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2017-10 25

[Faculty]Imperial Ambition through Bird’s Eye

Imagine that a bird is observing the world while flying over the sky. The holistic insight of a bird’s-eye view displayed at Hanyang University’s museum may overwhelm the audience. A bird’s-eye view designed and drawn by Hatsusaburo Yoshida during the Japanese colonization is evaluated as a creative and fresh masterpiece of the era. However, professor Han Dong-su and Seo Dong-chun of Far East Architectural History Lab have discovered that the vast coverage and amplification of specific geography behind the bird’s-eye view may imply the colonial ambition of Japan. The exhibition <Japan Draws the Ambition on Bird's-Eye View> is currently hosted at Hanyang University's museum. Ambitious bird flies over the world Bird’s-eye views drawn by Hatsusaburo Yoshida contains not only the geography of Japan, but also that of Korea, China, Europe, and further America. “It is hard to exactly beg the question that the intention behind this bird’s-eye view is for the colonial purpose due to the different stance between Korea and Japan. However, Korea’s assertion can be supported by several historical and architectural evidence,” said Seo. First point of focus is the view’s extensive, yet unnecessary coverage of geography. “Unlike the early views drawn in 1913, the 1922 view created during the peak of the Japanese Colonization era is peculiar in that the view resembles more of a world map conquered by Japan,” said Seo. The 1913 view has a narrow perspective of geography focusing only on Japan and the surrounding countries, while the 1922 view has an enormous spectrum of the world in Japan’s interest at the time. Bird's-eye view drawn by Yoshida pinpoints several colonial sites with extreme amplification. Another aspect to pay attention is from whom Yoshida received requests to draw more than 3,000 views. “We thought that if we discover who asked for these views, it can help explain the intention behind the map. The investigation was worth it because the client was the Japanese Railroad Administration, the key organization of colonization,” said Seo. In addition, Yoshida himself has arbitrarily served in the war in 1940, which supports the claim. “It is also eccentric that Yoshida magnified specific locations and buildings in the view, which were vital buildings to colonization, such as the Japanese Government General of Korea or shrines,” said Seo. Complementary history and architecture Far East Architectural History Lab has hosted several architectural history exhibitions including this year’s bird’s eye view. “Professor Han’s ultimate goal was to collect as much data on Korea’s architecture for his junior researchers that have been lost due to numerous wars and colonization.” Seo has been working with Han for 15 years to create the central historical axis of the three East Asian countires- Korea, Japan, and China. “Korea has lost a lot of historical reference on architecture despite the fact that our forefathers built great edifices. To restore all the data and develop future architecture in the sense of Korean traditional style, we must approach architecture in the perspective of the entire far east,” explained Seo. Three countries of the far east have been in close relationship since the early history. Through long-time interactions, cultures were exchanged including architecture, and the lab suggests that Koreans pay attention to Chinese and Japanese culture by analyzing the past interchanges. “Historical background of Korean architecture after the Japanese colonization is sometimes depressing in that we had to lose all the great work of our ancestors. However, it is now the time that we build a new beginning cheerfully,” said Seo. “Architecture is not just a building that we live in or see. It embodies the history, sorrow, happiness, and memories, and I wish all potential architects of Hanyang will polish up this holistic perspective.” Kim Ju-hyun kimster9421@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Kim Youn-soo

2017-05 22

[Faculty]Winner of the Paiknam Scholar Award

During his 12 years at Hanyang University, Professor Kang Yong-soo of the Department of Energy Engineering has demonstrating the virtues of an educator and a researcher. For his endeavor, Kang was awarded the Paiknam Scholar Award on the 78th school anniversary. Expecting to retire in 2018, Kang reminisces his life as scientist and professor. Life as a scholar Kang began his teaching career at the Department of Chemical Engineering in 2005. While at HYU, Kang pioneered and led a new discipline from the basics to the application of the "facilitated transport phenomena in the solid state" and obtained excellent results by applying it to membranes and solar cells. As a result, about 185 papers were published in SCI international journals from 2005 to 2017 and Kang was able to win several awards, including the Paiknam Scholar Award. “The Paiknam Award was a great honor for me, and it leads me to think of myself as a lucky person. I should attribute all the credit to my lab students, who followed and supported me,” said Kang. One of Kang’s best research is on the facilitated transport phenomena in the solid state and their various applications. The beginning of his research dates back to when Kang was working at KIST (Korea Institute of Science and Technology). “The first project assigned to me at KIST was separating oxygen and nitrogen from air. Each element can be utilized pragmatically in practical life, and the usage of the separation membrane was the key,” emphasized Kang. After great research findings, Kang was recognized as the greatest scholar at Hanyang University this year. Since then, Kang's interest has changed to the separation of olefin such as ethylene or propylene because it is one of the most difficult tasks to solve. “I was sponsored one billion won for this Creative Research Program by the NRF (National Research Foundation of Korea) to develop this fuekd for 10 years, which was a tremendous opportunity for me,” reminisced Kang. After 10 years at KIST, Kang realized that his specialization lies in the basic understanding of principles, not practical applications. As a result, he left KIST to become an educator at HYU. Multi-player in research and education In addition to personal academic achievement, Kang’s BK21 Project and the ERC (Energy Research Center) of the Leading Research Center Support Project also ushered science at Hanyang to advance. Kang also undertook the role as chairman and editor-in-chief of various academic societies at home and abroad, contributing to the development of the school as well as the broader society. When Kang came to Hanyang University, he realized that he could not bring the research funds provided by KIST to his school lab. In need of research funds to satisfy the scientific desires of his and his students, Kang made a difficult decision. “I just called an executive director of Samsung Institute of Science, Dr. Kim Jong-min, to ask for research funding. He would have been very confused, because we have only met a few times before, but Kim decided to support me for the development of science,” said Kang. After such vicissitudes in life, Kang was able to investigate how to overcome low ionic conductivity in polymer electrolyte for dye-sensitized solar cell and improving the separation performance of membranes. These are each utilized on strengthening solar cells and curtailing petrochemistry’s high energy consumption, enormous cost and inefficient use of space. Kang sends gratitudes to his fellow students at the school and at his lab. The Best Teacher Award is Kang’s most favorite prize as professor. “This award is given by students that I teach. I wish my students will have pride in themselves when learning about science and life,” said Kang. According to him, calmly waiting for opportunities while preparing one's own unique characteristics will help students realize their dreams. Kim Ju-hyun kimster9421@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Kim Sang-yeon

2016-12 26 Important News

[Faculty]New Leader of the Hanlim Academy

In the 21st century where science is becoming the touchstone of indicating the future, there are 38 National Academies of Engineering around the world, putting in their endeavors to vitalize scientific development. Out of the 38 academies, only 28 are officially authorized National Academies. Among them, the National Academy of Engineering of Korea (NAEK), also called the Hanlim Academy, is in the lead of scientific development. Professor Kwon O-kyung of the Department of Electronic Engineering has been newly appointed as the president of NAEK and is envisioning the bright future of science in South Korea. Professor Kwon is explaining about the significance of developing the engineering field. The Hanlim Academy and the promising future The NAEK, or the Hanlim Academy, is composed of 291 industrial CEOs and professors with authorities in the engineernig academia. Due to the popularity of engineering field and people's desire to enter the academy, there are 260 more candidate members other than 291 regular members. The official role of the Hanlim Academy is to map out the future of South Korea in regards to the engineering science field. Representative work of the NAEK is consulting and giving advice to the government about engineering and scientific policies. “The Hanlim Academy prepares the draft for policy plans every five years when the new government is ready to be established,” said Kwon. The main concerns of the Academy are increasing the possibility for job creation and augmenting the rate of economic growth from the current 4.5% to 9%. Kwon expects that the engineering field will contribute the most to augmentating the of economic growth of South Korea in the next few years. Also, the unification of the two Koreas is a major interest of the Academy, since ample resources and radical development in science will meet along with the unification in due course. Thus, the NAEK is currently researching North Korea's social overhead capital (SOC) in order to correctly identify how the two Koreas’ capitals are being established, and how the North Korean economy can be succored through engineering and scientific aid. “If South Korea is not knowledgeable enough about North Korea before the unification, it will incur disasters such as the spread of infectious diseases through North Korea’s peculiar living accommodations and ongoing chemical research. Thus researching about North Korea in advance with regards to unification is extremely vital,” emphasized Kwon. Key to a successful life Professor Kwon also accentuated the importance of living a well-regulated life and the willpower to achieve the goal of one’s life. Until this moment, of having become the president of the NAEK, Kwon has crossed many paths. Once he graduated from Hanyang University in electronic engineering, Kwon attended Stanford University for his Master's and Ph.D. degrees. He subsequently joined Texas Instruments, a semiconductor manufacturing company, at the process and design center. In 1992, many professors at Hanyang University solicited for Kwon's return for him to contribute as an educator and a scientist. However, when Kwon submitted his resignation, Texas Instrument turned it down every year. Even when Kwon came to Hanyang University to pursue his academic career as a professor, Texas Instrument did not accept his resignation for 10 years. Kwon has also successfully filled various posts in the engineering academia, including the president of Korean Information Display Society and the vice-president of the Engineering Department at Hanyang University. To the question of how he maintains such a successful life, Kwon answer was the "maintenance of a busy life and willpower". “When I decided to enroll in the doctoral program at Stanford University, I slept three hours a day and spent the rest of my time to study,” said Kwon. Even though this sort of commitment was hard to keep up, after about six months, he was able to maintain such a lifestyle for 40 years up until now. According to Kwon, a steady lifestyle is the key to success, and the will to study and learn more about the field is the most critical attribute to securing a rewarding life. ▲Kwon attends the NAEK forum (third from the right). (Photo courtesy of NAEK) Kwon's ultimate goal is to make Korea a country that is full of chances and competence. “I have always pondered about the Korean education system since I was a university student. South Korea tries to inject too many subjects into students' heads, and this will only result in lining them into a ragged line of test scores. Korea needs to become a nation where everyone can be the leader of each specific field, meaning that everyone deserves to discover what they are intelligent in, instead of studying a lot of uninterested subjects at once,” said Kwon. He is currently looking to achieving this objective at the National Academy of Engineering of Korea by reforming the education system in the field of science. Kim Ju-hyun kimster9421@hanyang.ac.kr Photo by Choi Min-ju