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2018-07 17

[Faculty]Old Poetry Gathered into a Book

People say that being a parent is a whole new experience that brings so many unexperienced emotions and thoughts into one's life. Professor Pak Dong-uk (Korean Language & Literature) felt the same as any other father. With his son being born at a relatively late age for him, he was mesmerized by the feelings the little one gave him. He did not stop there but put his overflowing feelings into poem and searched more vigorously through old Korean poems written about family and being a father. Pak recently published his third book on the subject, No Flower Better that You. The title of this collection of poems sounds as if it is a love story or a love letter and indeed, it is. It all started with a question: Did fathers from the Joseon dynasty really disregard their daughters as portrayed in the dramas? It is widely known that Joseon – a country that later became the Republic of Korea – believed strongly in Confucianism. One commonly held belief was that women deserved fewer rights and respect than they do in contemporary Korean society. Wives who were forced back to work the day after giving birth to a daughter instead of a precious son are commonly portrayed in films and dramas that take place on the pages of our history. But as a father, Pak wondered if that would be true. News H interviewed Pak Dong-uk (Korean Language & Literature) in the Engineering BuildingⅡ. Pak's No Flower Better than You was published on May 18th. Using his early morning time before going to his 9 a.m. classes, Pak was able to find dozens of old poems written by fathers to their daughters, filled with nothing but love. “I figured fathers loved their daughters throughout history,” smiled Pak. His work does not necessarily say that all daughters during the Joseon Dynasty were loved as much as the daughters of the contemporary world, but it does point out that ladies in affluent families (enough for their father to be literate) were loved by their fathers, unlike the common misconception. It has been seven years since my daughter has been born, I can’t let her go out the doors now. A crow reminds you playing with ink, And a bracken reminds of your small hands picking up chestnuts. You wouldn’t have gotten used to getting ready in the morning with your mother. Who would comfort you when you cry for dad at night? Just wait child, for I will hug you the first thing I get back home, Even before I get my coats off. <Thinking of my daughter>, Jo Wee-han Pak himself defines a father as "a person who does not fall." He remarked that he feels so much more responsibility to his family and that having a child has widened his perspective of the world. “I now treat my students differently, because I keep thinking how precious they must be to their own parents.” Two more books on the topic of married couples will be published later this year. Pak still has endless topics he would love to write, collect and introduce old poems about. He gave readers of News H a special sneak peek into his upcoming book that will be published later this year. He said “It's about a truely genius poet named Lee Un-jin, who died at the age of 27. He wrote a series of poems with 170 poems in it, and that's all I can reveal now,” smiled Pak. The professor was humorous for the entire interview, yet he had much seriousness in his face. Kim So-yun dash070@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Kang Cho-hyun

2018-07 16

[Faculty]Population Problems of the Aging Korean Society

Hanyang University's Institute of Aging Society, according to Professor Lee Sam-sik (Department of Policy Science), has a lot of advantages as an academic institute with such an interest. Having Lee as the director, the institute was established in 2008 and has been dedicated to conducting research regarding today's aging society problems in Korea. This week, Lee spoke about the role of the institute and the ongoing population problem regarding the aging society in South Korea. Professor Lee Sam-sik (Department of Policy Science), the director of the Institute of Aging Society at Hanyang University, explained the research in progress at the institute on July 13th, 2018. The main goal of the Institute of Aging Society is to fuse the field of engineering with that of humanities and social science to achieve social innovation. This institution strives to realize “active aging,” which is intended to “inform discussion and the formulation of action plans that promote healthy and active aging,” according to the World Health Organization (WHO). There are six subsidiary research organizations of the Institute of Aging Society and Lee is the representative of the population strategy research group. This organization often forms a study group of external associations to develop and suggest the nation’s policies, vision, and strategy. The smart health aging research group involves the engineering field, where it is put to use in order to solve problems that the elderly face. The fruits of this group will increase the quality of people’s lives domestically, and motivate the growth of the international market. The advanced wellndess research group focuses on studies of exercise, food, and nutrition. Humans' taste organs degrade the most as they age. This group researches ways that the brain can register unsavory food as something delicious, or to protect the elderly from the damage of a fall, by developing textiles that act as an airbag. “Just like Spiderman’s clothing,” he smiled while he explained the logic of the idea. The lifecare research group conducts studies on ways to handle emergency situations. Age-friendly cities and communities research group targets making the whole city senior-friendly. Last but not least, the “third age” (referring to the 30 years after the age 40) research group conducts further research on leisure and the cultural life of the seniors. From 2006, the Korean government started to implement policies to supplement the nation’s low birth rate and the rapidly aging society in Korea. Lee emphasized the importance to strengthen not only the field of engineering but field of humanities and social sciences at Hanyang University. “The fusion of those two studies will not only bring important contributions to society but will also bring practical and creative solutions to population problems that our generation faces today,” said Lee. The gist of the population problem is that the growth rate of senior citizens is increasing at an unprecedented speed while there are increasingly fewer of the younger generations to support them. The average age of senior citizens is increasing, with most of them being 80 or older. In addition, households with a senior citizen living alone is increasing as well. The engineering departments have come up with the idea of creating big data by using a sensor to detect all circumstantial behaviors of the elderly. This way, it would be easier to spot any abnormal behavior and prevent accidents from happening. Professor Lee Sam-sik emphasized the importance of fusion research of diverse fields in pursuit of solving the problems that Korean society faces due to its rapidly aging population. “The way to handle the fast approach of an aging society is to resolve population problems. This is not something that can be solved at once, so we must look into and ameliorate things that we can handle for now. As we live in a time where human beings can live up past age 100, the balance between money, health, and civilized living for the elderly has become more important than ever. The government and institutions like the Institute of Aging Society at Hanyang University should make greater efforts to lessen the burden that the younger generation holds to support their elders, while seeking optimal welfare for the senior citizens.” Kim Hyun-soo soosoupkimmy@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Park Geun-hyung

2018-06 26

[Faculty]Increasing the Efficiency of Solar Batteries

Global warming is a clear threat to the human race. After long disputes over the validity of the phenomenon for nearly a quarter of a century, it has been revealed after an investigation of the fossil fuel industry that global warming is a real threat. The past scientific disputes had in fact been a result of interventions by the industry to protect their business. So what now? Aside from bringing justice to these corporations, one of the biggest assignments facing humanity is the creation of sustainable energy. For this task, the recent finding by Professor Park Jea-gun (Department of Electronic Engineering) has shed a new light of hope. Park Jea-gun (Department of Electronic Engineering) explains global warming. Simply put, Professor Park found a new way to improve the power conversion efficiency of our standard solar batteries. However, the process had been far from simple, and many complications had confronted Park on his journey. Solar power is among the few established sources of sustainable energy, which include tidal, wind, and hydraulic power. However, despite the research and development of solar batteries over the past 20 years, the highest power conversion efficiency, meaning the rate of the electrical energy that is converted from its original form, remained a staggering two percent. Park’s research had raised this rate to 4.11 percent. To give a brief explanation on the mechanics of solar energy, sunlight includes three types of rays: ultraviolet rays, infrared rays, and visible rays. These rays are projected in a form of waves, which are essentially energy. Currently, our solar batteries convert only visible rays, which is where Park began questioning a possible improvement. What Park did was to install quantum dots, a core semiconductor that is capped by an outer cell, on the silicone surface of the standard solar battery. A size smaller than 10 nanometers, quantum dots convert UV rays into visible rays, a process referred to as ‘energy-down-shift’. With this conversion, solar batteries could begin to convert a proportion of UV rays. An illustration of how a quantum dot converts UV rays for solar batteries (Photo courtesy of Park) This initial finding, published in 2014, improved the power conversion efficiency of solar batteries to three percent. Park was yet to be satisfied. Building on the scientific fact that the yield of energy from visible rays are greatest in the colors red and green, Park quickly moved to improve the new model. The problem was that the standard quantum dots converted UV rays to blue visible rays. Park resorted another process of quantum mechanics called ‘energy tuning’, which allowed the standard quantum dot to finally convert UV rays in a yellowish light, well between the rays of red and green. His new finding improved the power conversion efficiency to four percent. Now comes the final stage of Parks recent journey. Although his improvements to the standard solar battery was immensely significant, one flaw of his model was that it was composed of cadmium, a heavily regulated material. To make his model feasible for commercialized use, Park had to find a replacement for cadmium, which he found in a material called gallium. With his new improvement, Park’s research had been recognized and published in one of the most internationally renowned scientific journal, Advanced Energy Materials. Park’s research had been recognized and published in Advanced Energy Materials. As a word of advice to students aspiring to follow a scientific career, Park emphasized the importance of attitude. According to Park, the rate of development of scientific technology has grown exponentially within the past few decades. Students need to be aware of this, and needs to make an effort to follow recent discoveries and trending methods as opposed to focusing on traditional learning through textbooks. He also advised students to be well studied in software technologies, as they have grown much more significant in all domains of engineering. “The key is fundamental base, and a prepared attitude,” commented Park. Lee Chang-hyun pizz1125@hanyang.ac.kr Photo by Park Geun-hyung

2018-06 25

[Faculty]Childhood Inspiration Shared With Pupils

Some people have ‘that moment’ when they decide what career path to pursue. For Kim Eung-soo (Department of String and Wind Instruments), it was when he first listened to Mozart’s Violin Concertos when he was in elementary school. After about 30 years, Kim organized a concert with his students to play his childhood inspiration at Paiknam Art hall, on April 30th. Not a lot of concert play the entire concertos (comprised of five songs) in one occassion, as the pieces are long and very difficult to play. It is most likely that Kim’s performance was the first one in Korean musical history to play the whole set of songs at once. To perfect the songs, Kim and ensemble SOL practiced for two months for the concert. Kim Hyung-eun (String & Wind Instruments,4th year) mentioned “after this concert, preparing other songs and concerts felt whole lot easier.” Unlike other concerts, where there are separate team to organize the event, the performers had to do everything from advertising, contacting journalists and putting up posters on the wall. Kim Eung-soo (Department of String and Wind Instruments) is explaining about the meaning of ensemble SOL at Paiknam Art hall, on April 30th. The ensemble members all students of Kim, with 15 violin players. It is not common for a professor and students to play in a same concert, as there are unignorable gaps between the performers. What Kim wanted to make through the event is to make a “fence” for his students to keep in touch and to cooperate with eath other even after the graduation. Kim, the student, also agreed on the point commenting “through overcoming the hardships together, the performers became really close.” She also thanked her professor for making the concert possible. Kim graduated all three universities; University of Music and Performing arts Vienna, University of Music and Performing arts Gratz and Hannover Universty of Music, Drama and Media summa kum laude (first of class, meaning ‘with highest honor’ in English). However, despite of his awards and career, I could tell he is a very humble person through his remarks such as “I personally don’t think I am good enough to teach anyone,” “I am honored to participate in one of the most great things humanly possible, education.” Kim also emphasized that Hanyang University students have the necessary skills to become top musicians, so that they need to have more pride in our school and be more self-content. Kim and some of his students, namely Kim Hyung-eun, is participating in Korean Chamber Music Concert on coming 27th and 29th of June, at Seoul Arts Center. He also plans to make more events where he can harmonize with his students sometime next month. With the love and passion for both violin and his students, his plans seem bright. "Have more confidence" was the encouragement message Kim wants to give to his students. Kim so-yun dash070@naver.com Photos by Kang Cho-hyun

2018-06 25

[Faculty]Going Against Dominant Paradigms

Professor Eun Yong-soo (Department of Political Science and International Studies) recently published a new book, What is at Stake in Building "Non-Western" International Relations Theory?, this March, following his former book Regionalizing Global Crises which was released in 2016. Both writings were published by major publishers Routledge and Palgrave, respectively. Both publishers are renowned companies with their published writings being considered must-read materials within the field of diplomatic politics. Eun's recently published book What is at Stake in Building "Non-Western" International Relations Theory? focuses upon the existing dominant paradigms of the Western region, and how effective alternatives can be harmoniously placed from an Eastern perspective. This is going further in depth into the subject of his former book, which shed light on the theoretical backgrounds of such dominant paradigms and questioned whether the newly arising alternatives would provide an absolute replacement or act as a supplement to the existing theories. Professor Eun Yong-soo (Department of Political Science and International Studies) recently published his book What is at Stake in Building "Non-Western" International Relations Theory? In the book, Eun tries to provide solutions to the current dominant Western paradigms from the perspectives of other regions. Eun takes the stance that the existing dominant Western paradigms must be seen from an Eastern perspective, while finding harmonious frameworks in which the newly suggested theories can be applied to a non-Western culture. This goes against two extreme stances that the dominant Western paradigms are suitable from a global stance, whereas the other argues that the Western paradigms should be completely replaced with new theories that meet the needs of non-Western regions. "By taking a midway stance, I had to be ready to take the criticisms of both extreme perspectives," explained Eun during the interview. Eun also mentioned the strict evaluation process of the major publishers as a hardship while writing his recent book. Routledge and Palgrave, both being major publishers, which are highly sought-after by many writers in the field, have a strict examination process that goes over four major trials. They have a double blind review, which assures the anonymity of both the author and examiners in order to maintain an impartial examination process that is focused upon the proposed content only. As having two books published by these major companies has a significant meaning to him as a scholar within this particular field, Eun stated that awaiting the long trial process was a difficult task for him. When asked of his future plans, Eun answered that he is planning to conduct research upon the concept of emotion. He explained how the collective emotion of the public can represent a national sentiment and furthermore be used as a methodological tool for understanding international relations. From this perspective, understanding the formation and conversion process of a national sentiment can help the consolidation between nations, especially within the North-East Asian region. The whole premise of this research project began with an examination of the belief that emotion is an opposing concept of rationality, as it was long seen throughout history. Eun shared his research principles during the interview: continuously challenging and questioning the already accepted social norms, which goes alongside his newly planned research on collective emotion. Such thoughts go alongside with Eun's research principles, which put an emphasis upon challenging already accepted social norms. Most of his research started upon questioning whether the social norms that we have accepted are really right. He gave an example of how most of the Western paradigms were simply applied within the Korean context, yet Eun questioned this whole application process in the introduction of his recent research. He stated that, “As a professor and scholar, I believe that finding a hole within a box is my job. Widening and passing through this hole is a task that future students must fulfill.” Choi Seo-yong tjdyd1@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Park Kuen-hyung

2018-06 18

[Faculty]Professor Kim Ki-hyun, Laureate of the Science Technology And Researcher (STAR) Award

Over the course of the past few years, public awareness and concern for the level of air pollution has increased rapidly. More people have begun to monitor the level of fine dust concentration on a regular basis, and sanitary masks have become an indispensable daily item. In addition, air purifiers have become a key home appliance, now that opening the window brings in polluted air. In the midst of this growing awareness, the research achievements of Professor Kim Ki-hyun (Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering) is more illuminated than ever. Having been recognized for his significant contribution to air preservation, Kim received the Science Technology And Researcher (STAR) award in June. The STAR award is a prestigious award presented monthly to scientists in the fields of education, research, and industry. It was created in 1997 to promote the scientific and technological minds to the public, while boosting the morale of scientists in various sectors of the country. Kim was recognized by the committee for his creation of a nano-material that enables the assessment and control of pollutants in the air at a more effective rate. Through his research achievements, Kim Ki-hyun (Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering), the recipient of the Science Technology And Researcher (STAR) Award, has become internationally recognized as a prominent researcher in his field. To delve into the details of the research, Kim created the Metal Organic Framework (MOF), essentially a web of metals connected by an organic substance. This new material was created to act as a nano-level filter that could reduce pollutants in the air at a more effective rate. Furthermore, he made improvements in the standard environmental analysis system, making it more efficient to eliminate volatile organic compounds (VOC) and odor-causing substances in the air. “The current level of air purification technology is quite effective. However, there is a limit to the ability to detect and eliminate VOC,” explained Kim. Unlike dust, which is a solid form of pollutant, VOC includes substances such as benzene and formaldehyde, which are in the form of gas. As byproducts of household activities like cooking, these materials are highly toxic; unfortunately, only 40 to 50 percent of them can be eliminated by a standard air purifier. When considering that people spend 80 percent of their time indoors on average, the damage from these substances could be significant. Kim is hopeful about the prospects of his research and predicts that he will someday find a method to eliminate gas pollutants all together. When asked for a comment on receiving the award, Kim answered that it was the result of hard work. As a researcher devoted to the interface between human activities and the environment, Kim has spent his life attempting to raise the public's awareness and interest in environmental issues. After working on the discovery and monitoring of pollution levels, Kim set out on a path to reduce them. “I feel fortunate and grateful," answered Kim, who felt that his devotion to the field had been recognized. Kim offering a tour around his laboratory on the 13th of June. Kim's current goal is to break down the limitations of reducing VOC in the air. Although it is currently possible under the condition of the air being stagnant, the dynamic nature of air necessitates the creation of a technology that will make it possible under all conditions. In the long run, Kim hopes to create a road map that stipulates the various hazards created under different conditions, and how to address them. In his last comment, Kim raised his concerns of the public's discretion in accepting environmental facts. Although he recognizes the increase in public awareness, he pointed out that we should be more critical of what we consider facts, as well as our actions.“Nothing strikes me as more ignorant than a smoker who puts on air filter masks,” added Kim. Though our hearts may be in the right place, there is a need for the public to critically review their life patterns in making efforts to combat pollution. Lee Chang-hyun pizz1125@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Lee Jin-myung

2018-06 04

[Faculty]Look Far, and Take Steady Steps

Looking back on his long career which includes serving as the vice minister of the Ministry of Trade, Industry, and Energy as well as the president of the Korea Trade-Investment Promotion Agency (KOTRA), Kim Jae-hong (Department of Public Administration) summarizes the lessons that he had learned over the years into one phrase: “As a large bird flies over great distance.” Taken from an ancient Chinese teaching, it is a phrase that emphasizes the importance of looking far and taking steady steps. “The large bird in the phrase is a massive mythical creature, with immeasurable wing span and size. The point is that once this bird takes off, it won't land in the middle of its flight for anything without great value,” explained Kim. In the same sense, it teaches us not to be swayed by immediate, marginal profits and to look at the long picture. Kim Jae-hong (Department of Public Administration) recalled during the interview on the 31st that the lesson, "look far and take steady steps" was first taught to him by his middle school teacher. This phrase also happens to be the title of the book that Kim published recently, covering his life career as well as his insights into the industry that he has committed his life to. The first part of his career was as a public servant, eventually rising to take the role of the vice-minister of the Ministry of Trade, Industry, and Energy. Kim had specialized in the industry and trade throughout his 31 years of service. According to Kim, the most difficult part of leading in a public role is maintaining the values of objectivity and fairness. “In all public policies, there tends to be people who benefit, and those who face a loss. Sometimes people facing a loss take drastic measures to oppose certain policies, and it takes a great deal of consideration and negotiation to satisfy all parties involved,” recounted Kim. Furthermore, as the position entails great influence, Kim was sometimes approached by interested parties, often times in very subtle ways. To maintain objectivity in these situations also required great effort. Kim also devoted a large portion of his book to explaining how the our trade patterns and domestic industries should change to create a sustainable economic environment. The second part of his career was his three years as the president of KOTRA. After decades of creating public policies on trade and industries, this was his time to actually see through the practical practice. According to Kim, he was able to see and experience various processes that he had not been able to witness as a policy maker. Even the marginal exhibits required complicated regulations and detailed preparations, and it was a great experience for him to gain further expertise in the field. Finally, Kim concludes his book by explaining the life lessons that he has learned through his career. Returning again to the old teaching, "to look far and take steady steps," Kim explained that this principle should be adopted by all domains. Public policies need to be made with significant long-term vision, and the national trade pattern needs to brush aside immediate surpluses and establish deeper trade relationships. Kim refers to this principle in his advice to students of Hanyang. He was most concerned with students’ tendency to seek "stable" jobs. According to Kim, this goes against the value of youth, where challenges and adventures should take place. He advised students to come up with bigger dreams and to work hard for them. “In the course of my life, I have witnessed that if you have a dream, and work hard for it, you eventually get there. One way or another. So take great breaths and look far. Don’t remain short sighted,” encouraged Kim. Lee Chang-hyun pizz1125@hanyang.ac.kr Photo by Lee Jin-myung

2018-05 14

[Faculty]Finding the True Meaning of Engineering

Although Medecins Sans Frontieres (Doctors Without Borders), which has the mission of international humanitarian medical treatment, is a familiar organization to the public, not many are intimate with Scientists and Engineers without Borders (SEWB). First started in 2009, the SEWB has endeavored to develop and provide the "appropriate technology" to developing countries. Professor Kim Yong-soo (Department of Nuclear Engineering) was elected as the fourth president of this organization on the 9th of this month, with an office term of two years. The Scientists and Engineers without Borders The main purpose of the SEWB is to provide aid to developing countries through the application of scientific and engineering methods. However, as developing countries have low standards of scientific technology, the SEWB mainly focuses on appropriate technology, which is a form of technology that takes the social infrastructure of a particular society into consideration and provides the adequate technical standards that can be sustainably developed and consumed within the society. Neglected classes of people exist in every field, including science and technology. According to Kim, there are currently 1.4 billion people who are unable to access electricity. For these neglected classes, it is important that their actual quality of life is improved. Rather than simply providing them with cutting-edge technology, the SEWB aims to supply adequate technology that can be used within their scientific boundaries while meeting the direct needs of the people. Kim Yong-soo (Department of Nuclear Engineering), the newly elected president of Scientists and Engineers without Borders, explains the concept of appropriate technology and how its application has been the main purpose of the organization. A good example of an appropriate technology given by Kim was that there are groups of people in Cambodia who must use rainwater as their drinkable water due to the poor water supply system. Providing these people with a water filtration system that is inexpensive and approachable would greatly enhance the quality of their lives. Supplying such systems in an adequate way is the main theme of appropriate technology and a main purpose of the SEWB organization. Kim mentioned, “We want to find a way in which every single person benefits from scientific technology and improves their quality of life through such privilege.” Future plans as the new president Until now, there have been limitations on the SEWB's ability to take action. Keeping up with its name, Kim now plans to extend the organization's efforts across borders into developing countries. In order to magnify the organization’s base, collaboration projects with other organizations are in order. Cooperation with other companies, based on corporate social responsibility actions, is how Kim is designing the application of technology on the actual sites of developing countries. Furthermore, Kim has also been focusing on how the science and technology sectors are becoming an expanding interest of the Korean government’s official development assistance business, referring to aid offered to developing countries with the purpose of economic development, social improvement, and welfare promotion. The United Nations has also set poverty as its main sustainable development goal, which is in line with the SEWB 's purpose in tackling such issues through the application of scientific technology. Positioned upon such interests, Kim views the positive potentials of collaborative work with these major associations. Kim is also putting effort into trying to divide the SEWB into various sectors such as energy, water and health, and medical treatment. This would enable science technicians to unite diverse fields with enhanced expertise. Mainly focusing on the reinforcement of the overall organization, Kim, with the help of the former president, is going to overcome the existing limitations of the SEWB. As a professor at Hanyang University As a professor of an engineering field, Kim has the purpose of contributing to the advancement of engineering and challenging himself with the task of social restoration. Achieving his former goal of becoming a renowned figure in the field of nuclear decommissioning, even being registered on the Marquis Who’s Who, one of the three major biographical dictionaries, Kim is now moving onto accomplishing his second ambition. Having pursued this field for the last seven years, Kim is persisting in his actions of disseminating appropriate technology. Kim expressed proudness of his performance in Hanyang and how his presidential nomination represented these well-paid efforts. Kim mentioned that he was proud at the thought that his election to president represented the well-formed groundwork of Hanyang, which has long shown efforts to pursue appropriate technology, being the only school to have a research society among its professors. The university students have also recently made a group named A-Prime, which focuses on appropriate technology and its application in developing countries. Established by Kim, the Volunteer Corps of Hanyang University Alumni have also applied actions of appropriate technology, especially when conducting volunteer work in developing countries like Cambodia and the Philippines. According to Kim, where there is light there are shadows that exist. The rapid development of technology has greatly enhanced the overall lives of the human race, yet there are classes that have been alienated from even the most basic technologies. He ended the interview by stating, “I hope Hanyang students acknowledge such situations and feel thankful for all that they have received. A student that senses such gratitude will be strongly aware of his or her future actions.” Choi Seo-yong tjdyd1@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Hwang Yu-jin

2018-04 03

[Faculty]A Dancer and an Educator

In the words of the cherished German philosopher Friedrich von Schlegel, “Every art should become science, and every science should become art.” This is the very belief that College of Performing Arts and Sports Dean Kim Un-mi holds true for dance and education. Constantly emphasizing the importance of connectivity between educational theory and practice, Kim shared with News H some of her thoughts on being awarded the Korea Dance Association Art Award. Kim was recognized for having contributed to the field of Korean Dance, especially for having established the Research Institute of Korea Traditional Dance. The Korea Dance Association Art Award Dating back to 1961, the Korea Dance Association is the largest and most deeply rooted organization in the domestic field of dance. Every year, people who have made great advancements, not just in the field of dance but in regional developments and education as well, have been recognized and awarded by the organization. Nevertheless, with the awardees of the Art Award traditionally having been dancers, Kim answered that it was a great honor for her to have received the honor as an educator. Kim was highly praised in contributing to the preservation and advancement of Korean traditional dance through the Research Institute of Korea Traditional Dance. It was clear that Kim held immense passion for Korean dance as she talked about the background of its establishment. In addition to researching and teaching the theories of dancing, Kim stated that she still dances to this day. (Photo courtesy of Kim) According to Kim, it all began with a performance in Australia. It was a composition dance, where the choreography was built around the theme of a Korean traditional wedding. From stage editing to costumes and music, the Korean traditional style had been adapted. Even more important was the choreography. Kim desired to deliver the very essence of the traditional ceremony, with an emphasis on the emotions of the bride. “The traditionally long event had to be compressed into a 30-minute sequence, which was a challenge for me.” From anxiety to excitement, joy, and happiness, Kim directed the performance in a manner through which the emotions of the bride on the day of the wedding could be felt by the audience. Eventually accruing great praise and recognition for the performance, Kim was offered support to expand her activities and research, which was when she proposed the idea of the research institute. Established well before the currently ubiquitous concept of convergence research, the Research Institute of Korea Traditional Dance utilized the two separate fields of Korean dance and engineering for one purpose: the preservation and advancement of Korean traditional dance. Not only does the institute conduct historical research, digging deeper into the roots of Korean dance, but it also analyzes the virtue and spirit that is contained in it. Various concepts are devised to capture abstract meanings in the dance. Furthermore, methods to install these values and ultimately design them into choreography are studied there. A photo of Kim instructing her students (Photo courtesy of Kim) Born to dance “My first memories are that of dancing.” With her mother also a dancer and an educator, Kim stated that she had always danced. However, that does not mean that it was only out of external influence. According to Kim, she had always been captivated by the stage, and there was always an exhilarating emotion that arose seconds after she started dancing. As a student, she was also very studious. Determined to prove to herself that the Korean stereotype of dancers and musicians being academically underachieved is wrong, she always set aside time to study. In fact, Kim graduated from the Department of Dance at the top of her class. “It was, however, never for the sake of coming in first." As an educator, Kim wishes to teach her students how to endow meaning to their dance. “Our students are very passionate. Having such passion to move, dance, and train the body for dancing requires just as much time and effort as studying.” However, deeply influenced by the Korean system of college preparation, Kim worries that most students dance out of instruction. According to Kim, there should always be a motive for each movement, and as dancers, students need to think profusely about how they move and dance. This is the very core of her idea in emphasizing the importance of theoretical aspects of dancing. “The theoretical foundations of dancing could result in profound changes in their movements.” Kim is very keen on communicating with her students, which was quite evident by the array of letters that she had received in her office. As a word of wisdom for the students of Hanyang, Kim refers to the Hanyang motto, "Love in deed." “What I want to stress is the "deed" part. By that I mean that all studying must be followed with some practical actions.” According to Kim, whether it is dancing, studying, or even breathing for the sake of living, things must have meaning. For that, we must engage in theoretical and cognitive research, and follow with some appropriate actions. She believes that this will create results deeper in meaning and satisfaction. “People must move. And to move, people must think. One does not carry meaning without the other.” Kim stated that she hopes to see more students able to think and act for themselves, and pursue achievements as proud students of Hanyang. Lee Chang-hyun pizz1125@naver.com Photos by Choi Min-ju

2018-03 26

[Faculty]Story of a Self-Taught Professional Mountain Photographer

Known as a mountainous country, South Korea is famous for the year-round beauty of both small and huge mountains along with never-ending groups of hikers. Despite the obvious attraction of the mountains’ natural aspects, it is still possible for people to miss the hidden beauty in the depths of the mountains. It is these moments that Cho Myung-hwan (Department of Electronic Engineering, ’82), the passionate self-made photographer, likes to catch. Turning Point at the Age 50 Cho was not a professional photographer from the start. In fact, ever since Cho graduated from Hanyang University (HYU) as an electronic engineering student, he had been working at a few IT related companies for about 10 years before voluntary retirement at the age 50. According to Cho, he had promised himself that when he turned 50, he would do something that he truly loved and had passion for. However, this did not mean he switched to photography right away. “Now that I look back, I did love photography ever since I was a HYU student. I was a part of a photography circle that I truly preferred over classes.” According to Cho, in 2004 he started hiking Baekdu Mountain and ran into a friend with whom he promised to later complete the whole Baekdudaegan Mountain Range hiking course. Every Saturday for 2 years, they hiked together, and Cho used the opportunities to take pictures which he then uploaded on his blog, attracting much attention and praise from his surrounding followers. “I’m a self-taught professional mountain photographer of 14 years, and I am still working and studying very hard everyday to improve,” said Cho. As a mountain photographer When asked if he had ever been interested in taking photos of other subjects, Cho instantly replied that he is only interested in mountains. He believes that Korean mountains hold the true Korean soul and identity, and that he wants to capture and show it through his pictures. He also does not like what has been touched and trampled on by people, so he only wants to capture the raw beauty of nature. That is why all the photo books he has self-published include “raw things” in the title. Cho said, “What I’m doing is a form of art and expression. You need to learn how to appreciate and understand the mountain in order to take good pictures. If you hike just to take pictures, those pictures are never going to become more than just ‘a picture.’” For years he had gone hiking day and night regardless of the time in order to capture the rare moments of natural beauty. His schedule, thus, was never fixed as he had to hike on rainy and snowy days, and even at dawn and the deepest darkest nights. He believes that creativity is always the most important part of art and has never been afraid to take on challenges to photograph these untouched parts and moments of the mountain that most hikers are not really aware of. However, it is not always easy, even for an experienced hiker like Cho, as it is quite common for him to hike for more than 6 hours and take hundreds of pictures without getting any satisfactory results. “Even if it is supposedly one of the worst situations you can ever be in, you should learn to accept it and give it your all. If it still doesn’t turn out the way you would have liked, then learn to be satisfied with what you have then.” Never-ending passion Cho has also consistently been working on calendars and books and opening photo galleries in order to give the public more access to his pictures. He mentioned that the hardest part of being a photographer was not in the physical, but financial aspects. For 14 years he did not have stable income even with the ID photo studio that he owns. He has also had to find ways to publish all the books and calendars of his photos at a cheaper price. Later on he even learned how to design them from scratch himself and sold them on the internet. “This is why a lot of people are scared to try something new. I also wouldn’t recommend for young people to simply go for it, to be honest. If you’re old like me, that’s a different story. If you’re young, I’d say you have a stable job first, and then try it as a side job,” said Cho. Along with his realistic advice, Cho mentioned how he wants to continue hiking and photographing the raw beauty of mountains in Korea, but also in other countries if he ever gets the chance to. Park Joo-hyun julia1114@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Choi Min-ju