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2018-02 22

[Performance]Hanyang University employment rate at 72.7%, ranking in the top 3

The employment rate of graduates at Hanyang University is the third highest among the major universities. According to the Jongro Academy Haneul Education, which analyzed the employment rate of 194 universities in 2016 (graduates from August 2015 and February 2016) by using the government education statistics service on Jan. 19, Hanyang University had an increase of 4 points bringing it to a total of 72.7%, ranking third among the 42 largest universities with more than 3,000 graduates. Sungkyunkwan University ranked first at 76.4%. The following universities comprise ranks 2 through 10 in the top 10 universities by employment rate, respectively: Korea University (73.8%), Hanyang University (72.7%), Seoul National University (70.6%), Yonsei University (70.1%), Soongsil University (69.0%), Inha University (68.3%), Dongguk University (68.2%), Gachon University (68.1%), and Chung Ang University (67.6%). According to the employment rate by departments, the Medical Department was the highest at 83.9%, followed by Engineering (69.4%), Social Studies (62.9%), Art, Music and Physical Studies (62.5%), Nature (60.7%), and Humanities (57.5%). The average employment rate for all universities was 67.7%, up 0.2 percent from the previous year (67.5%). According to a news article from the Korea Times on February 19th, Oh Jong-woon, the director of Haneul Education at the Jongno Academy, said, "Despite the recent drop in the number of unemployed college graduates last month from 7,000 last year, it will still be difficult to solve the unemployment problem for youths unless a dramatic employment stabilization policy comes out." Ranking University The number of graduates The number of graduates for employment The number of graduates employed Employment rate (%) Employment rate (Male) Employment rate (Female) Employment rate of privious year (%) 1 Sungkyunkwan Uni 4417 3516 2685 76.4 79.4 71.0 74.8 2 Korea Uni 4393 3250 2400 73.8 78.4 67.1 72.7 3 Hanyang Uni 3696 2895 2104 72.7 75.8 66.8 68.7 4 Seoul National Uni 3375 2185 1543 70.6 74.0 66.6 70.1 5 Yonsei Uni 4414 3229 2264 70.1 72.3 67.4 70.2 6 Soongsil Uni 3149 2819 1946 69.0 70.6 66.8 66.3 7 Inha Uni 3830 3346 2284 68.3 72.0 62.3 68.1 8 Dongguk Uni 3140 2579 1758 68.2 71.8 63.9 67.6 9 Gachon Uni 4330 3929 2675 68.1 69.2 67.2 67.9 10 Chung Ang Uni 5292 4688 3168 67.6 70.7 64.1 66.4

2018-02 20

[Performance]Hanyang University ranked 2nd in the nation in 'THE Asia University Rankings'

In 'THE Asia University Rankings' by the Times Higher Education (THE), a U.K. based institution for evaluating universities, Hanyang University ranked second in the nation on the International Reputation Category and was recognized for their great reputation among foreign students and in international academia. This assessment, which is considered to be the most credible in Asia, is based on five indicators: Citations, Industry Income, International Outlook, Research, and Teaching, respectively. Hanyang University ranked 38th in Asia with 41.9 points in Citations, 84.7 points in Industry Income, 56.4 points in International Outlook, 45.5 points in Research, and 40.7 points in Teaching. Hanyang is ranked eighth among domestic universities. ▲ Rankings and Score Details of Hanyang University (Source: THE official homepage) This year, a total of 359 universities were evaluated, and the top 200 rankings were released. Among the domestic universities, Seoul National University occupied 9th in Asia and 1st in the nation. In addition, the following Korean universities were ranked accordingly in the list of THE 2018 Asia University Rankings: KAIST (10th), POSTECH (12th), Sungkyunkwan (13th), Yonsei University (20th), UNIST (22nd), Korea University (24th), Hanyang University (38th), GIST (39th), Kyung Hee University (40th), Chung-Ang University (50th), Ewha Womans University (65th), Ulsan University (77th), Konkuk University (95th), Pusan National University (97th), and Sejong University (100th). The university which occupied the top spot in THE Asia University Rankings 2018 is the National University of Singapore, followed by Tsinghua University, occupying 2nd, , and Peking University, occupying 3rd. The University of Hong Kong (HKU) ranked 4th, and the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (HKUST) and Nanyang Technological University ranked 5th. ▶ Click here to see THE 2018 World University Rankings (click)

2018-02 12

[General]Hanyang Trail-Doolehgil Recreated on Our Hands

Hanyang University is known to have many hills, making the two-dimensional map less useful. It is not hard to encounter a visitor or a freshman on campus asking for directions year-round. The Industry-University Cooperation Foundation and the Wooyang Cooperation joined forces to develop Smart Doolehgil last April, which had its opening ceremony on December 12th. On Friday, January 9th, the team joined the 2018 College Lab Technology Start-up Demo Day in the Coex for the demonstration. News H joined the event to further explore the Smart Doolehgil. The Smart Doolehgil application is running on a tablet. The application can be downloaded from the Google Playstore. Visitors, freshman, and the visually impaired Doolehgil is a Korean word that refers to a walking road that goes around something. The Hanyang Doolehgil, therefore, refers to Hanyang’s eight scenic points and the roads that connect them. A 2.6km-long trail that passes through the campus covers major historical monuments and buildings of Hanyang. The trail provides a restful environment for people and an opportunity to see the whole Sungdong-gu at a glance. Unfortunately, there are some people that cannot join the majority due to their visual impairment. Smart Doolehgil provides guidance to those who are not familiar with the campus but mainly for the visually impaired. “We are always interested in corporate social responsibility (CSR) and have the technology to provide better guidance,” said Kim Jin-hong (Chemistry, '85), the CEO of Wooyang Cooperation. Smart Doolehgil was created with Wooyang Corporation’s technology in making beacon devices combined with the Hanyang Industry-University Cooperation Foundation’s data processing technology. A beacon is an intentionally conspicuous device designed to attract attention to a specific location. More than 350 beacon sensors planted on campus are now working as the new guide dog. Kim Jin-hong (Chemistry, '85), the CEO of Wooyang Cooperation, is enthusiastically explaining the background story of the Smart Doolehgil system. For better mobility With the smartphone application and a shoe sole, the visually impaired or individuals with very poor vision can locate buildings, ATMs, and bathrooms. A pair of location devices is embedded in the specially designed shoe sole, and vibrates in the direction where the person has to move to. For instance, if a walker needs to turn right at a corner, the sole in their right shoe vibrates. The device also lets the user know whenever he or she is facing a staircase, a hazardous place, or has arrived to their destination. The smartphone application is used together with the device to provide verbal instruction. Both Kim and Jang Gi-sool (Manager, Industry-University Cooperation Foundation) mentioned that Kim Hee-jin (Management, 4th year) helped a lot, especially in giving insight from the perspective of the visually impaired, from what they need the most in order to enhance their mobility. She also contributed in choosing the location of the device to be inserted in the shoes, where it was least apparent from the outside. Other options, such as the wrists or neck, would have discouraged the handicapped from using the system. The shoe sole vibrates to alert the user about the direction or any hazards. The product has not yet been placed on the consumer market as it is still under development. The Smart Doolehgil, however, is accessable only via the smartphone application. “We still need more progress. The most important thing is the preciseness, as many blind people cannot find the entrance of the building even if they succeed in finding the building itself. The more accurate it is, the better,” mentioned Kim. The Smart Doolehgil’s opening ceremony was in December, but the system is constantly developing based on user experience. Both the Wooyang Cooperation and HYU plan to exhibit the technology to the mass market during the upcoming entrance ceremony in March when the need for an accurate map and guidance system within the campus is at its highest. Kim’s ultimate goal is to grow his company as a social enterprise. With the success of the technology within Hanyang University, the Wooyang Cooperation will expand the system to roads and buildings outside the campus, yielding even better mobility for the visually impaired. Kim So-yun dash070@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Choi Jin-myung

2018-02 04

[Academics][Excellent R&D] From Harmful to Useful

It is undoubtable that global warming and air pollution are two of the most serious and urgent problems that countries all over the world need to worry about as members of the planet. However, due to the industrial development and the necessities of life, goals and promises of reducing harmful gas are not successfully being met by the majority of the countries that pledge to do so. Sang Byoung-in (Department of Chemical Engineering), in an attempt to reduce the amount of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere, has suggested a way to make use of the bountiful resources around us in his research by the name, ‘Power to Gas Technology for Stability of Future Energy Provision.’ "The amount of carbon dioxide can be effectively reduced by capturing it and turning it into a useful gas." Previously, there has been an approach suggested to reduce carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. It was to capture and store it, then bury it deep underground or under the ocean ground so that it would not cause any pollution in the air. This method is not being pervasively used because of the unfitting geological condition of Korea and its tremendous cost considering the amount of carbon dioxide that needs to be handled. To counteract this complication, Sang researched methods to utilize the captured carbon dioxide. By capturing the carbon dioxide in the atmosphere and separating hydrogen and methane in it, a new source of energy is created. Since methane gas is used in almost every aspect of our society, Sang’s research could greatly contribute to alleviating the current situation concerning air pollution and energy depletion. “Hydrogen could also be derived, but methane is a better option as it has a much wider range of usage and that it is far easier to store. Hydrogen would require costly equipment to deposit, unlike methane, which could be stored within affordability.” There are several reasons why methane gas is such a good product out of carbon dioxide. Since methane gas is commonly used in our daily life, converting carbon dioxide into methane gas would be both economically and environmentally favorable. It also means this new source of energy will be extremely convenient and effortless to supply. Since 90 to 100 percent of Korea is covered with methane gas pipelines, the newly generated energy will be conveniently supplied through the current infrastructure. Moreover, unlike other gases such as hydrogen, methane gas is easy to store because it does not require a special tank for storage. Hydrogen is difficult to store due to its minuscule molecular size, demanding special tanks of higher price. Most importantly, methane gas is incomparably more widely used—for power, heat, mobility, and more. By turning carbon dioxide into mathane, useful energy can be generated. (Photo courtesy of Sang) Furthermore, Sang’s research also focuses on cultivating the microorganism that produces methane on its own only by feeding on carbon dioxide and hydrogen. Such a microorganism is called hydrogenotrophic methanogen (methane-producing organism that feed on hydrogen), which could be cultivated in water of 55 to 65 degrees Celsius. Inside water, just by absorbing carbon dioxide and hydrogen, the microorganism could produce methane. The problem is, these microorganisms are quite fastidious and challenging to harvest. They are strictly anaerobic, meaning they cannot survive once they encounter oxygen. To overcome this challege, Sang is currently researching to successfully nurture the microorganism. In addition, his further goal of research is to cultivate methanogen that does not require hydrogen. The reason why the microorganism feeds on hydrogen is because they need electrons in it. However, Sang wants to cut down the cost of nurturing these microorganism by removing hydrogen in their production. To provide what they need for survival, Sang will research deeper on feeding the microorganism directly from the electrode so that the process of microorganism producing methane would be more effective in terms of cost and productivity. Sang and his students in his lab are researching to evolve microorganism that feeds on electrons. Jeon Chae-yun chaeyun111@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Lee Jin-myung

2018-01 31

[Event]The Hanyang Career Development Center

In the relentless battle for employement, students of Hanyang can take some comfort in knowing that there is a group of people devoted to supporting their cause. Asking for no price in return, employees at the Hanyang Career Development Center dedicate their time and energy to provide various education, counseling, and information that students may need during their journey to begin a career. To express gratitude and to update information about the center, News H interviewed Shin Yong-zin who is a manager of the Hanyang Institute for Talent Development and Career Development Center. The Hanyang Career Development Center is most busy during summer and winter breaks. Challenge Again Marking its third consecutive opening, the initial education process for the “Challenge Again” program, hosted by the Career Development Center, was held on the 24th of this January. The Challenge Again program is an employment counseling and support system that works in a manner similar to that of school clubs, dubbing it with a more familiar name, the “Employment Club.” Shin explained that the most crucial characteristic of the Challenge Again program that differentiates it from other employment programs previously held in Hanyang, or any other school, is that the target subjects for this program are graduates. “This program is for imminent graduates, as well as students who had graduated within three years. It started last summer, and has received extremely positive feedback.” Shin continued to explain that most graduates lack an infrastructure that supports their extensive employment. “They have nowhere to rely on other than expensive institutions in places like Gangnam.” The Career Development Center aimed to support these graduates, and so far, they have been quite successful. As of January 22nd, the applications for the program is over for this semester. The member who have received their initial education on the 24th will participate in a diagnostic consulting, where professionals will talk about the student’s career plan, aptitude, employment status, and so on. Based on the analysis of the counseling, students will be formed into groups, where each group will then be assigned an application manager from a major company or a professional consultant as a mentor. The program will last for the next 6 months, with regular counseling held 8 times throughout the schedule. In detail, the group activities and consulting will revolve around three main pillars; analysis of companies and profession, assembling and reviewing self-introduction documents for application, and demonstrative job interviews. The overall process will be more intense in sense of manner and content, as the subjects are graduates whose employment are of great urgency. The program is also free of charge, giving the program yet another advantage for those seeking to take part of it. The inital education for the Challenge Again program took place on the 24th. A major supporter of Hanyang For students still in their years of studying, you do not need to feel left out. The Challenge Again program is one of the three major programs that host students of Hanyang, and the other two programs are open for all students to take advantage of. One of these programs is the Hanyang Job School. The Job School program consists of employment education as well as a group camping activity, where experts in the field of career counseling, job application, and company human resources are recruited to provide a realistic interview environment. Regardless of what stage of career pursuit that each student is currently in, this program gives them an edge on what corporations and the society realistically look for in an applicant. Shin also added that there is extensive support for this program by the school, and that employment rates of participants had once even marked up to 80%. The other major program hosted by the Career Development Center is the Competitive Career Roadmap Exhibition. While the other two programs are targeted towards students in their 3rd to 4th grade, and even graduate status, the Career Roadmap competition is held for younger students. It provides them a chance to create a roadmap regarding the field, career, and company that a student wishes to pursue. Shin emphasized that this program is not just held to create a professional roadmap but roadmaps of student’s lives concerning their life goals and plans. A demonstration job interview conducted by the Job School program. (Photo courtesy of Career Development Center) A Mecca for Hanyang employment Other than the three major programs introduced, the Hanyang Career Development Center has various programs and systems in place to support students’ career pursuits. Any student can sign up for career counseling or an application document review online. The Career Development Center also provides a list of applicable internship programs that students can easily access. Furthermore, the center provides career aptitude tests and education for the National Competency Standard Exam. Shin also expressed ambition when he talked about a new system that the center was devising, which he introduced as the “Open Online Recruitment.” According to Shin, most students focus too much on getting employed at major conglomerates that they overlook smaller-scale companies that provide benefits that are just as good. Some of these companies have constant openings, which was a crack of opportunity that Shin hoped to take advantage of. The new program will allow students to upload promotional content about themselves in a designated system, and a number of selected companies will freely access these contents and contact students for job openings. Although construction for this system is still underway, Shin has high hopes that it could further help students. “I wish more students would visit and take advantage of the Career Development Center. Our school is the only one in the country that has a lounge dedicated to employment, yet it is not used as much as we hope.” Shin ambitiously projected that he plans to make the center a Mecca for employment. He desired nothing more but for students to benefit from the great facilities within Hanyang. Lee Changhyun pizz1125@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Kang Cho-hyun

2018-01 31

[Academics][Researcher of the Month] Producing Energy by Wearing Clothes

Clothes that create electricity is not something in a movie anymore. In the midst of searching for various renewable energy, Professor Hong Jin-pyo (Department of Physics) created a new energy source that is created through friction in a single thread, as demonstrated in his research, ‘Hierarchically Nanostructured 1D Conductive Bundle Yarn-Based Triboelectric Nanogenerators.’ Hong conducted his research on energy-producing threads. When designing a wearable device, people generally think of light and slim devices attached on one’s clothes or body, usually charged by a solar heat system. This is referred as a two-dimension technology, as an object is placed upon another object. This does have its own benefits but also contains deficits such as weight and energy sources. Therefore, Hong created a one-dimension energy source – a thread that is used when weaving clothes. “Once a material is attached to clothing, the efficiency lacks uniformity,” explained Hong. He invented a thread that can produce energy itself, without having to attach anything onto a particular piece of clothing. The threads that make up the clothing could create energy itself. This thread, also named as a ‘triboelectric nanogenerator’, is a structure made from the notion of friction that we experience in our daily lives. For example, when we rub a balloon to our hair, friction occurs, resulting in a form of spiky hair. This phenomenon occurs when an electron is moved from one object to another, when these two objects continuously collide with each other. Depending on the characteristics of an object, one object would lose electrons and the other would gain electrons, meaning some sort of slight energy is formed. In this thread, polymer and aluminum are used; the former collects the electrons and the latter releases the electrons. Therefore, once the body wearing the clothing weaved from this thread moves, energy is created. The microscophic strucuture of a thread. (Photo courtesy of Hong) This triboelectric nanogenerator is still in the midst of its research. As this thread is extremely thin, Hong’s research team created a conductive bundle yarn so that they could have more strength. Moreover, he attached polymer-like nanostructures onto a single thread, so that the thread could have an increased surface area of energy production. Once energy is created through a larger surface area, bigger energy could be created within a single thread. This whole process is also known as a tribo electric effect. This one-dimension thread has a bright future in front of them, as technology closer to human are fondly being conducted on. “Once a sensor could be attached onto the thread, even more tasks could be done. This sensor could send whatever information they require to the owner’s smartphone, once the sensor adapts a Bluetooth function,” commented Hong, when asked about the future of this invention. He wished that this function would be able to let citizens to have control of their IoT (Internet of Things, a system of interrelated computing devices, mechanical and digital machines, object, animals or people that are provided with unique identifiers) through their energy producing clothes. "Keep trying! No matter what!" As Hong has not majored in clothing and textiles, he is not yet an expert of clothing, but has not been afraid of pioneering this area. “I had been proceeding my research in semiconductors at first. As new technologies evolved, I believed it was important to keep up with these changes to improve what I have been initially doing,” reminisced Hong. As he had achieved an unexpected success through his passion, he also gave the same advice to all Hanyangians. “Don’t make excuses. What really matters is whether you tried your best or not. I wish all of you can improve yourself through endless challenges!” On Jung-yun jessica0818@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Choi Min-ju and Lee Jin-myung

2018-01 29

[Faculty]Life of a Life-Saver

Countless doctors are striving day and night to save another life in Korea. Especially in university hospitals, where patients with grave illnesses visit, doctors are trying to make every second count. In the midst of Hanyang University Hospital in the Neurosurgery Department, Ko Yong (Department of Medicine, ‘81) was also working hard in his position, caring for both the patients and the citizen’s health insurance. A step toward the development of health insurance Ko received the Minister prize from the Ministry of Health and Welfare on the 29th of December last year, for improving the system of Korea’s health insurance. Ko started off explaining the insurance systems of hospitals that most citizens do not know. “There is an organization named the Health Insurance Review and Assessment Service (HIRAS), which assesses hospitals’ usage of medical supplies and drugs to the patients, according to the insurance standard,” explained Ko. Various expensive drugs and supplies are needed in order to save the patient, and hospitals claim this differs between the severeness of the illnesses. Once the HIRAS decides that the hospital has not met the standards, they reduce the amount of financial aid, leaving the hospital with huge deficits. This creates a vicious cycle as hospitals then start to avoid patients with certain illnesses, since they already know they would not be able to receive the amount of money required to run the hospital. News H met Ko in his doctor's office early in the morning. In order to protect these hospitals, another organization named Health Insurance Dispute Medication Committee (HIDMC) exists. This organization gives further assessment on the hospitals that assert unfairness, and Ko has been working with this organization for four years. He applied evidence-based-medicine to his standards and gave the hospitals another assessment. “Quite a lot of the people in HIRAS lack practical experience in hospitals. Therefore, I wrote a book named, ‘Neurosurgery Health Insurance Payroll Criteria Consultation Guide’ including various actual examples, so that the evaluators could interpret the criteria in the right direction,” explained Ko. The book, ‘Neurosurgery Health Insurance Payroll Criteria Consultation Guide’ is the first book in the field of neurosurgery that has all the specific criteria and exceptions based on actual medical treatment. This book is especially important to the hospitals since their management of the hospital depends on this one assessment. “Say that a hospital used a 100 million won to save a patient. If the HIRAS decides they are going to reduce seven thousand won of their support money, the hospital has no option but to close their hospital,” said Ko. By giving the hospital a safer environment to cure patients without the risk of deficits, he was able to be recognized by an organization that is in charge of all medical affairs. “Allowing all doctors like me to concentrate solely on the treatment of patients felt fruitful,” commented Ko. Ko explained the contents of ‘Neurosurgery Health Insurance Payroll Criteria Consultation Guide.’ To save more lives in Korea The dream of becoming a doctor started when Ko was an elementary school student. “My grandfather passed away from a cerebral hemorrhage when I was only a second grader in elementary school. Back then, there were only a few neurosurgeons, and as a result, they could not cure my grandfather in the hospital. That’s why I was determined to become a neurosurgeon,” reminisced Ko. He devoted his life into medical studies since then. Now, as a professor, a doctor, and as a leader of various organizations, 24 hours is not enough. “I start my day with a conference around half past seven in the morning. I then make my rounds to observe my patients, write research in my lab, and treat patients that need help. I have conferences in each organization a couple of times a month and continue my studies to improve the health insurance system,” explained Ko. He commented that he feels a sense of accomplishment when his patients walk out of the hospital healthy after recovering from a grave illness. Although he is continuing various research, his top priority still lies in the lives of his patients. Ko showed his wish that he wants to travel with his wife after retirement. Ko emphasized the quality of life for all people. “Due to the characteristics of neurosurgery, there are a lot of people in a vegetative state. However, I exert my abilities as much as I can so that my patients can live a humane life,” commented Ko. He also conveyed his words that all Hanyangians, just like him, to have pride in themselves and our school, and to do their best, no matter what. Thanks to doctors like Ko, a citizens’ quality of life is improving day by day, without us even noticing. On Jung-yun jessica0818@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Choi Min-ju

2018-01 24

[Alumni]The Recognition of a Hard Working Soldier

With great hopes and expectations as we move into 2018, excellent news has already shown itself within mere days since the beginning of the new year. Congratulations are in order, as our proud alumnus Lee Sang Chul (Department of Economics, 90’) was promoted to a brigadier general on January 3rd. To use a term more familiar to the public, a brigadier general is also known as a one-star general. As much as this advancement is a great honor, News H interviewed Lee to ask how he felt about the promotion as well as some recollections from his days as a university student in the Reserve Officer’s Training Corps (ROTC). The newly appointed brigadier general An intense air of responsibility lingered in every answer that Lee had about his new position. Taken with a heavy heart, he referred to his promotion as a strict order from the country to achieve “defense, prosperity, and unification.” He also took the moment to newly engrave his attitude as a soldier, reorganizing himself to fully take on his mission. “This promotion is not a simple rise in ranking, but a delivery of an immense role and responsibility to promote national security and military development.” Regarding his specific position, Lee will now serve as the education-training director of the Second Operational Command. He will supervise the various educational trainings conducted on military bases and camps below the Chungcheong province. As a person directing the complete process of planning, conducting, and circulation of the trainings that will maintain the combat capabilities of our troops, Lee is burdened with an unmeasurable responsibility. Lee with President Moon at his promotion ceremony (Photo courtesy of Lee Sang Chul) Despite this intense pressure of the position, Lee answered that he is extremely happy to receive numerous words of congratulations and encouragement from people around him. After the promotion ceremony held on the 3rd, he visited the Hanyang ROTC as well as the president of the university to share his honor. He also recollected the opportunity to attend the Hanyang new year ceremony, where he met with the chairman of the board and the president of the Hanyang alumni association. Furthermore, he is also taking the time to visit his hometown, Yongin, to get together with family members and friends. However, now that the ceremony and education as a brigadier general is over, he wishes to focus wholly on his new duties. Regarding his aspirations, he does not wish to use his newly granted authority to initiate an abrupt change. “As the social paradigm constantly changes, so does the military." Lee aims to steer this change with a “noblesse obliges” mindset by acting as a role model who fulfills his ethical responsibilities. Lee as a student One thing that he had set clearly from his freshman year was his goal of becoming a soldier. His grandfather passed away while fighting in the Korean War. Lee's father also fought in the North Korean Guerilla Invasion in Uljin and Samcheok, returning home through a hardship discharge. Although his family influenced him greatly in forming his aspiration to become a soldier, Lee also thought that the opportunity to commit himself to national security was a great honor, a belief he holds to this day. Since entering the ROTC in March of 1988, he has served in the military for nearly 30 years. Lee considers himself extremely lucky, as every advance in his military rank was successful on the first attempt. Furthermore, of the 3533 officers commissioned from the 28th class of the ROTC, he was the only person to advance to a brigadier general. "I feel privileged to be able to serve my country, and I consider myself an extremely lucky person." (Photo courtesy of Lee Sang Chul) Lee as a soldier Regarding the ups-and-downs of being a soldier, Lee answered that he shares the same hardship of every other professional soldier, which is the constant necessity to move. He had moved a total of 19 times throughout his service. He was most concerned with his children, who had to move from schools and neighborhoods with him. He felt that his life as a soldier was also forced upon his children, who sometimes complained of never having a “hometown friend.” On that point, he was apologetic and also very grateful to his children for having grown up with young minds and aspirations. Meanwhile, Lee had a long list of answers for the “ups” of his profession. He answered that he always feels a warm sensation whenever he thinks that his service provides the groundwork for which the nation can live happily and comfortably. “My heart still pounds when I recall my days in the Gangwon province as a company commander. My subordinates and I circled around security posts in the front lines, where the winter temperatures dropped to minus 20-30 degrees Celsius.” Lee also provided military security in grand national events, such as the G-20 Summit or the World Championship in Athletics. He replied that nothing felt more proud than having supported the successful hosting of an international event that advanced his country. His life lessons As a word of advice for students of Hanyang, Lee referred to his previous answer about him being a fortunate person. Although he considers himself lucky, it never dawned on him that the course of his life was a debt to coincidence. During his past 30 years of military service, he always regarded his duties as top priorities. He also constantly worked to his limit and attempted to achieve harmony with his surroundings. Lee referred to the quote, “God helps those who help themselves,” and encouraged students to do the best they can in every moment. Lee recognized that for students, it is a time to form life goals and values that they will pursue throughout their lives. “People in their 20’s have health and energy like no one else, so there is nothing they cannot achieve if they have a dream and work hard to realize it.” However, he also desired to add that that goal will shine even more when it aligns with a humanitarian value. “In other words, I wish for students to establish goals not only for themselves but for the society, and to a larger extent, humanity.” Lee Changhyun pizz1125@hanyang.ac.kr

2018-01 21

[Academics]Combination of Machinery and Medication

Diseases such as myocardial infarction, which are related to the blockage of blood vessels, are threatful diseases to both the suffering patients and the doctors who cure them. As vessels require great sensitivity and attention in the process of treatment, professor Jang Gun-hee (Department of Mechanical Engineering) proposed an alternative way in his article: ‘Magnetic Helical Robot for Targeted Drug-Delivery in Tubular Environments.' Jang has been working on this robot for 9 years. “Once one’s blood vessel is blocked, doctors have to use a thin tube made of medical grade materials, called a catheter,” Jang started off. With the catheter, doctors have to push it through the vessel to find the blocked area, inject a liquid for dissolution, then drill it out. This process itself is indeed difficult as they mostly have to depend on a doctor's experience and skills. However, doctors face another difficulty, with their own health affected during the procedure. "Doctors have to face countless radiation when curing a patient, since they have to keep track of the position of the catheter though x-rays. The doctors even wear clothes made of lead to obstruct the radiation, but still is not enough,” explained Jang. In order to solve this dangerous progress, Jang’s research team created a micro robot. This micro robot is made to swim within a vessel of seven to eight millimeters, to transport and emit the designated drug to the intended spot to dissolute the clot, and to drill itself on the clot, just as the catheter would do. This micro robot is moved by the magnetic field created outside of the body, allowing the doctors to be less exposed to radiation. Jang commented, “Once this method is in commercialization, doctors would be able to remote control the robots outside of the operating room, while having better controls within the surgery.” A picture describing the structure of a micro robot (Photo courtesy of Jang) From the midst of the interview, Jang explained the motivation of his research. “My mother’s coronary artery had been blocked 10 years ago and, doctors, therefore, had to insert a few catheters in her body. As this is a genetic phenomenon, I gave attention to the process and then realized the difficulties of these surgeries,’ reminisced Jang. Studies on magnetic robots have been ongoing since the past, especially in Switzerland and Germany. However, their research was mostly concentrated on the swimming itself, while Jang’s research team had to make the robot in command of various movements, which had to go through various trials and errors. Jang and his students are standing beside the machine they have made by themselves. Jang’s research team had to import pure iron from China, produce the frame in another factory, and transport this four-ton-machinery to school in order to materialize the machine required to magnetically steer the micro robot. Students had to coil the iron by hand, assemble the pieces together, to complete building this two-meter machine. Jang emphasized the importance of the activeness of Hanyangians through this example. “I continuously tell my students ‘no one can achieve anything if we can’t’. I hope students make a higher goal and achieve their dreams even if it takes a long time because they all have the capability do to so.” On Jung-yun jessica0818@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Kang Cho-hyun

2018-01 14

[Academics]Cleaning the Air, Even of Weapons

Environmental conservation and weapon disarmament may seem to have no relevancy. However, Professor Kim Ki-hyun of Department of Civil & Environmental Engineering, in his long battle against environmental degradation, has found a common ground on which both fields could find a way to advance towards their goals. His recent research paper, “Metal-organic frameworks as media for the catalytic degradation of chemical warfare agents” introduces the utilization of metal-organic frameworks (MOF), previously used to filter pollutants in the air, to purify the air of toxins emitted from chemical weapons. Kim has already published a number of paper regarding the utilization of metal-organic framework. The key technology behind this research is the MOF. It is essentially a collection of multi dimensional sockets created when linking metals through the means of organic compounds. These nano-scaled sockets act as traps that capture undesired materials in the air. Kim explained that a crucial field of focus in creating MOFs is to use the smallest amount of substance possible to create the largest number of sockets. In practice, there are several options through which it could be put to use, one such option is the absorption mechanism, which is collecting as much pollutants as possible and disposing them. Another option is the catalytic treatment, which collects harmful substances and releases them in a safe form. Kim explained that there are two types of research. One involves numerous experiements and analysis, attempting to create or discover something new, and another tests out theories of other researchers and expands existing studies in depth. He explained that this research fell into the latter category, also known as a review research. “In a large frame, it’s part of a global effort to disarm weapons of warfare. This specific research began on the basis of environmental development technology, which expanded to include harmful materials from chemical weapons.” Kim added that the research came to being when several substances included in environmental pollutants were discovered to overlap from those of chemical weapons. Of the hundreds of existing research on environmental development and disarmament of chemical weapons, he took the revelant ones and “reviewed” them on the basis of his research. Kim explained that working to save the environment had been his calling since before becoming a professor. In the big picture, Kim explained that this study is just one of the many existing illustrations of how MOFs could be adapted and utilized. In the process of attempting to make the air free of pollution, a calling that Kim has had for over 30 years, the MOF was a crucial discovery that supported many of his researches. At the most initial stage, the MOF was designed to capture and reduce CO2 emission in the atmosphere. Now it is used in a number of fields, used for transporting medical substances, handling radioactive materials, and of course, to purify the air of certain substances. It is also applied in the actual market, with Kim having worked with industries of automobiles, electric cigarettes, and farms to eliminate undesired scent in their products and facilities. This research was part of a review to assess the potential scale of MOF utilization. "I think that 'boys be ambitious' is the appopriate phrase for students today" At the request for a word of advice for students of Hanyang, he referred to an old quote, “boys be ambitious”. He explained that it was sad for him to see students so desperate to begin a career and find a job right after graduation. In his days as a university student, many people sought admission to graduate school, with a number of people aspiring to become a professor. However, he now feels that most of the graduate school students in his major these days consist of foreigners, and only a handful of Korean students. Kim thinks that many young students today lack a long term planning of their lives. “I would like to see a little more amibiton from my students”. Lee Changhyun pizz1125@hanyang.ac.kr Photo by Kang Cho-hyun