Total 9Articles
News list
Content Forum List
2017-11 27

[Student]Step by Step, Changing the World

‘Changing the world’ might seem as a rather abstract goal to achieve as a university student. On the third floor of the Business School, there are 25 student interns whom are here for a semester in the Hanyang Business Lab to actually achieve this dream. Lee You-jin (Business Administration, 3rd year) and Yun Jeong-ah (Chinese Language and Literature, 4th year) were in the midst of reaching their goals through two missions: ‘Artist Tak’ and ‘Mindful Laundry’. Supporting students with ambition Hanyang Business Lab is one of the characterized programs of the Business school for students to better prepare themselves for the Fourth Industrial Revolution and to better experience the practical affairs of business. There are seven different labs in this program, starting from Artificial Intelligence to Quantitative Analytics. As the second semester’s members, Lee and Yun are working within the Social Innovation Lab with two other members led by professor Shin Hyun-sang. They work to make a platform that could positively influence the society and are therefore specifying their wishes through the two projects. From an individual artist to a platform Lee spends the whole day in the lab, creating better ideas for 'Artist Tak'. Lee is the manager of a facebook page ‘Artist Tak’, (Click HERE) which is a branded platform of Tak Yong-joon who became an artist after a general paralysis. “Tak suffered from a general paralysis after his honeymoon when he was 29. Most suffer depression after they are paralyzed. Unlike most people, he instead started drawing with the strength of his shoulder, which was the only part of his body he could freely move,” explained Lee. Although he drew over 1500 pieces of art, he couldn’t make a living due to the lack of promotion and acknowledgment. Therefore, Lee, along with her teammates, created a platform that could become a sustainable profit model. They started off from scratch to brand talented individuals, solely with the concept of 'everyone has a special talent'. “We first started through naming the brand along with designing the logo. Since the platform we were planning to design was an individual rather than an enterprise, we had difficulties in systemizing it,” reminisced Lee. After studying illustrations for this job, she herself made a logo that configurates a person drawing on a wheelchair and created a facebook page to better advertise this brand. They also sold his work at the 17 Hearts Festival held in HYU to better advertise it. The logo of 'Artist Tak' on the left, and a picture of the postcards they sold in the 17 Hearts Festival on the right. (Photo courtesy of Lee) In accordance with Tak’s request, they are donating a certain portion of their profits to NEXON Purme Children’s Rehabilitation Hospital to help those facing similar difficulties. Throughout the interview, Lee showed her desire for Tak to continue on with this platform for his living even after this project ends. “I wish we could make a system stable enough so that he could carry on this project easily by himself,” wished Lee. Her final goal is to make a social impact with less priority in making a profit. Lee commented, “My final goal is to become a CEO of a social enterprise. As for now, whatever I do after I graduate, I want to be in a position where I could give a positive influence on the society.” Washing off your depression "Someone who had the same experience can better understand them." “I myself suffered from depression in my early twenties,” Yun started off. “I visited various counselling centers and attended in school programs to overcome my insecurities but suffered from recurrences.” She had a thirst for helping the students in similar situations and therefore decided to take a scientific and systemized approach towards this matter. She applied ‘cognitive therapy’ into a platform to help those with depression to acknowledge their own status and recover the symptoms through their own cognitions. She created a facebook page named ‘Mindful Laundry’ (click HERE) and provided three steps in this model. First of all, she created videos for an entry, then introduced a mental inbody test so that the testers could be cognitive of their own state. As the last step, she intends to make gatherings between people with similar symptoms, to provide positive synergy. Yun’s idea is already being acknowledged in the society. She won a prize through this idea in the SBCA (Social Venture Competition Asia) held on the 10th. However, her duty isn’t as easy as it seems. “I take care of all of the activities required to maintain this platform. I create and visualize all the ideas needed and manage the facebook page by myself. The biggest difficulty definitely arises from the lack of manpower,” commented Yun. She added that she wanted to continue on this project even after this semester to achieve her goal. “A lot of people are suffering from depression in the current society even though you don’t reveal that fact in the first place,” commented Yun. She wishes to become a cozy nest for those in need of help. The four students of the Social Innovation Lab. They are still in the midst of achieving their dreams. Continuing different projects with the same goals, all members of the Social Innovation Lab are still working day and night to change the world in their own ways. A society where people can live with a hope, a society where people can easily reach for a hand is what they will be working on. We always have a better tomorrow ahead of us, thanks to these students with motivation. On Jung-yun jessica0818@naver.com Photos by Kang Cho-hyun

2017-11 20

[Academics]Conducting on a Sturdy Building

The current society is suffering from various natural and man-made disasters starting from terrors to earthquakes, such as the recent earthquake that panicked the citizens in Pohang. When a strong impact is made upon the ground, buildings require enough solidity to endure damage in order to protect the people. For a stronger, safer building, professor Yoo Doo-yeol (Department of Architectural Engineering) introduced an improvised concrete in his paper, ‘Effect of fiber geometric property on rate dependent flexural behavior of ultra-high-performance cementitious composite’. Yoo wishes to make sturdy structures for the citizens' safety. Most buildings are made of concrete, and it takes a huge part on the safety of a building. Concrete is initially vulnerable in tension, so there are already improvised versions of concrete commonly used in North America. The new model contains Micro steel fibers within the concrete to prevent the concrete from breaking into two big pieces. Through the steel fiber, the concrete only results in having micro-cracks even when a sudden weight is stressed upon the concrete. In this already improvised concrete, Yoo made a further research to strengthen this concrete in both quasi-static (a state in which something is almost still, but not completely) and impacted states. A ‘quasi-static’ state refers to an ordinary state with only mere impacts such as the vibration of footsteps everyday. These two states require a different sturdiness for different purposes, and the researchers concentrate on improving both of these conditions. Yoo focused on the aspect ratio of the micro steel fibers installed in the current improvised concrete. Aspect ratio is a numerical figure of the division of the diameter from the length of the fiber. Once this aspect ratio was changed in a quasi-static state, Yoo found out that the solidity was maintained and the energy absorption force was strengthened even when the amount of micro steel fibers were reduced. With the same amount of micro steel fibers with the changed ratio, Yoo was able to discover that the energy absorption force almost doubled within a shocked state. The results made through different aspect ratios. Micro-cracks can be seen within the pictures. (Photo courtesy of Yoo) Yoo emphasized the importance of this improvised matter. “Protecting the citizens within the buildings is becoming an urgent matter as countless accidents are occurring more frequently. The current structures lack enough safety to minimize the loss of lives.” The breaking of cement is distinctly more critical than the cracks in cement. Therefore, thorough research is required to make a sturdy building. “We had difficulties in capturing the process when the cement was impacted,” reminisced Yoo. The test cement is fully demolished within 0.001 second (a millisecond), and he had to capture all of the procedures within that millisecond. No kinetic equipment is available in Korea. As a result, he had to proceed with his research research by using the equipment from the University of British Columbia. Despite their mechanical hardships, Yoo made an innovative result in the field of architecture. 2017 is only his second year as a professor in Hanyang University. As the field of architecture is conservative, his final goal is to make practical application with his research. “Various factors such as durability and energy absorption force need to be considered when building a structure as it is directly related to the people living inside the building. This is only the beginning. I still have a lot more factors to work on, but I will continue my research enthusiastically until my studies can be applied to daily structures,” commented Yoo. Yoo will continue on with his goal to make a practical application with his discovery. On Jung-yun jessica0818@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Choi Min-ju

2017-11 07

[Notice]Expressing Out Confidence in Korean

“I have a Korean presentation a few weeks later, and I have no idea how to prepare for it.” This is a common concern among international students in Hanyang University (HYU). Along with the increasing number of international students in HYU, various programs are being created to help these students. The Intensive Korean Writing Class (IKWC) is a special program made solely for international students by the Center for Creative Convergence Education, for those having problems writing in academic Korean. News H attended the first class of the second semester to take a closer look. IKWC, a stepping stone for international students As international students in HYU, they inevitably have to go through an obstacle of a language barrier. This could happen both in daily living and in lectures. However, a lot of these students recall their Korean assignments as the most difficult. When writing, various literacy expressions along with the correct grammar have to be considered. This makes writing for the international students a cause for repulsion. “Grammatical problems aren’t the only problems international students go through. They have difficulties with applying the unique traits only Korean has. I try my hardest to teach them these characteristics so that they could freely use them in their assignments,” commented Oh Se-jin, a lecturer from the IKWC. Oh gave an enthusiastic lecture to the students. “The most important element when writing is considering the reader. In your cases, it would be the professor,” Oh started off. She explained the overall curriculum of the class, dividing writing into the distinction of the literary and colloquial style to writing reports and resumes. The lecturer kindheartedly gave similarities and differences between Korean and the students’ mother tongue. “I believe that both spoken and written words have the power to move a person. So I tend to emphasize sincere writing and speaking when I teach. I wish the students would not fear writing in Korean by the time this class is over,” said Oh. Various reasons have brought these international students with different nationalities to this class. Zhang Yang Yi (Business Administration, 1st year) from China explained, “I don’t have any difficulties when writing in Chinese. I can write in long sentences including all I want to say, but it’s the opposite in Korean. I simply can’t think of what I should write when writing a report in Korean.” Another Chinese student, Zuo Jia Yu also expressed that she had difficulties with her vocabulary. “I first started learning Korean two years ago when I first entered this university. I had problems with Korean grammar and vocabulary during lectures, so I intend to improve my vocabulary skills through this class.” The students also concentrated through the whole class. The Center for Creative Convergence Education Behind this helpful program, a lot of effort was made by the Communications Clinic in the Center for Creative Convergence Education. This Clinic was constructed in 2012 to develop the Hanyangians’ creativity and their communicative competency. This center manages not only this IKWC, but also various programs such as the communication clinic, future humanities forum, debate competitions, English film festival, and English quiz nights. The communication clinic is the foundation of IKWC, allowing all Hanyangians to receive help in four languages – Korean, English, Chinese and Spanish. This center is working hard for the improvement of creativity and communication skills, and a lot of students are receiving help from it. The IKWC made its first step last year, made by the request of the Office of International Affairs, due to the need for academic help for international students as HYU is a globalized university. International students require a certain ability with their Korean writing skills to proceed with their academics in HYU; therefore, there was a need for a program that could help them get to a certain extent in their writing of Korean. The first year of the IKWC, therefore, came to an end with great satisfaction for international students. This second IKWC this year is already almost full of students wishing to improve their Korean skills, and they have started their first class off successfully. Students can receive their counciling in these rooms. (Photo courtesy of Communications Clinic) Chan Puthearath from Cambodia commented, “I have a Korean presentation two weeks later, and I wish I can prepare it well to give a great presentation. I don’t want to be a harm to my Korean teammates, and I will do my best!” Anyone who is in need of help with their language skills, whether it is Korean, English, Chinese or Spanish, can freely visit this clinic and receive help. Why don’t you visit the clinic and express your confidence in the language you wish? On Jung-yun jessica0818@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Kang Cho-hyun

2017-10 16

[Event]Crisis of Humanities? Importance of Humanities!

Professor Yoo Jae-eun of the Department of English Language and Literature gave a lecture titled, “Welcome to the desert of the Real” in the College of Humanities on the 13th. This phrase, better known as a famous line of ‘Matrix’ (1999), is a book’s title written by Slavoj Zizek. She gave a lecture based on this book, explaining the influence made on the world after the 9/11 terror in America along with her philosophical opinions and interpretations. ‘The Real’ society Yoo first gave an explanation on ‘the Real’, meaning ‘existence’, differentiating the word with ‘the real’, implying to the general reality, through the capital letter. Lancan, a psychoanalyst, theorized the field of ‘the Real’. He divided the process of human consciousness’ development into three steps: the Imaginary world, the Symbolic world and the Real world. She started off with this background knowledge in order to refer this to diagnose the current post-modern society after the 9/11 terror, which was her main theme of the lecture. Yoo giving a lecture of 'the Real' She explained that it was proven that we have stepped into ‘the Real’ society through America, the powerful nation, being attacked. The notion of ‘the Real’ refers to incidents we experience but cannot fully understand, such as death. As people’s consciousness and the society’s trend completely changed after the 9/11 terror, the sentence, ‘Welcome to the desert of the Real’ was made. Yoo gave personal experiences she faced after the terror, as she was in America for her Ph.D. Professor Yoo is currently studying these conditions of a post-modern society. Yoo commented, “I chose this title as it is an eye-catching and a famous phrase. I intended to discuss the changed world order after the 9/11 terror as a citizen of the Third World." A student also gave positive comments on this forum. Park Young-in, a graduate of Hanyang University and now a student of the graduate school, commented, “It was a special lecture for me as I became a great fan of her through her past lectures. I am also interested in this subject, so I appreciate that the lecture provided concise explanation on the topic." Park giving her opinions on the lecture Future humanities forums This lecture of professor Yoo was a part of a program currently proceeding in Hanyang University in the name of ‘Future Humanities Forums’. This was the 11th forum, and these forums are held every month by the core enterprise organization in the College of Humanities. A total of 16 schools were selected for this program and will be supported with 40 billion dollars for three years. This program was made as one of the alternative methods to resolve the avoidance of humanities. The College of Humanities made three courses: international studies, merged majors, and intensification of foundation studies. This program works as the training of future-oriented and integrated students and therefore gives forums on these three subjects in rotation, allowing everyone to easily approach humanities. The Future Humanities forum has now already finished its 11th lecture, starting from the second semester of last year. The themes, depending on the lecturers, are diversified starting from arts and science to artificial intelligence. They, therefore, emphasize interdisciplinary approaches but talk about general humanistic worries at the same time. A researcher of the Division of Applied Humanities, Park min-a mentioned, “Hanyang University is working hard to plan various integrated humanities programs and is, therefore, trying to form mutual exchanges of lectures with different schools.” "More people should be interested in humanities!" The forums focus on various discussions on the direction of future humanities, as well as the critical feedback on the current role of humanities. The Division of Applied Humanities are enthusiastically working on various methods to make humanities a field that can be approached more easily. These forums take place once every month in the afternoon of a Friday. Next month, the director of Bosch Korea is planning to give a lecture. “I hope a lot more students would be able to have interest in humanities,” wished Park. On Jung-yun jessica0818@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Kim Youn-soo

2017-10 02

[Academics][Researcher of the Month] Producing Energy Through a Single Thread

'Lack of energy’ is an issue the whole world is focusing on. Various countries are searching for effective renewable energy and new materials that could replace the current energy sources. Professor Kim Seon-jeong (Department of Biomedical Engineering) discovered a new material every researcher was looking for. Kim's paper, “Harvesting electrical energy from carbon nanotube yarn twist” introduces the world’s first new material, which can produce energy through slight movements. Kim explains the concept of his new material Professor Kim’s research team started its first project in 2006 on artificial muscle. However, after his research, Kim realized its limitations as they were only able to move through an external energy source. Therefore, he thought of a new idea that the muscle would be more effective when it is able to produce energy by itself. Carbon nanotube is a new material which is a type of conductor and has a diameter of only a few nanometers. This material was made as a thread in the artificial muscle. However, when these threads were finely twisted into one direction, they were able to produce energy by itself through its contraction and relaxation without an applied voltage. Being made into a spring, their length can be changed as much as 30 percent on average. This new material, named as ‘twistron harvester yarn’, allowed a chance for the muscle to move by itself without a separate power source. This twistron harvester yarn looks and acts as if it were an ordinary thread. This states that making clothes out of this material is possible. Once this comes into realization, this would give a boost in making wearable devices, as producing electricity without an energy source is possible. Moreover, this thread is possible to use inside water, giving another possibility of an effective alternative energy. This has already been tested in the East Sea of Korea. Kim’s research team made a model consisting of a glass bottle connected with an electrode, the thread, a balloon, and an equipment that could measure electricity. As the twistron harvester yarn contracted and relaxed, electrical energy was verified from the ocean. Kim showed great passion in the research he was conducting. This research on the twistron harvester yarn was his fourth research. He has been working on artificial muscles for the past nine years before he started this research. “I didn’t start this research solely to find the twistron harvester yarn. I felt the limitations within the research I conducted earlier and was seeking for development,” reminisced Kim. He explained that he wasn’t the only person who conducted the research. Eight teams from three different countries worked on this new material for two years to deduct a better result. “We had a meeting through Skype every week, along with frequent visits to each team. Everyone had great passion and interest towards this research, and I believe that shows the firmness of this research,” said Kim. "Reach towards your own interest!" Kim also emphasized the attitudes Hanyangians should have towards their life. Even though he mainly teaches graduate school students, he wished all students could find what they truly wish to do. “Find something unique of your own. Find something you enjoy, and then you will be able to continue on with whatever you are doing. There are countless routes for all students. I wish students would keep challenging themselves to make the greatest results of their own,” wished Kim. Just as his words, Kim will continue with his work with great passion, for even better convenience for global citizens. On Jung-yun jessica0818@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Kim Youn-soo

2017-09 25

[General]Enjoying Each Movement on Stage

The 2017 Korea International Modern Dance Competition successfully came to an end on the 12th, with 209 participants, recording the largest scale. Countless modern dancers showed wonderful movements on stage, heightening the tension. Out of these outstanding modern dancers, Kwon Jae-heon (Department of Dance, 4th year) proudly received the grand prize. We, therefore, met him again in a year, since his winning of the Dong-A Dance Competition last June. He showed more composure and maturity during his whole interview. Kwon showed his charming smile throughout the whole interview. Life of concours Kwon performed a stage named ‘Howling, Eighty Keyboards’ to Nocturn no.13, for this competition. A lot of the dancers make their own stages, and so did Kwon. He created a concept of himself being the 80 keyboards, so that he could show himself ‘being played.’ Kwon added that he continuously watched Cho Seong-jin’s performance videos to express the delicacy of his facial expressions. “I imagined myself as an actual piano. Therefore, there were hardly any emotional lines compared to last year’s stage,” explained Kwon. Kwon, just like any dancers, went through a long, tough time preparing solely for this stage. Even though his stage took place in September, he started his practices for his competition since January. It takes him a month to recover his basic skills and another month to select his music and to set a frame of his performance. Since March, he sets himself into practice for an audition in May held by the Department of Dance. After the audition, he practices for another three months until the competition. “There are professors during the audition who admonish sternly. I was hurt by some of the comments even though they gave me more motivation. The most memorable comment was that I had no possibility compared to my friend next to me.” Reminisced Kwon. A picture of Kwon on stage. (photo courtesy of Kwon.) This 2017 Korea International Modern Dance Competition was especially a meaningful competition to Kwon. Not only did he win an international competition, but he was also granted an exemption from the national military service. Korean male dancers are granted an exemption when they get first or second place in an international competition. To male dancers, two years of the military service is critical. The dancers’ body needs to be trained to be fit to dance well. However, after the compulsory military service, their bodies stiffen due to the lack of practice during their service. Moreover, the dancers need another two years to train their bodies back to their initial state. Therefore, Kwon was able to save four years of his career. When asked for his feeling towards his award, he replied, “I fell into tears as soon as I heard my name at that time. Currently, being able to not go to military service delights me the most. That two year gap is a big risk to dancers. I’m very relieved I don’t have to worry about it anymore.” As a dancer and a choreographer Kwon’s life of dancing started since he was an elementary school student. “I just liked the applause I received during the recreation time when I was only an elementary school student. I danced through searching and following various dancing videos on the internet, without any private lessons before I entered an arts high school,” explained Kwon. He, therefore, started in earnest since high school and prepared for Hanyang University while his friends prepared for university of arts. “I saw a performance by a teacher in Hanyang University and was truly captivated by it. It was hard studying when all my friends finished their examinations, but it was absolutely worth it,” reminisced Kwon. Now as a Hanyangian majoring in dance, he is preparing himself to be a choreographer beyond a dancer. His dream hasn't changed since last year. He, again, emphasized his goal throughout his interview. “You don’t have to dance well to become a choreographer. However, you need an extensive view to choreograph well.” Kwon explained that he, therefore, visits and enjoys a lot of museums and performances. He listens to a lot of classical music, especially Chopin. Moreover, as his brother majors in creative writing, Kwon showed extra thanks to his brother for his help. “I talk a lot about movies, arts, and music. He’s the very one who made the title for this competition. We tend to understand each other well since we have the same interests,” explained Kwon. "I want to be a choreographer!" Now, before his graduation, he is looking forward to his department’s performance. Hanyang University’s Department of Dance will be performing in the opening ceremony of the Pyeongchang Olympics that is to be held next year. Kwon said, “I was planning to study more in Paris next year. However, I decided it’s more important to make meaningful memories with my friends here. I’m truly looking forward to it.” Kwon still has a bright future ahead of him. Instead of making ambitious goals, he explained that he’s going to stay realistic. “I’m not going to exaggerate my dream such as a ‘global choreographer.’ I want to be recognized in this field and be able to give speeches to people who don’t major in dance.” Kwon has been and will be able to show more in the near future. On Jung-yun jessica0818@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Kim Youn-soo

2017-09 11

[Academics]Making a Better Environment to Live In

Until the 21st century, the world has gone through excessive amounts of civilization. People were able to make various visible developments while failing to keep the environment without pollution. Professor Kim Ki-hyun of the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, therefore, focused on the environmental problems through his paper, “Biochar as a Catalyst”. Through the paper, he introduced a new material that could better purify various impurities. Biochar is a compound word of ‘bio’ and ‘char’, which is biology and charcoal. This material is a type of waste that is produced when you burn any biological materials that possess carbon. Just as charcoal is made when you burn trees, biochar is made when you burn biological materials. Through this not-so-helpful looking waste, people can purify the environment. When soil is polluted with something, such as oil, pesticides or heavy metal, biochar can be effectively used to absorb these contaminations. They combine well with toxic substances; therefore, it allows purification of soil only though scattering these materials in the soil and skimming them out again. The picture of the process of making biochar. (Photo courtesy of Kim) Kim introduced his overall research related to biochar. He studies various metal organic frameworks, which are much like biochars, used to purify polluted environments. “There are over 20 thousand types of metal organic frameworks, and I am currently working on which framework will be the most effective when purifying pollution,” explained Kim. Moreover, he talked about electronic cigarettes which are a relatively newly introduced invention. As there isn’t a proven result of the components within the electronic cigarette, Kim is working on the methods to discover the dangers of them. Kim said, “There isn’t a precise database related to electronic cigarettes. They could also consist of numerous cancer-causing agents and harm, just as original cigarettes does. I intend on discovering these substances and, furthermore, purify them.” Kim, however, does not solely research on this one material. He pays attention to the general issues within the society. His main interest lies on various aerial issues such as air pollution, fine dust, indoor pollution and stenches. Kim said, “There, indeed, are a lot of problems regarding pollution related issues. However, there are also a lot of methods that can be used to solve these problems. My goal is to make effective solutions through comprehensive research.” He explained that the biochar mentioned in his paper is only a small example of his overall goal. He intends to research on more new materials and solve various social issues. Kim hopes people could have correct information on the environment. Kim hopes that people would have a better understanding of environmental pollution. “When the dust level exceeds 100 microgram per 1 cubic meter, the Ministry of Environment suggests to refrain from going out. However, when people wear masks right after they smoke to protect themselves from fine dust, they breathe in eight hundred to nine hundred micrograms of dust. Due to excessive amounts of information, people sometimes make contradictory actions,” explained Kim. He wished that more environmental education would be made in the pursuit of proper knowledge. He added that Hanyang University students should give more interest towards the environment. “Let’s keep the air clean, with correct information!” On Jung-yun jessica0818@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Park Young-min

2017-08 21

[General]The Power of International Students

On the second floor of the International building, a global lounge along with a global information center desk is available for anyone to use. Any international students can ask whatever problem they have through this desk. However, surprisingly, the people answering these questions are also international students of Hanyang University (HYU). ‘Welcome Handae’, which is a volunteer group mainly consisted of international students, just finished recruiting their members for the second semester on the 18th and are ready to help their colleagues. Light for Hanyang international students ‘Welcome Handae’ is a volunteer group working behind the global information lounge. This lounge was first made due to the increasing number of foreign students visiting HYU. Currently in the International building, numerous administration teams are located, making it extremely hard for international students who aren’t familiar with Korean to receive the answers for their questions. In order to solve this problem, the global information center was opened on July 2016, as a one-stop service. Any international students can resolve most of their problems through this center that is seen as soon as they enter the building. A Welcome Handae student answering the questions of a foreign student. (Photo courtesy of Park Jin-ju) The manager of the global information center, Park Jin-ju explained that this group was initially created for the community service hour of foreign students. “Since most of the community service activities require fluent Korean skills, Welcome Handae was made for those who weren’t familiar with Korean.”, said Park. However, this program provided help not only for those participating, but also for other foreigners who were having trouble adapting to an unfamiliar environment. As most of the participants are international students, they were able to completely understand other international students’ difficulties and give them effective solutions as if it were their own problem. Welcome Handae provides extensive help to foreign students in numerous areas. They first help simple questions such as locations of various facilities and methods of handling various documents and applications. Moreover, information such as job fairs and useful programs in HYU are noticed through the posters made by the Welcome Handae students. They also plan various events held by the global information center in the global lounge such as Halloween and Thanksgiving Day, providing various entertainment as well. As Hanyangians, they provide eye-level assistance to all international students. As participants of Welcome Handae Not only did Welcome Handae give a lot of help to interantional students, but they also say they have received a lot from their experience. A Kenyan student, Nyambegera Duke Zacharia (Computer Science, 4th year) who participated reminisced “I think Welcome Handae is a great opportunity to learn not only about Korea, but also about many other countries. You can make friends with various nationalities, learning more about different cultures. I think this program evokes mutual understandings between other countries.” Moreover, Mohd Khairil Khairon (Department of Electronic Engineering, 3rd year) from Malaysia remarked “Both my English and Korean improved through this work. I am now able to find the information I need through the internet as I practiced doing so. I felt proud of myself when I was able to help another student apply for a program through the internet.” The participants have great affection towards Welcome Handae. From the left, Khairon (Department of Electronic Engineering, 3rd year) and Zacharia (Computer Science, 4th year) There were students who realized the hardships of others through their work. Luis Manuel Escandon (Mechanical Engineering, 4th year) from Mexico mentioned that he realized the effort the faculty was making towards the students. “I used to ignore the text messages sent from school since I couldn’t understand them properly. However, I found out that they were intently researching to make programs helpful for us.” There was even a student who was able to change another student’s school life. Rui Zhang (Theater and Film, 2nd year) from China gave advice to a student wishing to quit school even before entering, for the fear of their grade. She spent her time with the student even after her working shift, and was able to persuade the student to come back to Hanyang University again. “I felt so proud of myself when the student came back to me to say thank you for what I did,” reminisced Zhang. The third Welcome Handae will start their work from the second semester, and are prepared to give more help to all international students. Chang Ha-il (Business, 3rd year), a Korean participant, expressed his hope for the development of both Welcome Handae and the global information center. “There are a lot of information foreign students can receive, even when they don’t have any questions. I hope that they would more freely use this center and receive a lot of meaningful information they can use as HYU’s students.” The participants of Welcome Handae are standing around the global information center's mangager, Park Jin-ju (first row, second from the left). On Jung-yun jessica0818@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Choi Min-ju

2017-07 23

[Academics]Vitalization in Detecting NO2 in Daily Life

As environmental pollution is deteriorating, various hazardous gas face people unrecognizably in their daily lives. Professor Kim Hyoun-woo of the Division of Material Science and Engineering is an active researcher in various sensors that could help identify various gas, humidity, or even radiation. His recent paper “Enhancement of gas sensing properties by the functionalization of ZnO-branched SnO2 nanowires with Cr2O3 nanoparticles” proposes another effective method of detecting a particular gas, NO2. Kim expaining the nanostructure of his paper. His research aimed for an effective NO2 detecting nanostructure, which is a structure made from molecules. NO2, also called as nitrogen dioxide, is required to be detected since it can be found relatively easily through the atmosphere even when it is a toxic, air-contaminant gas. Kim mentioned “Once a practical method through this nanostructure is constructed, I wish people can be easily detect this toxic gas.” This nanostructure is composed of three different substances. First of all, a SnO2 (tin oxide) nanowire is required. A nanowire is a nanostructure of an extreme, fine line which has a diameter of one nanometer (10−9 meters). Next, ZnO (zinc oxide) nanowires are branched on the SnO2 nanowire. Then the last substance, which are Cr2O3 (chromium oxide) nanoparticles, would grow on the ZnO nanowires. With a completed nanostructure, detecting NO2 become possible. An illustration of Cr2O3 -functionalized ZnO branched SnO2 nanowires. (photo courtesy of Kim) This nanostructure mentioned in his paper is highly sensitive, which makes it a significant structure. A current always flows within a structure, and a resistance is made whenever there is a current. However, the resistance differs when there is an inflow of another gas. The external gas takes away the electron in the structure, therefore heightening the resistance of the structure. The sensitivity is determined through resistance within the sensor. When the sensitivity is elevated, a structure can perceive more NO2 than the one with low sensitivity even when there’s a same amount in the air. The nanostructure mentioned in the paper is indeed a unique technology. However, Kim also mentioned the insufficiency of this nanostructure. In order to detect NO2, this gas needs to be heated in an extremely high temperature; in the case of the paper, 300’C. Therefore, there is a difficulty for people to sense the gas in the current stance. Kim mentioned that he wants to improve this difficulty through further research. He is currently working on methods that could allow this nanostructure to detect NO2 in a room temperature. Kim wishes to develop a practical nanostructure. Kim is an enthusiastic researcher. He constantly works on structures that could benefit people in their daily lives. He is striving for extreme-high sensitivity in his structures so that people could quickly recognize and react to the contamination. Kim mentioned “I want to make a structure that can be commercialized. A lot of the inventions disappear due to the lack of cost competency or efficiency. I wish to contribute to the promotion of mankind welfare.” On Jung-yun jessica0818@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Kim Youn-soo