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2018-01 14

[Academics]Cleaning the Air, Even of Weapons

Environmental conservation and weapon disarmament may seem to have no relevancy. However, Professor Kim Ki-hyun of Department of Civil & Environmental Engineering, in his long battle against environmental degradation, has found a common ground on which both fields could find a way to advance towards their goals. His recent research paper, “Metal-organic frameworks as media for the catalytic degradation of chemical warfare agents” introduces the utilization of metal-organic frameworks (MOF), previously used to filter pollutants in the air, to purify the air of toxins emitted from chemical weapons. Kim has already published a number of paper regarding the utilization of metal-organic framework. The key technology behind this research is the MOF. It is essentially a collection of multi dimensional sockets created when linking metals through the means of organic compounds. These nano-scaled sockets act as traps that capture undesired materials in the air. Kim explained that a crucial field of focus in creating MOFs is to use the smallest amount of substance possible to create the largest number of sockets. In practice, there are several options through which it could be put to use, one such option is the absorption mechanism, which is collecting as much pollutants as possible and disposing them. Another option is the catalytic treatment, which collects harmful substances and releases them in a safe form. Kim explained that there are two types of research. One involves numerous experiements and analysis, attempting to create or discover something new, and another tests out theories of other researchers and expands existing studies in depth. He explained that this research fell into the latter category, also known as a review research. “In a large frame, it’s part of a global effort to disarm weapons of warfare. This specific research began on the basis of environmental development technology, which expanded to include harmful materials from chemical weapons.” Kim added that the research came to being when several substances included in environmental pollutants were discovered to overlap from those of chemical weapons. Of the hundreds of existing research on environmental development and disarmament of chemical weapons, he took the revelant ones and “reviewed” them on the basis of his research. Kim explained that working to save the environment had been his calling since before becoming a professor. In the big picture, Kim explained that this study is just one of the many existing illustrations of how MOFs could be adapted and utilized. In the process of attempting to make the air free of pollution, a calling that Kim has had for over 30 years, the MOF was a crucial discovery that supported many of his researches. At the most initial stage, the MOF was designed to capture and reduce CO2 emission in the atmosphere. Now it is used in a number of fields, used for transporting medical substances, handling radioactive materials, and of course, to purify the air of certain substances. It is also applied in the actual market, with Kim having worked with industries of automobiles, electric cigarettes, and farms to eliminate undesired scent in their products and facilities. This research was part of a review to assess the potential scale of MOF utilization. "I think that 'boys be ambitious' is the appopriate phrase for students today" At the request for a word of advice for students of Hanyang, he referred to an old quote, “boys be ambitious”. He explained that it was sad for him to see students so desperate to begin a career and find a job right after graduation. In his days as a university student, many people sought admission to graduate school, with a number of people aspiring to become a professor. However, he now feels that most of the graduate school students in his major these days consist of foreigners, and only a handful of Korean students. Kim thinks that many young students today lack a long term planning of their lives. “I would like to see a little more amibiton from my students”. Lee Changhyun pizz1125@hanyang.ac.kr Photo by Kang Cho-hyun

2018-01 08 Headline News

[Academics][Excellent R&D] Big Data and the Key to Handling Them

In the society where social networking is becoming more and more inseparable from people, an ever-increasing number of users are getting involved. As a consequence, the ocean of big data in corresponding area is expanding its capacity, and there has been a need to efficiently analyze and organize the data. In his Big Data Science Laboratory, Kim Sang-wook (Department of Computer Science) has been continuously researching the topic. In his recent paper “High-performance graph data processing on a single machine,” Kim has proposed a method to increase the performance of data processing and to efficiently arrange the mass of data. A graph or a network is a complex arrangement of nods and edges, which are the components of an online world such as its users and webpages and the relationships they have, respectively. In a social network, for example, each user will be labeled as a nod and the relationships that users have with other users or webpages will be marked as edges. “Where could this graph be used? Numerous types of data could be modeled in the form of this graph. For example, Facebook users and their friends, bloggers and their neighbors, and the recommender system of search engines such as Youtube, Amazon and more are all related to the graph of nods and edges.” Depending on who views what how many times or which page receives the most views, weights could be added onto the edge between the user and the page, zooming out of which will form a complex web of a graph. Big data is usually calculated in a matrix, the process which is made more efficient by Kim. (Photo courtesy of Kim) How Kim made the graph data processing more efficient is by creating three constructive approaches. First, he made matrix multiplication of data simpler and easier by balancing the load over each thread blocks of the matrix. When there is a poor balancing of load input in each row of the matrix, the multiplication process could take a long time and the performance might not be excellent. With the balanced threads of the matrix, however, even distribution of workloads would resolve this problem and it would be much less time-consuming compared to the previous method. Second, Kim created a graph engine, which is a storing software that handles data in a productive manner. In order to analyze a graph, the data must be saved in a disc first. In doing so, the tool that helps the disc to save the data more efficiently is the graph engine, which Kim proposed in his paper. “The strength of our laboratory is that we research on two aspects of data. By researching the performance-wise aspect of the data and also the analytical aspect, we leave no chance of missing a single detail of matter.” Thirdly, Kim introduced a placement algorithm that could simplify the arrangement of nods in a graph engine. Previously, when a graph undergoes a process of analysis in a graph engine, the data was put in the exact same order as it entered. Clusters of irrelevant nods could cause a delay in the data processing, which Kim solved by discovering that by sorting the nods of similar traits together, the overall performance of graph processing could show a big difference. With the same data, different outcomes could be derived by finding out the advantageous groupings of nods. With his current research of graph engine and graph modeling, he could use them as stepping stones to move onto his next research. Kim’s future research is directed toward community detection and recommender systems. With the modeled graph of data, analysis of the data could easily be made and the members of a social community with similar interests could conveniently be detected. On a similar note, a recommender system could be improved by analyzing what a user likes, clicks, views, buys, or prefers with the graph: a more accurate recommender system could be developed. With the building blocks he has worked on, Kim will be building on more as he carries on his future research. "Characteristics of the data could be figured out by analyzing the graphs." Jeon Chae-yun chaeyun@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Kang Cho-hyun

2018-01 04

[Event]Heavenly Winter at South Korea with Hanyangian Angels

The second HIWS (Hanyang International Winter School) drew the curtains open on December 28 of 2017 with the orientation for 300 international students from all over the world. For two weeks, students will be attending classes from HYU along with various cultural programs that the OIA (Office of International Affairs) and its HIWS volunteers, ‘Wingels’ (Winter Angels) have prepared. To celebrate the new year with the international students that are not spending the last day of 2017 with their family, the OIA and the Wingels organized the year-end party on December 31 of 2017. News H paid a visit to celebrate the new year with the HIWS participants. Wingels in Hanbok are posing with international students before the party. Festivity and energy One of the main events of the HIWS program was the year-end party which nearly all students, volunteers, and OIA staff participated. “This event was planned four months ahead in order to create an environment where all international students can become friends,” explained Park Ji-young of the OIA. As the party was on the fourth day of the HIWS program, there were various activities and games that required friendship and cooperation. HYU's dance team and Park Min-ji (Applied Music) are performing K-Pop music at the party. "Pop the balloons together and become friends altogether!" Beginning with the welcoming words from the OIA’s chief manager Lee Eun-ji, cheerful dance performances by HYU’s dance team and beautiful songs sung by Park Min-ji (Applied Music, 1) followed. With the lively hosting from the two emcees, Emile (Division of International Studies, 4) and Park Ji-young of the OIA, the party began. Main activities consisted of a quiz on HYU and Korea, balloon games, a dance battle, limbo, and learning K-pop songs. Two students from ‘Wingels’ also performed magic shows and EDM yoga to entertain their international friends. The final countdown to greet 2018 took place at the party at midnight where all students, ‘Wingels,’ and staffs gathered around with pounding hearts. “I was always interested in South Korean culture. I am extremely glad that HYU prepared such a great event for me,” laughed out Sheng Zien from Singapore. As 2018 began, all students returned to their residences to prepare for upcoming classes and cultural experiences for the remaining two weeks. Sheng Zien (middle) from Singapore is looking forward to more cultural activities that HIWS provides. Short, but fruitful program HIWS was first initiated on December of 2016 with around 100 international applicants for the program. Within only two years, the HIWS gained its popularity and acknowledgement for its fruitful cultural activities, guaranteed education, and interacting environment that OIA fosters. “The reasons behind the sudden increase in the number of participants are the high-quality lectures from diverse fields and trending cultural experiences,” explained Park. The lectures that international HIWS students can take are varied from science, business management, and literature to Taekwondo, K-Beauty class, and ceramics. Also, there are more cultural experience programs waiting for the HIWS participants, such as skiing or Nanta performances. Due to the grand size of the program, the main concern of the OIA was how to organize all events safely for students. However, due to the help of ‘Wingels,’ the start of the HIWS was successfully carried out. “There are a total of 25 Wingels, and each of them leads a group of international students. Their role is to introduce HYU and Korea while bringing the program to a conclusion safely,” said Park. “I am planning to participate in the exchange student program next year, and working as a Wingel helps me a lot to adjust in an international environment that I never belonged to before,” smiled Jang Hyun-ju (Economics and Finance, 3). "Happy new year!" Despite the brief period of the semester, HIWS is swiftly being acknowledged as one of the best winter school programs in South Korea. Global students still have two more weeks left to enjoy and learn more about Korea and various majors! International students interested in HIWS can view more information by clicking on the link found here. Kim Ju-hyun kimster9421@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Choi Min-ju

2018-01 03

[Academics][Researcher of the Month] Calculating the Effects of the English Rule and American Rule

Have you ever lost a lawsuit? There are two ways to resolve the financial issues concerning legal costs after the resolution. The first method is called the English Rule, where the loser of a lawsuit pays the winner’s legal fees. The other one is the American Rule, where each party handles their own legal cost. Since the 1990s, there has been a general consensus among economists that the former improves the quality of a lawsuit and reduces trial costs. Yoon Jung-mo (Professor, Department of Economics & Finance) was the one to propose the question, ‘is it really?’ in his recent article, ‘Estimating the Effects of the English Rule on Litigation Outcomes.’ When asked if he has anything to tell his pupils, Yoon said, "you are all doing excellent, so I wish you can stop worrying," with a warm smile on his face. Every government aims to reduce the number of lawsuits, especially Korea and the United States. The increased number of court cases lead to increased government and societal spending on legal institutions and its personnel. The key to amend such issues is to reduce the real number of law suits to alleviate the burden of the court and increase the case quality, which is determined by the chance of a plaintiff winning the case and the amount of the settlement. Therefore, according to the long research in the economics field that concluded the English Rule, a lot of people argue for the rule. Currently, Korea is running based on the American Rule, but the law limits the amount of money that can be covered by the loser of the case. The prevalent textbook conclusion is mostly derived from the comparison of the Florida case, where they switched from the American Rule to the English Rule in 1980 and then flipped back in 1985. Because measuring the economic impact of a legal system can sometimes look like comparing apples to oranges, the case of Florida provided the perfect background for legal economists to analyze the impact. Yoon mentioned that there are two main significances that the paper proposes. First is that there are more proofs accumulated after the 1990s when the consensus was initially made. The initial paper studies the cases before 1980 and cases between 1980 to 1985. However, it neglected the cases after the second change of the rule, which could have critical impact to the interpretation. Also, Yoon and his co-author implemented a new way of making a conclusion. Traditionally, the economic impact is measured and reported as a fixed number. However, this cannot entail all the complex probabilities behind the result. Using the bound analysis method, researchers can predict the best and worse case scenarios and give a range of possible influences. The second significance is that Yoon and his co-author took the cases that were settled during the process into account. As only a few litigations continue to the very end of the judicial process, it is very important to consider the changed behavior of people according to the increased or decreased amount of pressure resulting from the verdict. Yoon is enthusiastically giving an explanation about his paper. Yoon’s scrutinized analysis, however, contradicts what has been believed for a long time. When it comes to the trial outcomes, the range derived from the bound analysis does not signify any relevance between the change of legal system and the trial cost. It does increase the amount of settlement, while decreasing the number of settled cases. “The hardest part of continuing such rigorous research was to overcome the constant skepticism,” said Yoon. According to him, it takes a long time for a researcher to complete a paper and for the paper to be accepted in a journal or presented in a conference. Believing in himself and moving forward regardless of the incredulity, Yoon will continue further to conduct research. Kim So-yun dash070@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Kang Cho-hyun

2017-12 28

[Performance]Hanyang Made Remarkable Achievements in This Year's National Examinations Results

Hanyang University has achieved remarkable results in this year's national examinations. The excellent outcome of the three examinations have been provided below for the bar exam, civil service exam (technical post), and civil service examination (administrative post). ▶ 7 Hanyang students passed the final bar exam: ranked 2nd in nation. On the 7th of November, the Ministry of Justice announced 55 finalists for the 2017 59th Bar Examination. Hanyang University produced seven successful applicants: 12.7% of the total of the applicants and ranked second, trailing only Seoul National University (13 applicants). Hanyang, which occupied fifth place last year with 6 successful applicants (5.5%), jumped to a double-digit percentage this year and rose to 2nd place, showing the most notable results in this last bar exam. Most notably, the oldest candidate, Park Jung Hyun, who is a 45-year-old graduate (Laws 92), gained public attention. ▶ 15 Hanyang students passed civil service exam (technical post): ranked 2nd in nation. Of the 73 people who passed the 2017 civil service exam (technical post), which was announced on the 13th of December, 15 successful applicants are from Hanyang, ranking in 2nd place. There were 16 applicants (21.9%) from Seoul National University, followed by Hanyang University with 15 applicants (20.5%). Last year, the number was 19 candidates and occupied first place with Seoul National University. Most notably in this year's civil service exam (technical post), Hanyang proudly displayed the "Hanyang University of Engineering" with immense pride and distinction by producing the most successful applicants with four parts such as chemistry, machinery, architecture, electricity, etc., excluding civil engineering. The best students from each part are as follows: Jeon Eui-gun (Building Engineering 08) in architecture, Kwon Young-eun (Mechanical Engineering 13) in machinery, Park Sung-yeol (Electricity and Bio Engineering 12) in electricity, Jo Won-dam (Chemical Engineering and Biotechnology 14). ▶ 16 Hanyang students passed the civil service examination (administrative post): ranked 5th in the nation. Of the 275 final successful applicants (247 nationwide recruitment, 28 local recruitment) from the 2017 civil service examination (administrative post), published on the 7th of November, 16 candidates were from Hanyang University, ranking 5th. According to the results analyzed by the Law Journal, the number of successful applicants from Seoul National University were 100 (36.4%), followed by 36 from Yonsei University (13.1%), 35 from Korea (12.7%), 26 from Sungkyunkwan University (9.5%), 16 from Hanyang University (5.8%), each 8 applicant (2.9% each ) from Sogang · Ewha Womans University, 7 from Kukuk universities (2.5%), 6 from Kyung Hee University (2.1%), JoonAng University · KAIST (1.8% each), etc, in order. Looking at the applicants in each part, Hanyang University was the largest in the national general administration (8 people), and the local general administration (5 people) was also a large number. In addition, 1 applicant each was passed in parts, including international trade, legal administration and prosecutors, etc. Notably, Kang Hye-rim (Policy Studies 11) was the most successful applicant, displaying Hanyang University's excellence through her achievement.

2017-12 27

[Event]Achievements Beyond Border

For international students studying in Korea, the end-of-the-year and new-years period could be somewhat depressing. As these moments are usually spent with families, some homesickness and nostalgia is quite understandable. To cater to these members of Hanyang, the Office of International Affairs (OIA) has hosted an end-of-the-year party to celebrate the past year and appreciate the foreign members of our school. The festivities The event, officially advertised as the 2017 Year-end Party, was held in the Grace Hall of our Alumni Building on December 19. It started off with a huge buffet, catering to nearly 170 participants of the party. For well over an hour, students enjoyed a wide array of delicious trays. Foreign students as well as faculty members of the OIA gathered around assigned seats and spent time, much like families at dinner tables, sharing stories and laughing, while eating great food. The party really began to kick off after the meal with a long array of recreational activities prepared by the OIA and the Global Saranghandae. The Global Saranghandae is the official international ambassador of Hanyang, marking this year as the 8th year of their activities. Members of the Global Saranghandae not only took part in preparing for the event, they also hosted the majority of the program, with each host speaking Korean, English, and Chinese to better facilitate the event. Games such as rock-paper-scissors, guessing the name of a song, and dancing activities were held to grasp the audiences’ attention and bring liveliness to the hall. Kang Yuni, the senior manager at the OIA was enthusiastically applauded by the audience after her speech, illustrating how devoted she had been to the foreign students of Hanyang. A congratulatory speech was given by the senior manager of the International Admissions Department, Kang Yuni. She took her time to congratulate the graduating members of the foreign students and wished them good fortune in their future journeys. After the speech, there was a cake cutting ceremony by the graduating members to celebrate their achievements together. After the formalities of the event, a long list of performances continued through the night. The performances were prepared by foreign students as well as our global ambassadors. There were carol singing, traditional dancing, traditional Korean music, modern dancing, and so on. There were also raffles and prize giving games between the performances, keeping the audiences focused and thoroughly entertained. At the end of the party, raffles were picked by each faculty member of the OIA, congratulating students who received a prize. The wide variety of performances well captured the value of the event: embracing cultural diveristy. The stories of the participants “Fun” and “meaningful” were the two most common words that foreign students used to describe their feelings at the end of the event. After a round of interviews with some of the participants, it was clear that the party was a big success. Von Chan (Division of International Studies, ‘13), “I really like the event. The fondest memory that I have of Hanyang was the group MT that I went to with international students during my first year of school. They have all graduated now, so they couldn’t attend today, but I still keep in touch with them.” Ahmed Mansoor (Department of Medicine, ‘11), graduating after five and a half years from Hanyang, answered that he could not choose a specific memorable moment here, as he had so much fun every semester. “There were wonderful events every semester, and I enjoyed it so much here. I will miss Korea forever.” Omar Javaid (Department of Civil Engineering, ‘14) “It was a very good event. Especially because our friends from Pakistan could be with us here. It was very kind of the office to notify us of events like this. Especially for the graduating students, as this is their last moments here, this type of celebration will definitely be a special memory for them.” In addition to the students, the faculty members of the OIA also expressed great approval for the party. They felt extremely proud to see foreign students voluntarily signing up and performing on stage and were moved by their passion. They also wanted to express the deepest gratitude and congratulations to the students graduating this year. One room for improvement that they discovered this year was the difficulty in full participation. As there were more people than expected, people at the back of the room found it difficult to take part in raffle events and games. The OIA promised for an improved event in the coming year. For foreign students looking to take part in the year-end party for 2018, the event will be advertised on the OIA website as well as individual e-mails to foreign students. Those wishing to attend can do so by purchasing a ticket from the department office of the OIA, located on the second floor of the International Department Building. Graduating students can receive a ticket for free. Lee Chang-hyun pizz1125@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Lee Jin-myung

2017-12 26

[Academics]Insensibility of Hosting the Olympics and Its Hidden Negative Impacts

When the IOC (International Olympic Committee) officially announced Pyeongchang, South Korea as the host of the 23rd Olympic Winter games on July 6 of 2011, the whole nation was overwhelmed with joy. However, where does the joy and glory arise from? Despite all of the positive economic effects that hosting the Olympics produces, there are also negative opportunity costs and hidden expenses. Professor Ahn Yong-do of the Division of International Studies reveals the hidden costs of hosting the Olympics that the national media do not promote through his paper: “The Leontief Matrix, the Keynesian Cross, and Economic Insensibility of Hosting the Olympics: A Survey of the Korean Experience.” Ahn analyzes the hidden opportunity costs of hosting the Olympics through his paper. There are various feasibility studies (an assessment of the practicality of a proposed national plan) to evaluate the benefits and costs of hosting mega-events like the Olympics, Asian Games, and World Cup. For example, state-run research institutes use the Leontief Matrix or Keynesian Cross models to analyze the costs and benefits of hosting such events. Leontief Matrix is an input-output model which predicts the proper level of production of goods and services while the Keynesian Cross describes the relationship between an aggregate demand and the GDP (Gross Domestic Product). However, there are extensive flaws in such research methods, which Ahn depicts. “Such research methods are extremely inappropriate for national research institutes to utilize when predicting the benefits and costs of mega-events like hosting the Olympics. These events are macroeconomic, while the methods mentioned above are a closed-system and microscopic,” explained Ahn. Along with its problems of economic scope, the data accumulated by such research is exceedingly outdated and are also exorbitant to run the test. “The best option is to utilize the holistic cost-benefit analysis as a feasibility test which discovers and calculates all the hidden opportunity costs of hosting such events,” said Ahn. The most important criteria to consider when deciding to host an event in accordance with the national budget is the long-term productivity of the social overhead capital. “Let’s assume that we have a limited budget in our nation and we can either choose to build childcare facilities in a number of companies or to host the Olympics. Unlike what the media promotes, an increase in the GDP and job creation effects are merely similar between those two activities. Then, considering the long-term effects, obviously building childcare centers would be more plausible,” explained Ahn. Hosting mega-events like this year's Olympic games is not practical in the long-run, according to Ahn. Ahn also described another real-life example from the 2002 FIFA World Cup that proves macroeconomic risks in hosting mega-events. “In order to host the World Cup, South Korea constructed 10 stadiums in Sangam-dong that still require the national budget of 5 billion won as a fixed cost annually. However, when citizens use the airport highway, we have to spend our own money at the tollgate to support its construction costs which the government must have secured as its mandate budget. Comparing these two incidents, building an airport highway is more productive than hosting the World Cup in the long-run since we do not utilize the stadium as much as we demand highway usage,” described Ahn. The journey to produce this paper was arduous according to Ahn. Because the contents of the paper criticize the media and the government and their behaviors of covering people’s eyes, the procedure to find data to disprove the governmental decision was difficult. “I had to discover evidence for this paper through sometimes unofficial, desperate ways since the national research institutes would not provide the data passively. Thus, my research began in 2002 and was finally brought to a conclusion, just recently,” reminisced Ahn. Even though Ahn’s major is business management, his passion towards economics is extensive. “I am not an economist, but an economic learner. Economics is the most logical study in political science subjects which maintains my passion to reach forward,” said Ahn. Currently, Ahn’s goal is to produce his own version of books on the principles of economics in a groundbreaking way, similar to Paul Samuelson. “Students of Hanyang University are intelligent and passionate. But, I hope they stay out of the library and experience real life, which is the source of creativity!” Kim Ju-hyun kimster9421@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Kim Ju-hyun

2017-12 25

[General]Finding Facilities

“I know it’s somewhere, but where is it? I can’t remember!” “Let’s look at the campus map.” “Oh, that’s too much work. Forget it.” Have you and your friends ever had this conversation? For those who want to go to a café or a convenience store or need to find a place to study but cannot recall the exact location, then this article will be the perfect helper. Where is my caffein? All the cafes on campus are marked on the map. Everyone seems to grab a cup of coffee in the morning to wake themselves up from sleepy mornings. In Hanyang campus, caffeine and other delicious drinks are always there to rescue sleepy students. Starting from the subway station, café CNN is open from 8:30 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. during weekdays and from 9:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m. during weekends. Coming out of the Aejeemun, in Hanyang Plaza, there are four places to pick a drink from: The first is Twosome Place which opens at 7:30 in the morning and closes at 9:30 p.m. during weekdays and is open from 8:30 a.m. to 8:30 p.m. during weekends. The second place is CoffeeA which is open from 7:30 a.m. to 9:00 p.m. during the semester and from 7:30 a.m. to 8:30 p.m. during vacations. The third place, Coffee Bay is open from 8:00 a.m. to 8:30 p.m. during the semester and from 9:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. during vacations. Located on the second floor is the fourth and final place, Brow Nabi which is open from 8:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m. during the semester and from 8:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. during vacations. Additionally, right behind Hanyang Plaza is the Student Union Building, harboring Café Grazie which is open from 8:00 a.m. to 8:30 p.m. during weekdays and from 8:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. on Saturdays (closed on Sundays and holidays). Moving a little upward to the amphitheater, Café Tiamo gives out an aromatic coffee smell. They open from 8:30 a.m. to 9:00 p.m. on weekdays during the semester, from 9:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m. on Saturdays during the semester, and to 6:00 p.m. on Sundays during the semester. During vacation periods, Café Tiamo is open from 9:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m. on weekdays, from 11:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. on Saturdays, and from 11:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. on Sundays. Moving a little more upwards, in front of the Paiknam Library is another Café Tiamo available from 7:30 a.m. to 9:00 p.m on weekdays and from 8:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m. on Saturdays during the semester: during the vacation period, it is open from 8:00 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. on weekdays and from 8:30 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. on Saturdays. On the outer ring of the campus, other cafes are also available: Café Dopio on the third floor of the FTC building (8:30 a.m. to 7:30 p.m. on weekdays, from 9:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. on Saturdays), Café Queue on the third floor of IT/BT Building (from 8:30 a.m. to 8:30 p.m. on weekdays, from 10:30 a.m. to 5:30 on Saturdays), Café Namu on the first floor of Student Residence Building II (8:30 a.m. to 7:30 p.m. on weekdays and from 9:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. during semesters and from 8:30 a.m. to 7:00 p.m. on weekdays and from 9:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. on weekends during vacations), and Café Pandorothy on B1 floor of the Humanities Building (9:00 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.). Getting into the inner side of the campus, another café is located on the B1 floor of Haengwon Park (open from 8:30 a.m. to 7:30 p.m. on weekdays and from 8:30 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. on weekends during semesters and from 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. on weekdays during vacations), and another is located on the first floor of the Cyber University (from 8:00 a.m. to 8:30 p.m. on weekdays). The Amphitheater Cafe The College of Humanities Cafe I need a quick snack! All the yellow marks represent convenience stores. The green are PC rooms. For those who study overnight on campus, CU convenience stores are open 24 hours in front of the Paiknam Library and in the Advanced Materials and Chemical Engineering Building. Other CU stores are on the first floors of the Student Residence Building I and II, both open from 8:00 a.m. to 00:30 a.m. on weekdays, from 9:00 a.m. to 00:30 a.m. on weekends, and from 8:00 a.m. to 2:00 a.m. everyday, respectively. Another CU in Haengwon Park is open from 8:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m. on weekends and from 8:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. on weekends during semesters and from 8:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. on weekdays only during vacations. The two E-Marts on campus are located in the Humanities Building (from 8:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m. during weekdays and from 8:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. on Saturdays) and in the amphitheater (from 8:00 a.m. to 10:00 p.m. on weekdays and from 9:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m. on weekends). The only Seven-Eleven is on the second floor of the Cyber University II (from 8:00 a.m. to 10:00 p.m., Monday thru Saturday). On the fourth floor of the Olympic Gymnasium, there is a small store open from 8:30 a.m. to 7:30 p.m. on weekdays during semesters only. Lastly, in the subway station, IGa Mart is open from 6:00 a.m. to 11:00 p.m. on weekdays and from 6:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m. on Saturdays. The Amphitheater Convenience Store Search and type PC rooms that students can freely use are available throughout the campus: beginning on the second floor of the IT/BT Building (from 9:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. on weekdays), in the Business Building, B2 floor (from 9:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m. from Monday to Friday), in the Economics and Finance Building, third floor (from 9:00 a.m. to 7:30 p.m.), in the Engineering Building I and II, third and fourth floors, in the Natural Sciences Building, first floor (from 9:00 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.), in the College of Education, second floor (from 9:00 a.m. to 10:00 p.m. on weekdays), in the Humanities Building, first floor (from 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.), in the College of Social Sciences, second floor (from 10:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.), in the College of Human Ecology, fourth floor (from 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. with an hour clear-out time at noon), in the College of Policy Science, first floor (from 9:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. during semesters and from 8:30 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. during vacations), in the Music Hall II, second floor (from 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. on weekdays during semesters and from 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. on weekdays during vacations), and finally, in the Law Building III, first floor (from 8:30 a.m. to 8:30 p.m. on weekdays, from 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. during semesters, and from 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. on weekdays during vacations). The College of Humanities PC room Work, work, work Fitness centers and study halls are marked in blue and red, respectively. Meals and coffee are important but so is exercising. Here is the list of fitness centers on campus: (1) Student Union Building’s Health and Sweat (from 6:30 a.m. to 10:00 p.m. on weekdays and from 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. on Saturdays), (2) Olympic Gymnasium (from 3:00 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. on weekdays only, only available when the weight training class is not in session), (3) Haengwon Park, (4) Student Residence Hall V (from 10:00 a.m. to 10:00 p.m. everyday, for dormitory residents only), (5) Student Residence Hall II (from 7:00 a.m. to 11:00 p.m. everyday for dormitory residents only). In addition, the basketball court next to Haengwon Park is open to everyone, while the neighboring clayed tennis court is only for staff. The grass court may be used by students with a reservation (available from 8:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. for two hours per person). Health and Sweat in the Student Union Building. Health and Sweat Last but not least Study halls are what most students should be interested in the most. There are study halls here and there, around every corner in Hanyang campus. Starting with the International Building, the IT/BT Building, the Natural Sciences Building, the Medicine Building (for the department students only), the Medicine Building II, the Engineering Building I, and the Human Ecology Building, there are many more to visit. In the Policy Science Building, the Business Building, and the Economics and Finance Building (during exam weeks only), the study halls are open 24 hours. In the College of Education, the study hall opens early in the morning until midnight (7:15 a.m. to 00:00). In the College of Social Sciences, the study hall is open from 7:00 a.m. to 11:00 p.m. Lastly, in the Humanities Building, the running hours are from 8:00 a.m. to 11:00 p.m. Study room in the Humanities Building Study hall in the Humanities Building. Study hall in the College of Social Sciences A cup of coffee in the morning, quick snacks in between classes, the PC room in the afternoon for assignments, the fitness center in the evenings for health, and the study hall at night for studying are all important parts of a student's life here on campus. Stay convenient and academic! Jeon Chae-yun chaeyun111@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Kang Cho-hyun Design by Cho Eun-bi

2017-12 21

[Performance]National&World University Rankings in 2017

Hanyang University showed superior results by recording a rise over the previous year in national and interantional university evaluation during 2017. The results of this year made by Hanyang University are provided below including ‘Nature index’, ‘QS World University Rankings’, "JoongAng Ilbo University Rankings", and ‘Dong-A Ilbo Youth Dream University Rankings’ of the world's top university evaluation. ▶ Nature index 1st in nation, 23th in the world In the ‘2017 Nature Index Innovation’ announced in September by Nature Publishing Group’ (NPG), the global science publishing group, Hanyang University ranked 1st in nation and 23rd in the word a patent cited index(Normalized Lens influence) category ▲ ‘2017 Nature index Innovation’ (Nature index website capture image) The Normalized Lens Influence Metric is an indicator that shows how one paper is used in patents. The higher the score is, the more papers published at that institution are evaluated to reflect much on this practical technology development. Hanyang University ranked 1st in nation, with 25,633 papers published from 1980 to 2015, patent citations of 142,555 times and the Normalized Lens Influence Metric index paper, 5.56 points. ▶ QS World University Ranking 155th In last June, Hanyang University ranked 155th in 2017 QS World University Rankings announced by the UK global university evaluation institution QS (Quacquarelli Symonds), climbing 16 stairs compared to last year's performance. It is the eighth highest record among domestic universities. Hanyang University, which steadily climbed in QS world's university evaluation through the last five years, recorded its highest rank this year as well. ▲ 2017 QS World University Evaluation Rankings (QS Ranking website capture image) 2017 QS World University Rankings evaluated 4854 universities around the world and ranked them in four fields of research, education, graduate reputation, internationalization, etc. with six indicators. The six evaluation indicators are as follows: △ academic evaluation (40%) △ the number of paper citations per professor (20%) △ the number of students per professor (20%) △ graduate reputation (10%) △ foreign student rate(5%) △ foreign professor rate(5%). According to the article of Chosun Ilbo on June 8, QS said, "in this evaluation, Korean universities have high academic evaluation and graduate reputation, while those who measure the quality of university research are still low including ‘the number of paper citations per professor’ and ‘the percentage of foreign professors and students’.” It is pointed out that many Korean professors need to publish papers in English in order to increase the number of paper citations and the research power of Korean universities can be expanded globally. Meanwhile, Hanyang University received the total score of 83.8 (out of 100 points) in ‘2017 Asian University Evaluation’ announced by QS in October, ranked 30th in Asia and 7th in nation as last year. Hanyang University has high scores especially in these indicators, ‘exchange students who went abroad’ (99.9 points, 18th place), "exchange student who entered Korea" (96.1 points, 28th place), "graduate reputation" (94.3 points, 26th) and so on. ▶ 2017 JoongAng Ilbo University Rankings, Seoul Ranked 3rd · ERICA 9th In 2017 JoongAng Ilbo University Rankings released in October, three results of the evaluation were open including 'Comprehensive Evaluation', 'Department Evaluation' and 'Reputation Survey'. The ranking of Seoul campus dropped one stair from the previous year, but ranked within TOP 10 d in 'Department Evaluation' and 'Reputation Survey'. In ‘Comprehensive Evaluation’, Seoul Campus is ranked 1st in 'Student Performance' (58 points), 3rd in 'Professor's Research' (70 points), 4th in 'Educational Conditions' (60 points), 5th in 'Reputation' (24 points), and 3rd in overall rankings with total 214 points. ERICA campus ranked 9th overall by achieving 6th (49 points) in 'Student Performance', 10th (62 points) in 'Professor's Research' category. ▲’2017 JoongAng Ilbo University Rankings’ Comprehensive Rankings (Picture = JoongAng Ilbo) This year’s department evaluation was divided into four categories: humanities, social science, engineering, and natural sciences. In 'Humanities· Social Science Department Evaluation' the Seoul campus ranked 3rd in the humanities(179 points) and 2nd in the social sciences (188 points) category. ERICA campus ranked 14th in humanities (143 points) and 20th in social science (140 points). In the evaluation of 'Natural science and engineering department', Seoul Campus ranked 5th in the natural sciences (174 points) and 3rd in the engineering field (206 points). ERICA campus recorded the ranking of 10th in engineering (176 points). According to the Joongang Ilbo article, "Seoul Campus focused on finding a job suitable for student's aptitude through field placement (field placement participation rate, Humanities 3rd·Social Science 6th)". Article added, "Professors consulted continuously with many students and connected them to the training sites, and lots of students worked for the same company after six months of employment (Maintenance employment rate; Humanities 4th·Social Science 3rd)". In addition, "the number of technology venture companies, certified by Technology Guarantee Fund and identified from which university the founders graduated, was 13,947. Among the founders of these companies, 498 people are from Hanyang University in Seoul Campus, second only to Seoul National University (525 people) ". The article emphasized, " Hanyang University focuses on entrepreneurship education, and the number of students who received entrepreneurship training last year was the highest (6580, including redundancy) among the evaluated universities”. According to a reputation survey conducted together with ‘Research & Research’, Seoul Campus was ranked the 5th in natural sciences and 9th in liberal arts field for a question "University you wish to recommend for admission." Seoul Campus occupied 4th place in natural sciences and 6th place in liberal arts field for a question "University you wish to recommend for admission." Seoul Campus was ranked 6th and ERICA campus was the 9th for the question "university with a high potential of development." ▶Reception of the highest evaluation in the ‘2017 Youth Dream University Rankings’ by Dong-A Ilbo Hanyang University was selected in the 'Best' category for three consecutive times in the ‘2017 Youth Dream University Rankings’ by Dong-A Daily, the Ministry of Employment and Labor, the Korea Employment information Agency and the research firm Macromill Embrain. ▲ The result of ‘2017 Youth Dream University Rankings’ (Picture = Dong-A Ilbo) In this evaluation of how effectively and actively the finest universities offering good educations support students’ employment and entrepreneurship, Hanyang University received the highest score of 87.7 points among the top 10 universities in 'infrastructure' sector. Hanyang University received 82.1 points for 'education' sector, 80.6 points for 'network', and 74.5 points for 'service'. Dong-A Daily article states that Hanyang University has developed more sophisticated programs to support student’s employment and start-ups than the evaluation in 2015 by introducing HY-CDP (Career Development Program).

2017-12 21

[Performance]Hanyang University Ranked 2nd in Number of Successful Candidates in Civil Service Exam (Technical Post)

According to the results of analysis of 73 successful candidates of 2017 Civil Service Examinations (Technical Post), the number of graduates from Hanyang University was 15, the second highest in the nation after Seoul National University(16). In particular, Hanyang university produced 4 national top scorer in the main posts. Jeon Eui-gun (Architectural Engineering 08) in the architectural post, Kwon Yong-eun (Mechanical Engineering 13) in the mechanical engineer post, Park Seong-yeol (Electrical and Biomedical Engineering 12) in the electrical post, and Jo Won-dam (Chemical Engineering and Biotechnology Engineering 14) in the chemical engineering post ranked top score in each post respectively. When categorizing by post, 4 students passed in the civil engineering post, followed by the architectural post (3), communication post (2), and chemical engineering post (2). Also Hanyang University had one successful applicant in each of the machine, disaster prevention, fisheries, electrical post. The chart above shows the number of successful applicants by university. Seoul National University ranked 1st in number of successful candidates with 16 (21.9%) , followed by Hanyang University with 15 (20.5%), Korea University with 9 (12.3%), Yonsei University with 8 (10.9%), KAIST with 7 (9.5%), and Sungkyunkwan University and Inha University with 4 (5.4%) and University of Seoul of 3(4.1%). Nagoya Institute of Technology, Dongguk University, Sogang University, Wonkwang University, Jeonbuk National University, Chungang University, Pohang University of Technology produced one successful candidate respectively.