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2017-10 31

[Faculty]Celebrating the “Beautiful Foundation”

“I happened to be” was a phrase often referred to by Professor Ye Jong-seok (Business Administration) in his effort to remain humble when asked about his long list of achievements. Nevertheless, the array of awards and appreciation plaques that filled the shelves of his office gave more than a hint of just how valued he was by countless people and organizations. One of his most distinguished achievements is the co-establishment and nurturing of the “Beautiful Foundation.” The foundation, with its purpose of being the development and proliferation of a charity culture, was founded in 2000. The once small organization with nothing but a calling for charity has now grown to a massive institution that spends 3.1 billion won a year on public projects. Ye was a part of the foundation since its establishment and has been serving as the chairman of the board from 2012 to this day. Ye attending a ceremony of "The Beautiful Foundation" (Photo courtesy of Dong-hwa) Re-establishing the Korean charity culture Ye picked out Dale Carnegie as the epitome of American charity culture. Deeply drawn to his philosophy and legacy, Ye described how Carnegie practiced what he preached, spending his lifetime fortune to give back to society by building 2500 libraries, countless foundations, and a university. Inspired by Carnegie, entrepreneurs such as John Rockefeller, Henry Ford, and George Soros followed in his footsteps to bring about the height of American charity. Ye desired to reenact this kind of culture in Korea. The concept of donations in Korea is in strict contrast to that of the United States in many ways. For example, most of the donations in Korea are made through corporate donations, whereas most donations are made privately in the US. Furthermore, these promises of donations from domestic conglomerates are rarely carried out. This a fundamental flaw in terms of the Korean charity culture. Thus, Ye sought to change the sources of donation from a small number of large donors to a large number of small donors. The structure of the Beautiful Foundation was designed by benchmarking the community foundations in the US. At the time, the concept of foundation had a negative image in Korean society, seen as a means of tax evasion during the chaebols inheritance process. Needless to say, the Beautiful Foundation had to start from rock bottom. Not only have they had a negative perception, but people were also hesitant to donate to an infant organization with no credentials. A turning point for the initial hardship of the foundation was the donation from an elderly lady named Kim Boon-ja. Kim was a victim of sexual slavery in the era of Japanese imperialism and had donated her 50 million won worth of compensation money that she had received as a form of indemnification to the Beautiful Foundation. This donation of immense value served as a seed capital to establish a foundation that has collected over 50 billion won during the past 17 years. Another obstacle that the foundation had to overcome was the underlying conflict between charity organizations and conglomerates when it came to donation. In such circumstances, Ye utilized his experiences and acquaintances in both of these areas to facilitate an atmosphere of cooperation. Ye expressed deep passion for the desire to change the Korean charity culture. (Photo courtesy of The Hankyoreh) Personal philosophy and drive Aside from his hardships in restructuring the Beautiful Foundation to rely less on a small number of large conglomerate donations, Ye had faced numerous obstacles during his years of studying abroad and contemplation on his career path. After having served in over 100 corporate and non-profit organization, Ye claims with full confidence that the key to success is doing what you love: “I enjoy doing things I love. Obviously, I avoid taking roles that I dislike. Taking up a job that you hate will literally make you ill.” As if to prove his point, Ye, well into mid-sixties, seems robust and full of energy. Genuinely interested in liberal arts, he takes his free time to devote himself to an array of fields, such as cuisines, art, and even sports. One example would be his affection for skiing. Having been a devoted fan for the past 50 years, his involvement in skiing to “take a break” has led him to become a key member of the upcoming Winter Olympics. Upon his retirement in the coming year, he plans to lead a “new life” devoted to his pursuit of full-time writing. The shelves on Ye's office were stacked with photos depicting a variety of activities. Advice Ye expressed concerns for the next generation. The Fourth Industrial Revolution, said to bring about rapid and fundamental changes, surpasses the total impact of change seen in the society for the past two decades. About 65 percent of existing jobs are expected to disappear. In this approaching era of unprecedented change, Ye underlined the importance of students’ discretion in choosing a career path. At the request for advice to students, Ye bluntly answered, “Choose a goal, and work extremely hard.” Above all, he emphasized the importance of choosing the right goal. His definition of a “right” goal was something that can provide joy. “It’s hard to lead a healthy life doing something you dislike. Find something you can commit your life to,” expressed Ye. Lee Chang-hyun pizz1125@hanyang.ac.kr Photo by Chae Guen-baek

2017-10 25

[Faculty]Imperial Ambition through Bird’s Eye

Imagine that a bird is observing the world while flying over the sky. The holistic insight of a bird’s-eye view displayed at Hanyang University’s museum may overwhelm the audience. A bird’s-eye view designed and drawn by Hatsusaburo Yoshida during the Japanese colonization is evaluated as a creative and fresh masterpiece of the era. However, professor Han Dong-su and Seo Dong-chun of Far East Architectural History Lab have discovered that the vast coverage and amplification of specific geography behind the bird’s-eye view may imply the colonial ambition of Japan. The exhibition <Japan Draws the Ambition on Bird's-Eye View> is currently hosted at Hanyang University's museum. Ambitious bird flies over the world Bird’s-eye views drawn by Hatsusaburo Yoshida contains not only the geography of Japan, but also that of Korea, China, Europe, and further America. “It is hard to exactly beg the question that the intention behind this bird’s-eye view is for the colonial purpose due to the different stance between Korea and Japan. However, Korea’s assertion can be supported by several historical and architectural evidence,” said Seo. First point of focus is the view’s extensive, yet unnecessary coverage of geography. “Unlike the early views drawn in 1913, the 1922 view created during the peak of the Japanese Colonization era is peculiar in that the view resembles more of a world map conquered by Japan,” said Seo. The 1913 view has a narrow perspective of geography focusing only on Japan and the surrounding countries, while the 1922 view has an enormous spectrum of the world in Japan’s interest at the time. Bird's-eye view drawn by Yoshida pinpoints several colonial sites with extreme amplification. Another aspect to pay attention is from whom Yoshida received requests to draw more than 3,000 views. “We thought that if we discover who asked for these views, it can help explain the intention behind the map. The investigation was worth it because the client was the Japanese Railroad Administration, the key organization of colonization,” said Seo. In addition, Yoshida himself has arbitrarily served in the war in 1940, which supports the claim. “It is also eccentric that Yoshida magnified specific locations and buildings in the view, which were vital buildings to colonization, such as the Japanese Government General of Korea or shrines,” said Seo. Complementary history and architecture Far East Architectural History Lab has hosted several architectural history exhibitions including this year’s bird’s eye view. “Professor Han’s ultimate goal was to collect as much data on Korea’s architecture for his junior researchers that have been lost due to numerous wars and colonization.” Seo has been working with Han for 15 years to create the central historical axis of the three East Asian countires- Korea, Japan, and China. “Korea has lost a lot of historical reference on architecture despite the fact that our forefathers built great edifices. To restore all the data and develop future architecture in the sense of Korean traditional style, we must approach architecture in the perspective of the entire far east,” explained Seo. Three countries of the far east have been in close relationship since the early history. Through long-time interactions, cultures were exchanged including architecture, and the lab suggests that Koreans pay attention to Chinese and Japanese culture by analyzing the past interchanges. “Historical background of Korean architecture after the Japanese colonization is sometimes depressing in that we had to lose all the great work of our ancestors. However, it is now the time that we build a new beginning cheerfully,” said Seo. “Architecture is not just a building that we live in or see. It embodies the history, sorrow, happiness, and memories, and I wish all potential architects of Hanyang will polish up this holistic perspective.” Kim Ju-hyun kimster9421@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Kim Youn-soo

2017-09 19

[Faculty]Robotics is for Everyone

“I will be riding a huge robot like in the cartoons in 100 years, and I’ll live forever,” smiled Professor Han Jea-kweon (Department of Interdisciplinary Robit Engineering ). Han in his office in the late afternoon gave two vastly contrasting impressions of a pure child and an agile scholar. News H met with Han to hear more stories about his recent developments and insight in robotics. Han is explaining how much experience is valuable. Get out of the library “It’s really sad that most students ask me the question because it implies how much the young generation of our society is suffering from uncertainty, especially on their future.” When asked, ‘What made you become a robot engineer?’, Han answered both sarcastically and empathetically. He did have a special reason on becoming the person who he is now, but he wanted to make sure that the readers do not fall into the frame of thought that a person needs ‘the moment’ or ‘the reason’ to decide what to do in the future. Han went on to explain that a person passes by hundreds and thousands of opportunities in his or her lifetime, but it is what gives them fun and joy that they are truly attracted to. And ‘the thing’ is not found in books but in experiences. Han himself has also accumulated abundant experiences as a foundation of being one of the leading scholar in the field. Han has always wanted to make robots, but due to the lack of opportunities in Korea at that time, he proceeded with his study in graduate school in automobiles. Then, he got a job in a major company as mainstream society had told him to. “But there was always this unfulfilled thirst inside telling me, ‘this is not your life! You are not born to do this, go on and do what you really want to do,” recalled Han. So, he chose to study in the States to overcome such lack of opportunity. “At that time, I did not foresee my salary to be cut in half,” laughed Han. Geek in the lab Han expressed the most enthusiasm and seriousness when he talked about his work. “I really was a geek before. Watching robot animation is still one of the most important parts of my day,” said Han. The first robot he ever made was a ‘Humvee’, a transformer-like robot. The Humvee was made over the course of one week, during my summer vacation back in 2007, when the movie Transformers (2007) was first released. Han and his wife rebuilt an RC car ‘hummer’ and gave it arms and legs. The Humvee video ‘Real Transformer NO C.G. Upgrade Version -Humvee Bioloid-‘ uploaded on Youtube hit more than 342,000 views to this date. Han’s passion for robots only grew over time while he studied in the United States for his doctoral degree. After coming back to Korea, Han participated in DARPA (Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency) Robotics Challenge that lasted for three years from 2012 to 2015. Coming back from the States, Han was bitterly surprised at the situation of the Korean robotics field. The biggest challenge he felt was the lack of intelligence. “The people we had, one by one, were brighter than the ones I’ve seen in the States, but the absolute number was too small.” Han compared the situation with the professional baseball league, where other countries such as Japan or the US have lots of back up players to change in every match, but we do not. That is the moment when he decided to get involved in education. EDIE, one of Han's robots. EDIE is a type of Human Robot interaction robot, intricately structured to communicate and bond with humans. Robots WILL create jobs “Humanity has been worried about robots and machines taking their jobs since the 1760s,” smiled Han. He advised that we need to search for what we can do ‘with’ the robots instead of being worried about what they will take from us. Traditional elites good at calculation and memorizing will lose jobs. But people with intuition, sense and creativity will flourish in unlimited possibilities. That is because robotics requires people from all fields with the aforementioned qualities. For instance, it took a designer, psychologists, and screen play experts in creating a Human Robot Interaction (HRI) robot EDIE. “Robot is a tool needed in our daily lives. Students now need to contemplate on how to progress one step ahead with robots and create social values.” Han plans to focus on three main topics in robotics; humanoid robots, HRI and disaster inspection robots for the short term. Kim So-yun dash070@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Park Yong-min

2017-05 22

[Faculty]Winner of the Paiknam Scholar Award

During his 12 years at Hanyang University, Professor Kang Yong-soo of the Department of Energy Engineering has demonstrating the virtues of an educator and a researcher. For his endeavor, Kang was awarded the Paiknam Scholar Award on the 78th school anniversary. Expecting to retire in 2018, Kang reminisces his life as scientist and professor. Life as a scholar Kang began his teaching career at the Department of Chemical Engineering in 2005. While at HYU, Kang pioneered and led a new discipline from the basics to the application of the "facilitated transport phenomena in the solid state" and obtained excellent results by applying it to membranes and solar cells. As a result, about 185 papers were published in SCI international journals from 2005 to 2017 and Kang was able to win several awards, including the Paiknam Scholar Award. “The Paiknam Award was a great honor for me, and it leads me to think of myself as a lucky person. I should attribute all the credit to my lab students, who followed and supported me,” said Kang. One of Kang’s best research is on the facilitated transport phenomena in the solid state and their various applications. The beginning of his research dates back to when Kang was working at KIST (Korea Institute of Science and Technology). “The first project assigned to me at KIST was separating oxygen and nitrogen from air. Each element can be utilized pragmatically in practical life, and the usage of the separation membrane was the key,” emphasized Kang. After great research findings, Kang was recognized as the greatest scholar at Hanyang University this year. Since then, Kang's interest has changed to the separation of olefin such as ethylene or propylene because it is one of the most difficult tasks to solve. “I was sponsored one billion won for this Creative Research Program by the NRF (National Research Foundation of Korea) to develop this fuekd for 10 years, which was a tremendous opportunity for me,” reminisced Kang. After 10 years at KIST, Kang realized that his specialization lies in the basic understanding of principles, not practical applications. As a result, he left KIST to become an educator at HYU. Multi-player in research and education In addition to personal academic achievement, Kang’s BK21 Project and the ERC (Energy Research Center) of the Leading Research Center Support Project also ushered science at Hanyang to advance. Kang also undertook the role as chairman and editor-in-chief of various academic societies at home and abroad, contributing to the development of the school as well as the broader society. When Kang came to Hanyang University, he realized that he could not bring the research funds provided by KIST to his school lab. In need of research funds to satisfy the scientific desires of his and his students, Kang made a difficult decision. “I just called an executive director of Samsung Institute of Science, Dr. Kim Jong-min, to ask for research funding. He would have been very confused, because we have only met a few times before, but Kim decided to support me for the development of science,” said Kang. After such vicissitudes in life, Kang was able to investigate how to overcome low ionic conductivity in polymer electrolyte for dye-sensitized solar cell and improving the separation performance of membranes. These are each utilized on strengthening solar cells and curtailing petrochemistry’s high energy consumption, enormous cost and inefficient use of space. Kang sends gratitudes to his fellow students at the school and at his lab. The Best Teacher Award is Kang’s most favorite prize as professor. “This award is given by students that I teach. I wish my students will have pride in themselves when learning about science and life,” said Kang. According to him, calmly waiting for opportunities while preparing one's own unique characteristics will help students realize their dreams. Kim Ju-hyun kimster9421@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Kim Sang-yeon

2017-02 20 Important News

[Faculty]Insight from a Literature Critic

There's a saying that you see as much as you know. From this logic, it could be deduced that when reading a book, one can understand only as much as one has learned. Doubtlessly, in order to be an expert of a field, one manifestly needs extensive reading and the acquirement of boundless knowledge. On this, Professor Yoo Sung-ho (Department of Korean Language and Literature) shared his insight and understanding as a literature critic. Definition of a literature critic “Criticizing is a cordial cooperation between the literary work and the critic,” remarked Yoo. This is how he usually defines literary criticism. It is the act of pinpointing appreciable and admirable facets of the work, sometimes including inevitable reproaches. Yoo clarified that criticizing and condemning each possess distinct characteristics, thereby separating them in their essence. What lies at the center of criticism is the accurate interpretation of the literature, accompanied by the competence in constructing one’s own sentences. Finding the true values of a literary work and animating it into one's own words of criticism for others to read and relate to, is what critics do, as Yoo explained. Moreover, Yoo thinks self-consciousness is also important when it comes to reviewing a literary piece. Asking oneself the reason for analyzing a piece of work and deliberating what contributions the criticism could give to the world is attributable to a distinguished critic. Yoo believes reading with the sole objective to write could never widen a critic’s analytical perspective. Reading should be something that's done consistently, without intention. “I was deeply touched by a book and tried to express that feeling with words. That is how I came to submerge myself in reading and literature analysis.” Formula for criticism “It's often next to impossible to distinguish whether one idea comes from one’s value or taste,” said Yoo. Taste acts as the chief driving force in establishing one’s value. When analyzing a literary text, one’s taste inevitably functions as the judge, with existing values and philosophy added after it. Although taste is a personal and subjective factor, it is indispensable for critics, for every critic has their own style and preference that ultimately define their individuality. A critic should possess knowledge of the text, author, and general trend of the literary field. Knowing the author’s style such as writing techniques, philosophy, and taste will help the critic interpret the written work better. Literature tends to contain more than what is just written superficially in words, therefore necessitating critics to apprehend the core message beyond the visible text. The most important skill a critic should poseess, Yoo hinted, is the ability to express one’s interpretation in fluency. “No matter how outstanding your comprehension and analyses are, mediocre wordings could ruin your criticism. The power of words cannot be ignored,” commented Yoo. On top of everything, when reviewing a literary work, critics often feel tempted to stand on the same platform as the authors, drinking in only the perspective of the original writer. This enables critics to break the boundary of merely interpreting texts, letting them be “authors” themselves and write sentences of idiosyncrasy that exquisitely convey their own analysis. “Extensive reading begets great critics.” Above are two critism books that Yoo wrote. (Photos courtesy of Ridibooks and Yes24 respectively) Jeon Chae-yun chaeyun111@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Moon Hana

2017-01 09

[Faculty]Developing Art Materials With 3D Printer

Of the 170 teams that participated in the 2016 Student Research Program, 17 were selected as outstanding teams that submitted remarkable reports. Teams from various schools partook in this program, each comprising of several students and one supervising professor. Among the 17 teams stands the group from Hanyang University: Jang Jin-ho (Department of Mechanical Engineering, 2nd year), Choi Ki-bong (Department of Computer Science and Engineering, 3rd year), Kim Jung-hyun (Department of Applied Art, 2nd year), Kim Hee-ryung (Department of Applied Art, 2nd year), Song Si-young (Department of Applied Art, 2nd year), and Yoon Yeo-jin (Department of Industrial Design, 3rd year) from Sungshin Women’s University. They were under supervision of Professor Hyun Eun-ryung of the Department of Applied Art. The six students and the professor shared their glorious moment with News H. From left to right: Hee-ryung, Si-young, Professor Hyun, Jin-ho, and Ki-bong. 3D printer and art material Children with visual impairment need special support and adjustment for educational content, materials, the environment, and teaching methods owing to visual disability. Art materials were created with a 3D printer, enablling children with total blindness or low vision to feel and get familiarized with space and shapes intimately and graphically. This is expected to aid their education and improve day-to-day life in applying the senses they acquired. As for children attending a school for the visually impaired, auditory-oriented teaching methods are implemented. The new teaching material made with 3D printers proved to be more effective, as students are asking questions that are deeper and more relevant to what they are learning. Students were notably engaged in the new equipment. Overall, the newly designed material attributed in promoting students’ better understanding of learning content. Image of Mona Lisa printed graphically for sensory comprehension. (Photo courtesy of the team's research report) Students sketching images by sensing 3D material. (Photo courtesy of the team's research report) Alliance of three majors The main objective of the team was to develop art appreciation teaching materials for visually impaired children by facilitating specialmodes of perception with a 3D printer. Specifically aiming to increase the sense of space by letting students touch 3D materials, the ultimate goal is set on providing the children with more choices for their lives—by building a connection between what they know and what they can do. Their background research included comprehending the current state of affairs regarding education for the visually impaired to navigate further research. This project could be interpreted as a significant confluence of engineering, art, and education, as students from these majors collaborated to carry out the mission. The successful result encourages further collaborative work of the three fields, as Hyun remarked, “Although we had a lot of difficulties adjusting schedules and gathering together, every task we carried as a team meant a lot, because we were all from different majors. The department of engineering and art are considerably distinct from one another, yet the convergence of the three brought a remarkable result. We learned that such fusion of dissimilar fields could produce valuable outcomes.” The team members are planning to participate in additional student research programs, extending their studies on the same topic at hand. As their background research indicated, they realized that education for the handicapped or impaired children is not well instituted, and is meagerly funded. Without funds from the government or corporates, the quality of education for the minority will remain low and primitive. Today's high-end technology enable people to do anything with intention. With this, Hyun and the students are planning to develop their project in order to upgrade education for visually impaired children. Hyun and the students are looking forward to participating in more student research programs. Jeon Chae-yun chaeyun111@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Moon Ha-na

2016-12 26 Important News

[Faculty]New Leader of the Hanlim Academy

In the 21st century where science is becoming the touchstone of indicating the future, there are 38 National Academies of Engineering around the world, putting in their endeavors to vitalize scientific development. Out of the 38 academies, only 28 are officially authorized National Academies. Among them, the National Academy of Engineering of Korea (NAEK), also called the Hanlim Academy, is in the lead of scientific development. Professor Kwon O-kyung of the Department of Electronic Engineering has been newly appointed as the president of NAEK and is envisioning the bright future of science in South Korea. Professor Kwon is explaining about the significance of developing the engineering field. The Hanlim Academy and the promising future The NAEK, or the Hanlim Academy, is composed of 291 industrial CEOs and professors with authorities in the engineernig academia. Due to the popularity of engineering field and people's desire to enter the academy, there are 260 more candidate members other than 291 regular members. The official role of the Hanlim Academy is to map out the future of South Korea in regards to the engineering science field. Representative work of the NAEK is consulting and giving advice to the government about engineering and scientific policies. “The Hanlim Academy prepares the draft for policy plans every five years when the new government is ready to be established,” said Kwon. The main concerns of the Academy are increasing the possibility for job creation and augmenting the rate of economic growth from the current 4.5% to 9%. Kwon expects that the engineering field will contribute the most to augmentating the of economic growth of South Korea in the next few years. Also, the unification of the two Koreas is a major interest of the Academy, since ample resources and radical development in science will meet along with the unification in due course. Thus, the NAEK is currently researching North Korea's social overhead capital (SOC) in order to correctly identify how the two Koreas’ capitals are being established, and how the North Korean economy can be succored through engineering and scientific aid. “If South Korea is not knowledgeable enough about North Korea before the unification, it will incur disasters such as the spread of infectious diseases through North Korea’s peculiar living accommodations and ongoing chemical research. Thus researching about North Korea in advance with regards to unification is extremely vital,” emphasized Kwon. Key to a successful life Professor Kwon also accentuated the importance of living a well-regulated life and the willpower to achieve the goal of one’s life. Until this moment, of having become the president of the NAEK, Kwon has crossed many paths. Once he graduated from Hanyang University in electronic engineering, Kwon attended Stanford University for his Master's and Ph.D. degrees. He subsequently joined Texas Instruments, a semiconductor manufacturing company, at the process and design center. In 1992, many professors at Hanyang University solicited for Kwon's return for him to contribute as an educator and a scientist. However, when Kwon submitted his resignation, Texas Instrument turned it down every year. Even when Kwon came to Hanyang University to pursue his academic career as a professor, Texas Instrument did not accept his resignation for 10 years. Kwon has also successfully filled various posts in the engineering academia, including the president of Korean Information Display Society and the vice-president of the Engineering Department at Hanyang University. To the question of how he maintains such a successful life, Kwon answer was the "maintenance of a busy life and willpower". “When I decided to enroll in the doctoral program at Stanford University, I slept three hours a day and spent the rest of my time to study,” said Kwon. Even though this sort of commitment was hard to keep up, after about six months, he was able to maintain such a lifestyle for 40 years up until now. According to Kwon, a steady lifestyle is the key to success, and the will to study and learn more about the field is the most critical attribute to securing a rewarding life. ▲Kwon attends the NAEK forum (third from the right). (Photo courtesy of NAEK) Kwon's ultimate goal is to make Korea a country that is full of chances and competence. “I have always pondered about the Korean education system since I was a university student. South Korea tries to inject too many subjects into students' heads, and this will only result in lining them into a ragged line of test scores. Korea needs to become a nation where everyone can be the leader of each specific field, meaning that everyone deserves to discover what they are intelligent in, instead of studying a lot of uninterested subjects at once,” said Kwon. He is currently looking to achieving this objective at the National Academy of Engineering of Korea by reforming the education system in the field of science. Kim Ju-hyun kimster9421@hanyang.ac.kr Photo by Choi Min-ju

2016-12 11

[Faculty]Expert in Public Administration Law

Diverse fields of specialization in law exist, ranging from administration law, civil law, penal law, commercial law to constitutional law. Professor Lee Ho-yong of the Department of Public Administration at Hanyang University (HYU) is an expert in the field. Lee had attended HYU as a student, receiving his Ph.D. in Law in 2001. Although he does have experiences teaching different types of laws such as police law or social security acts, he has found public administration the most fascinating. Lee has been a member of the examination board for diverse national examinations such as the bar exam. Q1. Why did you choose Public Administration despite having majored in law? Lee: “Public administration law deals with the intentions of a country. It regulates a country so that it isn't perceptible to unlawful acts. Administration itself is the action taken by a country while public administration law is what enforces administration in the way that law functions. I believe that public administration law meaningful in that it propells the country in the right direction. Through it, people can be compensated for what they have been wrongfully dealt with. For instance, let’s say that my driver’s license was revoked due to an insignificant reason, not under the appropriate grounds for such a revocation. Then I can claim for a restoration through this law.” Lee explains about his experiences of being a national examiner. Q2. You seem to have a lot of experience in being a bar examiner. Tell us more about it. Lee: “I became an examiner through the recommendations of other professors in 2002. There are diverse types of tests ranging from the bar exam, to civil service examinations. I have probably been an examiner in more than hundreds of tests counting the small tests as well. We used to have a system where examiners are grouped and stay together for seven to ten days with no connections with the outside world. We would hand in our cell phones and communication would be limited. Out of the question banks, we pick out a few question cards and make sure that the questions have no ambiguity. This takes as long as making questions ourselves. Then we would compare certain questions with other professors to make sure that the questions and answers are correct.” Q3. Do the examiners become acquainted with each other as well? Lee: “Out of the professors that do not belong in the same majors, we do hold meetings from time to time. Since professors from the same majors often meet frequently in conferences and societies, the meetings don't really mean much to us but as for examiners with different occupations, such as a judge, we sometimes get to meet and talk.” Q4. Can you tell us about the law school preparation class? What could be the pros and cons for the elimination of national bar exams and turning it into a law school system? Lee: “Around 100 to 130 students from HYU usually enter law schools, and their achievements are starting to gain more light. A lot of students go to better law schools compared to when I first started this law school preparation class. As for the bar exams, it's quite a sensitive issue. As of next year, bar exam would be out of use and law schools would completely replace the exams. "As for entering law school, there are three things to prepare for: LEET, GPA and English. Personally, it seems unfair to only have a law school system since a lot more people could have seized the chance to become a lawyer, prosecutor, or judge, but now there is only one way to become a national judicial officer- by getting into and graduating from law schools. The biggest problem is that this imposes a huge limit to those who obtained low GPAs during their university years. LEET or English proficiency tests could improve through a lot of practice, but as for GPA, students cannot recover from it unless they return to school for retakes. Although the intention of the law school is for the good of many, it seems to me that other alternative options should be left open as well.” "I have always dreamed of becoming a professor, and it took a lot of effort to bring myself to this place." Q5. Was it your dream to become a professor? What motivates you to lecture students? Lee: “Yes, I have always dreamed of becoming a professor and it took me a lot of effort to bring me to this place. I worked hard anywhere I went, since I wanted to be recognized as a hard-working person so that universities would ask me to teach at their place. Once you set your dream too late, it just makes you fall behind. Some students come to me after watching a few of my lectures on YouTube. They either send e-mails thanking me for the lecture or come and visit my office for advice as well. Close acquaintances with my students is what makes me feel proud. I talk to the students a lot and they come asking for help quite often. This is what keeps reminding me to be a good professor.” Q6. Any last comments for the readers? Lee: “You should never be afraid to reach for your dreams. Put your mind to it, as well as a lot of effort, into the things that you would like to do- not what others tell you to. People get to reach a certain status socially, but what determines your status is how much you have worked for it, not where you have started off from. Dream for what you would like to do and pour the passion and effort into it. That's what I think success is.” Kim Seung-jun nzdave94@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Choi Min-ju

2016-10 19

[Faculty]Bionano Technology Leading the Medical Industry

Professor Choo Jae-beom of the Department of Bionano Engineering is a researcher who studies bionano microfluidics, a study which practical applications to systems in which small volumes of fluids are handled, and develops models that help diagnose different diseases such as respiratory tract infection, and cancer. As shown through his research, “Wash-free magnetic immunoassay of the PSA cancer marker using SERS and droplet microfluidics,” the significance of his research is that it will allow doctors to detect such diseases in patients within a short period of time. The previous study that Choo had worked on was using pregnancy diagnostic apparatus and the strips to discover different types of diseases. The diagnoses took about 5 weeks, which is usually how long it takes for expectant mothers to find out whether they are pregnant or not. Diagnoses using the microfluidic chips instead of pregnancy diagnostic apparatus will now only take about one week. What is more important is that it will give much more accurate results compared to the last model. When diseases such as MERS or Zika suddenly appears, there are two things to be taken care of. First, there must be a vaccine to cure the disease and second, the diagnosis of the disease should be quick to discover the new virus. If such diseases hadn’t been known to humankind, there would be no medicine available in the first place. This is why Choo’s research is so important. Shortening the time to analyze the DNA structures of the disease taken from a patient’s blood sample, then decoding it to suggest a cure for the illness will help save many more lives. ▲ Professor Choo is holding the silicon mold Professor Choo’s research points toward methods in detecting prostate cancer at an early stage using microfluidic chips instead of strips. Using strips used to have the method of developing the pregnancy diagnostic apparatus to detect different types of viruses but the new research has taken the equipment to a whole different level. The new hypersensitive protein diagnosis platform technology is carried out through a semiconductor process to build a silicon mold. Nanoparticles with the microfluidic chips are added inside a mold to hold the samples altogether so that when blood sample is mixed together, the nanoparticles will decidedly combine with the viruses. Once the particles are hit with laser beams, the concentration rate of the virus will be revealed. Knowing the concentration of such viruses is important since all diseases have cut-off points to determine whether the patient is actually contaminated with the virus or not. The goal of Choo and his research team is to develop an early diagnosis system for infectious diseases using the microfluidic system and through that, developing the vaccine that can just eliminate the viruses. Since the old methods of analyzing the DNA results in a higher percentage of error and takes much longer, Choo is trying to develop his model to be more sensitive, accurate and fast in terms of detecting the viruses. Microfluidic chips and an optical measuring system combined allows the blood sample to become naturally absorbed within the channel. By measuring the strength of the signals, the virus concentration can be detected. There are different types of nanoparticles, involving elements such as gold (Au) or silver (Ag) and a combination of other elements as well. This is because certain signals are captured when hit with laser beams, and the specific types of disease-provoking protein and DNAs are washed out and the leftover particles within the mold will result in a higher concentration of virus. ▲ Professor Choo explains about the microfluidic chip Myocardial infarction, cancer, or hormone disorders used to be what Choo focused on in the present studies along with the help of several doctors. Because new, unknown infectious diseases like MERS will become such an issue in the future, he will be working to develop a method to diagnose them in a short period of time. The technique being used now takes a whole lot of time since it requires a certain amount of blood sample from the patient, with particles needing to be separated using a centrifuge. More procedural steps follow. Strip methods are convenient but with the low sensitivity detection, it is hard to be sure whether the patient is infected with a certain virus or not. This is why decoding blood samples using the microchip reading method, which is fast, precise, and does not require much processes compared to the other analysis methods, is the future study that Choo will be focusing on. Kim Seung-jun nzdave94@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Moon Ha-na

2016-10 19

[Faculty]Leader of Korean Civil Law

Korea went through massive economic development since the 1970s. Various aspects of Koreans’ lives also greatly shifted along with it. Life expectency increased alongside quality of life. With the efforts of numerous citizens, democracy and human rights are now more settled in Korean society than it has ever been. To reflect new changes in society, it was essential for civil law, which adheres most closely to the lives of individuals, to develop as well. One former Supreme Court judge, Yang Chang soo, contributed highly to the development of Korean civil law. He is now a professor at Hanyang University’s School of Law. Yang majored in law at university and passed the Korean judicial examination in 1974, the year when he graduated. He first started his career as a judge for the Seoul Central District Court, and then later spent 20 years teaching law at a university. Then, in 2008, he was nominated as a Supreme Court judge, a position he held until 2014. After his retirement from the Court, Yang chose HYU and started teaching law here. It has now been two years since Yang started teaching at HYU. One of the reasons behind choosing HYU derived from the fact that HYU puts in a lot of effort in improving the quality of law education as an institution. “I appreciate that I am now back where I belong. I regard myself more as an educator than a jurist,” said Yang. Even when Yang worked diligently as a jurist, he also paid good amount of attention in setting the right direction of Korean law and how to educate it properly to students who are preparing to be a jurist. ▲ Yang was a jurist in the Seoul Central District Court and the Supreme Court. In between, he worked as a law professor. One of Yang’s most remarkable achievements was to write the ‘Study of Civil Law’ series in nine volumes. “While I was working as a judge at the Seoul Central District Court, I realized there weren’t many detailed researches or papers done on civil conflicts that are actually occurring within Korea,” said Yang. To supplement existing civil law and to suggest a new perspective to it, Yang started to write the law series from 2004. It was a great hit after a while it was published, being acknowledged by courts in Korea. Regional courts bought hundreds of Yang’s books to designate them as a new material to educate judges working in the court. Even until today, Yang’s publications are reputed to be one of the best that built fundamental frames of Korean civil law while upgrading it to the next level. After 20 years of working as a law professor, Yang reached the highest authority of law- serving as a judge for the Korean Supreme Court from 2008 to 2014. As the magnitude of the position implies, there were tremendous amounts of tasks to be done on a daily basis. “Every judge at the Supreme Court has to deal with more than 3000 cases a year, which made my life quite hectic at the time,” recalled Yang. Even though there was a considerable amount of duties he had to bear, Yang mentioned how his years of being a Supreme Court judge was a very momentous time in his life. “I was glad to have participated in the Korea’s top judiciary during the years when the country was reforming its laws based on different social economic circumstances,” commented Yang. Yang always tries to deliver to students what is important in law. “When we look into the Korean Constitution, there are 10 rules that state the basic rights of an individual to pursue his or her happiness, including the responsibility of the state to ensure a citizen’s basic rights. Korea was a society with a huge Confucian influence in the past, which emphasizes the duty of an individual to a group, society, and a state. I think law shows which path the nation should take in the future- that is to put more priority in protecting and supporting every citizen’s rights, which will naturally lead to a country where democracy and the economy flourishes.” ▲ Yang emphasized to students to develop an insight to deal with different situations flexibly. Yang left advice for HYU students, including those who dream to work in the field of law. “Of course, it is important to understand and study facts in textbooks, improving one’s ability in thinking and analyzing logically. However, I believe that what more important is to emotionally understand and imagine in different circumstantial cases in courts. I don’t think this should be confined to certain fields of jobs. It encompasses other field of studies or jobs that HYU students will strive for with passion,” said Yang. Yun Ji-hyun uni27@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Choi Min-ju