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2018-01 31 Headline News

[Academics][Researcher of the Month] Producing Energy by Wearing Clothes

Clothes that create electricity is not something in a movie anymore. In the midst of searching for various renewable energy, Professor Hong Jin-pyo (Department of Physics) created a new energy source that is created through friction in a single thread, as demonstrated in his research, ‘Hierarchically Nanostructured 1D Conductive Bundle Yarn-Based Triboelectric Nanogenerators.’ Hong conducted his research on energy-producing threads. When designing a wearable device, people generally think of light and slim devices attached on one’s clothes or body, usually charged by a solar heat system. This is referred as a two-dimension technology, as an object is placed upon another object. This does have its own benefits but also contains deficits such as weight and energy sources. Therefore, Hong created a one-dimension energy source – a thread that is used when weaving clothes. “Once a material is attached to clothing, the efficiency lacks uniformity,” explained Hong. He invented a thread that can produce energy itself, without having to attach anything onto a particular piece of clothing. The threads that make up the clothing could create energy itself. This thread, also named as a ‘triboelectric nanogenerator’, is a structure made from the notion of friction that we experience in our daily lives. For example, when we rub a balloon to our hair, friction occurs, resulting in a form of spiky hair. This phenomenon occurs when an electron is moved from one object to another, when these two objects continuously collide with each other. Depending on the characteristics of an object, one object would lose electrons and the other would gain electrons, meaning some sort of slight energy is formed. In this thread, polymer and aluminum are used; the former collects the electrons and the latter releases the electrons. Therefore, once the body wearing the clothing weaved from this thread moves, energy is created. The microscophic strucuture of a thread. (Photo courtesy of Hong) This triboelectric nanogenerator is still in the midst of its research. As this thread is extremely thin, Hong’s research team created a conductive bundle yarn so that they could have more strength. Moreover, he attached polymer-like nanostructures onto a single thread, so that the thread could have an increased surface area of energy production. Once energy is created through a larger surface area, bigger energy could be created within a single thread. This whole process is also known as a tribo electric effect. This one-dimension thread has a bright future in front of them, as technology closer to human are fondly being conducted on. “Once a sensor could be attached onto the thread, even more tasks could be done. This sensor could send whatever information they require to the owner’s smartphone, once the sensor adapts a Bluetooth function,” commented Hong, when asked about the future of this invention. He wished that this function would be able to let citizens to have control of their IoT (Internet of Things, a system of interrelated computing devices, mechanical and digital machines, object, animals or people that are provided with unique identifiers) through their energy producing clothes. "Keep trying! No matter what!" As Hong has not majored in clothing and textiles, he is not yet an expert of clothing, but has not been afraid of pioneering this area. “I had been proceeding my research in semiconductors at first. As new technologies evolved, I believed it was important to keep up with these changes to improve what I have been initially doing,” reminisced Hong. As he had achieved an unexpected success through his passion, he also gave the same advice to all Hanyangians. “Don’t make excuses. What really matters is whether you tried your best or not. I wish all of you can improve yourself through endless challenges!” On Jung-yun jessica0818@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Choi Min-ju and Lee Jin-myung

2018-01 29

[Faculty]Life of a Life-Saver

Countless doctors are striving day and night to save another life in Korea. Especially in university hospitals, where patients with grave illnesses visit, doctors are trying to make every second count. In the midst of Hanyang University Hospital in the Neurosurgery Department, Ko Yong (Department of Medicine, ‘81) was also working hard in his position, caring for both the patients and the citizen’s health insurance. A step toward the development of health insurance Ko received the Minister prize from the Ministry of Health and Welfare on the 29th of December last year, for improving the system of Korea’s health insurance. Ko started off explaining the insurance systems of hospitals that most citizens do not know. “There is an organization named the Health Insurance Review and Assessment Service (HIRAS), which assesses hospitals’ usage of medical supplies and drugs to the patients, according to the insurance standard,” explained Ko. Various expensive drugs and supplies are needed in order to save the patient, and hospitals claim this differs between the severeness of the illnesses. Once the HIRAS decides that the hospital has not met the standards, they reduce the amount of financial aid, leaving the hospital with huge deficits. This creates a vicious cycle as hospitals then start to avoid patients with certain illnesses, since they already know they would not be able to receive the amount of money required to run the hospital. News H met Ko in his doctor's office early in the morning. In order to protect these hospitals, another organization named Health Insurance Dispute Medication Committee (HIDMC) exists. This organization gives further assessment on the hospitals that assert unfairness, and Ko has been working with this organization for four years. He applied evidence-based-medicine to his standards and gave the hospitals another assessment. “Quite a lot of the people in HIRAS lack practical experience in hospitals. Therefore, I wrote a book named, ‘Neurosurgery Health Insurance Payroll Criteria Consultation Guide’ including various actual examples, so that the evaluators could interpret the criteria in the right direction,” explained Ko. The book, ‘Neurosurgery Health Insurance Payroll Criteria Consultation Guide’ is the first book in the field of neurosurgery that has all the specific criteria and exceptions based on actual medical treatment. This book is especially important to the hospitals since their management of the hospital depends on this one assessment. “Say that a hospital used a 100 million won to save a patient. If the HIRAS decides they are going to reduce seven thousand won of their support money, the hospital has no option but to close their hospital,” said Ko. By giving the hospital a safer environment to cure patients without the risk of deficits, he was able to be recognized by an organization that is in charge of all medical affairs. “Allowing all doctors like me to concentrate solely on the treatment of patients felt fruitful,” commented Ko. Ko explained the contents of ‘Neurosurgery Health Insurance Payroll Criteria Consultation Guide.’ To save more lives in Korea The dream of becoming a doctor started when Ko was an elementary school student. “My grandfather passed away from a cerebral hemorrhage when I was only a second grader in elementary school. Back then, there were only a few neurosurgeons, and as a result, they could not cure my grandfather in the hospital. That’s why I was determined to become a neurosurgeon,” reminisced Ko. He devoted his life into medical studies since then. Now, as a professor, a doctor, and as a leader of various organizations, 24 hours is not enough. “I start my day with a conference around half past seven in the morning. I then make my rounds to observe my patients, write research in my lab, and treat patients that need help. I have conferences in each organization a couple of times a month and continue my studies to improve the health insurance system,” explained Ko. He commented that he feels a sense of accomplishment when his patients walk out of the hospital healthy after recovering from a grave illness. Although he is continuing various research, his top priority still lies in the lives of his patients. Ko showed his wish that he wants to travel with his wife after retirement. Ko emphasized the quality of life for all people. “Due to the characteristics of neurosurgery, there are a lot of people in a vegetative state. However, I exert my abilities as much as I can so that my patients can live a humane life,” commented Ko. He also conveyed his words that all Hanyangians, just like him, to have pride in themselves and our school, and to do their best, no matter what. Thanks to doctors like Ko, a citizens’ quality of life is improving day by day, without us even noticing. On Jung-yun jessica0818@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Choi Min-ju

2018-01 21

[Academics]Combination of Machinery and Medication

Diseases such as myocardial infarction, which are related to the blockage of blood vessels, are threatful diseases to both the suffering patients and the doctors who cure them. As vessels require great sensitivity and attention in the process of treatment, professor Jang Gun-hee (Department of Mechanical Engineering) proposed an alternative way in his article: ‘Magnetic Helical Robot for Targeted Drug-Delivery in Tubular Environments.' Jang has been working on this robot for 9 years. “Once one’s blood vessel is blocked, doctors have to use a thin tube made of medical grade materials, called a catheter,” Jang started off. With the catheter, doctors have to push it through the vessel to find the blocked area, inject a liquid for dissolution, then drill it out. This process itself is indeed difficult as they mostly have to depend on a doctor's experience and skills. However, doctors face another difficulty, with their own health affected during the procedure. "Doctors have to face countless radiation when curing a patient, since they have to keep track of the position of the catheter though x-rays. The doctors even wear clothes made of lead to obstruct the radiation, but still is not enough,” explained Jang. In order to solve this dangerous progress, Jang’s research team created a micro robot. This micro robot is made to swim within a vessel of seven to eight millimeters, to transport and emit the designated drug to the intended spot to dissolute the clot, and to drill itself on the clot, just as the catheter would do. This micro robot is moved by the magnetic field created outside of the body, allowing the doctors to be less exposed to radiation. Jang commented, “Once this method is in commercialization, doctors would be able to remote control the robots outside of the operating room, while having better controls within the surgery.” A picture describing the structure of a micro robot (Photo courtesy of Jang) From the midst of the interview, Jang explained the motivation of his research. “My mother’s coronary artery had been blocked 10 years ago and, doctors, therefore, had to insert a few catheters in her body. As this is a genetic phenomenon, I gave attention to the process and then realized the difficulties of these surgeries,’ reminisced Jang. Studies on magnetic robots have been ongoing since the past, especially in Switzerland and Germany. However, their research was mostly concentrated on the swimming itself, while Jang’s research team had to make the robot in command of various movements, which had to go through various trials and errors. Jang and his students are standing beside the machine they have made by themselves. Jang’s research team had to import pure iron from China, produce the frame in another factory, and transport this four-ton-machinery to school in order to materialize the machine required to magnetically steer the micro robot. Students had to coil the iron by hand, assemble the pieces together, to complete building this two-meter machine. Jang emphasized the importance of the activeness of Hanyangians through this example. “I continuously tell my students ‘no one can achieve anything if we can’t’. I hope students make a higher goal and achieve their dreams even if it takes a long time because they all have the capability do to so.” On Jung-yun jessica0818@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Kang Cho-hyun

2017-12 18

[Performance]A Step Towards Start-up!

Hanyang University (HYU) widely opens its door to those wishing to establish one’s own organization, also referred as a ‘start-up' company. On the 12th of December, Hanyang Start-up Open Campus event was held for the building completion ceremony of Hanyang Start-up Town along with various programs related to start-ups. News H made a visit to this event and took a look around the event. A picture of the Hanyang Start-up Town that was newly built The whole event was held in the HIT building and the Start-up town from 10 a.m. until 9 p.m. This comprehensive start-up-related event held various programs simultaneously throughout the day. This included open special classes, exhibitions, mentoring sessions and more. Anyone interested in start-ups could participate and not only gain knowledge, but form a culture between these aspirants and express their willingness towards start-ups. Stepping into the campus of start-up When entered into the HIT building, A photo-wall was set up, expressing the scale and the atmosphere of this event. Various banners were provided for the participants to take unique photos in front of the photo wall. Not only students but also alumnus and staff members freely wandered around this event, showing their own individual interest towards various start-up. A photo wall prepared with humerous banners such as "Start-up! Super Great!" Right behind the photo-wall, an exhibition was prepared. 14 start-up organizations exhibited their work, their own unique ideas, and programs. There were a lot of projects catching eye sights with novel ideas. Ideas varied from newly developed smart-devices and 3D printers to fashion and share houses. Participants freely shared their ideas with the people around them in front of the products. They closely observed the explanations located beside the works and voted on a board in another corner of the exhibition. Paticipants tried out a robot of "Wonderful Platform", which was a robot that could be connected with computers, smartphones, speakers and so on. Start of a Start-up Town After the exhibition, the building completion ceremony of the Start-up Town was held. An explanation of the Startup Support Foundation was given, along with congratulatory messages and a tour within the Start-up Town. This town built by the enterprisers of various companies, will now be continuously used to train outstanding individuals on start-ups. The specific programs, targets and rules have not been yet organized, but will pursue their goals of helping those trying to venture one’s own organization. (On the left) President of the school, Lee Young-moo also participated in the event. A practical help to future enterprisers After the building completion ceremony, those who were willing to had a chance to meet a mentor in the field of start-ups. They were able to receive helpful information on new market openings, marketing, attraction of investment, technical commercialization and more. As it was a 1:1 counseling session, people were able to receive practical advice solely suited for the individual. The mentees asked questions on their own ideas and products, and the mentors gave them feedback along with their suggestions for the next step. Lee So-eui, a lecturer in the Music Department, was one of the mentees in this program. “I am interested in music programs and was actually working on a project. I only had the passion to start an organization, without having any knowledge related to the field of start-ups,” explained Lee. She participated in the 10th Hanyang Start-up Academy, which is a program designed to train the people on the essential theoretical information on start-ups, such as the selection of items, commercialization, marketing, taxation, finance and so on. Anyone in HYU can take this course, and enrolled students can also receive three credits by taking this course. Lee, in this case, took the course of Hanyang Start-up Academy and had a vague idea in her mind after the completion of the lectures. She then enrolled for this mentoring and received practical advice that was specifically needed for her. “I think HYU gives us the driving force to keep reaching for our goals. They provide us with numerous chances, to better visualize my dream. Now I’m planning to put my ideas into action and achieve my dream,” said Lee. Lee wished she could achieve her dream through the programs of HYU. Reaching for my own dream The average age in our society is increasing and now we are faced with an era where we can’t depend on a single job for our whole life. Starting an organization can be a career option for general people now. HYU provides us with high quality programs and sturdy groundwork for those willing to start a new organization. Start-up is not limited only to organizations. Start-up could include simple ideas, a laboratory or more. Park Min-jung, from the Hanyang Startup Foundation also emphasized the importance of start-up. “You might have to face a venture anytime in your life. It could be right after you graduate, during your employment, or even after your retirement. The gap between those who were trained and those who weren’t will be immense. The Startup Foundation is trying our best to give as much help as possible to those willing to learn. The doors to our Foundation is always open!” On Jung-yun jessica0818@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Lee Jin-myeong

2017-11 27

[Student]Step by Step, Changing the World

‘Changing the world’ might seem as a rather abstract goal to achieve as a university student. On the third floor of the Business School, there are 25 student interns whom are here for a semester in the Hanyang Business Lab to actually achieve this dream. Lee You-jin (Business Administration, 3rd year) and Yun Jeong-ah (Chinese Language and Literature, 4th year) were in the midst of reaching their goals through two missions: ‘Artist Tak’ and ‘Mindful Laundry’. Supporting students with ambition Hanyang Business Lab is one of the characterized programs of the Business school for students to better prepare themselves for the Fourth Industrial Revolution and to better experience the practical affairs of business. There are seven different labs in this program, starting from Artificial Intelligence to Quantitative Analytics. As the second semester’s members, Lee and Yun are working within the Social Innovation Lab with two other members led by professor Shin Hyun-sang. They work to make a platform that could positively influence the society and are therefore specifying their wishes through the two projects. From an individual artist to a platform Lee spends the whole day in the lab, creating better ideas for 'Artist Tak'. Lee is the manager of a facebook page ‘Artist Tak’, (Click HERE) which is a branded platform of Tak Yong-joon who became an artist after a general paralysis. “Tak suffered from a general paralysis after his honeymoon when he was 29. Most suffer depression after they are paralyzed. Unlike most people, he instead started drawing with the strength of his shoulder, which was the only part of his body he could freely move,” explained Lee. Although he drew over 1500 pieces of art, he couldn’t make a living due to the lack of promotion and acknowledgment. Therefore, Lee, along with her teammates, created a platform that could become a sustainable profit model. They started off from scratch to brand talented individuals, solely with the concept of 'everyone has a special talent'. “We first started through naming the brand along with designing the logo. Since the platform we were planning to design was an individual rather than an enterprise, we had difficulties in systemizing it,” reminisced Lee. After studying illustrations for this job, she herself made a logo that configurates a person drawing on a wheelchair and created a facebook page to better advertise this brand. They also sold his work at the 17 Hearts Festival held in HYU to better advertise it. The logo of 'Artist Tak' on the left, and a picture of the postcards they sold in the 17 Hearts Festival on the right. (Photo courtesy of Lee) In accordance with Tak’s request, they are donating a certain portion of their profits to NEXON Purme Children’s Rehabilitation Hospital to help those facing similar difficulties. Throughout the interview, Lee showed her desire for Tak to continue on with this platform for his living even after this project ends. “I wish we could make a system stable enough so that he could carry on this project easily by himself,” wished Lee. Her final goal is to make a social impact with less priority in making a profit. Lee commented, “My final goal is to become a CEO of a social enterprise. As for now, whatever I do after I graduate, I want to be in a position where I could give a positive influence on the society.” Washing off your depression "Someone who had the same experience can better understand them." “I myself suffered from depression in my early twenties,” Yun started off. “I visited various counselling centers and attended in school programs to overcome my insecurities but suffered from recurrences.” She had a thirst for helping the students in similar situations and therefore decided to take a scientific and systemized approach towards this matter. She applied ‘cognitive therapy’ into a platform to help those with depression to acknowledge their own status and recover the symptoms through their own cognitions. She created a facebook page named ‘Mindful Laundry’ (click HERE) and provided three steps in this model. First of all, she created videos for an entry, then introduced a mental inbody test so that the testers could be cognitive of their own state. As the last step, she intends to make gatherings between people with similar symptoms, to provide positive synergy. Yun’s idea is already being acknowledged in the society. She won a prize through this idea in the SBCA (Social Venture Competition Asia) held on the 10th. However, her duty isn’t as easy as it seems. “I take care of all of the activities required to maintain this platform. I create and visualize all the ideas needed and manage the facebook page by myself. The biggest difficulty definitely arises from the lack of manpower,” commented Yun. She added that she wanted to continue on this project even after this semester to achieve her goal. “A lot of people are suffering from depression in the current society even though you don’t reveal that fact in the first place,” commented Yun. She wishes to become a cozy nest for those in need of help. The four students of the Social Innovation Lab. They are still in the midst of achieving their dreams. Continuing different projects with the same goals, all members of the Social Innovation Lab are still working day and night to change the world in their own ways. A society where people can live with a hope, a society where people can easily reach for a hand is what they will be working on. We always have a better tomorrow ahead of us, thanks to these students with motivation. On Jung-yun jessica0818@naver.com Photos by Kang Cho-hyun

2017-11 20

[Academics]Conducting on a Sturdy Building

The current society is suffering from various natural and man-made disasters starting from terrors to earthquakes, such as the recent earthquake that panicked the citizens in Pohang. When a strong impact is made upon the ground, buildings require enough solidity to endure damage in order to protect the people. For a stronger, safer building, professor Yoo Doo-yeol (Department of Architectural Engineering) introduced an improvised concrete in his paper, ‘Effect of fiber geometric property on rate dependent flexural behavior of ultra-high-performance cementitious composite’. Yoo wishes to make sturdy structures for the citizens' safety. Most buildings are made of concrete, and it takes a huge part on the safety of a building. Concrete is initially vulnerable in tension, so there are already improvised versions of concrete commonly used in North America. The new model contains Micro steel fibers within the concrete to prevent the concrete from breaking into two big pieces. Through the steel fiber, the concrete only results in having micro-cracks even when a sudden weight is stressed upon the concrete. In this already improvised concrete, Yoo made a further research to strengthen this concrete in both quasi-static (a state in which something is almost still, but not completely) and impacted states. A ‘quasi-static’ state refers to an ordinary state with only mere impacts such as the vibration of footsteps everyday. These two states require a different sturdiness for different purposes, and the researchers concentrate on improving both of these conditions. Yoo focused on the aspect ratio of the micro steel fibers installed in the current improvised concrete. Aspect ratio is a numerical figure of the division of the diameter from the length of the fiber. Once this aspect ratio was changed in a quasi-static state, Yoo found out that the solidity was maintained and the energy absorption force was strengthened even when the amount of micro steel fibers were reduced. With the same amount of micro steel fibers with the changed ratio, Yoo was able to discover that the energy absorption force almost doubled within a shocked state. The results made through different aspect ratios. Micro-cracks can be seen within the pictures. (Photo courtesy of Yoo) Yoo emphasized the importance of this improvised matter. “Protecting the citizens within the buildings is becoming an urgent matter as countless accidents are occurring more frequently. The current structures lack enough safety to minimize the loss of lives.” The breaking of cement is distinctly more critical than the cracks in cement. Therefore, thorough research is required to make a sturdy building. “We had difficulties in capturing the process when the cement was impacted,” reminisced Yoo. The test cement is fully demolished within 0.001 second (a millisecond), and he had to capture all of the procedures within that millisecond. No kinetic equipment is available in Korea. As a result, he had to proceed with his research research by using the equipment from the University of British Columbia. Despite their mechanical hardships, Yoo made an innovative result in the field of architecture. 2017 is only his second year as a professor in Hanyang University. As the field of architecture is conservative, his final goal is to make practical application with his research. “Various factors such as durability and energy absorption force need to be considered when building a structure as it is directly related to the people living inside the building. This is only the beginning. I still have a lot more factors to work on, but I will continue my research enthusiastically until my studies can be applied to daily structures,” commented Yoo. Yoo will continue on with his goal to make a practical application with his discovery. On Jung-yun jessica0818@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Choi Min-ju

2017-11 07

[Notice]Expressing Out Confidence in Korean

“I have a Korean presentation a few weeks later, and I have no idea how to prepare for it.” This is a common concern among international students in Hanyang University (HYU). Along with the increasing number of international students in HYU, various programs are being created to help these students. The Intensive Korean Writing Class (IKWC) is a special program made solely for international students by the Center for Creative Convergence Education, for those having problems writing in academic Korean. News H attended the first class of the second semester to take a closer look. IKWC, a stepping stone for international students As international students in HYU, they inevitably have to go through an obstacle of a language barrier. This could happen both in daily living and in lectures. However, a lot of these students recall their Korean assignments as the most difficult. When writing, various literacy expressions along with the correct grammar have to be considered. This makes writing for the international students a cause for repulsion. “Grammatical problems aren’t the only problems international students go through. They have difficulties with applying the unique traits only Korean has. I try my hardest to teach them these characteristics so that they could freely use them in their assignments,” commented Oh Se-jin, a lecturer from the IKWC. Oh gave an enthusiastic lecture to the students. “The most important element when writing is considering the reader. In your cases, it would be the professor,” Oh started off. She explained the overall curriculum of the class, dividing writing into the distinction of the literary and colloquial style to writing reports and resumes. The lecturer kindheartedly gave similarities and differences between Korean and the students’ mother tongue. “I believe that both spoken and written words have the power to move a person. So I tend to emphasize sincere writing and speaking when I teach. I wish the students would not fear writing in Korean by the time this class is over,” said Oh. Various reasons have brought these international students with different nationalities to this class. Zhang Yang Yi (Business Administration, 1st year) from China explained, “I don’t have any difficulties when writing in Chinese. I can write in long sentences including all I want to say, but it’s the opposite in Korean. I simply can’t think of what I should write when writing a report in Korean.” Another Chinese student, Zuo Jia Yu also expressed that she had difficulties with her vocabulary. “I first started learning Korean two years ago when I first entered this university. I had problems with Korean grammar and vocabulary during lectures, so I intend to improve my vocabulary skills through this class.” The students also concentrated through the whole class. The Center for Creative Convergence Education Behind this helpful program, a lot of effort was made by the Communications Clinic in the Center for Creative Convergence Education. This Clinic was constructed in 2012 to develop the Hanyangians’ creativity and their communicative competency. This center manages not only this IKWC, but also various programs such as the communication clinic, future humanities forum, debate competitions, English film festival, and English quiz nights. The communication clinic is the foundation of IKWC, allowing all Hanyangians to receive help in four languages – Korean, English, Chinese and Spanish. This center is working hard for the improvement of creativity and communication skills, and a lot of students are receiving help from it. The IKWC made its first step last year, made by the request of the Office of International Affairs, due to the need for academic help for international students as HYU is a globalized university. International students require a certain ability with their Korean writing skills to proceed with their academics in HYU; therefore, there was a need for a program that could help them get to a certain extent in their writing of Korean. The first year of the IKWC, therefore, came to an end with great satisfaction for international students. This second IKWC this year is already almost full of students wishing to improve their Korean skills, and they have started their first class off successfully. Students can receive their counciling in these rooms. (Photo courtesy of Communications Clinic) Chan Puthearath from Cambodia commented, “I have a Korean presentation two weeks later, and I wish I can prepare it well to give a great presentation. I don’t want to be a harm to my Korean teammates, and I will do my best!” Anyone who is in need of help with their language skills, whether it is Korean, English, Chinese or Spanish, can freely visit this clinic and receive help. Why don’t you visit the clinic and express your confidence in the language you wish? On Jung-yun jessica0818@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Kang Cho-hyun

2017-10 16

[Event]Crisis of Humanities? Importance of Humanities!

Professor Yoo Jae-eun of the Department of English Language and Literature gave a lecture titled, “Welcome to the desert of the Real” in the College of Humanities on the 13th. This phrase, better known as a famous line of ‘Matrix’ (1999), is a book’s title written by Slavoj Zizek. She gave a lecture based on this book, explaining the influence made on the world after the 9/11 terror in America along with her philosophical opinions and interpretations. ‘The Real’ society Yoo first gave an explanation on ‘the Real’, meaning ‘existence’, differentiating the word with ‘the real’, implying to the general reality, through the capital letter. Lancan, a psychoanalyst, theorized the field of ‘the Real’. He divided the process of human consciousness’ development into three steps: the Imaginary world, the Symbolic world and the Real world. She started off with this background knowledge in order to refer this to diagnose the current post-modern society after the 9/11 terror, which was her main theme of the lecture. Yoo giving a lecture of 'the Real' She explained that it was proven that we have stepped into ‘the Real’ society through America, the powerful nation, being attacked. The notion of ‘the Real’ refers to incidents we experience but cannot fully understand, such as death. As people’s consciousness and the society’s trend completely changed after the 9/11 terror, the sentence, ‘Welcome to the desert of the Real’ was made. Yoo gave personal experiences she faced after the terror, as she was in America for her Ph.D. Professor Yoo is currently studying these conditions of a post-modern society. Yoo commented, “I chose this title as it is an eye-catching and a famous phrase. I intended to discuss the changed world order after the 9/11 terror as a citizen of the Third World." A student also gave positive comments on this forum. Park Young-in, a graduate of Hanyang University and now a student of the graduate school, commented, “It was a special lecture for me as I became a great fan of her through her past lectures. I am also interested in this subject, so I appreciate that the lecture provided concise explanation on the topic." Park giving her opinions on the lecture Future humanities forums This lecture of professor Yoo was a part of a program currently proceeding in Hanyang University in the name of ‘Future Humanities Forums’. This was the 11th forum, and these forums are held every month by the core enterprise organization in the College of Humanities. A total of 16 schools were selected for this program and will be supported with 40 billion dollars for three years. This program was made as one of the alternative methods to resolve the avoidance of humanities. The College of Humanities made three courses: international studies, merged majors, and intensification of foundation studies. This program works as the training of future-oriented and integrated students and therefore gives forums on these three subjects in rotation, allowing everyone to easily approach humanities. The Future Humanities forum has now already finished its 11th lecture, starting from the second semester of last year. The themes, depending on the lecturers, are diversified starting from arts and science to artificial intelligence. They, therefore, emphasize interdisciplinary approaches but talk about general humanistic worries at the same time. A researcher of the Division of Applied Humanities, Park min-a mentioned, “Hanyang University is working hard to plan various integrated humanities programs and is, therefore, trying to form mutual exchanges of lectures with different schools.” "More people should be interested in humanities!" The forums focus on various discussions on the direction of future humanities, as well as the critical feedback on the current role of humanities. The Division of Applied Humanities are enthusiastically working on various methods to make humanities a field that can be approached more easily. These forums take place once every month in the afternoon of a Friday. Next month, the director of Bosch Korea is planning to give a lecture. “I hope a lot more students would be able to have interest in humanities,” wished Park. On Jung-yun jessica0818@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Kim Youn-soo

2017-10 02

[Academics][Researcher of the Month] Producing Energy Through a Single Thread

'Lack of energy’ is an issue the whole world is focusing on. Various countries are searching for effective renewable energy and new materials that could replace the current energy sources. Professor Kim Seon-jeong (Department of Biomedical Engineering) discovered a new material every researcher was looking for. Kim's paper, “Harvesting electrical energy from carbon nanotube yarn twist” introduces the world’s first new material, which can produce energy through slight movements. Kim explains the concept of his new material Professor Kim’s research team started its first project in 2006 on artificial muscle. However, after his research, Kim realized its limitations as they were only able to move through an external energy source. Therefore, he thought of a new idea that the muscle would be more effective when it is able to produce energy by itself. Carbon nanotube is a new material which is a type of conductor and has a diameter of only a few nanometers. This material was made as a thread in the artificial muscle. However, when these threads were finely twisted into one direction, they were able to produce energy by itself through its contraction and relaxation without an applied voltage. Being made into a spring, their length can be changed as much as 30 percent on average. This new material, named as ‘twistron harvester yarn’, allowed a chance for the muscle to move by itself without a separate power source. This twistron harvester yarn looks and acts as if it were an ordinary thread. This states that making clothes out of this material is possible. Once this comes into realization, this would give a boost in making wearable devices, as producing electricity without an energy source is possible. Moreover, this thread is possible to use inside water, giving another possibility of an effective alternative energy. This has already been tested in the East Sea of Korea. Kim’s research team made a model consisting of a glass bottle connected with an electrode, the thread, a balloon, and an equipment that could measure electricity. As the twistron harvester yarn contracted and relaxed, electrical energy was verified from the ocean. Kim showed great passion in the research he was conducting. This research on the twistron harvester yarn was his fourth research. He has been working on artificial muscles for the past nine years before he started this research. “I didn’t start this research solely to find the twistron harvester yarn. I felt the limitations within the research I conducted earlier and was seeking for development,” reminisced Kim. He explained that he wasn’t the only person who conducted the research. Eight teams from three different countries worked on this new material for two years to deduct a better result. “We had a meeting through Skype every week, along with frequent visits to each team. Everyone had great passion and interest towards this research, and I believe that shows the firmness of this research,” said Kim. "Reach towards your own interest!" Kim also emphasized the attitudes Hanyangians should have towards their life. Even though he mainly teaches graduate school students, he wished all students could find what they truly wish to do. “Find something unique of your own. Find something you enjoy, and then you will be able to continue on with whatever you are doing. There are countless routes for all students. I wish students would keep challenging themselves to make the greatest results of their own,” wished Kim. Just as his words, Kim will continue with his work with great passion, for even better convenience for global citizens. On Jung-yun jessica0818@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Kim Youn-soo

2017-09 25

[General]Enjoying Each Movement on Stage

The 2017 Korea International Modern Dance Competition successfully came to an end on the 12th, with 209 participants, recording the largest scale. Countless modern dancers showed wonderful movements on stage, heightening the tension. Out of these outstanding modern dancers, Kwon Jae-heon (Department of Dance, 4th year) proudly received the grand prize. We, therefore, met him again in a year, since his winning of the Dong-A Dance Competition last June. He showed more composure and maturity during his whole interview. Kwon showed his charming smile throughout the whole interview. Life of concours Kwon performed a stage named ‘Howling, Eighty Keyboards’ to Nocturn no.13, for this competition. A lot of the dancers make their own stages, and so did Kwon. He created a concept of himself being the 80 keyboards, so that he could show himself ‘being played.’ Kwon added that he continuously watched Cho Seong-jin’s performance videos to express the delicacy of his facial expressions. “I imagined myself as an actual piano. Therefore, there were hardly any emotional lines compared to last year’s stage,” explained Kwon. Kwon, just like any dancers, went through a long, tough time preparing solely for this stage. Even though his stage took place in September, he started his practices for his competition since January. It takes him a month to recover his basic skills and another month to select his music and to set a frame of his performance. Since March, he sets himself into practice for an audition in May held by the Department of Dance. After the audition, he practices for another three months until the competition. “There are professors during the audition who admonish sternly. I was hurt by some of the comments even though they gave me more motivation. The most memorable comment was that I had no possibility compared to my friend next to me.” Reminisced Kwon. A picture of Kwon on stage. (photo courtesy of Kwon.) This 2017 Korea International Modern Dance Competition was especially a meaningful competition to Kwon. Not only did he win an international competition, but he was also granted an exemption from the national military service. Korean male dancers are granted an exemption when they get first or second place in an international competition. To male dancers, two years of the military service is critical. The dancers’ body needs to be trained to be fit to dance well. However, after the compulsory military service, their bodies stiffen due to the lack of practice during their service. Moreover, the dancers need another two years to train their bodies back to their initial state. Therefore, Kwon was able to save four years of his career. When asked for his feeling towards his award, he replied, “I fell into tears as soon as I heard my name at that time. Currently, being able to not go to military service delights me the most. That two year gap is a big risk to dancers. I’m very relieved I don’t have to worry about it anymore.” As a dancer and a choreographer Kwon’s life of dancing started since he was an elementary school student. “I just liked the applause I received during the recreation time when I was only an elementary school student. I danced through searching and following various dancing videos on the internet, without any private lessons before I entered an arts high school,” explained Kwon. He, therefore, started in earnest since high school and prepared for Hanyang University while his friends prepared for university of arts. “I saw a performance by a teacher in Hanyang University and was truly captivated by it. It was hard studying when all my friends finished their examinations, but it was absolutely worth it,” reminisced Kwon. Now as a Hanyangian majoring in dance, he is preparing himself to be a choreographer beyond a dancer. His dream hasn't changed since last year. He, again, emphasized his goal throughout his interview. “You don’t have to dance well to become a choreographer. However, you need an extensive view to choreograph well.” Kwon explained that he, therefore, visits and enjoys a lot of museums and performances. He listens to a lot of classical music, especially Chopin. Moreover, as his brother majors in creative writing, Kwon showed extra thanks to his brother for his help. “I talk a lot about movies, arts, and music. He’s the very one who made the title for this competition. We tend to understand each other well since we have the same interests,” explained Kwon. "I want to be a choreographer!" Now, before his graduation, he is looking forward to his department’s performance. Hanyang University’s Department of Dance will be performing in the opening ceremony of the Pyeongchang Olympics that is to be held next year. Kwon said, “I was planning to study more in Paris next year. However, I decided it’s more important to make meaningful memories with my friends here. I’m truly looking forward to it.” Kwon still has a bright future ahead of him. Instead of making ambitious goals, he explained that he’s going to stay realistic. “I’m not going to exaggerate my dream such as a ‘global choreographer.’ I want to be recognized in this field and be able to give speeches to people who don’t major in dance.” Kwon has been and will be able to show more in the near future. On Jung-yun jessica0818@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Kim Youn-soo