Total 19Articles
News list
Content Forum List
2018-05 14

[Faculty]Finding the True Meaning of Engineering

Although Medecins Sans Frontieres (Doctors Without Borders), which has the mission of international humanitarian medical treatment, is a familiar organization to the public, not many are intimate with Scientists and Engineers without Borders (SEWB). First started in 2009, the SEWB has endeavored to develop and provide the "appropriate technology" to developing countries. Professor Kim Yong-soo (Department of Nuclear Engineering) was elected as the fourth president of this organization on the 9th of this month, with an office term of two years. The Scientists and Engineers without Borders The main purpose of the SEWB is to provide aid to developing countries through the application of scientific and engineering methods. However, as developing countries have low standards of scientific technology, the SEWB mainly focuses on appropriate technology, which is a form of technology that takes the social infrastructure of a particular society into consideration and provides the adequate technical standards that can be sustainably developed and consumed within the society. Neglected classes of people exist in every field, including science and technology. According to Kim, there are currently 1.4 billion people who are unable to access electricity. For these neglected classes, it is important that their actual quality of life is improved. Rather than simply providing them with cutting-edge technology, the SEWB aims to supply adequate technology that can be used within their scientific boundaries while meeting the direct needs of the people. Kim Yong-soo (Department of Nuclear Engineering), the newly elected president of Scientists and Engineers without Borders, explains the concept of appropriate technology and how its application has been the main purpose of the organization. A good example of an appropriate technology given by Kim was that there are groups of people in Cambodia who must use rainwater as their drinkable water due to the poor water supply system. Providing these people with a water filtration system that is inexpensive and approachable would greatly enhance the quality of their lives. Supplying such systems in an adequate way is the main theme of appropriate technology and a main purpose of the SEWB organization. Kim mentioned, “We want to find a way in which every single person benefits from scientific technology and improves their quality of life through such privilege.” Future plans as the new president Until now, there have been limitations on the SEWB's ability to take action. Keeping up with its name, Kim now plans to extend the organization's efforts across borders into developing countries. In order to magnify the organization’s base, collaboration projects with other organizations are in order. Cooperation with other companies, based on corporate social responsibility actions, is how Kim is designing the application of technology on the actual sites of developing countries. Furthermore, Kim has also been focusing on how the science and technology sectors are becoming an expanding interest of the Korean government’s official development assistance business, referring to aid offered to developing countries with the purpose of economic development, social improvement, and welfare promotion. The United Nations has also set poverty as its main sustainable development goal, which is in line with the SEWB 's purpose in tackling such issues through the application of scientific technology. Positioned upon such interests, Kim views the positive potentials of collaborative work with these major associations. Kim is also putting effort into trying to divide the SEWB into various sectors such as energy, water and health, and medical treatment. This would enable science technicians to unite diverse fields with enhanced expertise. Mainly focusing on the reinforcement of the overall organization, Kim, with the help of the former president, is going to overcome the existing limitations of the SEWB. As a professor at Hanyang University As a professor of an engineering field, Kim has the purpose of contributing to the advancement of engineering and challenging himself with the task of social restoration. Achieving his former goal of becoming a renowned figure in the field of nuclear decommissioning, even being registered on the Marquis Who’s Who, one of the three major biographical dictionaries, Kim is now moving onto accomplishing his second ambition. Having pursued this field for the last seven years, Kim is persisting in his actions of disseminating appropriate technology. Kim expressed proudness of his performance in Hanyang and how his presidential nomination represented these well-paid efforts. Kim mentioned that he was proud at the thought that his election to president represented the well-formed groundwork of Hanyang, which has long shown efforts to pursue appropriate technology, being the only school to have a research society among its professors. The university students have also recently made a group named A-Prime, which focuses on appropriate technology and its application in developing countries. Established by Kim, the Volunteer Corps of Hanyang University Alumni have also applied actions of appropriate technology, especially when conducting volunteer work in developing countries like Cambodia and the Philippines. According to Kim, where there is light there are shadows that exist. The rapid development of technology has greatly enhanced the overall lives of the human race, yet there are classes that have been alienated from even the most basic technologies. He ended the interview by stating, “I hope Hanyang students acknowledge such situations and feel thankful for all that they have received. A student that senses such gratitude will be strongly aware of his or her future actions.” Choi Seo-yong tjdyd1@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Hwang Yu-jin

2018-04 03

[Faculty]A Dancer and an Educator

In the words of the cherished German philosopher Friedrich von Schlegel, “Every art should become science, and every science should become art.” This is the very belief that College of Performing Arts and Sports Dean Kim Un-mi holds true for dance and education. Constantly emphasizing the importance of connectivity between educational theory and practice, Kim shared with News H some of her thoughts on being awarded the Korea Dance Association Art Award. Kim was recognized for having contributed to the field of Korean Dance, especially for having established the Research Institute of Korea Traditional Dance. The Korea Dance Association Art Award Dating back to 1961, the Korea Dance Association is the largest and most deeply rooted organization in the domestic field of dance. Every year, people who have made great advancements, not just in the field of dance but in regional developments and education as well, have been recognized and awarded by the organization. Nevertheless, with the awardees of the Art Award traditionally having been dancers, Kim answered that it was a great honor for her to have received the honor as an educator. Kim was highly praised in contributing to the preservation and advancement of Korean traditional dance through the Research Institute of Korea Traditional Dance. It was clear that Kim held immense passion for Korean dance as she talked about the background of its establishment. In addition to researching and teaching the theories of dancing, Kim stated that she still dances to this day. (Photo courtesy of Kim) According to Kim, it all began with a performance in Australia. It was a composition dance, where the choreography was built around the theme of a Korean traditional wedding. From stage editing to costumes and music, the Korean traditional style had been adapted. Even more important was the choreography. Kim desired to deliver the very essence of the traditional ceremony, with an emphasis on the emotions of the bride. “The traditionally long event had to be compressed into a 30-minute sequence, which was a challenge for me.” From anxiety to excitement, joy, and happiness, Kim directed the performance in a manner through which the emotions of the bride on the day of the wedding could be felt by the audience. Eventually accruing great praise and recognition for the performance, Kim was offered support to expand her activities and research, which was when she proposed the idea of the research institute. Established well before the currently ubiquitous concept of convergence research, the Research Institute of Korea Traditional Dance utilized the two separate fields of Korean dance and engineering for one purpose: the preservation and advancement of Korean traditional dance. Not only does the institute conduct historical research, digging deeper into the roots of Korean dance, but it also analyzes the virtue and spirit that is contained in it. Various concepts are devised to capture abstract meanings in the dance. Furthermore, methods to install these values and ultimately design them into choreography are studied there. A photo of Kim instructing her students (Photo courtesy of Kim) Born to dance “My first memories are that of dancing.” With her mother also a dancer and an educator, Kim stated that she had always danced. However, that does not mean that it was only out of external influence. According to Kim, she had always been captivated by the stage, and there was always an exhilarating emotion that arose seconds after she started dancing. As a student, she was also very studious. Determined to prove to herself that the Korean stereotype of dancers and musicians being academically underachieved is wrong, she always set aside time to study. In fact, Kim graduated from the Department of Dance at the top of her class. “It was, however, never for the sake of coming in first." As an educator, Kim wishes to teach her students how to endow meaning to their dance. “Our students are very passionate. Having such passion to move, dance, and train the body for dancing requires just as much time and effort as studying.” However, deeply influenced by the Korean system of college preparation, Kim worries that most students dance out of instruction. According to Kim, there should always be a motive for each movement, and as dancers, students need to think profusely about how they move and dance. This is the very core of her idea in emphasizing the importance of theoretical aspects of dancing. “The theoretical foundations of dancing could result in profound changes in their movements.” Kim is very keen on communicating with her students, which was quite evident by the array of letters that she had received in her office. As a word of wisdom for the students of Hanyang, Kim refers to the Hanyang motto, "Love in deed." “What I want to stress is the "deed" part. By that I mean that all studying must be followed with some practical actions.” According to Kim, whether it is dancing, studying, or even breathing for the sake of living, things must have meaning. For that, we must engage in theoretical and cognitive research, and follow with some appropriate actions. She believes that this will create results deeper in meaning and satisfaction. “People must move. And to move, people must think. One does not carry meaning without the other.” Kim stated that she hopes to see more students able to think and act for themselves, and pursue achievements as proud students of Hanyang. Lee Chang-hyun pizz1125@naver.com Photos by Choi Min-ju

2018-03 26

[Faculty]Story of a Self-Taught Professional Mountain Photographer

Known as a mountainous country, South Korea is famous for the year-round beauty of both small and huge mountains along with never-ending groups of hikers. Despite the obvious attraction of the mountains’ natural aspects, it is still possible for people to miss the hidden beauty in the depths of the mountains. It is these moments that Cho Myung-hwan (Department of Electronic Engineering, ’82), the passionate self-made photographer, likes to catch. Turning Point at the Age 50 Cho was not a professional photographer from the start. In fact, ever since Cho graduated from Hanyang University (HYU) as an electronic engineering student, he had been working at a few IT related companies for about 10 years before voluntary retirement at the age 50. According to Cho, he had promised himself that when he turned 50, he would do something that he truly loved and had passion for. However, this did not mean he switched to photography right away. “Now that I look back, I did love photography ever since I was a HYU student. I was a part of a photography circle that I truly preferred over classes.” According to Cho, in 2004 he started hiking Baekdu Mountain and ran into a friend with whom he promised to later complete the whole Baekdudaegan Mountain Range hiking course. Every Saturday for 2 years, they hiked together, and Cho used the opportunities to take pictures which he then uploaded on his blog, attracting much attention and praise from his surrounding followers. “I’m a self-taught professional mountain photographer of 14 years, and I am still working and studying very hard everyday to improve,” said Cho. As a mountain photographer When asked if he had ever been interested in taking photos of other subjects, Cho instantly replied that he is only interested in mountains. He believes that Korean mountains hold the true Korean soul and identity, and that he wants to capture and show it through his pictures. He also does not like what has been touched and trampled on by people, so he only wants to capture the raw beauty of nature. That is why all the photo books he has self-published include “raw things” in the title. Cho said, “What I’m doing is a form of art and expression. You need to learn how to appreciate and understand the mountain in order to take good pictures. If you hike just to take pictures, those pictures are never going to become more than just ‘a picture.’” For years he had gone hiking day and night regardless of the time in order to capture the rare moments of natural beauty. His schedule, thus, was never fixed as he had to hike on rainy and snowy days, and even at dawn and the deepest darkest nights. He believes that creativity is always the most important part of art and has never been afraid to take on challenges to photograph these untouched parts and moments of the mountain that most hikers are not really aware of. However, it is not always easy, even for an experienced hiker like Cho, as it is quite common for him to hike for more than 6 hours and take hundreds of pictures without getting any satisfactory results. “Even if it is supposedly one of the worst situations you can ever be in, you should learn to accept it and give it your all. If it still doesn’t turn out the way you would have liked, then learn to be satisfied with what you have then.” Never-ending passion Cho has also consistently been working on calendars and books and opening photo galleries in order to give the public more access to his pictures. He mentioned that the hardest part of being a photographer was not in the physical, but financial aspects. For 14 years he did not have stable income even with the ID photo studio that he owns. He has also had to find ways to publish all the books and calendars of his photos at a cheaper price. Later on he even learned how to design them from scratch himself and sold them on the internet. “This is why a lot of people are scared to try something new. I also wouldn’t recommend for young people to simply go for it, to be honest. If you’re old like me, that’s a different story. If you’re young, I’d say you have a stable job first, and then try it as a side job,” said Cho. Along with his realistic advice, Cho mentioned how he wants to continue hiking and photographing the raw beauty of mountains in Korea, but also in other countries if he ever gets the chance to. Park Joo-hyun julia1114@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Choi Min-ju

2018-03 08

[Faculty]Hanyang College of Engineering’s Dean Becoming the President of all Engineering Deans

Engineering education has been growing in importance in Korean society ever since the beginning. Now it is emphasized more than ever as the Fourth Industrial Revolution or Industry 4.0 has started to prevail in our lives. Industry 4.0 is a name for the current trend of automation and data exchange in manufacturing technologies. It includes cyber-physical systems, the Internet of things, cloud computing, and cognitive computing. News H met Jung at his office in a sunny day. Although he must have been busy as the school was starting, he was very embracing and welcoming. This year, Hanyang University’s Dean from the College of Engineering, Jung Sung-hoon was elected as the president of Korean Engineering Deans’ Association. The association was founded in 1991 to promote and better the engineering education in Korea. News H visited Jung to congratulate him on his election and to hear more of his stories. Q. Congratulations on your election! How do you feel? A. Well, first of all, it is a big honor for me having this big position. And I am very thankful that I can hand this honor to Hanyang University, as HYU’s dean is the president of the Deans’ Association across the nation. Q. What does the Korean Engineering Deans’ Association do exactly? A. We collect opinions and discuss the current problems in the engineering education, and try to fix the problems through delivering our opinion to government bodies such as the Ministries of Trade, Industry, and Energy. I have a meeting with the vice vice-ministers from the Ministries of Trade, Industry, and Energy and the Ministry of Science and ICT. Q. What do you aim to accomplish during your time in office? A. There are about 160 colleges that are members of the Association, but only about 60 schools are actively participating now. I personally hope that I can bring more participation during my time, as engineering education is becoming more important these days. I feel sorry for the fact that not many schools are implementing new curriculums that can nurture competent students who are apt in this Industry 4.0 era. Q. What do you think was the key to your election? A. First of all, the Association appoints its president from Seoul and the other areas in turn, and this year was Seoul’s turn. And since Hanyang University is nearly the representative of the Korean engineering education,I was nominated as the candidate. It’s a bit embarrassing for me to say it out loud for myself, but I was elected unanimously. (laughter) Jung emphasized that Hanyang Graduate School of Engineering is world class, so students who are interested in advancing their academics should not hesitate to enroll in the graduate school in Hanyang. Jung and the word “engineering” are inseparable, as he graduated from HYU College of Engineering himself, came back as a professor, held the position of vice-dean and dean, and is now becoming the President of the Deans’ Association. “I would not have been able to come this far without love for engineering,” smiled Jung. He recalls that the three years of working in the textile factory right after graduation also helped him to gain profound insight into the industry. Jung mentioned that engineering is in the field rather than in books. That is why he still encourages his students to go work in the factory, even for months. “Students nowadays do not prefer working in the factories, but it really helps them understand and apply what they have learned in class. That will be the engine for their future careers, whatever they do,” said Jung, with a bitter smile. Jung is in the office from the 1st of March 2018 to the end of February 2019. With the passion and enthusiasm that has led him so far, we expect him to bring about the betterment of engineering education in Korea too. Kim So-yun dash070@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Choi Min-ju

2018-02 05

[Faculty]Founding the First Korean Dance Troupes Association

There is an old saying on unity, ‘united we stand, divided we fall’. It is important for people to cooperate and organize to raise their voice on issues and deliver their will more effectively. Professor Moon Young-chul, from the Department of Dance, has been a professional ballet dancer for over forty years and has always had the urge to bring dance troupes in Korea together for common goals. Thanks to his hard work, more than fifty organizations from three different fields of dance from – Korean dance, modern dance, and ballet – were able to cut the ribbons on July 13, 2017. Although it was a Saturday, Moon came to school for practice. Voicing out issues One of the many issues that Moon and the Korean Dance Troupes Association (tentative title) are interested in is the military issue of Korean male dancers. As dancing requires daily practice in a specific condition, male dancers in the nation are having a difficult time continuing their career while having to serve in the military for almost two years. There are very limited opportunities for exemption compared to other fields of art such as music. While there are more than 240 awards which are subject for the exemption annually, male dancers must win first prize from one of the four events to be exempt from military duty, which are the Dong-A Dance Competition, Seoul Dance Festival, Korea Dance Festival, and the Korea Newbie Dancer Competition. “Korean dancers are good, but the condition is harsh up to the point where foreign dance companies ‘import’ our dancers” lamented Moon. Moon plans to discuss such issues with the head of other dance troupes and bring them up to the table as much as he can. The association also aims to provide foundations for the member organizations to brand themselves, promoting Korea to the world. Moon’s MoonYoungChul Ballet Pomea contributes a lot in that sense. As well as the media work and teaching, Moon works hard to live up to another title of his, 'a ballet dancer'. (Video courtesy of Moon) Leading creative ballet in Korea MoonYoungChul Ballet Poema was founded in 2003 by Moon when he started teaching in HYU. He brought Hanyang graduates and students together to perform creative ballet, scripts inspired from literature. ‘Poema’ means poet in Spanish. Moon named his organization as such because he believes ballet dancing is like a poet, literary and delicate. The organization performs once a year with original pieces. Moon organized his ballet group aiming to make the creative ballet group that represents the whole nation. In a sense, he has already achieved that goal. The MoonYoungChul Ballet Poema has won dozens of awards in Korea and has been invited to perform in Saint Petersburg, Russia for four years in a row. The most recent performance was titled <The Blue Bird>, from Maurice Maeterlinck’s script <The Blue Bird (1908)>. A video clip from last year, The MoonYoungChul Ballet Poema performing <The Blue Bird> (Video courtesy of Moon) Moon himself occasionally performed in the play although he does not plan to take the stage this year. When asked what motivated him so much from a young age to continue in ballet and constantly strive to dance, produce, and engage in backstage jobs, Moon replied that “ballet is like a drug to me. I just can’t live without it.” With the passion he has inside, he aspires to provide more stage for his students now. “Students need motivation to keep them practicing every day. I feel like it is my duty now to find and give as much opportunity to them,” smiled Moon. Recently appointed as the 17th president of the Dance Research Journal of Korea, Moon will be busier than ever. “Dance and procrastination never go along. The one who keeps working and keeping themselves busy will survive,” emphasized Moon. He wishes his students to participate more in the academic realm of ballet, as its importance is growing day by day. Kim So-yun dash070@naver.com Photos by Choi Min-ju

2017-12 04

[Faculty]A Professor and a CEO

The two nouns, professor and CEO often do not go along too well. It is because the two jobs require two distinct traits, such as a rigorous academic interest for a professor and innovation for a CEO. There are few who manage to bear the two titles, but Park Jai-koo (Professor, Natural Resources and Environmental Engineering) is one of them. In one of the busy Saturday afternoons of Park, News H visited his office to take a closer look at his recent accomplishment. Park is holding a sample of his insulatio, explaining with pride. "Technology is what led to the invesment," smiled Park. Hang in there, that is what makes difference in the end ‘Congratulations’ was the word that started the interview. Park and his company, Micropore was able to draw a huge 3 billion won investment to mass produce his original insulation. The type of insulation Park has developed is specifically used in the process of assembling displays, which is one of the most important industries in the modern world. Park’s insulation is different from the Japanese and German products mainly in two ways. First, it creates less dust. The invention is made of Silicon dioxide, commonly known as Silica. It is one of the most commonly found minerals that originates from underground. “Most insulations are made of Silica, but the root technology of processing it creates vastly different results,” said Park. The second specialty is that it protects from heat very well. The statement may sound awkward as all insulates should prevent heat. Nevertheless, Park mentioned that the imported materials are not specifically made to be used as semi-conductor display insulates. Therefore, Park’s invention with countless pores inside serves the purpose much better. To the question, ‘what was the core factor for Micropore to receive such investment?’ Park answered ‘technology’ without a second of hesitation. Park told us that his past 20 years of working as a professor and a CEO was burdensome as it sounds. Despite the Act on Special Measures for the Promotion of Venture Businesses in 1997 that gave birth to dozens of ‘professor-start-ups’, Micropore is one of the longest living ventures of its kind. “Right earlier this week, I took off from the metro to visit my factory and realized that my shoes were worn out so much. That is how much effort and energy was required to keep up the work,” smiled Park. When asked what is the key behind all this, Park replied, "You just hang in there. There is no special skills or knowledge required. What you do is to pour your everything and hang in there. In the end, the one who endured the longest will make difference.” "A social atmosphere encouraging college students to explore and make companies should be created." Manufacturing industry as the engine of Korea As an engineer professor, Park laments at the reality where not many companies own domestic factories. “Manufacturing industry should revive. That is the way for Korea to grow its competency,” said Park, filled with certainty. The root of such industry is mineral. In order to be utilized, a mineral requires to be located, mined, and processed. Park focuses in processing but also in Urban Mining. “There is more gold in your phone than in a 1 ton of mineral,” mentioned Park. Urban mining retrieves disposed cell phones or PCB (Printed Circuit Boards, found in all electronic devices) and selectively processes them in order to retrieve rare metals such as Au, Ag and Pt. Park now looks forward to acquiring another title, an author. With his abundant experience in both business and engineering, he would like to give advice to fellow professors who are starting his or her own business or planning to have one. “They all need to hold up until the company actually makes progress and profit. I wish Hanyang, as one of the leading engineering schools in the nation, should have a signature company that has our name on it,” wished Park. For the short-term goal, Park plans to list Micropore on KOSDAQ. With the recent investment, may the wind blow to his path. Kim So-yun dash070@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Lee Jin-myung

2017-10 31

[Faculty]Celebrating the “Beautiful Foundation”

“I happened to be” was a phrase often referred to by Professor Ye Jong-seok (Business Administration) in his effort to remain humble when asked about his long list of achievements. Nevertheless, the array of awards and appreciation plaques that filled the shelves of his office gave more than a hint of just how valued he was by countless people and organizations. One of his most distinguished achievements is the co-establishment and nurturing of the “Beautiful Foundation.” The foundation, with its purpose of being the development and proliferation of a charity culture, was founded in 2000. The once small organization with nothing but a calling for charity has now grown to a massive institution that spends 3.1 billion won a year on public projects. Ye was a part of the foundation since its establishment and has been serving as the chairman of the board from 2012 to this day. Ye attending a ceremony of "The Beautiful Foundation" (Photo courtesy of Dong-hwa) Re-establishing the Korean charity culture Ye picked out Dale Carnegie as the epitome of American charity culture. Deeply drawn to his philosophy and legacy, Ye described how Carnegie practiced what he preached, spending his lifetime fortune to give back to society by building 2500 libraries, countless foundations, and a university. Inspired by Carnegie, entrepreneurs such as John Rockefeller, Henry Ford, and George Soros followed in his footsteps to bring about the height of American charity. Ye desired to reenact this kind of culture in Korea. The concept of donations in Korea is in strict contrast to that of the United States in many ways. For example, most of the donations in Korea are made through corporate donations, whereas most donations are made privately in the US. Furthermore, these promises of donations from domestic conglomerates are rarely carried out. This a fundamental flaw in terms of the Korean charity culture. Thus, Ye sought to change the sources of donation from a small number of large donors to a large number of small donors. The structure of the Beautiful Foundation was designed by benchmarking the community foundations in the US. At the time, the concept of foundation had a negative image in Korean society, seen as a means of tax evasion during the chaebols inheritance process. Needless to say, the Beautiful Foundation had to start from rock bottom. Not only have they had a negative perception, but people were also hesitant to donate to an infant organization with no credentials. A turning point for the initial hardship of the foundation was the donation from an elderly lady named Kim Boon-ja. Kim was a victim of sexual slavery in the era of Japanese imperialism and had donated her 50 million won worth of compensation money that she had received as a form of indemnification to the Beautiful Foundation. This donation of immense value served as a seed capital to establish a foundation that has collected over 50 billion won during the past 17 years. Another obstacle that the foundation had to overcome was the underlying conflict between charity organizations and conglomerates when it came to donation. In such circumstances, Ye utilized his experiences and acquaintances in both of these areas to facilitate an atmosphere of cooperation. Ye expressed deep passion for the desire to change the Korean charity culture. (Photo courtesy of The Hankyoreh) Personal philosophy and drive Aside from his hardships in restructuring the Beautiful Foundation to rely less on a small number of large conglomerate donations, Ye had faced numerous obstacles during his years of studying abroad and contemplation on his career path. After having served in over 100 corporate and non-profit organization, Ye claims with full confidence that the key to success is doing what you love: “I enjoy doing things I love. Obviously, I avoid taking roles that I dislike. Taking up a job that you hate will literally make you ill.” As if to prove his point, Ye, well into mid-sixties, seems robust and full of energy. Genuinely interested in liberal arts, he takes his free time to devote himself to an array of fields, such as cuisines, art, and even sports. One example would be his affection for skiing. Having been a devoted fan for the past 50 years, his involvement in skiing to “take a break” has led him to become a key member of the upcoming Winter Olympics. Upon his retirement in the coming year, he plans to lead a “new life” devoted to his pursuit of full-time writing. The shelves on Ye's office were stacked with photos depicting a variety of activities. Advice Ye expressed concerns for the next generation. The Fourth Industrial Revolution, said to bring about rapid and fundamental changes, surpasses the total impact of change seen in the society for the past two decades. About 65 percent of existing jobs are expected to disappear. In this approaching era of unprecedented change, Ye underlined the importance of students’ discretion in choosing a career path. At the request for advice to students, Ye bluntly answered, “Choose a goal, and work extremely hard.” Above all, he emphasized the importance of choosing the right goal. His definition of a “right” goal was something that can provide joy. “It’s hard to lead a healthy life doing something you dislike. Find something you can commit your life to,” expressed Ye. Lee Chang-hyun pizz1125@hanyang.ac.kr Photo by Chae Guen-baek

2017-10 25

[Faculty]Imperial Ambition through Bird’s Eye

Imagine that a bird is observing the world while flying over the sky. The holistic insight of a bird’s-eye view displayed at Hanyang University’s museum may overwhelm the audience. A bird’s-eye view designed and drawn by Hatsusaburo Yoshida during the Japanese colonization is evaluated as a creative and fresh masterpiece of the era. However, professor Han Dong-su and Seo Dong-chun of Far East Architectural History Lab have discovered that the vast coverage and amplification of specific geography behind the bird’s-eye view may imply the colonial ambition of Japan. The exhibition <Japan Draws the Ambition on Bird's-Eye View> is currently hosted at Hanyang University's museum. Ambitious bird flies over the world Bird’s-eye views drawn by Hatsusaburo Yoshida contains not only the geography of Japan, but also that of Korea, China, Europe, and further America. “It is hard to exactly beg the question that the intention behind this bird’s-eye view is for the colonial purpose due to the different stance between Korea and Japan. However, Korea’s assertion can be supported by several historical and architectural evidence,” said Seo. First point of focus is the view’s extensive, yet unnecessary coverage of geography. “Unlike the early views drawn in 1913, the 1922 view created during the peak of the Japanese Colonization era is peculiar in that the view resembles more of a world map conquered by Japan,” said Seo. The 1913 view has a narrow perspective of geography focusing only on Japan and the surrounding countries, while the 1922 view has an enormous spectrum of the world in Japan’s interest at the time. Bird's-eye view drawn by Yoshida pinpoints several colonial sites with extreme amplification. Another aspect to pay attention is from whom Yoshida received requests to draw more than 3,000 views. “We thought that if we discover who asked for these views, it can help explain the intention behind the map. The investigation was worth it because the client was the Japanese Railroad Administration, the key organization of colonization,” said Seo. In addition, Yoshida himself has arbitrarily served in the war in 1940, which supports the claim. “It is also eccentric that Yoshida magnified specific locations and buildings in the view, which were vital buildings to colonization, such as the Japanese Government General of Korea or shrines,” said Seo. Complementary history and architecture Far East Architectural History Lab has hosted several architectural history exhibitions including this year’s bird’s eye view. “Professor Han’s ultimate goal was to collect as much data on Korea’s architecture for his junior researchers that have been lost due to numerous wars and colonization.” Seo has been working with Han for 15 years to create the central historical axis of the three East Asian countires- Korea, Japan, and China. “Korea has lost a lot of historical reference on architecture despite the fact that our forefathers built great edifices. To restore all the data and develop future architecture in the sense of Korean traditional style, we must approach architecture in the perspective of the entire far east,” explained Seo. Three countries of the far east have been in close relationship since the early history. Through long-time interactions, cultures were exchanged including architecture, and the lab suggests that Koreans pay attention to Chinese and Japanese culture by analyzing the past interchanges. “Historical background of Korean architecture after the Japanese colonization is sometimes depressing in that we had to lose all the great work of our ancestors. However, it is now the time that we build a new beginning cheerfully,” said Seo. “Architecture is not just a building that we live in or see. It embodies the history, sorrow, happiness, and memories, and I wish all potential architects of Hanyang will polish up this holistic perspective.” Kim Ju-hyun kimster9421@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Kim Youn-soo

2017-09 19

[Faculty]Robotics is for Everyone

“I will be riding a huge robot like in the cartoons in 100 years, and I’ll live forever,” smiled Professor Han Jea-kweon (Department of Interdisciplinary Robit Engineering ). Han in his office in the late afternoon gave two vastly contrasting impressions of a pure child and an agile scholar. News H met with Han to hear more stories about his recent developments and insight in robotics. Han is explaining how much experience is valuable. Get out of the library “It’s really sad that most students ask me the question because it implies how much the young generation of our society is suffering from uncertainty, especially on their future.” When asked, ‘What made you become a robot engineer?’, Han answered both sarcastically and empathetically. He did have a special reason on becoming the person who he is now, but he wanted to make sure that the readers do not fall into the frame of thought that a person needs ‘the moment’ or ‘the reason’ to decide what to do in the future. Han went on to explain that a person passes by hundreds and thousands of opportunities in his or her lifetime, but it is what gives them fun and joy that they are truly attracted to. And ‘the thing’ is not found in books but in experiences. Han himself has also accumulated abundant experiences as a foundation of being one of the leading scholar in the field. Han has always wanted to make robots, but due to the lack of opportunities in Korea at that time, he proceeded with his study in graduate school in automobiles. Then, he got a job in a major company as mainstream society had told him to. “But there was always this unfulfilled thirst inside telling me, ‘this is not your life! You are not born to do this, go on and do what you really want to do,” recalled Han. So, he chose to study in the States to overcome such lack of opportunity. “At that time, I did not foresee my salary to be cut in half,” laughed Han. Geek in the lab Han expressed the most enthusiasm and seriousness when he talked about his work. “I really was a geek before. Watching robot animation is still one of the most important parts of my day,” said Han. The first robot he ever made was a ‘Humvee’, a transformer-like robot. The Humvee was made over the course of one week, during my summer vacation back in 2007, when the movie Transformers (2007) was first released. Han and his wife rebuilt an RC car ‘hummer’ and gave it arms and legs. The Humvee video ‘Real Transformer NO C.G. Upgrade Version -Humvee Bioloid-‘ uploaded on Youtube hit more than 342,000 views to this date. Han’s passion for robots only grew over time while he studied in the United States for his doctoral degree. After coming back to Korea, Han participated in DARPA (Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency) Robotics Challenge that lasted for three years from 2012 to 2015. Coming back from the States, Han was bitterly surprised at the situation of the Korean robotics field. The biggest challenge he felt was the lack of intelligence. “The people we had, one by one, were brighter than the ones I’ve seen in the States, but the absolute number was too small.” Han compared the situation with the professional baseball league, where other countries such as Japan or the US have lots of back up players to change in every match, but we do not. That is the moment when he decided to get involved in education. EDIE, one of Han's robots. EDIE is a type of Human Robot interaction robot, intricately structured to communicate and bond with humans. Robots WILL create jobs “Humanity has been worried about robots and machines taking their jobs since the 1760s,” smiled Han. He advised that we need to search for what we can do ‘with’ the robots instead of being worried about what they will take from us. Traditional elites good at calculation and memorizing will lose jobs. But people with intuition, sense and creativity will flourish in unlimited possibilities. That is because robotics requires people from all fields with the aforementioned qualities. For instance, it took a designer, psychologists, and screen play experts in creating a Human Robot Interaction (HRI) robot EDIE. “Robot is a tool needed in our daily lives. Students now need to contemplate on how to progress one step ahead with robots and create social values.” Han plans to focus on three main topics in robotics; humanoid robots, HRI and disaster inspection robots for the short term. Kim So-yun dash070@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Park Yong-min

2017-05 22

[Faculty]Winner of the Paiknam Scholar Award

During his 12 years at Hanyang University, Professor Kang Yong-soo of the Department of Energy Engineering has demonstrating the virtues of an educator and a researcher. For his endeavor, Kang was awarded the Paiknam Scholar Award on the 78th school anniversary. Expecting to retire in 2018, Kang reminisces his life as scientist and professor. Life as a scholar Kang began his teaching career at the Department of Chemical Engineering in 2005. While at HYU, Kang pioneered and led a new discipline from the basics to the application of the "facilitated transport phenomena in the solid state" and obtained excellent results by applying it to membranes and solar cells. As a result, about 185 papers were published in SCI international journals from 2005 to 2017 and Kang was able to win several awards, including the Paiknam Scholar Award. “The Paiknam Award was a great honor for me, and it leads me to think of myself as a lucky person. I should attribute all the credit to my lab students, who followed and supported me,” said Kang. One of Kang’s best research is on the facilitated transport phenomena in the solid state and their various applications. The beginning of his research dates back to when Kang was working at KIST (Korea Institute of Science and Technology). “The first project assigned to me at KIST was separating oxygen and nitrogen from air. Each element can be utilized pragmatically in practical life, and the usage of the separation membrane was the key,” emphasized Kang. After great research findings, Kang was recognized as the greatest scholar at Hanyang University this year. Since then, Kang's interest has changed to the separation of olefin such as ethylene or propylene because it is one of the most difficult tasks to solve. “I was sponsored one billion won for this Creative Research Program by the NRF (National Research Foundation of Korea) to develop this fuekd for 10 years, which was a tremendous opportunity for me,” reminisced Kang. After 10 years at KIST, Kang realized that his specialization lies in the basic understanding of principles, not practical applications. As a result, he left KIST to become an educator at HYU. Multi-player in research and education In addition to personal academic achievement, Kang’s BK21 Project and the ERC (Energy Research Center) of the Leading Research Center Support Project also ushered science at Hanyang to advance. Kang also undertook the role as chairman and editor-in-chief of various academic societies at home and abroad, contributing to the development of the school as well as the broader society. When Kang came to Hanyang University, he realized that he could not bring the research funds provided by KIST to his school lab. In need of research funds to satisfy the scientific desires of his and his students, Kang made a difficult decision. “I just called an executive director of Samsung Institute of Science, Dr. Kim Jong-min, to ask for research funding. He would have been very confused, because we have only met a few times before, but Kim decided to support me for the development of science,” said Kang. After such vicissitudes in life, Kang was able to investigate how to overcome low ionic conductivity in polymer electrolyte for dye-sensitized solar cell and improving the separation performance of membranes. These are each utilized on strengthening solar cells and curtailing petrochemistry’s high energy consumption, enormous cost and inefficient use of space. Kang sends gratitudes to his fellow students at the school and at his lab. The Best Teacher Award is Kang’s most favorite prize as professor. “This award is given by students that I teach. I wish my students will have pride in themselves when learning about science and life,” said Kang. According to him, calmly waiting for opportunities while preparing one's own unique characteristics will help students realize their dreams. Kim Ju-hyun kimster9421@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Kim Sang-yeon