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2016-12 11

[Faculty]Expert in Public Administration Law

Diverse fields of specialization in law exist, ranging from administration law, civil law, penal law, commercial law to constitutional law. Professor Lee Ho-yong of the Department of Public Administration at Hanyang University (HYU) is an expert in the field. Lee had attended HYU as a student, receiving his Ph.D. in Law in 2001. Although he does have experiences teaching different types of laws such as police law or social security acts, he has found public administration the most fascinating. Lee has been a member of the examination board for diverse national examinations such as the bar exam. Q1. Why did you choose Public Administration despite having majored in law? Lee: “Public administration law deals with the intentions of a country. It regulates a country so that it isn't perceptible to unlawful acts. Administration itself is the action taken by a country while public administration law is what enforces administration in the way that law functions. I believe that public administration law meaningful in that it propells the country in the right direction. Through it, people can be compensated for what they have been wrongfully dealt with. For instance, let’s say that my driver’s license was revoked due to an insignificant reason, not under the appropriate grounds for such a revocation. Then I can claim for a restoration through this law.” Lee explains about his experiences of being a national examiner. Q2. You seem to have a lot of experience in being a bar examiner. Tell us more about it. Lee: “I became an examiner through the recommendations of other professors in 2002. There are diverse types of tests ranging from the bar exam, to civil service examinations. I have probably been an examiner in more than hundreds of tests counting the small tests as well. We used to have a system where examiners are grouped and stay together for seven to ten days with no connections with the outside world. We would hand in our cell phones and communication would be limited. Out of the question banks, we pick out a few question cards and make sure that the questions have no ambiguity. This takes as long as making questions ourselves. Then we would compare certain questions with other professors to make sure that the questions and answers are correct.” Q3. Do the examiners become acquainted with each other as well? Lee: “Out of the professors that do not belong in the same majors, we do hold meetings from time to time. Since professors from the same majors often meet frequently in conferences and societies, the meetings don't really mean much to us but as for examiners with different occupations, such as a judge, we sometimes get to meet and talk.” Q4. Can you tell us about the law school preparation class? What could be the pros and cons for the elimination of national bar exams and turning it into a law school system? Lee: “Around 100 to 130 students from HYU usually enter law schools, and their achievements are starting to gain more light. A lot of students go to better law schools compared to when I first started this law school preparation class. As for the bar exams, it's quite a sensitive issue. As of next year, bar exam would be out of use and law schools would completely replace the exams. "As for entering law school, there are three things to prepare for: LEET, GPA and English. Personally, it seems unfair to only have a law school system since a lot more people could have seized the chance to become a lawyer, prosecutor, or judge, but now there is only one way to become a national judicial officer- by getting into and graduating from law schools. The biggest problem is that this imposes a huge limit to those who obtained low GPAs during their university years. LEET or English proficiency tests could improve through a lot of practice, but as for GPA, students cannot recover from it unless they return to school for retakes. Although the intention of the law school is for the good of many, it seems to me that other alternative options should be left open as well.” "I have always dreamed of becoming a professor, and it took a lot of effort to bring myself to this place." Q5. Was it your dream to become a professor? What motivates you to lecture students? Lee: “Yes, I have always dreamed of becoming a professor and it took me a lot of effort to bring me to this place. I worked hard anywhere I went, since I wanted to be recognized as a hard-working person so that universities would ask me to teach at their place. Once you set your dream too late, it just makes you fall behind. Some students come to me after watching a few of my lectures on YouTube. They either send e-mails thanking me for the lecture or come and visit my office for advice as well. Close acquaintances with my students is what makes me feel proud. I talk to the students a lot and they come asking for help quite often. This is what keeps reminding me to be a good professor.” Q6. Any last comments for the readers? Lee: “You should never be afraid to reach for your dreams. Put your mind to it, as well as a lot of effort, into the things that you would like to do- not what others tell you to. People get to reach a certain status socially, but what determines your status is how much you have worked for it, not where you have started off from. Dream for what you would like to do and pour the passion and effort into it. That's what I think success is.” Kim Seung-jun nzdave94@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Choi Min-ju