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2017-10 24

[Event]The 3rd Paiknam Prize

On October 16, Paiknam Memorial Association held ‘The 3rd Paiknam Prize’ at Paiknam Music Hall in Hanyang University, Seongdong-gu, Seoul. Paiknam Prize was established to honor Dr. Paiknam Kim Lyun-joon, the founder of Hanyang University. The winners of the 3rd Paiknam award are ▲Engineering: CEO of Nano Co. Ltd., Shin Dong-woo (57), ▲Music: former director of the National Chorus, Na Young-soo (79) ▲Human rights and service: former president of Ireland Mary Robinson (73) ▲ Engineering sector winner, Shin Dong-woo and his wife are taking a commemorative photo with Kim Chong-yang, Chairman of Hanyang Foundation. ▲Music sector winner, Na Young-soo and his wife are taking a commemorative photo with Kim Chong-yang, Chairman of Hanyang Foundation. ▲ Human rights and Service sector winner, Mary Robinson is taking a commemorative photo with Kim Chong-yang, Chairman of Hanyang Foundation. ▲ The National Chorus members are performing commemorative performances.

2017-10 23

[Academics]Wastewater Treatment Facility to a Potential Power Plant

"Biomass is the only replacement for fossil fuels," said Jeon with certainty. Biomass is defined as living or recently dead organisms and any byproducts of those organisms, plant or animal. It can be used to produce renewable electricity, thermal energy, or transportation fuels (biofuels). In his recent review article, "Recent progress in microalgal biomass production coupled with wastewater treatment for biofuel generation," Jeon reviewed the technologies required to successfully integrate the two seemingly different areas: wastewater treatment and cultivation of microalgae. Jeon is enthusiastically explaining his recent article and progress of related fields. In order to generate biofuel, a substantial amount of biomass is required. Biomass is found in the natural world, such as in food crops. However, and often times, they are rare and have a low energy yield. Microalgae overcome all of the stated shortcomings. Known as one of the fastest growing life forms on earth, microalgae are found in fresh water or marine systems but can also survive versatile environmental conditions. In other words, microalgae have optimal conditions to be converted into energy. This potential energy source requires abundant Nitrogen and Phosphorus along with diverse minerals, and surprisingly enough, wastewater is a source of such nutrients. With the adequate pre-treatment of wastewater, a sewage disposal plant can turn into a ground for the mass cultivation of microalgae. This particular review article written by Jeon and his colleagues discourse on the advantages and disadvantages of recent progress and research around the world on such point. The reason why Jeon's research team can write such a review article concentrated on the relationship between microalgae and wastewater treatment is because the very research team discovered that wastewater can be used as a type of microalgae farm. "I personally dream to change such disposal plants into energy plants," said Jeon. He mentioned that 0.5% of the national electricity is spent on the wastewater treatment facilities. What if that facility can generate the amount of resource they use? Or even better, utilize the infrastructure to produce even more energy? "Sewage plant is located in every other neighborhood, unlike other power plants such as nuclear or coal plants. If sewage plants can create energy, the town will be a self-sufficient town." A chart explaining the relations among microalgae cultivation facilities, microalgal biomass and how water is purified while generating biofuels. (Photo courtesy of Jeon) In becoming one of the leading labs in the field, Jeon emphasizes looking through the keywords. As a college student, Jeon believed that ‘environment' and ‘energy' are going to be one of the most conversed topics in the future. Environmental engineering and eco-friendly energy came naturally into his pathway, which led Jeon to where he is now. Mentioning the fact that Korea can produce only ca. 0.3% of biogas than that of Germany's, Jeon suggested that the environmental engineering field in Korea still needs further research and development. "The field is very future-oriented," said Jeon. "Among the many topics that are and going to be significant in the coming days, renewable and environmentally friendly energy are some of the areas that engineers can contribute to." Jeon plans to keep working on his dream to convert wastewater facilities into energy-independent, and energy-creating social infrastructure. Jeon is holding a cylinder with microalgae in his lab. Kim So-yun dash070@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Choi Min-ju

2017-10 17

[Student]Foreign Students of Hanyang University Helped the Damage of Mexico Earthquake

Foreign students studying at Hanyang University started a fundraising campaign on September 28 to help Mexico suffered a massive earthquake. This fundraising campaign was held for about a month with voluntary participation of foreign students, and domestic students also started to participate. About 7,000 foreign students including undergraduate students are currently attending Hanyang University. Meanwhile, a strong earthquake struck southern and central Mexico, killing hundreds of people according to a foriegn press. ▲ Foreign students at Hanyang University are participating fundraising campaign to help Mexico. A foreign student is putting money in the donation box. ▲ A foreign student proceeding with the fundraising campaign (the right at the picture) is handing out materials with explanations about Mexico earthquake. ▲ Foreign students proceeding with the fundraising campaign are requesting more participation prior to the start of the campaign.

2017-10 16

[Academics]Creating the Most Stable Elevators

Like any other industries, the field of engineering is a harshly competitive market. Stepping ahead requires the latest technology, practical design, efficient utilization, and the list goes on. In the area of elevators, it is no longer just about going up and down. It is not even the speed of the transport. Rather, it is about how smooth the ride is. In this regard, Professor Hong Jung-pyo of the Department of Automotive Engineering has paved the way for elevator manufacturers to produce the most stable elevators in his paper, “Advanced method of selecting number of poles and slots for low-frequency vibration reduction of traction motor for elevator.” Professor Hong’s research began with the approach of a prominent elevator manufacturer, requesting a joint research to seek solutions for some of the stability issues that they have had with their elevators. It happened to be a great opportunity, as the number of domestic test towers for elevators were quite limited, and using them required cooperation with a company that owned such a facility. A blueprint of an elevator motor (courtesy of Montanari Elevators) The biggest concern for elevator manufacturers had always been vibration. Specifically, it is the low-frequency vibration that humans are especially sensitive to, which is caused by the generation of power from the motor. As most people know, elevators move through the winding and unwinding of ropes that are connected to a motor. The level of vibration felt in the car box, or the compartment that people actually get on, is determined by the motor. To put in simple terms, the design of the motor decides how shaky the elevator is. Just as the riding comfort decides the price of a luxurious car model, the reputation of an elevator brand is determined by its stability. Hong’s research aimed to analyze the causes of vibration and provide solutions to minimize it. Hong’s research can be conceptualized by understanding a fundamental mechanism of the motor: the poles and slots. Poles refer to magnetic poles, equivalent to the north and south poles from a general conception of magnets. Slots are physical holes in the motor where conductors are placed to allow electrical current to flow. Upon the flow of electricity, the poles and slots create an electromagnetic force that rotates the motor and provides physical power. The combination of the numbers of poles and slots in the motor results in weaknesses in particular areas that cause instability and, thus, vibration. Hong used a mathematical approach to diagnose the problem with various motor models and provided the ideal number of poles and slots to minimize vibration. Professor Hong with his co-author, Kim Doo-Young Hong expressed deep interest in extending his research into similar areas. Like any other field of study, the engineering field is also becoming interdisciplinary. As can be seen in Hong’s study, the research process involved a combination of electrical engineering and mechanical engineering approaches to the motor. The field of electrical engineering and mechanical engineering are now somewhat well-established individually. In contrast, we have little data and research on what happens when they interact with each other. The necessity for research into this field of electro-mechanical engineering has always been demanded, yet barely explored. Hong aims to study the designs and mechanisms of various systems extensively in his further research. As a word of advice to students of Hanyang, Hong commented that hard work is the only thing he can emphasize. As a respected professor, many students come to him for counseling on issues such as pursuit in a field of study, seeking career paths, and various decisions in between. Rather than spending time deliberating, he advises students to find any reason to make a decision. “It’s not about where you end up, it’s about how hard you work after you get there.” He also stressed constant self-development, adding that improving yourself by the smallest bit from one day to another will make you a different person by the end of a year. Lee Chang-hyun pizz1125@hanyang.ac.kr

2017-10 16

[Event]Crisis of Humanities? Importance of Humanities!

Professor Yoo Jae-eun of the Department of English Language and Literature gave a lecture titled, “Welcome to the desert of the Real” in the College of Humanities on the 13th. This phrase, better known as a famous line of ‘Matrix’ (1999), is a book’s title written by Slavoj Zizek. She gave a lecture based on this book, explaining the influence made on the world after the 9/11 terror in America along with her philosophical opinions and interpretations. ‘The Real’ society Yoo first gave an explanation on ‘the Real’, meaning ‘existence’, differentiating the word with ‘the real’, implying to the general reality, through the capital letter. Lancan, a psychoanalyst, theorized the field of ‘the Real’. He divided the process of human consciousness’ development into three steps: the Imaginary world, the Symbolic world and the Real world. She started off with this background knowledge in order to refer this to diagnose the current post-modern society after the 9/11 terror, which was her main theme of the lecture. Yoo giving a lecture of 'the Real' She explained that it was proven that we have stepped into ‘the Real’ society through America, the powerful nation, being attacked. The notion of ‘the Real’ refers to incidents we experience but cannot fully understand, such as death. As people’s consciousness and the society’s trend completely changed after the 9/11 terror, the sentence, ‘Welcome to the desert of the Real’ was made. Yoo gave personal experiences she faced after the terror, as she was in America for her Ph.D. Professor Yoo is currently studying these conditions of a post-modern society. Yoo commented, “I chose this title as it is an eye-catching and a famous phrase. I intended to discuss the changed world order after the 9/11 terror as a citizen of the Third World." A student also gave positive comments on this forum. Park Young-in, a graduate of Hanyang University and now a student of the graduate school, commented, “It was a special lecture for me as I became a great fan of her through her past lectures. I am also interested in this subject, so I appreciate that the lecture provided concise explanation on the topic." Park giving her opinions on the lecture Future humanities forums This lecture of professor Yoo was a part of a program currently proceeding in Hanyang University in the name of ‘Future Humanities Forums’. This was the 11th forum, and these forums are held every month by the core enterprise organization in the College of Humanities. A total of 16 schools were selected for this program and will be supported with 40 billion dollars for three years. This program was made as one of the alternative methods to resolve the avoidance of humanities. The College of Humanities made three courses: international studies, merged majors, and intensification of foundation studies. This program works as the training of future-oriented and integrated students and therefore gives forums on these three subjects in rotation, allowing everyone to easily approach humanities. The Future Humanities forum has now already finished its 11th lecture, starting from the second semester of last year. The themes, depending on the lecturers, are diversified starting from arts and science to artificial intelligence. They, therefore, emphasize interdisciplinary approaches but talk about general humanistic worries at the same time. A researcher of the Division of Applied Humanities, Park min-a mentioned, “Hanyang University is working hard to plan various integrated humanities programs and is, therefore, trying to form mutual exchanges of lectures with different schools.” "More people should be interested in humanities!" The forums focus on various discussions on the direction of future humanities, as well as the critical feedback on the current role of humanities. The Division of Applied Humanities are enthusiastically working on various methods to make humanities a field that can be approached more easily. These forums take place once every month in the afternoon of a Friday. Next month, the director of Bosch Korea is planning to give a lecture. “I hope a lot more students would be able to have interest in humanities,” wished Park. On Jung-yun jessica0818@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Kim Youn-soo

2017-10 04

[Event]When Altogether, You Are Never Alone

When the season comes for farmers to harvest crops and fruits treasured with their sweat, it is the best time to throw a party. Koreans named this day of invaluable delight, Chuseok- Korean Thanksgiving that comes every August 15th of the lunar calendar. While Chuseok presents Koreans with blissful moments to enjoy traditions, a large number of international students often get lost on what privileges this day delivers to them. In order to help the international students learn more about Chuseok and how to enjoy it, the Division of Engineering and the Office of International Affairs (OIA) prepared discrete Chuseok festivals. Berk Gebes (English Language Education, 2nd year, left) and Shalom Oruma (Division of International Studies, 1st year, right) are trying on a hanbok. On the right, caligraphy is done by one global student who says, "Big things begin small." Invitation from the Division of Engineering The Division of Engineering invited all of the international engineering students studying at Hanyang University (HYU) to experience and learn more about Chuseok. The event was held on September 26, 2017 in front of the Engineering Building and lasted for a 150 minutes, beginning at 12 PM. In order to provide a unique experience for foreign students who can’t easily access special Korean culture, the Division of Engineering included a total five booths for the Chuseok adventure. The first booth was a traditional food festival, including songpyeon (half-moon shaped rice cake served only during Chuseok) and sikhye (sweet rice drink). Also, a booth for trying out Korean traditional clothes- the hanbok was prepared. Students received the opportunity to learn about the various colors and shapes of the hanbok. The next expedition was a traditional folk game. The most interesting game that intrigued the students’ attention was a slap-match game, also called ttakji. The runner-up of this match was Hafiz Omer (Electronic Engineering, 2nd year) from Malaysia, who recalled this game as the best experience in this event, saying, “it was a great experience for me since we don’t have such a game in Malaysia. Also, trying on the Hanbok made me feel like a king due to its silky texture and vivid red color.” The Dance Club of the Division of Engineering "Bunpuri" is performing samulnori (left), and international students are enjoying traditional Chuseok food (right). The program also included a booth for making Korean traditional masks and folk-painting bags. This program introduced a new concept of Korean masks and folk-painting and allowed foreign students to easily experience the culture in a more exciting way. Along with various programs, the samulnori performance (Korean traditional percussion quartet) was also displayed by the Dance Club from the Division of Engineering- Bunpuri. “I love Korean culture, and the samulnori performance was also fascinating. I am especially impressed by Arirang, the Korean traditional song,” said Dilmac (Department of Computer Science, 3rd year) from Turkey. Complete all the Chuseok quests and win the prize The OIA has been preparing Chuseok events for international students of HYU every year. This program took place at the entrance of the International Building on September 27, 2017. “The purpose of this program is to let the foreign students spend the long Chuseok holidays together since most of them are here in Korea alone,” said Yang Ji-young, event supervisor of the OIA. Along with members of the OIA, Global Saranghandae (international HYU ambassador) and Welcome Handae (volunteer group for international students) members also helped global students learn and be more adjusted to Chuseok culture. The program consisted of trying on hanboks, writing words of Chuseok wisdom in individual’s calligraphy style, folk games, and a traditional food booth. Once individuals were confirmed to have completed all the activities, the OIA gifted them with traditional presents. Global students passing by the International Building could try on a colorful hanbok with a cup of sikhye in their hands, and songpyeon in their mouth. “I think the hanbok looks good on me, due its beautiful colors. I had to study for this year’s Chuseok holiday, but this event gifted me a great memory to dwell upon,” said Berk Gebes (English Education, 2nd year) from Turkey. International students are playing folk games - jegichagi (left) and tuho (right). Also, folk games such as tuho (traditional game of throwing sticks into canisters) and jegichagi (Korean shuttlecock game) drew the attention of foreign students. The calligraphy corner, where international students could experience writing well-wishing remarks for each other on picture scrolls, was also crowded. “I especially loved tuho, despite the fact that I missed out all the marks! Even though I miss my family in Nigeria, staying here with my friends during Chuseok through this kind of event definitely cheered me up,” said Shalom Oruma (Division of International Studies, 1st year). Kim Ju-hyun kimster9421@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Kim Youn-soo

2017-10 02

[Academics][Researcher of the Month] Producing Energy Through a Single Thread

'Lack of energy’ is an issue the whole world is focusing on. Various countries are searching for effective renewable energy and new materials that could replace the current energy sources. Professor Kim Seon-jeong (Department of Biomedical Engineering) discovered a new material every researcher was looking for. Kim's paper, “Harvesting electrical energy from carbon nanotube yarn twist” introduces the world’s first new material, which can produce energy through slight movements. Kim explains the concept of his new material Professor Kim’s research team started its first project in 2006 on artificial muscle. However, after his research, Kim realized its limitations as they were only able to move through an external energy source. Therefore, he thought of a new idea that the muscle would be more effective when it is able to produce energy by itself. Carbon nanotube is a new material which is a type of conductor and has a diameter of only a few nanometers. This material was made as a thread in the artificial muscle. However, when these threads were finely twisted into one direction, they were able to produce energy by itself through its contraction and relaxation without an applied voltage. Being made into a spring, their length can be changed as much as 30 percent on average. This new material, named as ‘twistron harvester yarn’, allowed a chance for the muscle to move by itself without a separate power source. This twistron harvester yarn looks and acts as if it were an ordinary thread. This states that making clothes out of this material is possible. Once this comes into realization, this would give a boost in making wearable devices, as producing electricity without an energy source is possible. Moreover, this thread is possible to use inside water, giving another possibility of an effective alternative energy. This has already been tested in the East Sea of Korea. Kim’s research team made a model consisting of a glass bottle connected with an electrode, the thread, a balloon, and an equipment that could measure electricity. As the twistron harvester yarn contracted and relaxed, electrical energy was verified from the ocean. Kim showed great passion in the research he was conducting. This research on the twistron harvester yarn was his fourth research. He has been working on artificial muscles for the past nine years before he started this research. “I didn’t start this research solely to find the twistron harvester yarn. I felt the limitations within the research I conducted earlier and was seeking for development,” reminisced Kim. He explained that he wasn’t the only person who conducted the research. Eight teams from three different countries worked on this new material for two years to deduct a better result. “We had a meeting through Skype every week, along with frequent visits to each team. Everyone had great passion and interest towards this research, and I believe that shows the firmness of this research,” said Kim. "Reach towards your own interest!" Kim also emphasized the attitudes Hanyangians should have towards their life. Even though he mainly teaches graduate school students, he wished all students could find what they truly wish to do. “Find something unique of your own. Find something you enjoy, and then you will be able to continue on with whatever you are doing. There are countless routes for all students. I wish students would keep challenging themselves to make the greatest results of their own,” wished Kim. Just as his words, Kim will continue with his work with great passion, for even better convenience for global citizens. On Jung-yun jessica0818@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Kim Youn-soo

2017-09 29

[Performance]Hanyang Ranked 23rd Worldwide for Its Influence on Industry and Innovation

Hanyang University ranked 1st in nation and 23rd worldwide in The Nature Index 2017 Innovation table, 'Top 100 institutions by Lens score.' ▲Data from Top 100 institutions by Lens score (input data) Hanyang's 'Normalized lens influence metric' was 5.56 indicating that the ratio of 'Normalized aggregate citation' to 'Total resolved articles' is higher than other institutions. This achievement can be interpreted that there is high connection between Hanyang's high-quality research and the commercialization of new products and services, as Hanyang's founding principle 'Application of Knowledge' indicates. 8 institutions in South Korea including Hanyang University, POSTECH, KAIST, GIST, Yonsei University, Seoul National University, Sungkyunkwan University and Korea University were ranked within global Top 200. Table presents data on research quality and broad influence on inventions. Institutions are ranked by normalized Lens influence metric, an indicator of an institution’s influence on patents. For further information on the normalised Lens influence metric of Hanyang University, click this link. Click to see, Top 100 institutions by Lens score (input data)

2017-09 27

[Event]Hanyang University Hosted a 'Chuseok Event' for Foreign Students

Hanyang University hosted a 'Chuseok event with foreign students from College of Engineering' at the Engineering Building of Seoul Campus, Seongdong-gu, Seoul on September 26th. This event was held to celebrate Korea's national holiday, Chuseok, by providing opportunities to experience traditional culture to foreign students and to strengthen the ties between international students and Korean students. ▲ Foreign students who participated in the event are making rice cakes ▲ Foreign students who participated in the event are making Songpyeon. ▲ Foreign students who participated in the event are playing slap-match game(ttakji-chigi) ▲ Foreign students who participated in the event are experiencing the traditional play 'Touho'. ▲ Foreign students who participated in the event are making holiday foods. ▲Foreign students attending the ceremony are wearing hanbok. ▲ Foreign students who participated in the event are trying Korean traditional taffy stick ▲ Foreign students who participated in the event are writing Korean callygraphy scroll

2017-09 27

[Academics]Low Energy Consuming Utilization of Chemical Sensors

When a chemical sensor is embedded into a mobile device, the significant sensing properties are amplified by low costs, high response, great stability, and robustness. However, there is one property of a chemical sensor that hinders technicians from utilizing it with a mobile device--unbearable power consumption. In his paper, “Self-heating effects on the toluene sensing of Pt-functionalized SnO2-ZnO core-shell nanowires,” professor Kim Hyeon-woo of the Division of Material Science and Engineering proposes a self-power sensor that allows low energy consumption of 31 μW at 5 V. Kim is explaining about the novel discovery of his research. In order to apply chemical sensors to mobile devices, the temperature of the sensor should be high enough to be generated. However, in the process of raising the temperature, the magnitude of energy consumption is vast. “Chemical sensors have extreme advantages such as cheap costs, small size, excellent stability, and robustness. However, the high energy consumption prevents scientists to consider them as an option for mobile devices,” said Kim. To reduce the energy consumption, Kim and his fellow researchers have exhibited a self-heated nanowire sensor through this study. “For the reduction of energy usage, we synthesized Pt nanoparticle-functionalized SnO2–ZnO core–shell nanowires. The shells of these wires utilized for the chemical sensor are thicker than usual. This allows a larger self-heating ability and a higher sensor response,” explained Kim. SnO2–ZnO is a synthesis of tin dioxide and zinc oxide that results in a strong core-shell (class of materials which have properties intermediate between those of small, individual molecules and those of bulk, crystalline semiconductors). The total energy required for this chemical sensor to be self-heated was 31 μW at 5 V. “This novel discovery was possible due to the groundbreaking nanowires that allowed the sensor to self-heat even at room temperature,” said Kim. Thus, this research, has ultimately suggested the potential application of chemical sensors into mobile devices, fully utilizing their peculiar sensing properties. “The sensor industry in South Korea will now be able to gain international competitiveness by exporting this novel sensor, which is currently in the process of development,” proposed Kim. Kim is holding a sensor that he's currently developing. The academic life of Kim has been devoted to nanostructure and sensors. His original research area was on nanostructure (a structure, especially a semiconductor device, that has dimensions of only a few nanometers). “I have always studied nanostructure, and I realized that the practical application of this leads to sensors,” explained Kim. Gas and radioactive sensors are Kim’s further research subjects, which he looks forward to utilizing in real life in a few years. “Pragmatic application of dramatic discoveries in research is difficult, but I will try my best to improve this industry,” revealed Kim. Kim Ju-hyun kimster9421@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Choi Min-ju