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2019-01 14

[Academics]Performance of Stock Price with Changes in SRI Governance Index

Professor Lee Chang-won (School of Business) recently presented his study on the performance of stock price with changes in socially responsible investment (SRI) governance index. Mainly looking at the different levels of performance that various corporations are achieving depending on their SRI, Lee has managed to publish his studies in the academic journal, "Corporate Social Responsibility and Environmental Management." According to Lee, while the performance of a corporation was evaluated only on its actual profit in the past, the importance of fulfilling its social responsibility is gaining weight in its evaluation in order to achieve sustainable growth nowadays. With a trend of studying how to reflect social responsibility within the actual performance of a company, Lee has managed to find the correlations between the stock price of a corporation, which represents its performance, and its inclusion within the SRI governance index. Professor Lee Chang-won (School of Business) recently presented his study on the performance of stock price with changes in SRI governance index, finding the correlation of how corporations within the index showed higher levels of performance both in the short and long term. “It is those that are included in this SRI governance index that have managed to show a higher performance both in the short and long term,” stated Lee. Having to satisfy the various stakeholders within the company, it is mainly those that have managed to conduct such social actions that have seen an actual rise of their stock price, or in other words, shown high levels of performance. This is especially applicable to global corporations, as they have to satisfy the different levels of social actions that their more varied stakeholders require. Socially responsible investment (SRI) It was explained by Lee that the social responsibility of corporations varies across a number of fields, including those of environmental, economic and even those related to the governance structure of such companies. Presenting an example of environmental responsibility, he explained how corporations within the index focus upon issues, both internally and externally. Internally, the working environments of the workers are improved, whereas externally, environmental problems such as air pollution are tackled by the company. The importance of such actions is becoming enhanced, especially when related to the sustainable growth of a corporation. Additional to the traditional financial index, the SRI is also becoming a significant metric for success. “It can be compared to today’s students. They are not only required to simply study hard during their school years but also to become skilled in order to adapt and succeed in the contemporary society. The same goes for companies, as they have to do more than simply make profit,” explained Lee. Lee explained how the inclusion of the SRI governance index has now become an important metric for the performance of corporations and their sustainable growth. The research and its future With the importance of social responsibility for corporations gaining light, Lee believes that it is the highest level of management that should be mostly focused towards this trend. In order to become a corporation that successfully conducts business on the international level, it is crucial to be included within the SRI index and fulfill the levels of social responsibility that is being required in the current industry. Lee started his research in order to prove this correlation and arouse the attentions of domestic corporations, which put a heavy emphasis upon ‘owner leadership.’ Using the traditional event history analysis method, Lee focused upon the actual factors that had an impact upon a corporations’ stock price and compared the performance of those that are either included or excluded within the SRI governance index from 2003 to 2012. He was able to conclude the significance of the inclusion within the SRI index as being crucial, especially within the global business environment. This is due to the fact that it is not only the developed markets, but also the markets of developing countries that are placing a higher emphasis upon social responsibility. Based on his research, Lee showed his hopes towards corporations showing a higher interest in social responsibility, becoming a company that goes from ‘Good to Great’ and that can show actual contributions towards a healthier society. He also added that the students of Hanyang should also become figures that are able to acknowledge and fulfill the responsibilities that the society requires, being able to carry out the school philosophy of ‘Love in Deed’ when they become the true leaders of society in the future. Choi Seo-yong tjdyd1@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Park Guen-hyung

2019-01 14

[Academics][Excellent R&D] GET-Future Lab

Amidst the rising awareness and concerns over climate change, two major events such as the Paris Climate Agreement in 2015 and Volkswagen’s Dieselgate scandal have really started to place countries worldwide under the pressure of stricter environmental regulations. With many countries accelerating their research to overcome the future environmental challenges whilst embracing the oncoming wave of the Fourth Industrial Revolution, Professor Sun Yang-kook (Department of Energy Engineering) has taken up this major mission as a leading research lab in Korea. Sun Yang-kook (Department of Energy Engineering) is explaining how crucial the development of ion battery technology is for Korea. According to the United States Environment Protection Agency (EPA), one of the major emitters of greenhouse gas, a vital contributor to climate change, is carbon dioxide (CO2). The primary source of CO2 includes cars and factories where there is a high usage of fossil fuel and industrial processes. That is why countries, especially those who are member-states of the UN and have agreed to the Paris Agreement, are striving to keep low emission levels to mitigate the worsening conditions. The fact that fossil fuel is an exhaustible source only adds to the incentive to develop the appropriate technology that could even further improve living conditions. One of the major examples of ongoing research for this are the battery-run cars. The current commercial batteries on the market are lithium-ion batteries. However, because it is comparatively less abundant, less capacity-efficient, and higher in cost, research for replacements have already long been in place. Now, there are the likes of Li-S batteries, Li-Air batteries, and Na-ion batteries, but they are still in the process of research and are not enough to fully supplement nor replace the lithium-ion batteries. “Especially because Korea does not have abundant natural resources, it is crucial for us to develop our own technology ahead of other countries,” said Sun. The expected battery-run car sales rate per year (Photo courtesy of Sun) The development of the next generation of ion battery technology is vital as it can decide your place in the future market. Developing and securing this environmentally friendly technology is the future, and that is why time is crucial. “In 2017, sales for battery-run and hybrid cars was highest in Japan (1.1 million), and then in China (800,000), Europe and America in that order. For China, its battery-run car sales increased by 38 percent within just a year and is expected to increase up to 1.5 million by 2020. Overall, the market for battery-run cars and the natural demand for car batteries is expected to increase from $15.7 billion (2016) to $67.6 billion (2020, 331 percent increase from 2016),” said Sun. Sun and his GET-Future Lab lab students That is why Sun has taken full responsibility to lead the GET-Future Lab. The GET-Future Lab receives full support from the school and is the only lab where active research on next generation batteries and interactive knowledge sharing with both companies, such as LG Chemical and POSCO, takes place. “This lab was mainly created and run for three things: secure vital battery technology to take the lead in the market, increase the high-skilled workforce in the battery field in Korea, and enhance research exchange with foreign countries. Getting here was a competitive process as well. Luckily, my work and passion were recognized, and I am proud to lead this lab and contribute to our country’s future,” said Sun. Park Joo-hyun julia1114@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Kang Cho-hyun

2019-01 14

[General]Driving Seoul Without a Driver

Driving through the jam-packed roads of Seoul could be tiring and intimidating, and especially so, if you have just gotten your driver’s license. Under such circumstances, it would be nice if you could borrow a hand from a skilled driver. Hanyang University’s Automotive Control and Electronic Lab (ACE Lab), with the help of LG U+ (a Korean telecommunication company), has succeeded in developing such a driving partner: the one who can drive and is always the driver when driving - the car itself. (From left) Lee Seong-jin (Department of Automotive Engineering, Doctoral program) and Lim Won-taek (Department of Automotive Engineering, Doctoral program) are members of ACE Lab. ACE Lab has announced a successful demonstration of their self-driving car. The car drove itself for seven kilometers on the especially busy roads of Seoul, starting from the Seoul Forest, to the Gangbyeon Expressway, to the Seongsu Bridge, to Olympic-daero, and finally, ending on the Yeongdong Bridge, all the while, doing appropriate obstacle avoidance and lane changes. The research team leader of ACE Lab, Lim Won-taek (Department of Automotive Engineering, Doctoral program), and another member, Lee Seong-jin (Department of Automotive Engineering, Doctoral program) stated that the study focused on the self-driving car successfully managing the busy intersections of the highways and city roads of Seoul, the places where drivers typically find it difficult to drive. The particular achievement held two major significances. Technology-wise, cars have become much more intelligent. So far, commercialized, self-driving cars changed lanes only when the driver gave instructions, such as turning on the blinker. In contrast, the car introduced by ACE Lab decides when to change lanes and cut in lines all by itself. Another significance was its cooperation with LG U+ and applying 5th Generation (5G) mobile telecommunication on the vehicles. This communication between the vehicle and other objects, or between two vehicles, brought about improvements in various aspects, primarily in obstacle avoidance. For instance, upon recognizing an accident ahead, the first vehicle could inform the following vehicles, thereby reducing the possibility of having to stop suddenly, and consequently, decreasing the accident rate. The researchers of the lab said that it is the first time in Korea that a self-driving car succeeded in driving on both the highway and city roads. Since some drivers drive rather aggressively, the researchers of the lab have stated that every trial is frightening. “Cutting in line is the scariest. Once, we dodged an accident by a mere two centimeters,” said Lee. After countless test trials, December 18th was their first attempt on the actual path from the Seoul Forest to the Yeongdong Bridge. The result was successful, and the car met all assessing criteria satisfactorily. It was the first time in Korea that a self-driving car succeeded in driving on both the highway and city roads. Lim and Lee have stated that despite their achievement, there is still a long way to go until the self-driving car becomes popular. There needs to be sufficient demonstration for all possible situations one might confront on the road, and 5G mobile telecommunication has a wide spectrum of possible usage. “So the self-driving car expects to take much time in becoming the norm,” said Lim, “but we'd say we are one step ahead than the others.” Lim Ji-woo il04131@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Kang Cho-hyun

2019-01 14

[Admission ]Hanyang University holds Korea's largest international winter school entrance ceremony

Hanyang University held an entrance ceremony for the '2018 Hanyang International Winter School' on the Seoul Campus on December 27th. Approximately 530 students from 25 dfferent countries were in attendance for the third annual entrance ceremony for the 2018 Hanyang International Winter School. In addition, this is the largest number of international winter schools opened by a Korean university with foreign students. There will be 23 major and cultural classes that were established at the Hanyang International Winter School, and the students will participate in various programs for cultural enrichment such as a ski camp, visiting a sauna, and watching public performances. The participants of the entrance ceremony pose for a commemorative photo. President Lee Young-moo is giving a lecture to students attending the entrance ceremony. Students from Hanyang's Korean Classical Music Department are giving a congratulatory performance to foreign students during the entrance ceremony. Another student from the Korean Classical Music Department is giving his congratulatory performance to foreign students during the entrance ceremony. t The audience members are enjoying the congratulatory performance for foreign students during the entrance ceremony.

2019-01 07

[General]The Winners of the 2018 MBA Case Competition

Hosted by MTN and the Yonsei University Graduate School of Business, the first place winner for the 10th MBA Case Competition was team Illusion from the Hanyang University Master of Business Administration (MBA). They proposed a vision to create early on the components and the charging station for the future of hydrogen powered vehicles. Each year, a company is chosen to decide on a topic for that year. In the 2018 year, POSCO declared, “POSCO’s new undertaking project for the spread of future values and development of mutual interest” as the theme. From August 6th, in which the application for participation began, the topic of competition was already chosen for participants. The contest itself has the preliminaries and the final round. The preliminaries took place in October, and eight teams were chosen to compete in the finals. The final presentation date was November 17th, in which all the teams produced a powerpoint and prepared their presentions. The awards ceremony was held on November 29th. The members of team Illusion: (from left) Lee Jong-wook (Art, Culture, and Entertainment, Master’s program), Oh Jung-hyun (Business Management, Master’s program), Choi Chan-woo (Strategic Management, Master’s program) photographed on January 4th, 2019. Jeon Hack-hee, (Strategic Management and Venture, Master’s program) was not present in the photo. According to the latest update on the McKinsey Report, hydrogen powered cars that amount to $400,000 will be sold worldwide per annum by 2050. In this regard, team Illusion thought it would bring about a synergy effect for POSCO to produce components for hydrogen powered cars since they are already equipped with parts like battery or iron ore. Also, they believed that if POSCO could first create a movable charging station, then it would be possible to earn an enormous profit in the same sense that Rockefeller seized the gas station. Iron ore takes up about 60 percent of the total revenue for POSCO. However, due to the growing sharing economy like uber and car pool, not many cars are selling, and the amount of components needed to build a car has significantly decreased as green cars prevail. Therefore, POSCO also faces a business transfer to green cars. Hydrogen powered vehicles have more prospects than electric cars, according to team Illusion. Electric cars have been put to practical use already, and their fuel is eco-friendly, whereas hydrogen powered cars act as air purifiers, benefiting our environment. The eight teams that made it to the finals were given time to complement their research by absorbing the commentary from the judges. For team Illusion, the panel had commented on how there were too many broad suggestions for the company and lacked the logic behind why such a business strategy was to be fulfilled. Listening to and adjusting the shortcomings that the judges had pointed out made it possible for Hanyang University to win first place among the other prestigious schools. The award winners and participants of the 2018 MBA Case Competition held on November 29th, 2018 (Photo courtesy of Oh Jung-hyun) The interviewees had all agreed that teamwork was the main reason that their team was able to win first place at the 2018 MBA Case Competition. “Other than the perfect balance between us as a team, we correctly identified the business trends that companies were interested in and suggested a realistic idea for POSCO’s future oriented project.” Team Illusion was the last to present among the eight teams in the final round, and they said that they had a feeling that they would win first place after seeing the reactions from the judges from the previous presentations. The head of the department at POSCO, who was one of the judges, asked the team if there was a POSCO employee among the team members, emphasizing how difficult it was to figure out precisely what POSCO wanted to see, as team Illusion had done. The MBA Case Competition is one of the biggest contests for MBA students to participate in. Members of team Illusion recommended other MBA students to openly challenge themselves. Choi Chan-woo (Strategic Management, Master’s program) said that he learned more about his team members and was surprised by how they had creative new ideas and vision. For those who want to give it a shot at the competition, Lee Jong-wook (Art, Culture, and Entertainment, Master’s program) advised that since judges are mostly hands-on workers as well, that it would be important to know what is needed on a working-level and to be in their shoes when creating business plans for their company. Kim Hyun-soo soosoupkimmy@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Kang Cho-hyun

2019-01 07

[General]What Hanyang Professors Do in Their Spare Time (Part 2)

In a previous news piece, three Hanyang professors with very interesting hobbies were introduced. In this week's news story, three additional professors from other departments have shared their fascinating hobbies, from ballet, tennis, and even classical music. Ballet-watching professor, Hwang Se-jin Professor Hwang Se-jin's (Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology) hobby, deeply soaked into his daily life, is watching beautiful ballet performances. Hwang’s poetic praises of ballet such as “the utmost beauty on the planet Earth,” “art at its best,” and “human’s best impression” speak for a mere fragment of his deep affection towards ballet. Hwang first started enjoying ballet performances through his love of classical music. As a student, he took part in an orchestra in the College of Medicine, and it did not take long for him to discover the wonders of the closely related fields of opera and ballet. Hwang says he came to fancy ballet for the ballerina and ballerino’s passion and endless practice and effort they devote for their shows. Ever since then, he has been a regular audience of ballet stages. The most important thing in classic ballet is how precise the moves are, “and there is a surprising thrill when the dancer does it just perfectly,” says Hwang. He has watched the popular ballet pieces, ‘The Nutcracker’ and ‘Swan Lake’ each over thirty times. Especially, the particular scene in ‘Swan Lake’ of the princess dancing was so amazing that he replayed the video over a few thousand times. “Ballet presents us with pure happiness; after all, happiness is what life is all about,” says Hwang. Professor Hwang Se-jin (Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology) also enjoys taking pictures of ballet performances. A Photo taken by Hwang of ballet dancers (Photo courtesy of Hwang) Tennis-playing professor, Ryu Su-yeol Over the past 15 years, Professor Ryu Su-yeol (Department of Korean Language Education) has spent much of his spare time running on a court with his long time friend of tennis, which he calls 'an honest rectangle.' “You see, my time is mostly spent in a rectangle: my office or the tennis court,” joked Ryu. Ryu comes to the court to play tennis at least two to three days a week. Many other professors also join, even running a Hanyang professors-tennis-club. Last year, the team attended the national tennis tournament of professors, competing with those from other universities. With many years of loving tennis, the sport has given many other fun anecdotes to tell as well. Ryu recalled that once, after playing seven games in a row, he was so exhausted that he could barely walk home. Also, there had been a few times when he was so carried away by the game that he almost missed the lecture time. Ryu says that tennis has also taught him some important principles about life. “When playing a game with four players, we team the weakest player with the strongest player. That, for instance, teaches attitude towards the social disadvantaged groups,” explains Ryu. “I hope to be able to play tennis until I grow really old. Since they say that ‘tennis is the only sport where an 80-year-old can win over a 20-year-old,’ I hope to be that 80-year-old.” Professor Ryu Su-yeol (Department of Korean Language Education) often plays tennis at Hanyang University. Classical music-listening professor, Kim Sung-hwan “I met my wife in the 1970s. She liked classical music, and I always followed her around, so I started listening to it as well,” recalled Professor Kim Sung-hwan (Division of International Studies). The music fascinated him in that the same music always sounded different depending on the orchestra and the conductor. Since then, visiting concert halls has been Kim’s new hobby. On his bucket list, Kim wrote down--‘going to the famous foreign music festivals.’ Kim says he is progressing to a stage of crossing them out, by taking every opportunity during the holidays to visit the world's famous music festivals: the Swiss Lucerne Festival, the Salzburg Festival of Austria, and the German Bayreuth festival. Although he has already seen so many concerts, its ever-changing nature always fascinates him, making him eagerly anticipate each one all the same. “Once, my family and I were at the London’s Christmas concert, and my young daughter would not stop singing. However, my wife and I wanted to watch the concert so bad that we took turns, running from the concert hall to the outside corridor, half listening to the music and half looking after our daughter." Kim says that classical music is charming because it calms his heart. His next goal is to make Korea’s music concert like the PyeongChang Music Festival a world-wide famous event. Since 2014, (Pictured Right) Division of International Studies Professor, Kim Sung-hwan has helped run the PyeongChang Music Festival. He hopes that the festival will become known world-wide, representing Korea. (Photo courtesy of Kim) Lim Ji-woo il04131@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Park Geun-hyung

2019-01 01

[General]Farewell HYU

As 2018 comes to an end, and we bid our farewells to all the memories and welcome in 2019, HYU has also bid its farewells to its dear family members who have worked for the school for many years. Consisting of both professors and faculty members, two retirement ceremonies were hosted for each group on the 21st and 27th of December, 2018. The retirement ceremony for professors with the HYU President Lee Young-moo (fourth from the right) on December 21st, 2018 (Photo courtesy of HYU Media Center) On the 21st of December, a retirement ceremony for professors was held on the sixth floor of the new Administration Building. The ceremony consisted of a warm farewell as well as performances in addition to a last lunch with the dean. Professors Joo Sung-soo (Graduate School of Public Policy), Rim Kwang-joo (School of Law), Kim Seon-jin (Division of Material Science and Engineering), Kim Jong-kyung (Department of Nuclear Engineering), Kim Joo-han (Department of Neurology), Choi Woong-hwan (Internal Medicine), Park Hae-young (Urology), Park Chul-won (Otolaryngology), Lee Young-soo (Dentistry), Park Hong-goo (Department of Mathematics), Choi Byung-dae (Department of Public Administration), Ye Jong-suk (School of Business), Lee Young-in (Department of Piano), and Kim Choong-bae (Department of Orchestral Instruments) from the Seoul Campus were present. As for professors from the ERICA Campus, professors Shin Dong-hyuk (Department of Material Science), Han Jeong-seon (Department of Applied Mathematics), Kim Yong-bum (Department of Digital Culture & Contents), Kim Jae-bum (Deparment of Journalism & Mass Communication), Ryu Tae-soo (College of Business and Economics), and Park Kyu-won (Department of Communication Design) were present. Joo Sung-soo (Graduate School of Public Policy) leaves his last farewell words at the retirement ceremony held in the new Administration Building. (Photo courtesy of HYU Media Center) Joo, who is a professor at the Graduate School of Public Policy, had been teaching since 1987. For over 31 years, he has been a dedicated and passionate professor who has loved his students and his research more than anything else. “One of the most meaningful classes I’ve taught was called Globalization and Development. I’ve taught that class for nine years every semester, and it was to help students understand this rapidly changing world. I’ve also founded the HYU voluntary group, which is also the very first out of all Korean universities. With this group, I’ve been active in the realms of civil societies, corporations, public organizations, and secondary education for over 25 years to revitalize the volunteering spirit in overall Korean society. However, I still think that most voluntary work is the result of other incentives rather than one’s own will. Now that I’m leaving HYU, I would like to say my goodbyes with the hope that the school’s ‘practice of love’ becomes the general university culture, which would also later on change the whole society to a culture of love, respect, and other human values. I hope HYU becomes an educational ground for those who will bring that change.” The retirement ceremony for faculty members and the HYU President (center), December 27th, 2018. (Photo courtesy of HYU Media Center) On December 27th, the retirement ceremony for the faculty members of both the Seoul and ERICA campuses was held in the new Administration Building. The ceremony consisted of the dean thanking the faculty members for their longterm dedication to the school and a last lunch to share their memories. Cha Soon-geol (Office of Student Affairs, ERICA), Cho Jeong-hwan (ERICA College of Pharmacy Administrations Office), Kim Wang-ki (HYU Information Center), and Myung In-sik (College of Medicine Administrations Office), Kim Hwi-chool (Paiknam Academic Information Center and Library Research & Information Team), Kang Jeong-wu (College of Science and Convergence Technology Administrations Office, ERICA), Park Jeom-suk (Office of General Affairs & Management, ERICA), Lee Jong-lak (College of Sports and Arts Administrations Office, ERICA), Sang Hyun-suk (College of Human Ecology Administrations Office), and Yoo Se-sil (College of Business and Economics Administrations Office, ERICA) were present. HYU President Lee Young-moo is passing on his sincere appreciation to those who have been dedicated to the school. (Photo courtesy of HYU Media Center) Cha is the head of the Office of Student Affairs for the ERICA Campus. He has worked for HYU since 1983 and has shown his dedication and love for the school for 36 years. Of course, he has not only worked in the Office of Student Affairs, but also in the Office of International Affairs, the Admissions Office, Human Resources, and the Office of Public Relations and Planning. “I still remember the days of the late 1990s to the early 2000s when HYU started growing immensely. I was so proud of its rapid growth, and it will be a memory that I will never be able to forget as a faculty member.” Cha’s love for the school and students could be seen as he talked about his plans to teach Korean to foreign students. He also wanted to work as a volunteer at the Korean International Cooperation Agency (KOICA). For his last comments, Cha said, “I have spent two thirds of my life at HYU and have grown with this school. HYU is where it is as a result of the hard work of many people. Those who are remaining in the school should continue to take on this role for the tomorrow of Hanyang. In the future, this school that you will grow with will give you immense strength.” Park Joo-hyun julia1114@hanyang.ac.kr

2019-01 01

[General]VR Avatars Copy Your Facial Expressions

Virtual reality (VR) is explosively gaining popularity, and its technology is developing day by day. Still one drawback is that the avatars are yet to reflect the current state of the players, such as their eye movement and facial expressions. For that reason, Im Chang-hwan (Division of Electrical and Biomedical Engineering) suggested a new way that allows one’s VR avatar to copy the expression of oneself. He further commented that it's “just like the movie, ‘Ready Player One.’” As the player smiles, the avatar in virtual reality (VR) smiles also. As they frown, the avatar frowns likewise. They also smirk, look surprised, as well as scared. What seemed only possible in the Sci-Fi movies thus far is now available in real life. Finally, our VR avatars can read and replicate our facial expressions. Im Chang-hwan (Division of Electrical and Biomedical Engineering) studies the reproduction of players' facial expressions on the VR avatar using the electromyography (EMG). The suggested method employs the electromyogram (EMG), the electrical activity produced when the facial muscles move. The eight sensors that are attached around the VR head-mounted display (HMD) measure the EMG as the player makes a face and reconstructs the data to guess the expression. Although previously there had been several attempts to utilize EMG to mirror facial expressions, the crucial problem existed in that they required too many times of enrollment (from 4 up to 14 times), during which, similar to fingerprint enrollment, the player allows the machine to scan and identify each type of facial expression. “Four-times enrollment of ten facial expressions adds up to 40 times of enrollment, which is nothing near convenient,” explained Im. “Thus, our goal was to create a system that requires the minimum number of enrollment, but detects the maximum number of facial expressions, and with outperforming accuracy.” The avatar is replicating a player's happy and surprised facial expressions. (Photo courtesy of Donga) The new method gained surprising results in various aspects. First of all, only one time of enrollment was sufficient to correctly identify the expression, compared to 4 to 14 times that was required previously. Also, they could detect a total of 11 facial expressions, which is the greatest number by far, and is very soon expected to be expanded to 15. Moreover, it has achieved an astonishing accuracy of 92 percent. They were also relatively affordable and extremely comfortable since the sensors can be made of rubber or cloth. Im evaluated the technology as the possible core technology of the next-generation VR application. “It is applicable to virtually all kinds of VR applications that use player avatar.” The prime example is Facebook’s Spaces where players use avatars to play and interact, added Im. “Basically, our ultimate goal would be to actualze Sci-Fi movies like ‘Ready Player One’ – to the point where the avatars can read not only the players’ facial expressions, but their feelings as well.” Lim Ji-woo il04131@naver.com Photos by Park Geun-hyung

2018-12 31

[Academics][Researcher of the Month] Nonfoamy Macrophages, More Effective in Restraining Arteriosclerosis

Department of Life Science Professor Choi Jae-hoon's thesis: "Transcriptome analysis reveals nonfoamy rather than foamy plaque macrophages are proinflammatory in atherosclerotic murine models" was officially published offline on October 26th of this year through the Circulation Research Journal. The objective of the study was to examine the state of foamy and nonfoamy macrophages to determine which are more likely to drive lesional inflammation. “The single-cell RNA sequencing” technique was selected as the breakthrough of the year by the 2018 science journal. That is, now it was possible to study how and when each cell creates a leg, a foot, or a tail through the single-cell RNA sequencing. Recently, technology has developed to the extent that using this technique has made it possible to catch the change of a gene in a single cell, instead of many cells. According to Professor Choi Jae-hoon (Department of Life Science), newly announcing the traits of macrophages during the process of discovering arteriosclerosis is one step forward for the science community. Inflammation is the reaction of our body in the case of injury or infection. Activating an immunocyte is a process of curing inflammation. Similarly, if lipids (simply known as fat) accumulate in blood vessels and bring infections to the body, the immunocytes that follow the inflammation are a compound of cells including macrophages and a lymphocytes. Among those, macrophages are one of the most important cells, which acts as a cleaner, eating up dead or damaged organic body. These macrophages detect and eliminate lipids effectively at first, but when lipids pile up, it becomes difficult to remove, and the infection tends to grow. The initial state of macrophages before they eat up lipids is called nonfoamy macrophages. Macrophages grows bigger as they consume lipids, and this state is known as foamy macrophages. Initially attacked macrophages actively trigger inflammation, whereas macrophages that consumed many lipids do not contain much genes related to infection and instead work hard to eliminate lipids. In the past, analysis was done on the whole rather than respecting the individual traits of single cells. Through single-cell RNA sequencing, they first discovered that macrophages that came into the blood vessel before the uptake of lipid facilitated inflammatory responses. On the other hand, the macrophages that had become bigger by consuming lipids lacked the ability to be inflamed, effectively eliminating lipids. Nonfoamy macrophages must be restrained. “The fire broke out in the nonfoamy state, so the fire must be put out in such a state,” stated professor Choi. The foamy macrophages take care of infections in the beginning, but when they cannot handle them, they die and the cells burst, creating inflammation all over again. Suppressing nonfoamy macrophages is a much more effective way to restrain arteriosclerosis since nonfoamy macrophages promote inflammation. Professor Choi is posing with his graduate students in the lab at the College of Natural Sciences. The beginning of professor Choi’s research was when one of his graduate students performed an experiment of extracting only the foamy macrophages in order to grasp the traits of them. That was in the year 2012, a year after he first came to Hanyang University. Professor Choi also studied at Washington State University for a year with his studies concluding in January of this year. The single-cell RNA sequencing, an integral part of research needed for his thesis, was conducted in Washington as the same technique was not available at Hanyang University. Professor Choi expressed his hopes to perform similar research in Korea in the future, when Hanyang University is equipped with the available sources. He enthusiastically went on to say that he wanted to further study bioinformatics, which is a technique used to analyze the big data that single-cell RNA sequencing produces. Professor Choi emphasized the need to accurately analyze what is going on in a living body, and advised students to do research that can help many people. “Just like the study of life science, look further into the future rather than seeing short term results and gains.” Kim Hyun-soo soosoupkimmy@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Lee Jin-myung

2018-12 31

[General]Learning Science With A Cheerful Santa

The 2018 17th Christmas Science Concert – Science in Cooking with Santa was held on December 26th at the Hanyang University Paiknam Music Hall. First started and hosted by Professor Choi Jung-hoon (Department of Chemistry) and the Teenager into Science and Technology Center (TIST) in 2002, this year’s concert also ended in great success with a gathering of around 600 participants. The 2018 17th Christmas Science Concert -Science in Cooking with Santa was held successfully with 600 people gathering at the Paiknam Music Hall on December 17th, 2018. The theme was cooking this year. The Christmas Science Concert The Christmas Science Concert has been held for 17 years, with the main theme of the concert changing every year. First planned to deliver scientific themes and principles in a more fun and easy manner, especially towards elementary and middle school students, every year Choi and the members of TIST host the concert, gathering hundreds of students on a national basis. According to Choi, they once even gathered 5000 participants, having to host the concert at the School Olympic Stadium, when they had the theme of ‘Finding Science within Circuses.’ Being the 17th this year, the concert has gained fame among young students, managing to gather 600 participants without any extra forms of promotion. With the main theme being ‘Finding scientific principles within the cooking environment,’ Choi introduced various scientific concepts that can be found in the conventional kitchen such as the basic principles of the microwave and induction heater. He also gave an image of the future cooking environment, by explaining how molecular gastronomy can be developed into the use of a 3D printer. The students showed great enthusiasm throughout the whole concert, actively participating and communicating with Choi. Two students from Hansan Elementary School, Cho Ye-dam and Lim Seo-yeon (4th grade), especially displayed high levels of satisfaction after the prepared concert. With both students showing special interests towards the part in which slush changed into ice, they stated that the concert made them look upon science from a much more easy perspective. “Compared to school providing us with only lectures, the concert was interesting in that it helped us understand the process through fun experiments,” explained Lim. The participating students showed high levels of enthusiasm throughout the whole concert. Students from Donam Elementary School are showing their questionares after the concert. Professor Choi Jung-hoon and TIST Already meeting its 17th year, Choi mentioned that he has three years left until his age of retirement, which is exactly the 20th year that the concert would have been hosted. Making the concert into a great success, other countries, such as the Nagasaki University in Japan, have also tried to benchmark this particular program. Furthermore Choi has given guest lectures across 38 countries worldwide, based upon his continuous and successful efforts towards providing novel educational systems, mostly targeted towards teenagers. Being the founder of the STEAM Education Program, which is a collaborative education system that fuses the fields of humanities, science, engineering, and the arts, Choi has long worked with TIST to promote the program, with the Christmas Concert setting an good example. TIST is one of the six ‘Teenager Science Centers’ that were first promoted by the government and is the one that is considered to have operated most fully towards meeting its original functions, even recently being introduced on the tvN program ‘Little-Big Hero’. (Replay of 'Little-Big Hero') Due to the long efforts of Choi and the members, TIST is now being recognized even upon a global basis. “Both in size and the contents provided TIST is considered to be the largest and most successful science center targeted towards the educational promotion of teenagers” explained Choi. With plans after the 20th concert yet being decided, it seems that people should keep a heads up in order to participate in the remaining three concerts due to its high levels of success and recognition that it is receiving in the educational environment. Choi Jung-hoon (Department of Chemistry) stated that the 20th concert is going to be hosted on the year of his retirement, and future plans toward the concert are to be confirmed at a later date. Choi Seo-yong tjdyd1@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Park Guen-hyung