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2017-02 20 Important News

[Faculty]Insight from a Literature Critic

There's a saying that you see as much as you know. From this logic, it could be deduced that when reading a book, one can understand only as much as one has learned. Doubtlessly, in order to be an expert of a field, one manifestly needs extensive reading and the acquirement of boundless knowledge. On this, Professor Yoo Sung-ho (Department of Korean Language and Literature) shared his insight and understanding as a literature critic. Definition of a literature critic “Criticizing is a cordial cooperation between the literary work and the critic,” remarked Yoo. This is how he usually defines literary criticism. It is the act of pinpointing appreciable and admirable facets of the work, sometimes including inevitable reproaches. Yoo clarified that criticizing and condemning each possess distinct characteristics, thereby separating them in their essence. What lies at the center of criticism is the accurate interpretation of the literature, accompanied by the competence in constructing one’s own sentences. Finding the true values of a literary work and animating it into one's own words of criticism for others to read and relate to, is what critics do, as Yoo explained. Moreover, Yoo thinks self-consciousness is also important when it comes to reviewing a literary piece. Asking oneself the reason for analyzing a piece of work and deliberating what contributions the criticism could give to the world is attributable to a distinguished critic. Yoo believes reading with the sole objective to write could never widen a critic’s analytical perspective. Reading should be something that's done consistently, without intention. “I was deeply touched by a book and tried to express that feeling with words. That is how I came to submerge myself in reading and literature analysis.” Formula for criticism “It's often next to impossible to distinguish whether one idea comes from one’s value or taste,” said Yoo. Taste acts as the chief driving force in establishing one’s value. When analyzing a literary text, one’s taste inevitably functions as the judge, with existing values and philosophy added after it. Although taste is a personal and subjective factor, it is indispensable for critics, for every critic has their own style and preference that ultimately define their individuality. A critic should possess knowledge of the text, author, and general trend of the literary field. Knowing the author’s style such as writing techniques, philosophy, and taste will help the critic interpret the written work better. Literature tends to contain more than what is just written superficially in words, therefore necessitating critics to apprehend the core message beyond the visible text. The most important skill a critic should poseess, Yoo hinted, is the ability to express one’s interpretation in fluency. “No matter how outstanding your comprehension and analyses are, mediocre wordings could ruin your criticism. The power of words cannot be ignored,” commented Yoo. On top of everything, when reviewing a literary work, critics often feel tempted to stand on the same platform as the authors, drinking in only the perspective of the original writer. This enables critics to break the boundary of merely interpreting texts, letting them be “authors” themselves and write sentences of idiosyncrasy that exquisitely convey their own analysis. “Extensive reading begets great critics.” Above are two critism books that Yoo wrote. (Photos courtesy of Ridibooks and Yes24 respectively) Jeon Chae-yun chaeyun111@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Moon Hana

2017-01 09

[Faculty]Developing Art Materials With 3D Printer

Of the 170 teams that participated in the 2016 Student Research Program, 17 were selected as outstanding teams that submitted remarkable reports. Teams from various schools partook in this program, each comprising of several students and one supervising professor. Among the 17 teams stands the group from Hanyang University: Jang Jin-ho (Department of Mechanical Engineering, 2nd year), Choi Ki-bong (Department of Computer Science and Engineering, 3rd year), Kim Jung-hyun (Department of Applied Art, 2nd year), Kim Hee-ryung (Department of Applied Art, 2nd year), Song Si-young (Department of Applied Art, 2nd year), and Yoon Yeo-jin (Department of Industrial Design, 3rd year) from Sungshin Women’s University. They were under supervision of Professor Hyun Eun-ryung of the Department of Applied Art. The six students and the professor shared their glorious moment with News H. From left to right: Hee-ryung, Si-young, Professor Hyun, Jin-ho, and Ki-bong. 3D printer and art material Children with visual impairment need special support and adjustment for educational content, materials, the environment, and teaching methods owing to visual disability. Art materials were created with a 3D printer, enablling children with total blindness or low vision to feel and get familiarized with space and shapes intimately and graphically. This is expected to aid their education and improve day-to-day life in applying the senses they acquired. As for children attending a school for the visually impaired, auditory-oriented teaching methods are implemented. The new teaching material made with 3D printers proved to be more effective, as students are asking questions that are deeper and more relevant to what they are learning. Students were notably engaged in the new equipment. Overall, the newly designed material attributed in promoting students’ better understanding of learning content. Image of Mona Lisa printed graphically for sensory comprehension. (Photo courtesy of the team's research report) Students sketching images by sensing 3D material. (Photo courtesy of the team's research report) Alliance of three majors The main objective of the team was to develop art appreciation teaching materials for visually impaired children by facilitating specialmodes of perception with a 3D printer. Specifically aiming to increase the sense of space by letting students touch 3D materials, the ultimate goal is set on providing the children with more choices for their lives—by building a connection between what they know and what they can do. Their background research included comprehending the current state of affairs regarding education for the visually impaired to navigate further research. This project could be interpreted as a significant confluence of engineering, art, and education, as students from these majors collaborated to carry out the mission. The successful result encourages further collaborative work of the three fields, as Hyun remarked, “Although we had a lot of difficulties adjusting schedules and gathering together, every task we carried as a team meant a lot, because we were all from different majors. The department of engineering and art are considerably distinct from one another, yet the convergence of the three brought a remarkable result. We learned that such fusion of dissimilar fields could produce valuable outcomes.” The team members are planning to participate in additional student research programs, extending their studies on the same topic at hand. As their background research indicated, they realized that education for the handicapped or impaired children is not well instituted, and is meagerly funded. Without funds from the government or corporates, the quality of education for the minority will remain low and primitive. Today's high-end technology enable people to do anything with intention. With this, Hyun and the students are planning to develop their project in order to upgrade education for visually impaired children. Hyun and the students are looking forward to participating in more student research programs. Jeon Chae-yun chaeyun111@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Moon Ha-na