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2017-05 22

[Academics]Novel Way of Measuring Cellular Nanoparticles

Nanoparticles, which are particles with diameters at least one dimension less than 100nm, are gaining intense interest from researchers. This is due to their wide applications in diverse fields such as biomedicine, materials, and electronics. Nanoparticles in medical treatments, for example, are used as drug carriers which are introduced to the human body to deliver medicine to targeted tissues. But because the safety of nanoparticles are not yet fully proven, it is important to understand to what extent the human body can be exposed to nanoparticles. In the paper “Flow Cytometry-Based Quantification of Cellular Au Nanoparticles”, Professor Yoon Tae-hyun (Department of Chemistry) focuses on the quantitative measurement of nanoparticles associated with mammalian cells. Among the increasing research interests toward nanoparticles, Yoon developed a new efficient way to quantitatively count cellular nanoparticles. With the approach of analytical chemistry, Professor Yoon and his research team utilized a technique called flow cytometry (FCM), which is already commonly used in biological and medical fields. One of its uses is to measure the number of blood (e.g. platelet, red and white blood cells) in blood samples. “While the ultimate purpose of our research is to determine whether it is hazardous to humans or not, a more detailed or fundamental subject in this specific study was to develop a method of quantitatively measuring how many nanoparticles would associate with a single mammalian cell,” explained Yoon. As it is a very micro-level research, the goal of the research is to be as simple and accurate as possible. Yoon and his team exposed cells to gold nanoparticles and measured the scattered light intensity of the cell samples using a flow cytometer. Yoon gave the example of fine dust for easier understanding. “When there is a large amount of fine dust in the air, it is usually hard for people to have clear vision because light is scattered by fine dust particles. However, we are able to recognize the existence of nanoparticles thanks to the scattered intensity of a laser source in a flow cytometer. When nanoparticles are associated with cells, the laser beam will be scattered by the nanoparticles and the scattered intensity will be high. If there are no nanoparticles, the laser beam will not scatter but just shoot straightforward,” explained Yoon. Overall graphic and imagery process of FCM, and scattering lights of cells with nanoparticles. (Photo courtesy of Yoon) The main significance of the research not only comes from the fact that it tried to tackle and study fundamental characteristics of nanoparticles, but also from how Yoon and his team improved the conventional FCM technique for utilization. His team discovered the statistical relationship between the FCM-scattered light intensity of the cell samples and the number of nanoparticles associated with cells. This finding enabled Yoon's team to accurately detect and quantify the cellular association of nanoparticles. “I think it is important to have thorough knowledge about the safety and effectiveness of the use of nanoparticles, and our research can act as a foundation for acquiring such knowledge to develop further applications. Along with the new findings, I hope our research contributes to the fusion of nanoscience and technology, along with other research areas such as biomedical fields,” said Yoon. Yoon hopes to research on nanoparticles for practical use in different fields. Yun Ji-hyun uni27@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Kim Youn-soo

2017-05 22

[General]3rd Cultural Properties Drawing Competition

On the 20th of May, Hanyang University Museum held the 3rd Cultural Properties Drawing Competition for kindergarten and primary school children. The competition was held from 2 to 5 pm. After a short tour of the museum by the curators, the children drew the most interesting cultural properties that they enjoyed seeing. The results of the competition will be notified on the museum’s webpage and phone calls will be made to the winners individually on the 29th of May. Tales of Individuals As this competition is not well known to the public, a large number of participants have either not been able to join or chose not to. Although 30 students from the lower grade and the upper grade groups were expected to join, the number totaled 18 (9 from each group) students whose parents were associated with Hanyang University (HYU). With the help of Book 21 Chunga Books, the museum was able to provide gifts for participants of the competition. Kim Young-san (left) and his big brother Kim Young-bin (right) are drawing skulls. Each student had a tale to tell in relation to their drawing. Kim Kyu-hoon (Jamhyun Primary School, Grade 4) whose mother is a professor at the Department of Nursing decided to participate in this competition after seeing the advertisement on campus. “I am drawing about the slender bronze dagger although it’s not in the HYU museum. I will draw what I want,” added Kim. Not everything in life has to make sense nor do we have to answer questions in a logical way, and Kim seems to already know a lot. “I won the grand prize in the Science Creativity Contest held at Seoul National University of Education,” said Kim. Although not all questions asked of him add up, Kim enjoys telling stories about his life so far. Kim (left) enjoys telling stories of his life and being new friends with Oh Jae-yoon (right). The winner of the 1st Cultural Properties Drawing Competition has decided to participate for the second time. Nam Yeon-seo (Jungdeok Primary School, Grade 4), who participated in the lower grade division in the first competition, has now entered in the upper grade division. “I tried to depict primitive man cooking ramen in an earthenware,” said Nam. Nam’s parents were also proud for what their child created. “It doesn’t really matter if she wins this competition or not. The important thing is that we have another memory to remember,” said Nam’s mother. Winner of the 1st competition Nam (left) with her mother. HYU museum is not utilized by the students to its full capacitiy, which is what curators feel the saddest about. “The museum is not really popular among students mostly because students feel uncomfortable going to such places, but we would like them to realize that it could be a place they can visit and take a rest,” said Choi Hyo-young (curator at HYU Museum). Not only do they hold such competitions, but the museum also provides programs for middle school and high school students with job fairs and educational programs as well. High level of interest and participation of students towards HYU Museum would certainly brighten future prospects for the museum. Kim Seung-jun nzdave94@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Moon Hana

2017-05 15 Important News

[General]Project 'You Did a Great Job !'

On a hot afternoon in May, a group of students of Hanyang (HYU) wandered around the Seoul Campus. What was noticeable was a HY-Lion (a lion character symbolizing HYU), boasting its adorable and huggable appearance. With his friends holding a trashcan and a gift box, they had a special mission of their own in mind. News H followed along their short tour around the campus. Giving people a positive message The whole team - (from the left) Kim Moses, Kim Dong-beom, Park Young-kwang, Kim Mary, and Li Mi-rae - pose for a picture. Composed of a total of 5 members, the leader of the team, Park Young-kwang (Business Administration, 4th year), decided to cosplay HY-Lion. The rest of the members were Kim Dong-beom (Electronic Engineering, 2nd year) Kang Mary (Business Administration 1st year), Kim Moses (Chinese Language & Literature, 1st year) and Lee Mi-rae (Applied Art Education, 1st year). Their project named “You did a great job” was a project initiated by a group assignment in a course called ‘Creativity and Communication’. Their group assignment was to choose one of the bucket lists of a teammate and try to actualize it. “After hearing each and every wish of our team member, the one from Kim Dong-beom, to say hi and shake hands with people passing by, was selected as the theme and goal of our project,” said Park. The team's whole purpose was to give a boost of power to people they meet during the day. One of the main reasons for initiating their project was the fact that Korea is the country with the longest working hours yet with the lowest happiness rate. “While it will be hard for us to change something very fundamental to the problem, we thought we could do something we can actually do. To visit them and encourage them and try to give them a smile,” said Park. To specify their theme, they met at every Tuesday since the middle of the March to plan their project. “We definitely had ups and downs, as it was a first time for all of us to make such kind of project, we had to spend quite a time to negotiate and decide on what to do,” said Kim Dong-beom. Through several meetings, they decided that they would give two pieces of paper to people they meet in the campus. On one, they would write one of their worst memories and rip it off to throw in the trashcan. On the other paper, people would write their happiest memories to keep in the gift box. Visiting members of HYU An employee from the Center for Business Incubation is ripping her paper off to throw in the trash can. After asking for cooperation in several offices in HYU, they visited the Global Entrepreneurship Center and Center for Business Incubation. Employees looked quite happily surprised from the sudden visit. “We are delighted to see these students coming to visit us. Not many students come to offices and I think this is great way to shorten the sense of distance between faculty members and students at HYU,” commented manager Cho Sung-eun. After touring around several offices of HYU, they decided to move to Aejeemun, the HYU subway station, exit #2, where a lot of students come and go. Even on their way to Aejeemun, a lot of students and professors welcomed HY-Lion’s handshakes. HY-Lion is shaking hands with passersby. In front of Aejeemun, HY-Lion and his teammates were busy saying hello and handing out papers to students. Quite a lot of students gathered around them to participate in the project. “I first thought HY-Lion was really cute when I first saw it. I felt quite stressful today due to my presentation but writing it down and tearing it definitely helped me feel much better,” said one student. Happy memories to be kept After a long day of working as a HY-Lion, leader of the team, Park is taking some rest. While people’s ripped bad memories will be thrown away, their precious happy memories collected in the gift box will be kept. “We decided to keep them and read through all of it. After, we will pick some of it and display in a panel to exhibit to people. Of course, with no names on it,” said Park. The rest of the team members also mentioned how it was difficult, though very rewarding. While giving people positive energy, they received the same energy from people as well. After hours of sending cheerful messages to people, the day of the team finally ended. “We hope more projects like ours will appear within campus, and if it does, we are more than willing to help,” said Park. HY-Lion with the students met in front of the Aejeemun. "We just hope our little project gave people another reason to smile today." Yun Ji-hyun uni27@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Moon Hana and Yun Ji-hyun

2017-05 14 Important News

[Academics]Production of Green Energy

Professor Lee Kun-sang of the Department of Earth Resources and Environmental Engineering is an expert in the field of earth resources. His paper, “Evaluation of CO2 injection in shale gas reservoirs with multi-component transport and geomechanical effects”, discusses a novel method of sequestrating carbon dioxide while extracting more shale gas efficiently. Professor Lee explains the findings depicted in his paper. Carbon dioxide, also known as CO2, continues to be a huge problem on the agenda nowadays. Numerous countries and environmental groups are trying to reduce CO2 emissions by imposing carbon tax. This may help reduce the CO2 emission rate but it does not actually reduce the total amount of CO2 in the air. What Lee has been studying may be a groundbreaking way to reduce CO2 in the atmosphere. The idea sparked up a few years ago when Lee and his students were funded the government through a research program to visit Pennsylvania State University in the US, that has been initiating research on this topic. The most well-known idea at the moment is to store the CO2 in the ground, but the problem with this was the economic drawbacks. Lee’s research focuses on injecting CO2 into shale reservoirs, which is a very tight sedimentary rock. Basic Diagram of CCS method. (Photo courtesy of Global CCS Institute) This method, also known as carbon capture and storage (CCS), is the act of separating CO2 from flue gases and collect them to store them underground. Just injecting CO2 into the ground results in high costs to store them, but Lee's approach not only takes care of CO2 in the air, but also allows for an easier extraction of shale gas as CO2 has a stronger tendency to absorb to shale. Simply put, CO2 increases the pressure into the methane gas while CO2 resides in the shale. All in all, CCS is economically and environmentally beneficial. Lee is continuously working to keep the natural properties of shale rock. Since it has a very meticulous feature, injecting oil or gas in them changes the properties a lot. Trying to develop the most refined model that would keep the properties of shale rock is one of Lee’s goals. Professor Lee has worked on a profitable model of reducing CO2 and collecting more methane gas that would benefit the environment. Kim Seung-jun nzdave94@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Kim Youn-soo

2017-05 02 Important News

[Academics][Researcher of the Month] Simulation of Human Movements

Professor Kwon Tae-soo. Human movements are much more intricate and complicated than it seems. Many attempts were done to portray moving human actions by computer program and animation. Those attempts were partly successful until now, yet with certain limitations. Professor Kwon Tae-soo of the Department of Computer Science & Engineering is greatly interested in simulating human motion. In his recent paper, “Momentum-Mapped Inverted Pendulum Models for Controlling Dynamic Human Motions”, he explains about how physics can be applied into animating human movement and be used in its development. Simulating human animation is a complicated business. Most of the animation we see in games and movies is based on a technical method called motion capture. Motion capture is a method of simulating motions by attaching sensors to a moving object and tracking the information of the movements, then analyzing its numerical data. However, movements of these animations have certain limits because of its foundation which merely consists of pre-captured motions. Therefore, in order to exceed this disadvantage, quite a few research was done utilizing physics into developing animation using Inverted Pendulum Model, or IPM, which analyzes human motions through controlling robots by computerized robot simulator program. Although IPM became a potentially alternative method of producing simulation of motions, it had a problem of producing unnatural movements of characters. Kwon, who was aware with this limitation of IPM, developed a new form of IPM called Momentum-Mapped Inverted Pendulum Models (MMIPM). The similarity of IPM and MMIPM is that both methods use two kinds of robot, a simple kind of robot, an upside-down kind of pendulum which is comprised of a cart and a pole, and a humanoid. Due to the difficulty of controlling a complex humanoid, the simple robot is first used. By using conversion after mapping the present state of simple robot, signals for controlling the humanoid can be calculated. The difference of the quality of movement of characters between IPM and MMIPM. (Photo courtesy of Kwon) One of the main contrasts between IPM and MMIPM is the way mapping is done. While mapping for IPM must use both the center of mass and center of pressure of the robot for mathmatical differentiation, momentum-mapping uses the center of mass. Differentiating one time instead of two is highly beneficial because the quality of signals improve. In addition, if two feet of the humanoid are above the ground, center of pressure becomes absent, mapping with conventional IPM method become impossible, whereas mapping with MMIPM is still possible. MMIPM also concentrates on modeling the changes of postures and how much the human body is tilted during performing certain actions. Therefore, because of the differences or technical improvements of MMIPM compared with IPM, expressing more natural and difficult movements can be realized. As a result, Kwon could successfully produce more natural movements of running, and complex acrobatic motions such as spinning, backflip, and handstand. Character performing a backflip. (Photo courtesy of Kwon) Character performing a handstand. (Photo courtesy of Kwon) Professor Kwon’s future studies also focus on human movements, which are reenacting motions of soft parts of the human body, such as fat. According to Kwon, the technology which is used for today’s animations and games is from a decade ago. “Although at first a game with great graphics may seem like something big. However, when you start an online game, soon you will realize that the actions of your characters are mere repetitive movements, ” said Kwon. Through his study, Kwon aspires to broaden the limits of present day game-play and animation. “My ultimate objective is enabling game characters to perform unexpected movements when players enjoy unpredictable game plays,” Kwon revealed. Jang Soo-hyun luxkari@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Choi Min-ju

2017-05 01 Important News

[General]Construction of Hanyang Career Development Center

As a leading university of employment and business, Hanyang has been doing its best to foster talented students and to contribute to convergence education. In an attempt to accomplish this objective, another step was taken by the Hanyang Institute for Talent Development Career Development Center which launched a new plan last October. In order to provide students with an open and practical space to work together with their fellow students as well as provide guidance consultation, the center has earmarked a portion of space near the HIT Building and is anticipated to open by the end of this August. The anticipated effect is to initiate early interest in one’s career path and an increased rate of employment for Hanyangians. This building is to be named by students, welcoming the most suitable name through a naming contest with prizes offered. The design of the development center which will be named by students via a contest. (Photo courtesy of Hanyang Institute for Talent Development Career Development Center) Interior Blueprint Upon entering the building and walking across the lobby, the Career Café is the first area that can be detected. It is designed to be a friendly and relaxing lounge where students can communicate freely and share their ideas. It also functions as a room for consultation and teaching while attracting visitors at the same time. Advertisements about Hanyangians’ employment and startups are also given in this room that lead to broader knowledge and perspective of the students. The room is sketched to be wide opened to maximize comfort and create an atmosphere of hospitality. The big open area boxed in red is the Career Café. (Photo courtesy of Hanyang Institute for Talent Development Career Development Center) A view of the Career Café from the lobby. (Photo courtesy of Hanyang Institute for Talent Development Career Development Center) Situating perpendicular to the Career Café is the 10 recruiting booths where employers from various corporations have a counseling session with students during recruitment season. During non-recruiment times, the booths operate as study rooms. Students can walk around the booths and take a look at the different corporations before deciding which one they want to visit. The recruiting rooms situating adjacent to the Career Café. (Photo courtesy of Hanyang Institute for Talent Development Career Development Center) A closer view of the recruiting rooms. (Photo courtesy of Hanyang Institute for Talent Development Career Development Center) Forming the peripheral edges of the recruiting rooms are consulting rooms that welcome students in need of counseling or consulting about their job or business. Delegated consultants from the Career Development Center hold consulting sessions with students in these rooms to provide guidance on their career plans. Two of the consulting rooms are designed differently from the others, putting comfort at the fore so that students can freely stimulate their creativity and ingenuity. Eight consulting rooms lining the edges of the recruiting rooms. (Photo courtesy of Hanyang Institute for Talent Development Career Development Center) A comfortable setting of the consulting room intending to stimulate creativity. (Photo courtesy of Hanyang Institute for Talent Development Career Development Center) Jeon Chae-yun chaeyun111@hanyang.ac.kr

2017-05 01 Important News

[Academics][Researcher of the Month] How ‘Fit' Are You With Your Boss? (1)

For a higher competency of a company or a corporation, factors like personality, values and goals that employees and leaders prioritize were focus of a research in management or psychology studies. It has been thought that such factors should be met between a leader and an employee for higher effectiveness in a company. Rather than determining how ‘fit’ a leader and an employee is under the standards of aforementioned aspects, there has been a new perspective suggested by Professor Shin Yu-hyung of the Department of Management. Appointed as one of the researchers of the month, her recent paper, “Does Leader-Follower Regulatory Fit Matter? The Role of Regulatory Fit in Followers’ Organizational Citizenship Behavior” discusses the two different concepts, ‘promotion focus’ and ‘prevention focus’ and how it works between a leader and an employee. From her doctoral course, Shin realized how aptitude and characterisitcs of people are important. The core of Shin’s research is one’s different strategic intentions, which can be divided into prevention focus and promotion focus. Promotion focus refers to a strategy to bear risks for positive outcome. Thus employees with promotion focus would put themselves into challenges for better results in their tasks even if they have to bear risks during the process. On the other hand, employees with prevention focus will contain themselves inside a security zone, putting their biggest effort to avoid the worst outcome. Thus, unlike the ones with promotion focus, they would not try to change the conditions in the given environment and will aim to accomplish the goals within the boundary of rules or conditions. For example, consider two college students in their 3rd year. Both of them studies hard to get better GPAs but their focus can be different. Student A with promotion focus studies hard because A wants to get higher scores to apply to a company he or she wishes. Student B with prevention focus would only study hard merely to avoid an F on his or her GPA. In the paper, Shin tried to examine and demonstrate such relevance with Organizational Citizenship Behavior (OCB), which refers to discretionary and extra-role behavior that is considered to increase overall effectiveness in an organization, a company in this case. What Shin chose was to prove it through a survey. She chose 140 leaders and 640 employees from different fields of Korean domestic companies. The questions mainly asked of one’s attitude to different focus, whether it is more toward promotion or prevention. As a result, Shin was able to witness different focus strategy each employees and their leaders take. According to the graph, the allignment of leader and follower (employee) proves the highest effectiveness of OCB. (Photo courtesy of Shin) Analysis of the survey showed several facts. First, when an employee pursues promotion focus, his or her fit with a leader showed less significance. “People with high promotion focus are the ones who tries to break a conventional frame or a box, which makes their fit with their leaders less necessary. Only their degree of the focus will determine their degree of accomplishment,” explained Shin. However, the importance of ‘fit’ was shown in the case of an employee with high prevention focus. In this case it has been proven that the more one is fit with his or her leader, the better accomplishment one can make. “As people with prevention focus tries to work most effectively within the given frame, they try to cooperate and negotiate well with others while abiding by the law, which makes the fit with their leaders more important,” said Shin. While researches on regulatory fit between leaders and employees have been done for a long time, the different perspective Shin suggested is getting credits for positive feedbacks of the paper. In the same line, Shin is working on how various styles of working can affect the outcome. In a case like where an employee is the one who tends to take more steps in completing his task while his or her leader is the one who is always chased by the dead line. As the cooperation between a leader and an employee is always important for a successful company, Shin expects the research could positively affect and motivate more innovative management studies. Shin said she will keep on researching to contribute to HYU and Korea's good brand image. Yun Ji-hyun uni27@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Kim Youn-soo

2017-04 26

[Academics]Interrogating History

History, by definition, chronicles and recounts past events of people, countries, and the world at large. It may answer the wh-questions concerning a particular event, reporting from time and place of an event to who and what were involved. However, it does not always perform an excellent job in informing us why an event occurred. Professor Carl Joergen Saxer (Division of International Studies), whose primary interest lies in political science, wanted to shed light on the unexplored domain of history, the big question of why. Saxer unfolded his curiosity about why the Nordic countries participated in the Korean War. The Big Question, Why History books state that in the 1950s, just five years after the World War 2, the Nordic countries—Denmark, Norway, and Sweden—had participated in the Korean War in the form of medical aid. Denmark and Norway had been occupied by Nazi Germany and Sweden remained neutral. Additionally, until recently, those countries had very limited knowledge about Korea, had no diplomatic relations and was located on the other side of the globe. Yet, they decided to participate in the war by supporting the country with medical supplies. At this point, a question should arise: what led the three countries to participate in a war that went on in a remote, unrecognized land that most Nordic people had never heard about? Delving into the state archives of the Nordic countries, Saxer disclosed the answer to the question. He accessed to documentations related to decision making process and examined the thought process of what led governments in the first place to participate and what led them to the decision of how to participate. As it turned out, for diplomatic reasons, the Nordic government have always emphasized on humanitarian intervention, out of moral concerns. This means their participation in the Korean War should be on account of the North Korean invasion in South Korea. However, the documents showed otherwise: it was much more of a political matter. "The national archives allowed me to access to documents that showed the decision-making process" The emphasis on the Nordic countries when it came to participating in the war was actually to do as little as possible, signifying an outside factor that urged its decision: the America. Norway and Denmark had just become members of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) and were under American pressure to defend Korea under the United Nations flag—perchance this was the reason they only joined the war by supporting the medical supplies and not combat materials. In other words, the concerns of politicians when they came to participate in the war was not so much about what was going on in the Korean peninsula but rather about the potential of the war to result in another big issue: World War 3. It was very much influenced by the Cold War in European countries that the fear arose in relation to the possible outbreak of another global disaster. Coming down to a summary, moral element intermingled with their international stance in a context of fear of potential World War 3 and insecurity of the Cold War led the Nordic countries to participate in the Korean War in the least aggressive manner. “I usually don’t research much on history as my interest is more on democracy in politics. But with this research, I was very interested in looking into the documents. I do empirical research, meaning I don’t speculate about how things should or would be in the future but rather how things were or have been. I was very interested in finding out why people act the way they do and how certain decisions are reached,” explained Saxer on his motivation of this research. "I intend to write a book on the linkage between foreign policy making and domestic politics in middle powers." Jeon Chae-yun chaeyun111@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Choi Min-ju

2017-04 23

[General]HY Yellow Jacket Volunteering Program

Waiting in the long line filled with boredom, yet anticipating their names to be called, patients and their guardians may feel alone, even adrift in pitch-black darkness. Hospital visits by patients and their families is like an arduous journey, passing through doctor’s office, examination rooms and even operating rooms. A lot of staff, including doctors and nurses, are the ones who help patients and their families get around the unfamiliar hospital environment. Therefore, medical knowledge is not only what doctors learn through their six years at university. It is necessary for future doctors to experience the detour that patients have to take, albeit indirectly. A volunteer program for the Department of Pre-Medicine freshmen HY Yellow Jacket Program, a volunteer program at the Hanyang Medical Center, Seoul, launched on March 8th, is for the Department of Pre-Medicine freshmen. Initiated last year through MOU with the Medical Center and supported by its social welfare team, the program was planned by the professors of the College of Medicine. “Students learn to sympathize with patients and their guardians through volunteer work during their visits to the hospital.” said Kim Hyun-young, chairman of the Department of Pre-medicine and College of Medicine. 115 freshmen are divided into four groups in the volunteering program. Each group of freshmen visits the hospital one by one for four weeks. There are about 12 members in each group, placed in various places in the hospital. “We, as student volunteers help patients and visitors and aid each department of the hospital if they need an extra hand. We volunteer at different areas every week. Before volunteering, we get familiar to many places in the hospital and learn about our duties from nurses, ” said Kim Hyun, president of the Department of Pre-medicine student council, who volunteered in the HY Yellow Jacket Program last year. Pre-Medicine student helping a visitor in the hospital in Hanyang Medical Center. (Photo courtesy of Hanyang Medical Center) The students spend 16 hours of volunteer work, providing directions to different areas of the hospital to patients, helping people check in, and calling out the names of the patients who are ready for their appointments. They also organize materials used in the hospital under nurses' instructions, and sometimes even help transport the patients by hospital beds who can’t walk by themselves. Since the students are freshmen, the program does not include any medical field work. However, students are able to observe what makes patients feel uncomfortable and causings difficulties during their visit and stay. They also are aware of the many other staff members apart from doctors and nurses, such as occupational therapists who aid patients’ rehabilitation, and medical technologists who perform and analyze medical examinations. Shaping true leaders of the hospital through volunteer work Previously, no notable program in the College of Medicine existed that allowed students to volunteer in the hospital. “Although the HY Yellow Jacket Program isn't compulsory, every freshman joins in the program,” explained Kim Hyun-young. According to him, freshmen are the participants of the volunteer program because they have more time compared to their seniors. In addition, freshmen are given a chance to think about the concept of a ‘doctor’ as their career choice with what they witness in the hospital before constructing a more concrete plan or frame for their future. “College of Medicine students spend most of their time studying or listening to lectures in classrooms. Participating in HY Yellow Jacket Program, I could imagine my future, seeing nurses and doctors caring for patients. I could learn about various situations in a hospital as well,” said Kim Hyun. Although some students feel shy and have trouble approaching patients, most of them gradually become knowledgeable about the visitors' needs and learn to empathize with them through the volunteering program. Although doctors' responsibilities comprise of the most important duties in a hospital, leading the team in a cooperative manner and understanding patients are a must. Through the HY Yellow Jacket Program, future doctors of Hanyang can learn to practice medicine with love, indeed. Pre-Medicine Freshmen learn about various works done in a hospital, and empathizing with patients in through HY Yellow Jacket Program. (Photo courtesy of Hanyang Medical Center) Jang Soo-hyun luxkari@hanyang.ac.kr

2017-04 23

[General]Winner of IDTC Dwell & Share Competition

On March 27th, the 2nd Dwell & Share Competition hosted by the Incheon Development & Transformation Corporation collected submissions and announced the winner on March 31st. Ji Soo-yeon (Division of Architecture, ’17) won the participation award, beating 771 teams that competed in the contest. Next Step for Urban Steps Ji's work was "Next Step for Urban Steps". She remarked that she had always been interested in multiplex housing due to the intimate atmosphere it holds. “Since the topic was strongly related to my graduation work, I felt quite lucky to participate in this competition,” said Ji. “I had more time to prepare for the competition even though I worked alone.” Ji also won the grand prize at the graduation exhibition, adding to her streak of fortune. “I feel so honored to have won two prizes in a row. I did not expect such great results, but I guess my work was well received which makes me proud,” added Ji. "Next Step for Urban Steps" (Photo courtesy of Ji) After having chosen Haebangchon in Yongsan as the site, Ji wanted to show the transition from studio to apartment in a multiplex housing. Haebangchon got its name from the Japanese colonial period as refugees gathered around to this place after the liberation from being a colony ('haebang' means liberation and 'chon' means town). The main theme of Ji’s project was to build the multiplex housing around 108 stairs, which represent Haebangchon. “I planned the first floor to be a social place like a library or a gallery, and the 24th floor to be individual housings sharing a kitchen. Each building would hold about eight households, and there would be shared workrooms including a front yard,” explained Ji. Ji explains the concept of her work. Some of the difficulties Ji faced was building up the multiplex building on such a small limited site. “In order for people to walk around and live, there’s so much to consider, and it was difficult to plan,” said Ji. “Since I was to build the area from scratch, I carefully tried to consider ventilation and lighting.” Next Step for Ji Architecture has been Ji's dream from an early age. “I always enjoyed looking around different houses. Eventually, I got the chance to build what I had planned in my mind,” explained Ji. It is not always easy to be an architect. “Listening to the critiques of professors just tears you down sometimes. Our projects get denied after days of contemplation, and we needed to start all over again.” What gets Ji going again is the joy of achieving the result that she was hoping for. “It’s like a puzzle sometimes. Once I get the last piece into the right place, and I can explain things logically, it gets to me. All that time I had spent would be for this great result in front of me,” added Ji. Ji wants to be an architect who is of practical help to others. Ji now awaits for the application results to graduate schools abroad. “I don’t expect good results since I had so little time to prepare my portfolio. I guess I will study English a little more and get my work ready,” said Ji. Hoping this opportunity will bring her positive results for her career, Ji ultimately wants to provide realistic help. “As we live in buildings all our lives, there must be some positive effects that buildings can give us. I’m not much of a architect that designs fancy buildings, but I could be of help providing what’s necessary in our daily lives,” concluded Ji. Kim Seung-jun nzdave94@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Kim Youn-soo