then it is a long way back for most students. That is why I mostly prefer to go to school cafeterias. There are several school cafeterias throughout the campus and they aren't that bad. Most importantly, the price is reasonable and it saves you a lot of time and money if you eat in school cafeterias. Da-eun: Also, if you are a freshman, your seniors will treat you to lunch more than often. I don't remember paying for my own lunch when I was a freshman. I always had friendly seniors who treated me to nice lunches. In other words, you don't need to worry too much about looking for good places to eat around the campus. If you follow them around several times, you'll get an idea of where to eat. Yoo-kyung: If you are tired of school cafeterias, and are too lazy to go outside the campus, order some delivery food. It's very convenient and tasty. Da-eun, Chang-hee, and Yoo-kyung (left to right) are answering the juniors' questions. Q4. What do you like about Hanyang University? Ho-joong: I like how the subway is connected to the campus. I think that is the best advantage I have found so far. Yoo-kyung: Yes, definitely. The subway makes our lives so much easier and more convenient. Chang-hee: I also agree. Since our campus is big, you can find nice views here and there. The night view around the Humanities Building is especially remarkable. Ye-hwan: I think the school logo is impressive. The word ‘Hanyang’ in Korean, forming the the school’s mascot lion, is absolutely brilliant. Q5. Lastly, any other questions to ask? Ye-hwan: What are some recommendable clubs to join? Da-eun: There will be a few times throughout the school year when all the clubs promote themselves and recruit new members. As you'll see, there are a lot of different clubs that do various things. You can join as much as you can handle. Ho-joong: Are there any tips on making friends? Chang-hee: As long as you embrace the differences between you and your peers, you will have no trouble getting close to them. Similarly, you shouldn't feel too burdened about your seniors. Just try to be comfortable around them and your peers, and you'll be fine. After the discourse, they are cheering for their upcoming semester. Jeon Chae-yun chaeyun111@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Choi Min-ju

2016-11 28

[Culture]Global Community in Itaewon, Seoul

Itaewon refers to the roughly 1.4 km-stretch from Itaewon 1-dong to Hannam 2-dong in Yongsan-gu, Seoul. When you get off at Itaewon station, line number 6, signs of stores written in English, Chinese, and Japanese will catch your eyes. Just by walking along the streets, one will soon sense the exotic atmosphere that can only be felt in Itaewon. In fact, Itaewon is one of the most outlandish places in Seoul where people of different nationalities and cultures are clustered. As a 'foreign city', Itaewon is also the place where foreign residential districts and a number of foreign embassies are gathered. In 1997, Seoul designated Itaewon as the first ‘Special Tourism District’ for both foreigners and Korean citizens. There are more than 2000 stores that include shopping centers, restaurants, recreational facilities, trade firms, hotels and tourist bureaus. Hamilton Hotel is located at the center of Itaewon. (Photo courtesy of Hamilton Hotel Seoul) Stories behind its formation While the word 'Itaewon' originated from the Joseon Dynasty when it originally referred to a residence specifically for the Japanese, the current form of this global tourism site is more relevant to Korea’s modern history. After the Korean War (1950-1953), the American military base was established in Yongsan which was later followed by more residential zones and businesses for its soldiers. Itaewon was once called as the 'Las Vegas of Seoul', the recreation center for American soldiers. Soon, the place attracted more foreigners who started to spread their own cultures in the region. Only in Itaewon Itaewon Antique Furniture Street is close to Itaewon station Exit 4. (Photo courtesy of Visit Seoul) As mentioned, there are many different stores and restaurants that fascinate tourists. While there are high-end brand stores in Itaewon, big and small indie shops in street corners contribute more to the distinctive character of Itaewon. Fashion shops specialize in imported clothes, furs, handbags, shoes and antique furnitures that are hard to find in general Korean markets. Its price range is quite extensive- from being fairly affordable to being as expensive as designer brands. Dress shops are also more easily seen in Itaewon for foreigners who are more used to partying than Koreans. For foreigners with different body shapes, bigger sizes are also well-stocked in Itaewon shops. Cuisines from 30 different countries such as Korea, the US, the UK and India are also one main reason why people visit Itaewon. The 'World Food Street' located at the back of Hamilton Hotel is currently one of the most popular places to eat as it allows people to try exotic foods that are hard to experience without going overseas. Itaewon is the only place where people can find cuisines that are hard to find in other parts of Korea. It is said that Bulgarian and Uzbekistan restaurants can only be found in Itaewon. Moreover, the fact that a lot of foreign restaurants stick to their traditional or original recipes adds to their allure. The World Food Street of Itaewon. (Photo courtesy of Visit Seoul) The first Islamic mosque in Korea Behind the Itaewon fire station, another unfamiliar sight can be spotted along with the smell of pungent spices. It is Usadan-gil, or Islamic street, which manifests the harmonious blend of Seoul’s old landscape and Islamic culture. The first Islamic mosque in Korea, the Seoul Central Mosque, is located at the center of Usadan-gil. In the country where Christian crosses are more frequently found, twin minarets that tower around the mosque is a sure unique site to check out. To visit the mosque, people must abide by the Islamic law, which forbids wearing short-sleeved tops, skirts, and pants. To take a more constructive tour inside the mosque along with a guide, it is advised to make a reservation beforehand through the Seoul Central Mosque's official homepage. With 35 thousand Korean Muslims, there are a total of apporoximately 150 thousand Muslim devotees who attend the Itaewon Muslim Mosque. (Photo courtesy of Seoul City Tour) Itaewon is a place where different people from various cultures coexist. It is an important duty for all of its members, both Koreans and foreigners, to try their best to keep peace and security within its community while fostering its uniqueness in Korea's number one tourism district. Yun Ji-hyun uni27@hanyang.ac.kr

2016-10 30

[Culture]Korea's Traditional Soju

From the Goryeo Dynasty to now, soju has been one of the most popular alcoholic drink for over seven centuries. Throughout its history, changes in ingredients and recipes have become more distinct according to specific regions around Korea. The distinctive features of traditional soju are different from the commercialized versions that are mass produced. Also, different ingredients, recipes, tastes, and flavors consummate the peculiarities of soju each region possesses. Traditional and Modern-Day Soju There are two different ways of producing soju- the traditional and the modern way. The traditional method of concocting soju is the single distillation process to bring forth the fermentation of various grains. This procedure of fermentation includes washing, drying, and crushing wheat, and mixing it with water. Then, it is filtered, fermented, and mixed with hard-boiled rice, which is then placed in a crock for 15 days. Since this distillation procedure accounts for a host of time and monetary investment, many of the soju brands of today prefer the modern method of making soju- the dilution of industrial grade ethanol. Manufacturers purchase the ethanol in quantity, dilute it with water, and fortify sweeteners to it. This manner of soju production claims for a dash of hours and financial support, which capacitates the soju suppliers to mass-produce soju at an inexpensive price. Regional Peculiarities of Traditional Soju Traditional soju in Seoul and the Gyeonggi province touts elegance and exclusiveness. Due to their geographical locations, breweries of Seoul and the Gyeonggi province consecrated beverages directly to the royal family and noble bureaucrats. Thus, the quality of soju was material to the producers, resulting in the straitened accessibility to ordinary people. Abiding to Confucian values, the nobles yearned for frugal looks and scents of soju. The most renowned examples are samhae-soju and hyangonju of Seoul, and namhansansung-soju and munbaeju of the Gyeonggi province. The appellation of samhae-soju was entitled because samhae means 3 years in Korean and even the king of Joseon could only procure it once in 3 years, demonstrating its exiguity. Also, hyangonju was famous for its bestowment to the king and to loyal bureaucrats. Both namhansansung-soju and munbaeju are famous for their usage of conventional ingredients. Brewers of namhansansung-soju boiled down grains into taffy and for munbaeju, pears were used for slight sweetness. These are all characterized by their pellucid tint and delicate scents of the melded mung beans and wheat. From left to right, traditional soju of Seoul and the Gyeonggi province: samhae-soju, hyangonju, namhansansung-soju, munbaeju (Photos courtesy of Seoul Master, Visit Korea, Moonbaesool) Traditional soju products of the Chungcheong province are generalized by their high-proof alcohol percentage. In order to cover up the bitterness of alcohol, the brewers added omnifarious flowers into soju. The representatives are yeonyupju of Asan, sogokju of Hansan, baekilju of the Gyeryong district, and dugyeonju of Myuncheon. Flowery ingredients include lotus leaves in yeonyupju, azalea leaves in dugyeonju and chrysanthemum stems in baekilju. Also, sogokju of Hansan has its byname of the crippled soju (anjungbangui-sul), due to its sweet taste brought about by fortified taffy made of bee hives. From left to right, traditional soju of the Chungcheong province: yeonyupju, dugyeonju, baekilju, sogokju (Photos courtesy of Yeousai's Blog, Chungnam Net, Deltaeagle, Sogokjunara) Furthermore, brewers of the Jeolla province produce traditional soju with exceptional color and taste. Yigangju of the Jeonju district avails itself of various ingredients such as pear, cinnamon, and honey in order to balance out the bitter and sweet taste of soju. Due to the congruous colors of ingredients, yigangju catch drinkers’ sights with its unique yellow hue. Also, hongju of Jindo adds in medicinal herbs called jincho to stain the alcohol red and usage of barley instead of wheat creates the distinctive, deep taste. Traditional soju of the Jeolla province: yogangju and hongju (Photos courtesy of Umbyeolgung's Blog, TPHolic) Lastly, the Gyeongsang province boasts the prominence of their traditional soju. The most well-known traditional soju of all, Andong-soju brewed by the historically eminent family -the Kim family of the Andong district- has its own singular recipe. The fermentation and filtering processes that accounts for longer time than any other alcohol in Korea augment the bottomless taste of soju. Andong-soju has a strong percentage of alcohol, 45%, which assembled numbers of devotees beyond the Gyeongsang province. In addition, gyodongbupju of the Gyeongju district is brewed by another prominent family of Korea- the Choi family of the Gyeongju district. This type of soju is famous for its intricacy and 100-day-long distillation process. Also the drinking etiquette principally designed for gyodongbupju is notorious for its complicated sequence, which draws people in to be fascinated by it. Pictures of brewing traditional soju of the Gyeongsang province: Andong-soju and gyodongbupju (Photos courtesy of Chosun News, Korean Cultural Heritage Administration) Values of Traditional Soju Unlike the modern-day soju, simply diluted with water and ethanol, traditional soju possesses its own classical values that bear exclusive recipes and history. With more glimpse into the gravity of traditional soju and a sip of it, it will present astonishment flowered by the time and endeavor spent. Kim Ju-hyun kimster9421@hanyang.ac.kr

2016-10 24

[Culture]Foreign Towns in Korea

There are different foreign towns or villages in Korea which possess a unique historical background. It boasts exotic scenery and sites. People in Korea can have the chance to learn about foreign culture. For special experiences in Korea, two foreign towns are worth taking a look. One with the Longest History, Incheon China Town Incheon China Town is located at Jung-gu, Incheon. It is easily accessible if people use the subway and get off at the Incheon station, Line 1. The first thing that draws people in is the color red and the large, decorative gate. As red is the favorite color of the Chinese, a lot of the buildings, store signs and lights are decorated with red. The history of Incheon China Town started with the Hwagyo. Hwagyo refers to Chinese people living outside of China. It traces back to 1882 when China was in the Qing Dynasty. About 40 Hwagyo people came to Joseon (the name of Korea then) as military merchants providing materials needed by the Chinese military. They also had frequent deals with Koreans as well. As the scale of their business grew, an official concession for the Chinese was granted in 1884. The official consulate of Qing was established in the several months that followed. In the year 1890, the number of Hwagyo increased up to 1000. Incheon China Town's first gate (top), Chinese street food (bottom left), and Samgukji Mural Street (bottom right). Photo courtesy of Korea Tourism Organization Hwagyo successfully promoted benefits in between Qing and Joseon. They brought in materials that were very rare in Joseon at the time. It included products like silk and cotton cloth. It is said that vegetables like onions, carrots, and tomatoes were also first introduced in Joseon by the Chinese merchants. More Chinese people were attracted to Joseon because of the high possibility of successful business. Consequently, more Hwagyo began residing in Joseon, building Chinese-style architecture that remains until this day in Incheon. Although Hwagyo once suffered from the Sino-Japanese war from 1894 to 1895, and more regulations by the Korean government made the lives of Hwagyo hard, the spread of globalization in the 21st century shed light on the cultural and historical values of the Incheon China Town. With the support of the Korean government, now there are more tourism infrastructures like museums, stores and decorated streets in the town. Museums provide Korean and Chinese language courses and Chinese traditional music performances. Chinese food in streets and restaurants also adds up to the flavor of the town. Home of the Patriots, Namhae German Village History of Namhae German Village located in Namhae is closely affiliated with Korea’s heightened economic development in the 60s. In the early 1960s, Korea was suffering from economic depression. It was extremely hard for young people in Korea to get a job. Germany, on the other hand, had a serious shortage of labor force in so-called 3-D jobs: 'Difficult, Dirty and Dangerous'. To solve employment problems and supplement foreign currency reserves, about 20,000 nurses and miners were sent to Germany to work there. Despite many hardships like language and harsh labor conditions, young Koreans greatly aided in solving Korea's economic depression by transferring their earnings to families at home. The Korean government inferred that this contribution largely helped to accomplish the 'miracle of the Han river'. To compensate the nurses and miners who came back, the government started to build the Namhae German Village in 2000. German people live in the village, too, who are married to Korean citizens. Namhae German Village offers diverse cultural experiences, which includes beautiful scenery, food, and festivals. Photo courtesy of Namhae German Village and SEGYE There are now about 40 houses built inside the village. All the houses are built in the unique style of German architecture with red roofs. It is also in close proximity to the coastline, embodying a calming and beautiful landscape. About 30 houses run private room rental services, used by visitors of the village. As a small German community within Korea, the village provides food, festivals, and landscape that let people truly enjoy the German culture. Popular German beer and sausages are easily attained. Festivals composed of various programs are held annually to attract tourists. This includes performances and beer-drinking contests. Information on the lives of Korean miners and nurses is exhibited in the village museum. It opened in 2004 to raise awareness about the hardships confronted by young Korean workers in Germany. Yun Ji-hyun uni27@hanyang.ac.kr

2016-10 19 Important News

[Culture]Kimchi - Regional Variations and Its Multifarious Traits

From historical times until now, gimjang, or kimchi-making, was Koreans’ yearly routine before greeting winter. Kimchi boasts many different kinds, each of which possess distinctive characteristics with varying ingredients and recipes. These distinguishing factors derive from regional idiosyncrasies- they reflect each region’s own taste preference. Displaying different colors, ingredients and appearance, each and every kind portrays manifold facets of Korea’s traditional and cultural icon, kimchi. Various types of kimchi, each displaying different ingredients and form. (Photo courtesy of antiquealive.com) Regional Idiosyncrasies A broad generalization concerning all kinds of kimchi is that kimchi from the south of the peninsula tends to be saltier with a stronger taste than that of the north. This is largely due to the climate difference within the peninsula: the northernmost region has a cooler temperature, thus necessitating less sodium replenishment than the southern region. In a warmer climate, fermented food—or any food in general—is prone to spoiling. Salt is not only favorable when it comes to preventing such harm, but also cooperative in helping people to balance the salinity rate within their body by replenishing lost-salt from sweating in warm regions. Starting off with Seoul and the Gyeonggi province, which are geographically adjacent and therefore almost bear no difference, those regions pinpoint elegant semblance and a moderate intensity of salinity. This is because these areas, especially Seoul being the capital city, used to be inhabited by royal families and nobles. Not only did they demand an opulent look of the dish, but they also preferred a flawless taste. Representative kinds of kimchi from these areas include whole cabbage kimchi (tongbaechu kimchi), wrapped kimchi (bossam kimchi), cucumber kimchi, soy sauce kimchi (jang kimchi), and cubed radish kimchi. Some exemplary kimchi of Seoul and Chungcheong province (Photos courtesy of lara.tistory.com; recipe.ezmember.co.kr/; food4.net; static.theaapl.com) The Chungcheong province also shares the style of highlighting moderate amounts of seasoning to avoid excessive saltiness or spiciness. Prototypes from this area include young radish kimchi (chonggak kimchi or yeolmu kimchi) and eggplant kimchi. Kimchi from the Gangwon province typically has a light and clean taste. Divided into Yeongdong and Yeongseo areas by the Tae Baek Mountains, the former is near the East Sea and the latter in proximity to mountainous areas. Correspondingly, the Yeongdong area incorporates fresh seafood cultivated from its region such as squid, pickled shrimp, and salt-fermented anchovy paste, producing a chewy texture. In contrast, the Yeongseo area adds dry ingredients like mustard leaf and stem, fine pepper powder, and salt to create a neat and spicy taste. One distinction between the two areas is that the former puts in a lot more salted seafood pickles than the latter. Overall, some exemplary kimchi from the Gangwon province are squid kimchi, seafood kimchi, mountain herb kimchi (deodeok kimchi), and soybean sprout kimchi. Furthermore, the Gyeongsang province and Jeolla province hold comparable traits. Since the two regions exhibit clemency in weather, their kimchi tends to be piquant and have generous amounts of spice combined together. To prevent rotting in the warm weather, extra garlic, salt and red pepper powder are added, resulting in relatively very spicy and salty kimchi. This makes these regions’ kimchi distinctive from all the others. Prototypical kinds from these regions are perilla leaf kimchi, chives kimchi, dried sliced daikon kimchi, chilli kimchi, and burdock kimchi. Dried-sliced daikon kimchi, perilla leaf kimchi, chive kimchi, and chilli kimchi from Gangwon and Gyeongsang province. (Photos courtesy of eventimg.auction.co.kr; sandeulraefood.co.kr; lara.tistory.com) Last but not least, kimchi from Jeju Island is quite unique on its own. As an island, scanty food reserves somehow pose a limitation on the recipe- it is simple and plain. Nevertheless, special regional products come in handy and make its kimchi even more exclusive. The islanders enjoy using minimal seasonings and vitalize the natural taste of the ingredients. A representative specialty from Jeju Island is hijiki, a brown sea vegetable that also transforms into the island’s own taste of kimchi. Abalone kimchi, carrot kimchi, and canola herb kimchi are common types of the region as well. Hijiki from Jeju Island, and kimchi made with hijiki. (Photos courtesy of cfile235.uf.daum.net; postfiles15.naver.net) Kimchi and Culture It may be possible to further categorize types of kimchi through more precise measures, dividing each province into smaller units and considering every detailed variety that exists. However, even with the broader and more general division of kimchi, one can take a glimpse into kimchi's diversified and unique aspect that show regional variation. Jeon Chae-yun chaeyun111@hanyang.ac.kr

2016-10 04

[Culture]Kimchi, Korea’s Historical and Conventional Icon

Many will agree that kimchi is Korea's most well-known representative traditional food. Despite the pungent smell—that can be unbearable to a non-Korean—it is receiving extensive love around the world. There are hundreds of varieties of kimchi that are made of different types of vegetables. Its variety caters to suit the demands of diverse palates. Throughout the years, kimchi has become an indispensable part of a Korean meal. The outdated name for this indigenous food, chaejeo, comes from Chinese characters which mean fermented vegetable. This popular commodity bears a deep-rooted history and offers substantial health benefits to those consuming them. Tracking Down the Culture It is virtually impossible to state exactly when kimchi first came into the picture, since there are many different kinds of kimchi. The definition of 'kimchi' is ambiguous- any fermented vegetable with seasonings can be kimchi. However, an approximate date, according to a historical record, traces back to 3000 years ago, when chopped cucumber was fermented after being marinated. The “kimchi” we know, the type that is made with cabbage, is known to have originated from the ancient times, even before the era of The Three Kingdoms. The most common type of kimchi we know today became an ideal type in the early 1600s, as pepper was commercialized. Pepper powder, the main seasoning, and Kimchi made with it. In order to preserve food against decomposition, especially during winter, Korean ancestors came up with the means of drying food to prevent rotting. Then a more sophisticated method was discovered, which was fermenting- how kimchi came into the minds of the forebears. They needed to store vegetables for winter when greens cannot be accessed. Initially, kimchi was dipped in salt inside a pottery jar, then buried underground for more thorough fermentation. Having rice as the main staple, carbohydrate was the primary nutrient obtained by Koreans during that time period. To supplement other vitamins, vegetables were highly desirable. By satisfying both conditions of long durability and nutrition, making and storing kimchi became a common practice. Kimchi in pottery pots, buried underground during winter. Kimchi and its Health Benefits To endure the day-to-day industrious lifestyle, people need a good source of fuel for their survival. One sufficient source is, not too surprisingly, kimchi. The dish is made from various vegetables and contains a high level of dietary fiber, while being low in calories. One serving also provides more than half of the daily recommended amount of vitamin C and carotene. Onions, garlic, ginger, chilli peppers are the main ingredients of kimchi (aside from the main body, cabbage cucumber, and radish), all of which are salutary. These vegetables in kimchi also contribute to the overall nutrition value of the dish. Vegetables that serve as ingredients of kimchi, and the final outcome. Health benefits of kimchi can be largely categorized into catalyzing digestion, preventing diseases, increasing immunity, regulating bio-rhythm, and disinfecting the organs. The nutritious constituents of vegetables in kimchi make this work. They boost and smoothen the digestion by allowing the stomach to absorb and decompose the nourishment thoroughly. The low-calorie aspect of kimchi contributes to clearing the blood vessels, leading to a better circulation of blood. Various lifestyle diseases such as obesity, diabetes, and hypertension can also be avoided. Kimchi enables the whole body to maintain good health, which raises immunity and stabilizes bio-rhythm. One health benefit derived from kimchi summon another betterment, and create a chain reaction therein. Jeon Chae-yun chaeyun111@hanyang.ac.kr