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2017-09 06

[Event]Hanyang University Held Entrance Ceremony for International Students

Hanyang University held “2017 Entrance Ceremony for international students” at Paiknam Concert Hall, Seoul Campus, Seongdong-gu, Seoul on August 31st. Over 400 students from 43 countries attended the ceremony. ▲Foreign students who attended the entrance ceremony taking a commemorative photo ▲Students from College of Music are performing Korean traditional music. ▲Freshmen are watching the celebration performance ▲Students are taking a commemorative photo ▲ Students are participating in entrance ceremony ▲ Students are participating in entrance ceremony ▲ Taekwondo performance is being held ▲ Students are being informed about the event

2017-09 04

[Academics]Chlor-alkali Electrolysis in Use

Professor Park Joo-yang of the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering is an expert in the field of engineering. His paper, “SWRO brine reuse by diaphragm-type chlor-alkali electrolysis to produce alkali-activated slag” discusses a novel method of breaking down the brine after the desalination process. After the desalination process, what is left over is the brine (salt water with twice the concentration) and fresh water. Letting the brine out back into the ocean would cause a destruction of the ocean life cycle because thousands of tons of water is desalinated everyday and the concentration of salt would cause trouble for ocean farms. Through electrolysis process of the brine, chlorine gas and hydrogen gas are produced and this would be reused in diverse ways such as tap water. Park is explaining about the break down of brine process. Electrolysis process would leave chlor-alkali which would be used to produce alkali-activated slag used for pavements. Through the activation process of the alkali with the slag, it would turn into hard substance which is then processed to make pavement blocks. Since it is produced out of what should be discarded, it is economically efficient and is very durable, and also environmentally friendly. Some of the problems that Park is facing is that the research studies regarding this plant is almost reaching the developed level but has difficulty in terms of industrialization. Since brine has been let out into the ocean until nowadays which resulted in low handling expenses. For Park’s team to collect the brine and run the electrolysis process costs way too much even considering the fact that the slags would be produced at a reasonable cost. Handling costs outweigh the expenses of economic and environmental costs which makes it reluctant for companies to invest in producing such power plants. Park is continuously working to produce more environmentally friendly and cost efficient products through electrolysis processes although it may be a hard task to implement it. “I believe that continuously working in a field of expertise would open the doors for many opportunities,” concluded Park. “Continuously working in a field of expertise would open the doors for many opportunities.” Kim Seung-jun nzdave94@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Choi Min-ju

2017-08 31

[Academics][Researcher of the Month] What Makes People Pro-Environment? (1)

“Whenever I go on a trip or big festivals, I always worry about all the trashes people throw away. It’s just too much.” Professor Hyun Sung-hyup of the Division of Tourism recently published his paper, "Fostering customers’ pro-environmental behavior at museum". The paper thoroughly investigates the affective and cognitive factors of individuals visiting museums and analyzes which factor has the most impact on their pro-environmental intentions. Hyun emphasized that most people are very environmentally friendly in their house. They recycle well, try not to waste food or water. However, the point is that the very same people behave entirely differently from the moment they leave their house. Trashes are disposed not separately, which then has to be combusted, letting carbon into the air. Tissues, water, food and all kinds of resources are wasted. Hyun wondered what is behind the people’s paradoxical behavior. He also wanted to figure out what needs to be triggered in order to resolve such paradox and to motivate eco-friendly behavior from the general public. A table showing relations of each factor and their effects (Photo courtesy of Hyun) Over the course of a year, Hyun went to a broad range of museums which deal with themes like art, war, and tradition to interview, survey and observe the visitors. From the data collected from 321 tourists, he ran statistical analysis simulation program to construct a conceptual framework that can predict people’s behavior in public spaces. He also sought for professional advice from other fields such as environmental specialists or professors in engineering for further insight. Based on his field research with dozens and hundreds of related papers he studied, Hyun found out that ‘Environmental Knowledge (EK)’ out of five cognitive factors, was the most significant factor in determining one’s environmentally responsible decision-making process. Hyun is explaining the process of his research. Hyun asserted that environmental education on a regular basis is essential. People with more professional knowledge on the vulnerability of the environment or the impact of their action is more inclined to show consistent behavior both in and outside of their home. "It seems like a lot of people lack education regarding the environment in both public and private sectors," said Hyun. Lamenting at such reality, Hyun wishes environmental education to be part of the public education curriculum in the near future. When asked what inspired him to become a researcher in Tourism, Hyun smiled and answered that his professors during college years influenced him a lot. “Hanyang University offers the best curriculum on Tourism, with respectful professors. I always looked up to them.” Hyun said he decided to study further because there are so much intriguing topics to research in the field of Tourism. He encourages future researchers in the field to boldly try out, because tourism is very future oriented, interdisciplinary and economically significant field of study. Hyun himself plans to vigorously research further on issues related with environment and tourism. “Researching while lecturing, mentoring and living personal life is tough but I still enjoy it,” said Hyun, with affection to his work. Kim So-yun dash070@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Choi Min-ju

2017-08 29

[Event][채널H] Hanyang International Summer School 2017 opening ceremony

■ Date : July 3rd 2017 ■ Location : Hanyang University Paiknam Concert Hall Although spring semester ended two weeks ago, our university’s summer is just getting started with Hanyang International Summer School. Let’s take a closer look at the opening ceremony and find out what kind of events took place. On July 3rd, 2017, the opening ceremony in Paiknam Concert Hall marked the beginning of this year’s Hanyang International Summer School. Hanyang International Summer School, which was established 20 years ago, offers over 70 courses that are taught in English to international students from around the glove every summer. The number of students who apply for the program has been constantly increasing. This year, more than 2,000 students from 54 countries have come to our school.

2017-08 28

[Alumni]The Master of Go

Currently a professional player and a professor of the game Go, Jeong Soo-hyun (English Language and Literature, ’83) dreamed of becoming a professional Go player since he was in high school. Jeong learned to play Go as a student and was charmed by the joy until he eventually decided that he wanted to be a master of it. As a professional player, Jeong has written about 40 books, has been teaching Go for more than 20 years, and has telecasted on numerous TV programs. Go and life Jeong navigated his life toward the world of Go and sought his career in that field at first because he was purely attracted by its joy. It all began as an interest and a passion, after which he grew to be more enthusiastic and ambitious. To Jeong, Go is not just a job but rather something that links to his mind and thoughts. “I found another world studying Go. I might call it a world of Go culture,” laughed Jeong. “I often refer to Go as a panacea, which is the cure for all ills. I sometimes get amazed by how extensive Go can reach in our daily lives. It teaches us so much!” exclaimed Jeong. After graduating from high school, he entered the Korea Baduk (game of Go) Association as a researcher, which is the first and indispensable step of becoming a professional. He had about 40 Go matches every year, through which Jeong studied and accumulated his skills and knowledge. “It’s not through practice that you improve yourself in Go, but it is rather through analyzing other players’ games. So I made several small groups and focused on growing insights and developing my own mastery.” Jeong read books about Go in order to get the holistic picture of the game and to master the theory of it. The more he studied, the more he was absorbed into the game. Jeong reached the highest level of 9th grader in Go after countless matches starting from level one when he was 41. Higher levels could be achieved through gaining points by winning Go matches. “I highly recommend learning or practicing Go as a hobby. It is not only fascinating itself but also extremely lesson-full and wisdom-giving at the same time. Recently, Go has become a global mind-sport, meaning being good at it will enable you to be good at communicating with people.” After becoming a professional Go player and entering Hanyang University, Jeong has established a club named “Hanyang Giwoohui”, which has become more active even after Jeong’s graduation. "Go is full of lessons!" (Photo courtesy of heraldcorp) As a professional and a professor It has been more than 20 years since Jeong became a professor of Go at a Korean university. He spent the longer part of his Go life as a professor than as a professional. With his life motto “no pain no gain”, he has been teaching his students that where there is no effort, there is no outcome. “What I’ve learned through my life as a Go player is that it feels more worthwhile to do something for the others than for just yourself and that the ultimate result will be in your favor. I believe doing what you love with passion will beget meaningful outcomes,” manifested Jeong. Winning the second place in both KBS Baduk Match and SBS Baduk Match, and being the first winner of the Professional Baduk Match, Jeong’s name is mentioned in lists of the winners of many professional Go matches. “I only won the second place because my rival was mighty. I can still recall the bitterness,” reminisced Jeong. Currently taking the role of the president of Korea Professional Baduk Association and Korean Society for Baduk Studies, Jeong is continuting his studies of Go. “No pain no gain is my life philosophy. If you don’t work, there will be no award.” Having published about 40 books of baduk (Go), Jeong’s recommendations for beginners are ‘Introduction to Baduk’, ‘Master of Management’, and ‘CEO Who Reads Baduk’, all of which are perfect for baduk beginners to read. He first wrote a book due to a request of learners, after which Jeong got a number of requests from other publishing companies to publish more books. Thanks to all his publications, he acquired the nickname “baduk professor” even before he became one. His achievements all together as a professional Go player spotlights him as one of the most prominent players. "I believe hard work always pays off. There awaits rewarads for those who work hard." (Photo courtesy of heraldcorp) Jeon Chae-yun chaeyun111@hanyang.ac.kr

2017-08 22

[Academics]Beyond the Matter of Life and Death

Most people do not enjoy postoperative scars, especially on the visible parts of their body. Professor Tae Kyung of Department of Medicine recently reported the outcomes of newly developed operation method in his paper “Functional and cosmetic outcomes of robot-assisted neck dissection by a postauricular facelift approach for head and neck cancer”. As from the title Tae’s research compared surgical outcomes of both conventional neck dissection and his new facelift approach, which takes cosmetic aspects of the patients into account. “Nowadays, it is more than just life and death. Quality of life after the operation is also important.” (Photo courtesy of Tae) In the case of patients with head and neck cancer, cancer cell often spreads to the lymph node of cervical (neck) area. The conventional surgical method to treat the lymph node metastasis is to give vertical and transverse cervical incision (cut), which leaves permanent mark in the patient’s neck. As always having interest in plastic surgery – which is part of Otolaryngology (Head and Neck Surgery) – Tae concerned for postoperative quality of life. Therefore, he took the facelift approach which is still mostly used for cosmetic purposes, especially to unwrinkle one’s face. This way, the scar is left in the back side of the patient’s ear alongside the hairline, which is significantly less visible. The paper “Functional and cosmetic outcomes of robot-assisted neck dissection by a postauricular facelift approach for head and neck cancer” specifically reports the postoperative outcomes of the revolutionary implication as short as one day after the surgery to as long as 12 months. From 2013 Tae and his co-researchers collected data of 113 patients who underwent unilateral neck dissection both through the particular approach and the conventional approach. As a result, the team led by Tae was able to compare the functional and cosmetic outcomes which proved that Tae’s method is advantageous. Namely, patients suffered from less neck edema (swelling of neck) and sensory loss. Cosmetically patients reported significantly lower satisfaction scores. (Note that the higher the satisfaction is, the lower the scores are.) Both neck edema and sensory loss is lower in the robotic procedure, as shown in the tables. (Photo courtesy of Tae) Another specialty of Tae’s method of operation is that it requires robotic assist called Da Vinci robot because the operation makes a very thin tunnel inside the neck, making it physically impossible for the surgeons otherwise. Tae, as one of the first person in the world to conduct robotic neck dissection wanted to further develop the method and evaluate it. This report is one of his efforts trying to keep evaluating and improving his new surgical method. “It is still early to report the cure rate of cancer through this method, but now we know about the postoperative sensory loss, motion limitations, and the satisfaction of patients through this research,” said Tae. Tae also struggles to improve Otolaryngology in Korea and Asia. He mentioned that he chose to become head and neck surgeon because the area was less developed and researched at that time, and that challenged him. Now he is a general secretary of Asia Pacific Society of Thyroid Surgery which he founded, wishing well for the future of the field. “I wish my students to improve Korea as much to be the leading country in Otolaryngology and become global leaders.” Kim So-yun dash070@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Choi Min-ju

2017-08 21

[General]The Power of International Students

On the second floor of the International building, a global lounge along with a global information center desk is available for anyone to use. Any international students can ask whatever problem they have through this desk. However, surprisingly, the people answering these questions are also international students of Hanyang University (HYU). ‘Welcome Handae’, which is a volunteer group mainly consisted of international students, just finished recruiting their members for the second semester on the 18th and are ready to help their colleagues. Light for Hanyang international students ‘Welcome Handae’ is a volunteer group working behind the global information lounge. This lounge was first made due to the increasing number of foreign students visiting HYU. Currently in the International building, numerous administration teams are located, making it extremely hard for international students who aren’t familiar with Korean to receive the answers for their questions. In order to solve this problem, the global information center was opened on July 2016, as a one-stop service. Any international students can resolve most of their problems through this center that is seen as soon as they enter the building. A Welcome Handae student answering the questions of a foreign student. (Photo courtesy of Park Jin-ju) The manager of the global information center, Park Jin-ju explained that this group was initially created for the community service hour of foreign students. “Since most of the community service activities require fluent Korean skills, Welcome Handae was made for those who weren’t familiar with Korean.”, said Park. However, this program provided help not only for those participating, but also for other foreigners who were having trouble adapting to an unfamiliar environment. As most of the participants are international students, they were able to completely understand other international students’ difficulties and give them effective solutions as if it were their own problem. Welcome Handae provides extensive help to foreign students in numerous areas. They first help simple questions such as locations of various facilities and methods of handling various documents and applications. Moreover, information such as job fairs and useful programs in HYU are noticed through the posters made by the Welcome Handae students. They also plan various events held by the global information center in the global lounge such as Halloween and Thanksgiving Day, providing various entertainment as well. As Hanyangians, they provide eye-level assistance to all international students. As participants of Welcome Handae Not only did Welcome Handae give a lot of help to interantional students, but they also say they have received a lot from their experience. A Kenyan student, Nyambegera Duke Zacharia (Computer Science, 4th year) who participated reminisced “I think Welcome Handae is a great opportunity to learn not only about Korea, but also about many other countries. You can make friends with various nationalities, learning more about different cultures. I think this program evokes mutual understandings between other countries.” Moreover, Mohd Khairil Khairon (Department of Electronic Engineering, 3rd year) from Malaysia remarked “Both my English and Korean improved through this work. I am now able to find the information I need through the internet as I practiced doing so. I felt proud of myself when I was able to help another student apply for a program through the internet.” The participants have great affection towards Welcome Handae. From the left, Khairon (Department of Electronic Engineering, 3rd year) and Zacharia (Computer Science, 4th year) There were students who realized the hardships of others through their work. Luis Manuel Escandon (Mechanical Engineering, 4th year) from Mexico mentioned that he realized the effort the faculty was making towards the students. “I used to ignore the text messages sent from school since I couldn’t understand them properly. However, I found out that they were intently researching to make programs helpful for us.” There was even a student who was able to change another student’s school life. Rui Zhang (Theater and Film, 2nd year) from China gave advice to a student wishing to quit school even before entering, for the fear of their grade. She spent her time with the student even after her working shift, and was able to persuade the student to come back to Hanyang University again. “I felt so proud of myself when the student came back to me to say thank you for what I did,” reminisced Zhang. The third Welcome Handae will start their work from the second semester, and are prepared to give more help to all international students. Chang Ha-il (Business, 3rd year), a Korean participant, expressed his hope for the development of both Welcome Handae and the global information center. “There are a lot of information foreign students can receive, even when they don’t have any questions. I hope that they would more freely use this center and receive a lot of meaningful information they can use as HYU’s students.” The participants of Welcome Handae are standing around the global information center's mangager, Park Jin-ju (first row, second from the left). On Jung-yun jessica0818@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Choi Min-ju

2017-08 15

[Academics]Upgrading Transcriptome Map

Incredible amount of transcriptomes encoded by eukaryotic genomes has been produced as RNA-sequencing reads are published in piles. The transcriptome is the sum of all RNA information contained in a body’s cells, which is an indispensable data when creating the transcriptome map of the body. The current map, however, is not its apotheosis since it was constructed based on RNA-seq reads that lack their orientations and certain boundary information. In his paper “High-confidence coding and noncoding transcriptome,” Professor Nam Jin-wu of Department of Life Science has presented the transcriptome map with RNA-seq reads with high accuracy and efficiency. “What makes this research valuable is its contribution to the scientific community. It will function as an indispensable infrastructure.” RNA and the map In the past 10 years, with the technology of next generation sequencing (NGO), data of individual’s genome and transcriptome has been developing at a rapid pace. Genetic information of both healthy and diseased individuals aggregates to approximately 10 peta bytes from all over the world, from which Nam focused specifically on analyzing the transcriptome, disregarding the genome for the moment. A critical difference between the two is that genome has orientation while transcriptome lacks it. This indicates that it would be extremely difficult and inconvenient to arrange the little pieces of information to form the whole genetic map of transcriptome. “What it means by ‘lack of orientation’ is, simply picture this situation: putting batteries in a remote control which has no plus or minus indicators. You would have to find the right direction by just trying. It is also like jigsaw puzzles where you have to search thoroughly the scattered pieces and find and put the right ones together until you get the whole picture,” explained Nam. Constructing a genetic map with orderless pieces of information could be an arduous task, since the massive bio-big data offers a tremendous amount of genetic information and they lack orientation. What Nam has created through his research is an algorithm that predetermines the orientation and boundaries of transcripts and genetic information. This will not only lessen the work of constructing the transcriptome map by assembling RNA-seq reads that lack orientation but also increase the accuracy and quality of the resulting maps. The outcome of his research, in a word, orients the directionless RNA-seq reads and locate them where they belong. Now with the more accurate and systematic transcriptome map, the amount and structure of RNA in a cell in the body could be figured. Nam first started this research three years ago, spending the first two years constructing the algorithm and spending the last year producing data using NGS. He is currently researching on the noncoding RNA (RNA that does not produce protein), which is highly related with various types of cancer and other rare diseases. The ultimate goal of Nam’s studies is to solve the mystery of unexplored RNA. 98% of RNA in human body belongs to the noncoding category, so how exactly do they affect the way a human being is and how do they account for different anomalies? “A good question begets a good study.” Jeon Chae-yun chaeyun111@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Choi Min-ju

2017-08 08

[Academics]Founding Father of the Pragmatic Application of Stepping Motors

Every moving object needs a power plant. In the industrial world, permanent magnet stepper motors are widely used, which are designed with permanent motor (PM) rotors that are commanded by electrical pulses. In his paper “Nonlinear H2 Control for a Nonlinear System with Bounded Varying Parameters: Application to PM Stepper Motors,” Chung proposes a new nonlinear H2 controller for the PM motors that can increase the efficiency both in its speed and practicality. Chung is the pioneer in South Korea to discover new methods of applying nonlinear H2 control for a nonlinear system. Utilization of the PM motors vary from household purposes such as printers to industrial purposes such as gas systems and cars. Since its earlier usage from the 1970s, these motors have thrown questions to scientists and engineers on its formula. “Despite the fact that these motors are popularized in the industry, there are constraints in the PM motors, such as speed restriction,” said Chung. To solve this problem, engineers have discovered the DQ (direct quadrature) transformation of the motors which is a tensor that rotates the reference frame of a element vector matrix to simplify the analysis of it. “My research team has found that DQ is comparatively inefficient in terms of energy saving and cost control. Thus, we detected a new mathematical method to replace the DQ transformation,” said Chung. Often times, engineers used the linear system to control the PM motors. A linear motor is an electric motor that has its stator and rotor unrolled, so that instead of producing a torque, it produces a linear force along its length. However, linear motors are not necessarily straight, which causes restrictions in speed. “Formula of the linear system consists of homogeneity and additivity, and the main point of our research was to minimize the relationship between them using the H2 control system,” emphasized Chung. This FOC (Field Oriented Control) with the H2 system went through an experiment with other traditional methods for a comparison. “The results were outstanding as more simplified version of mathematical calculation and less usage of sensors beforehand were required, while the tracking errors and energy cost were reduced respectively,” said Chung. The green line of case 3, which uses the FOC (Field Orientation Control) of the H2 control shows the extreme distinction in tracking errors. (Photo courtesy of Chung) The most desired application of this method is on the intelligence vehicle, which is a car that can drive by itself without any interference of a driver. “Learning about the motion control, which is the main issue of my paper, is the most important criteria of designing a self-driving vehicle. This study allowed me to grow this industry rapidly in five years,” astonished Chung. Currently, Chung’s research lab for the intelligence vehicle based on motion control is the best in Korea which acquire all the knowledge on the sensors, actuators, and control algorithms. Chung’s passion for science was conspicuous from the days he used to make a radio on his own. When he started gaining interests in engineering, motion control grabbed his sight. “The stepping motors and their control system are fundamental technologies. I thought that developing them into pragmatic applications would be exciting,” reminisced Chung. Currently, Chung is passionately contributing to the scientific and technological advancement. For the visible result, he had launched the IEEE (Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers) ‘s CDC (Conference on Decision and Control) conference at Jeju Island, South Korea. “This is the first time ever that the CDC conference is being held in South Korea and I consider this the greatest achievement of my academic life so far,” smiled Chung. Chung is currently working on developing more advanced intelligence vehicles. Chung’s everlasting hope for his students is that they could study both science and liberal arts. “I wish South Korean educational system could teach students to embrace the joy of learning. This will eventually rear the bright sprouts of Korea,” said Chung. Kim Ju-hyun kimster9421@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Choi Min-ju

2017-08 07

[Culture]Apps You Need in Your Life

Kakao Talk, Jihachul, Naver Map, Seoul Bus, Naver Dictionary, Candy Camera, Snow, Melon, Kakao Taxi, and various coffee shop stamp apps are all typical applications found in an ordinary korean’s smartphone. These apps are common yet indispensable to the extent that they have become a big part of people’s daily lives in Korea. Besides these everyday applications, what are some fun, genius apps worth downloading? From left to right, Date Pop, Seoul Travel, Albamon, People of Delivery, and Zigzag. (Photo courtesy of play.google.com) Brilliant and convenient First things first, for those who love to visit new places, either one of these two applications are highly recommended: Date Pop or Seoul Travel. These applications are more than just handy when looking for some fun places to hang out with friends and lovers or when finding appetizing cafes or restaurants. From location, menu, price and reviews, the apps provide much information and works as the encyclopedia of enjoyment. Creation of such applications has motivated a win-win situation for both users and business owners. People can gain fun and convenient information with just a few taps on their smartphone screen while the app functions as a great loudspeaker for the restaurant and cafe owners. By providing wandering roamers with countless options for their destination, the app has become a great mean of advertisement and a plan maker at the same time. Click the region you want to go and see where you want to visit. (Photo courtesy of achimjuice.tistory.com) Price, location, and menu are all listed in Seoul Travel. (Photo courtesy of app.chosun.com) When looking for an alba, or part-time jobs, there is nothing more helpful than the app Albamon. If Date Pop and Seoul Travel are the mobile books of fun places, Albamon is the one for people looking for part-time jobs. The app displays countless employment notice from myriad of companies, restaurants, cafes, stores, and more. Jobs can be funneled by one's setting according to his or her categories such as payment, location, working time, and age requirements. With the right setting, finding a perfect fitting alba for one is not a tricky task anymore. It is an useful app to anyone who is looking for all kinds of part-time jobs. Detailed, comprehensive, and individual-tailored part-time job information are provided. (Photo courtesy of appannie.com) There is nothing more convenient than having one's food delivered when there is no time and energy to cook or go out to eat but hunger is demanding some action. In such situation, People of Delivery is the perfect app to satisfy hunger’s demand. Korea’s delivery service is something that exceeds the level of mere convenience but something that has developed into a huge part of its culture—even McDonalds is delivered. Fitting to the title, this app is the phonebook of all menus in Korea, since virtually all the menus are listed in the app and they are all ready to be delivered. Making the app more convenient, the categorization according to menu and franchised restaurants enables easy scanning for indecisive customers. According to menu and franchised restaurants, categories are made. (Photo courtesy of estimastory.com) Even online shopping can be an easier task with a mobile app. Zigzag is urgent to download for lazy shopaholics or thrifty shoppers. This application is the ultimate compilation of numerous online shopping malls, having the excellent function of gathering and presenting a particular item from different malls and allowing the shopper to compare the price at one sight. The app allows the shopper to find the item or fashion he or she is looking for and buy it at its best price. Enter the category of clothing, look through the list of online shopping malls, and compare the price are all it takes to purchase the exact item one wants at the most affordable price. Styles, price and items can be seen in one sight. (Photo courtesy of simsimha3.tistory.com) Jeon Chae-yun chaeyun111@hanyang.ac.kr