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2017-12 04 Headline News

[Academics][Researcher of the Month] Obesity, Everyone’s Enemy

Regardless of gender, age, and nationality, obesity is a health problem that is affecting an increasing number of people. While most people think obesity merely has to do with dietary habit, it shows close relations with metabolic diseases and cancer. In other words, obesity is not just caused by the consumption of large calories, but there are other possible factors to it. Kim Yong-hee (Department of Bio-Engineering), whose interest lies in obesity and the ways to prevent and cure it, discovered an innovative way to counteract obesity in his paper “Visceral adipose tissue macrophage-targeted TACE silencing to treat obesity-induced type 2 diabetes,” which was coauthored by two of the graduate school students of the department: Song Yoon-sung (2nd year) and Yong Seok-beom (3rd year). Kim explained that by targeting the inflammation caused by the excess fats, obesity can be treated. The existing method used to treat obesity was to suppress appetite by touching the nerve system, for it was mainly believed that the root cause of obesity was excessive-consumption. However, Kim discovered in his laboratory that obesity has to do with inflammation within fat-storing tissues, which are called adipose tissues. Inside a patient’s body, the excess fat that cannot be stored in the adipose tissue spreads to its surroundings, which then causes inflammation when in contact with other types of cells. A type of white blood cell that engulfs and digests foreign cellular debris called macrophage are largely responsible for obesity-induced adipose tissue inflammation. A breakthrough in Kim’s research is that obesity can be treated by preventing the accumulation of fat within the body, by controlling the inflammation through gene delivery, not by suppressing appetite. In such a scenario, the gene delivery system Kim and his students have invented in the laboratory refers to the targeted gene delivery system that is capable of selectively targeting the visceral (relating to the intestines) adipose tissue macrophages, which are the major cause of inflammation because they produce a type of protein called cytokine. The excess fats that cannot be stored in the adipose tissue spread to their surroundings, and when they come in contact with cytokines, that is when the inflammation springs. By targeting the inflammation, which is the root cause of obesity, the treatment for obesity is made possible. There have been several clinical studies that have highlighted the significance of inflammation regarding obesity, but few therapeutic approaches have been suggested. Through his research, Kim and his students have proposed a therapeutic strategy of targeted gene delivery that could safely treat the disease without any side effects. This strategy is also favorable in treating type 2 diabetes, which primarily occurs as a result of obesity. It is preventable by staying at a normal weight through regular exercise or dietary changes. This could also be the way to prevent obesity as well, which, in other words, means that the cause of the two diseases have the same outset, which is the inflammation within the tissues due to being overweight. Therefore, Kim’s proposal of therapeutic approach for obesity can also treat type 2 diabetes. Targeted gene delivery strategy could kill two birds with one stone. Building on his current studies, Kim’s future research aims to create more formulas for drugs that could treat obesity. “Liposuction is an extremely dangerous surgery because it sucks the good fats as well. Obesity is surely preventable or even cured for those who are not severely obese. However, those who are super-obese, their genes could transform into obese genes and this can affect their children. So, the targeted gene delivery approach can optimally be used in the future.” Kim specifically chose the topic of inflammation of obesity because he wanted to find a narrow gate and open it wide. Since not many solutions for obesity inflammation have been discovered, he wanted to delve into the studies of this topic and create a cure for the countless people waiting for treatment. Kim always aspires to study and research on topics that is subject to a breakthrough outcome. "I am interested in finding cures for diseases that do not have many treatments." Jeon Chae-yun chaeyun111@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Kabg Cho-hyun

2017-11 14

[General]Fusion Major 101

Hanyang University Social Innovation Center is carrying out the initiative called “HUGE (Hanyang University for Global Engagement)”, which aims to help the youth become a true global leader in accordance with the founding philosophy of "Love in Action". It attempts to foster global leaders who practice the spirit of sharing by facing global social issues and resolving them. Fusion majors is one of the means by which innovative global leaders are fostered, by opening new perspectives and enagling them to lead the society into an innovative direction. What is a fusion major? Fusion majors are majors established by combining courses of preexisting majors or departments, marked as the second or the third major of the student. The currently established fusion majors on the Seoul campus are as follows: Humanities Transdisciplinary Studies (consisting of Art Technology, Technoscience Humanities, Digital Storytelling, and Engineer Communicatiton), Humanities-Software Convergence, Public Administration Humanities, Chinese Economy and Trade Program, Global Business Culture, Classical Reading, Business Foundation, Automobile Software, and Big Data Science. As for the ERICA campus, there is Global Strategy Communication, Design Engineering, and Software for Emerging Technology. Fusion majors are innovative in the way that they can help students become outbound experts, encompassing comprehensive knowledge from different perspectives rather than an inbound single viewpoint. Although it may sound similar to double majoring, there is a distinction between the two. While the former is the studying of two separate majors at the same time, the latter introduces the two different fields in one bowl, combining different majors and creating an innovative one. By combining different fields, fusion majors offer a multiangular perspective. (Photo courtesy of CIO) “I am double majoring in Chinese Economy and Trade Program because I wanted to study further and deeper about China aside from the studies in my first major, digging more into the politics and economic aspects of the country. I want to recommend this major to others who are interested in China because it enables you to comprehend the country from an acute viewpoint,” answered Jung Jae-woo (Chinese Language and Literature, 3rd year). According to Jung, the fusion major enables him to acquire knowledge not provided in his first major from an innovative, integrated perspective of different majors, which truly helps him dig deep into the root of the expertise. “It’s also possible that the fusion majors becomes a separate department in the future, depending on its performance. And there is no restriction or regulation to foreign students, as the same rules apply to all students. Fusion majors are for anyone who wants to become an innovative global leader!” noted Lee Won-gurl from the Center for Creative Convergence Education. He added that the greatest advantage of fusion majors is the convergence of different fields, going beyond the boundaries of each domain and creating an outlook of integration for the next level. Fusion majors can open the career path to unfixed routes, from Humanities to Engineering, for example. Lee believes fusion majors could open unprecedented career paths. Some FAQ’s! When considering double majoring, students often come up with one or more of the following questions: Q: I am a double-major student, and what happens if I cannot fulfill the graduation requirement in time? A: You will be disqualified if you fail to fulfill the requirements. Taking seasonal courses can be an option. Q: If I am an ERICA campus student, and I applied for a double-major on the Seoul campus. Which campus do I belong to? A: Those who have successfully fulfilled the requirements in the 4th year will belong to the Seoul campus under that situation. In other words, when finishing the courses of your second major, you are a Seoul campus student. However, after completing the course, when going back to your first major, you will receive your degree on the ERICA campus. Q: What will my graduation certificate look if I double major? A: Your first and second major will appear in parallel on your graduation certificate. In terms of the certificate paper, you will receive separate papers for your first and the second major. Jeon Chae-yun chaeyun111@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Kang Cho-hyun

2017-10 29

[Academics][Researcher of the Month] The Faster, Simpler, Easier, the Better!

Today, we live in the world where everything is becoming mechanized, meaning the field of electronics and mechanics are infinitely evolving. Conspicuous or not, there are small and big changes around us that make our lives more convenient and more efficient in various ways. Professor Hong Jung-pyo (Department of Automotive Engineering), in his paper, “Simple size determination of permanent-magnet synchronous machines” has established a milestone in the field of both electronics and mechanics, by proposing a means of simplifying the process of designing and developing machines. Hong’s research can determine the direction of the process of motor’s development. When designing and producing an instrument, engineers go through trials of experiments, trying to pick the best formula by observing the results of each experiment. Such a process demands laborious amounts of time and cost, which under certain circumstances can be unaffordable. A perfect, well-constructed device or motor has been made through stages of trial-and-error so far, being tested on their performance in each stage. However, with Hong’s proposal of simulation experiment, this entire step could be greatly reduced, simply by executing the experiment with the simulator. When working on a motor, it is important to harmoniously combine the techniques of both the electrician and the engineer. However, what is more important is, the two fields should not be seen separately. The two perspectives commingled as one will bring the best result, whereas if they are regarded separately, failures can arise, and it would be difficult to figure out where the problem originated from. The simulator Hong proposed in his paper acts not only as a catalyst in making the process of developing machines faster, simpler, and easier by exempting the trial-and-error step but also allows to preview an outcome of integrated viewpoint. “For a better understanding, imagine this picture. There is a device I’m trying to make, and I want to equip this circle-shaped part. After doing so, I still think I can improve the final product somehow, so I will try dismantling the part I just added and equip this oval-shaped part. When doing so, I have to carefully remove the circle-shaped part and re-equip the oval-shaped one and then compare the two results to see what the best combination is.” This process of trial-and-error and comparison, which is time-consuming, is what Hong wanted to resolve with his research. With the simulator, engineers can simply enter the input and compare the different outcomes and go for what is the best much more conveniently. Everything that moves, including cars, elevators, and airplanes, are all powered by electric motors. In the future, the range of usages will increase infinitely which means there will be experiments after experiments for the development of motor-based objects. In each case, Hong’s research can greatly reduce the development process and offer the direction of choices for better outcomes. His future research goal is to create a unified solution of electronics and mechanics, which will boost the usability of the machine itself. Hong’s research will be a constructive contribution to engineers. Jeon Chae-yun chaeyun111@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Park Young-min, Kim Youn-soo

2017-09 25

[Academics]A Tactile Sensor for Texture Recognition

With computers today, auditory and visual senses can be materialized—through sound and screens. The other three of the five senses, on the other hand, have not yet been on the platform of materialization because they require a somewhat more delicate mechanism and are harder to deliver with technology. Professor Park Wan-jun (Department of Electronic Engineering), in his paper, “A tactile sensor using single layer graphene for surface texture recognition”, presented and elaborated on a tactile sensor that could distinguish different materials, which opens many doors for future technology. It is hard to imagine the sense of touch being delivered with a machine because it is usually perceived as something only humans are capable of. But why can sound and sight be materialized by computers but not touch? The answer is, electronic signals for sound and vision are made possible in the aspect of engineering, while that of touch is not. What Park presented in his paper is a small chip-like device that enables perception of touch for surface texture recognition. The output of Park's research, which is a chip-like electronic device. (Photo courtesy of Park) The first thing he had to do, according to Park, was to turn the sense into electronic signals. Only then can the machine read what is being conveyed. Once the signal of touch is conveyed to the device, it will analyze the signal and distinguish what kind of texture it is. The subtle and clear differences in terms of texture between various kinds of surfaces can be perceived and distinguished by the tactile sensor, detecting the microscopic scale of differences. There is a single layer of graphene embedded in the device, which creates a different resistance variation each time a surface comes to interaction. It is what functions as the main player in telling apart different surfaces because it is what creates the different signals. The signal is then sent to the computer by the chip, which is to be analyzed and categorized into different kinds of textures. “Just as there is virtual reality (VR) for sight, a touch-version will be possible with this device,” anticipated Park. “A tactile display is also possible with this device, as the signal for touch is now readable by the computer. If you put your hand on the tactile display device, you can actually feel whatever the object or texture input in the computer is,” envisaged Park. This technology is also applicable in the medical field. Those who lost their sense of touch in certain parts of their body by burns, for example, will be able to regain their sense by implanting this small device in the portion of injury. Now that the signals of touch can be read by the device and since senses can be transmitted in the form of signals, delivery of the sense of touch is made possible. The inserted chip will send signals to the brain and this will enable the patient to feel what is being touched. “In recap, this research of mine has provided a human-sensorlike device that will enable transmission of the sense of touch in terms of engineering. Now I’m currently working on machine learning by categorizing and classifying different textures into groups and making the device absorb the data. The ultimate goal of my research is to complete materializing the sense of touch from the perspective of engineering so that further technologies could be developed based on my research,” planned Park. Park's further research is set on mechanizing the sense touch. Jeon Chae-yun chaeyun111@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Choi Min-ju

2017-08 28

[Alumni]The Master of Go

Currently a professional player and a professor of the game Go, Jeong Soo-hyun (English Language and Literature, ’83) dreamed of becoming a professional Go player since he was in high school. Jeong learned to play Go as a student and was charmed by the joy until he eventually decided that he wanted to be a master of it. As a professional player, Jeong has written about 40 books, has been teaching Go for more than 20 years, and has telecasted on numerous TV programs. Go and life Jeong navigated his life toward the world of Go and sought his career in that field at first because he was purely attracted by its joy. It all began as an interest and a passion, after which he grew to be more enthusiastic and ambitious. To Jeong, Go is not just a job but rather something that links to his mind and thoughts. “I found another world studying Go. I might call it a world of Go culture,” laughed Jeong. “I often refer to Go as a panacea, which is the cure for all ills. I sometimes get amazed by how extensive Go can reach in our daily lives. It teaches us so much!” exclaimed Jeong. After graduating from high school, he entered the Korea Baduk (game of Go) Association as a researcher, which is the first and indispensable step of becoming a professional. He had about 40 Go matches every year, through which Jeong studied and accumulated his skills and knowledge. “It’s not through practice that you improve yourself in Go, but it is rather through analyzing other players’ games. So I made several small groups and focused on growing insights and developing my own mastery.” Jeong read books about Go in order to get the holistic picture of the game and to master the theory of it. The more he studied, the more he was absorbed into the game. Jeong reached the highest level of 9th grader in Go after countless matches starting from level one when he was 41. Higher levels could be achieved through gaining points by winning Go matches. “I highly recommend learning or practicing Go as a hobby. It is not only fascinating itself but also extremely lesson-full and wisdom-giving at the same time. Recently, Go has become a global mind-sport, meaning being good at it will enable you to be good at communicating with people.” After becoming a professional Go player and entering Hanyang University, Jeong has established a club named “Hanyang Giwoohui”, which has become more active even after Jeong’s graduation. "Go is full of lessons!" (Photo courtesy of heraldcorp) As a professional and a professor It has been more than 20 years since Jeong became a professor of Go at a Korean university. He spent the longer part of his Go life as a professor than as a professional. With his life motto “no pain no gain”, he has been teaching his students that where there is no effort, there is no outcome. “What I’ve learned through my life as a Go player is that it feels more worthwhile to do something for the others than for just yourself and that the ultimate result will be in your favor. I believe doing what you love with passion will beget meaningful outcomes,” manifested Jeong. Winning the second place in both KBS Baduk Match and SBS Baduk Match, and being the first winner of the Professional Baduk Match, Jeong’s name is mentioned in lists of the winners of many professional Go matches. “I only won the second place because my rival was mighty. I can still recall the bitterness,” reminisced Jeong. Currently taking the role of the president of Korea Professional Baduk Association and Korean Society for Baduk Studies, Jeong is continuting his studies of Go. “No pain no gain is my life philosophy. If you don’t work, there will be no award.” Having published about 40 books of baduk (Go), Jeong’s recommendations for beginners are ‘Introduction to Baduk’, ‘Master of Management’, and ‘CEO Who Reads Baduk’, all of which are perfect for baduk beginners to read. He first wrote a book due to a request of learners, after which Jeong got a number of requests from other publishing companies to publish more books. Thanks to all his publications, he acquired the nickname “baduk professor” even before he became one. His achievements all together as a professional Go player spotlights him as one of the most prominent players. "I believe hard work always pays off. There awaits rewarads for those who work hard." (Photo courtesy of heraldcorp) Jeon Chae-yun chaeyun111@hanyang.ac.kr

2017-08 15

[Academics]Upgrading Transcriptome Map

Incredible amount of transcriptomes encoded by eukaryotic genomes has been produced as RNA-sequencing reads are published in piles. The transcriptome is the sum of all RNA information contained in a body’s cells, which is an indispensable data when creating the transcriptome map of the body. The current map, however, is not its apotheosis since it was constructed based on RNA-seq reads that lack their orientations and certain boundary information. In his paper “High-confidence coding and noncoding transcriptome,” Professor Nam Jin-wu of Department of Life Science has presented the transcriptome map with RNA-seq reads with high accuracy and efficiency. “What makes this research valuable is its contribution to the scientific community. It will function as an indispensable infrastructure.” RNA and the map In the past 10 years, with the technology of next generation sequencing (NGO), data of individual’s genome and transcriptome has been developing at a rapid pace. Genetic information of both healthy and diseased individuals aggregates to approximately 10 peta bytes from all over the world, from which Nam focused specifically on analyzing the transcriptome, disregarding the genome for the moment. A critical difference between the two is that genome has orientation while transcriptome lacks it. This indicates that it would be extremely difficult and inconvenient to arrange the little pieces of information to form the whole genetic map of transcriptome. “What it means by ‘lack of orientation’ is, simply picture this situation: putting batteries in a remote control which has no plus or minus indicators. You would have to find the right direction by just trying. It is also like jigsaw puzzles where you have to search thoroughly the scattered pieces and find and put the right ones together until you get the whole picture,” explained Nam. Constructing a genetic map with orderless pieces of information could be an arduous task, since the massive bio-big data offers a tremendous amount of genetic information and they lack orientation. What Nam has created through his research is an algorithm that predetermines the orientation and boundaries of transcripts and genetic information. This will not only lessen the work of constructing the transcriptome map by assembling RNA-seq reads that lack orientation but also increase the accuracy and quality of the resulting maps. The outcome of his research, in a word, orients the directionless RNA-seq reads and locate them where they belong. Now with the more accurate and systematic transcriptome map, the amount and structure of RNA in a cell in the body could be figured. Nam first started this research three years ago, spending the first two years constructing the algorithm and spending the last year producing data using NGS. He is currently researching on the noncoding RNA (RNA that does not produce protein), which is highly related with various types of cancer and other rare diseases. The ultimate goal of Nam’s studies is to solve the mystery of unexplored RNA. 98% of RNA in human body belongs to the noncoding category, so how exactly do they affect the way a human being is and how do they account for different anomalies? “A good question begets a good study.” Jeon Chae-yun chaeyun111@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Choi Min-ju

2017-08 07

[Culture]Apps You Need in Your Life

Kakao Talk, Jihachul, Naver Map, Seoul Bus, Naver Dictionary, Candy Camera, Snow, Melon, Kakao Taxi, and various coffee shop stamp apps are all typical applications found in an ordinary korean’s smartphone. These apps are common yet indispensable to the extent that they have become a big part of people’s daily lives in Korea. Besides these everyday applications, what are some fun, genius apps worth downloading? From left to right, Date Pop, Seoul Travel, Albamon, People of Delivery, and Zigzag. (Photo courtesy of play.google.com) Brilliant and convenient First things first, for those who love to visit new places, either one of these two applications are highly recommended: Date Pop or Seoul Travel. These applications are more than just handy when looking for some fun places to hang out with friends and lovers or when finding appetizing cafes or restaurants. From location, menu, price and reviews, the apps provide much information and works as the encyclopedia of enjoyment. Creation of such applications has motivated a win-win situation for both users and business owners. People can gain fun and convenient information with just a few taps on their smartphone screen while the app functions as a great loudspeaker for the restaurant and cafe owners. By providing wandering roamers with countless options for their destination, the app has become a great mean of advertisement and a plan maker at the same time. Click the region you want to go and see where you want to visit. (Photo courtesy of achimjuice.tistory.com) Price, location, and menu are all listed in Seoul Travel. (Photo courtesy of app.chosun.com) When looking for an alba, or part-time jobs, there is nothing more helpful than the app Albamon. If Date Pop and Seoul Travel are the mobile books of fun places, Albamon is the one for people looking for part-time jobs. The app displays countless employment notice from myriad of companies, restaurants, cafes, stores, and more. Jobs can be funneled by one's setting according to his or her categories such as payment, location, working time, and age requirements. With the right setting, finding a perfect fitting alba for one is not a tricky task anymore. It is an useful app to anyone who is looking for all kinds of part-time jobs. Detailed, comprehensive, and individual-tailored part-time job information are provided. (Photo courtesy of appannie.com) There is nothing more convenient than having one's food delivered when there is no time and energy to cook or go out to eat but hunger is demanding some action. In such situation, People of Delivery is the perfect app to satisfy hunger’s demand. Korea’s delivery service is something that exceeds the level of mere convenience but something that has developed into a huge part of its culture—even McDonalds is delivered. Fitting to the title, this app is the phonebook of all menus in Korea, since virtually all the menus are listed in the app and they are all ready to be delivered. Making the app more convenient, the categorization according to menu and franchised restaurants enables easy scanning for indecisive customers. According to menu and franchised restaurants, categories are made. (Photo courtesy of estimastory.com) Even online shopping can be an easier task with a mobile app. Zigzag is urgent to download for lazy shopaholics or thrifty shoppers. This application is the ultimate compilation of numerous online shopping malls, having the excellent function of gathering and presenting a particular item from different malls and allowing the shopper to compare the price at one sight. The app allows the shopper to find the item or fashion he or she is looking for and buy it at its best price. Enter the category of clothing, look through the list of online shopping malls, and compare the price are all it takes to purchase the exact item one wants at the most affordable price. Styles, price and items can be seen in one sight. (Photo courtesy of simsimha3.tistory.com) Jeon Chae-yun chaeyun111@hanyang.ac.kr

2017-07 24

[Student]First Try, Best Result!

To foster future leaders of unfolding automobiles market and self-driving cars, Hanyang University (HYU) hosted its 15th Smart Model Car Competition at the Olympic Gymnasium on the 14th of July. Applause of encouragement and cheers were heard here and there with shout outs of supports being made each time a team took their turn to run their cars. Of the 20 teams that made it to the final, team Future Automotive Engineering (FAE) won the first place. All five members of the team are students of the Department of Automotive Engineering: Park Sung-woo (4th year), Shin Hyun-ki (4th year), Park Soo-hyun (4th year), Byun Hyo-seok (2nd year), and Byeon Moo-kyung (4th year). Participants were required to develop an embedded control system (a smart computer system enabling machines to operate on their own) and run their cars on the track, which was readily set in the Olympic Gymnasium, waiting for the entrants to come. Each team was to bring their cars to the start line and present its ability when called upon. The missions were as follows: cars must drive in the middle of the lane, must avoid obstacles, must speed down in the school zone and go back to the original speed after leaving the zone, should be able to go over the hill, and must make curves without departing the lane. Now, ready, set, go! The finished work of team FAE, the only one to complete the whole track. (Photo courtesy of FAE) Prize of 10,000,000 given to team FAE! Unforeseen and unforgettable “None of us expected to win the competition. Since all five of us has no experience of participating in a contest like this, we thought we would barely make it to the final,” began Byun. About 100 teams were present for the preliminary round, after which 20 teams were selected for the final. Much to their surprise, when team FAE passed the preliminary round ranking the 4th place, their goal changed to complete the track and make it to the finish line in the final. What was surprising was not only the fact that they have won the competition but also that they were the only team who made it to the finish line. “We were happy with the result, of course, but at the same time, we were quite shook from such unexpected outcome. We didn’t expect to be the only team to complete the track,” remarked Byun. The most essential requisite for the car was to keep itself in the middle of the lane, not crossing over to the other or departing it. When the car was free to drive, it had to maintain its speed and make curves as the track demanded. Then at some point, school zone was marked by thick, black lines in which the car had to slow down and avoid the obstacles. Marking the end of the school zone with another set of thick black lines, the car was to go back to its original speed and finish the track, passing a hill and stopping at the finish line without bumping into the blockage. FAE’s car has successfully fulfilled all these requirements and confidently marched to the end. Sung-woo, who was the team leader, was looking for fellow students who would join his team. The members came together as one team through acquaintance, since they took the same course. The team first gathered around April, in the middle of the semester, and met up from time to time to work on their automobile. It was after the semester was over that they deeply got down to their business and invested more time on constructing the car. They even got access to the 3D printer thanks to professor Yoon Soo-kyung and tested their designs, by mapping out where each part should lie. Nonetheless, they received no particular help from any of their professors to be fair. “This course named 'Microprocessor' we took was quite helpful in a way that it taught us about the parts we used for this competition.” Byeon Moo-kyung (left), Byeon Hyo-seok (middle), Park Soo-hyun (right) Fix it till you make it “Finding the right angle of the camera, which will be the eye of the car, was one of the most difficult tasks,” recalled Park. It was crucial to adjust the camera at the perfect angle because the car has to sense and move according to what it observes. If it is too short-sighted, the car will fail to perceive the other lane and if it is too far-sighted, the car will easily depart the lane. “We had to remove and adjust the camera countless times to find the perfect spot. Everything will go into nothing if the camera fails to observe the area correctly in the first place,” explained Byeon. In addition, more than ten parts had to be replaced because they were burned during the process. If one part goes wrong, the whole thing fails to function. Therefore, it was crucial that each part maintained its good condition. Overall, the process was not so smooth, as the members struggled to “Our team name was uninteresting, our car wasn’t that flashy, and we even had to fix it until the last minute. However, our car presented the best performance and eventually became the only car that finished the whole track. This was unexpected, but we’re very happy with how it all turned out,” said the members unanimously. "Small changes and corrections lead to a big difference!" Jeon Chae-yun chaeyun111@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Choi Min-ju

2017-07 18

[Academics]Developing and Improving MRI Contrast Agent

Contrast agents are the substances injected inside or outside of the digestive tract or blood vessels in order to show tissue or blood vessels more clearly during radio graphic examinations such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computerized tomography (CT) imaging. Its role is crucial as it improves the diagnostic value by artificially increasing the X-ray absorption of each tissue, which makes it more easy to distinguish the biomechanical structure or the lesion from the surroundings. Professor Lee Dong-yun (Department of Biotechnology), through his paper “MRI-sensitive contrast agent with anticoagulant activity for surface camouflage of transplanted pancreatic islets,” has presented an inventive contrast agent that kills two birds with one stone. “When I was conducting this research regarding treatment of diabetes, my biggest concern was whether the outcome would be useful in the medical field or not. Even if the research is flawless, it is of no use if it cannot be put into real uses.” A contrast agent could evoke two main issues: the issue of MRI detection and of blood coagulation. Lee’s research, however, has overcome the two problems. In hopes of creating medical technologies that are valuable and pragmatic, specifically concerning contrast agents in this research, Lee has gone through detailed research and experiments. “The cell therapy products can be said to be ‘coated’ with contrast agents.” The contrast agent Lee has formulated approaches the body in a different manner. Instead of directly injecting the contrast agent into the patient’s body, Lee attached them on the cell therapy products through chemical reaction and then instill the contrast-agent-dissolved cell therapy products into the body. This not only makes detection of cells through MRI or CT imaging possible but also enables controlling of blood coagulation and prevent fibering clot. In Lee’s research, which specifically deals with patients of diabetes, a technology to transplant insulin-secreting cell has been devised for the sufferer. As shown in the diagram, islets (clusters of cells) are implanted into the blood vessels of the liver through catheter, which leads to the problem of accumulation of blood platelets on the surface of the newly implanted cells. This would eventually result in blood coagulation, creating thick fibering clots, further resulting in destruction of the cells. This means the cell therapy products lose their original function and go into nullity. However, with Lee’s research, as the contrast agents are acting as a layer to prevent accumulation of blood platelets and prevent blood coagulation and allow MRI detection at the same time, the use of the newly developed contrast agent is expected to be put in various uses. ' Lee's contrast agents allow MRI detection and prevent blood coagulation. (Photo courtesy of Lee) Jeon Chae-yun chaeyun111@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Choi Min-ju

2017-06 12

[Student]Collective Intelligence Kicks In

“Two heads are better than one” is a phrase often used to describe a situation where a task is better carried when more than one person is involved. While some people prefer to study alone and concentrate to the full, others like to study in a group and exchange mutual help. The Smart Learning and Learning Center is running a 'Global Learning Community' program that supports community learning activities and cultural experience activities for major courses since 2014. The program, which allows 4 to 6 team members to study as well as cultural exchanges, is paid up to 500,000 won. We are actively conducting this semester, and we have looked into the Global Learning Community 7 activity, which is about a week before the final evaluation. Consistent and diligent studying Lee Ji-yeon, the principal researcher, is overseeing the overall progress. The global learning community is a program developed to develop creative learning methods and improve communication and collaboration skills through self-directed, community learning. It is also possible to develop global communication skills through exchange of learning and cultural exchange with foreign students. At the beginning of each semester, a team member who submits a detailed application plan will be selected by the Smart Teaching and Learning Center. Most students who apply for team are required to work with students who attend classes in the same major, but international students who are having difficulties in studying their major or those who want to study hard with other friends are more than welcomed to apply. The aim of the Global Learning Community Program is to provide an opportunity for Korean students and foreign students to study together in harmony and to share their knowledge and culture for better learning, obtaining mutual benefits from one another. The program intends to give a helping hand to those foreign students who are struggling to follow along with their class content due to language barrier. By having weekly meetings to review their class contents, students can stay away from procrastination and keep up with their learnings. On top of this academic pursuits, students are expected to experience different cultures from each other and broaden their cultural knowledge. Starting from this semester, supporter system has been adopted, in response to participant students’ feedback that it would be helpful to have a more thorough check-up system that manages the communication and difficulties among members of each team. There are total three assistant teachers, all of whom are graduate students. Each assistant teacher is in charge of helping students in different languages: Chinese, English, and Korean. "We have added a feedback system to support students' learning activities in depth and detail. For example, we have been using the supporter system since this semester to help foreign students understand how much they are learning, whether there is a need for learning support, or to facilitate communication between team members," commented Lee. Assistant teacher Noh Ah-young (Department of Education, Master’s Program) and one team leader, Ahn Jae-won (Division of Business Administration, 4th year) Outstanding team of exemplary work The 'Friends Management' team was conducted at the beginning of the 'Project Management' class in Business Administration. The group did not simply took the program as an opportunity for themselves to come together and help each other, but further extended to create a project in which they embraced other fellow students to join in. They created a culture exchange program where 20 students joined Korean traditional clothes hanbok experience and tea-house field trip. “When submitting the monthly report, a lot of students put the focus on what they studied and how they kept up with it. However, Ahn’s team showed innovativeness and creativity in their project and demonstrated perfectly for what this program aims to achieve,” commented Lee. Ahn’s team did a great job in bringing about a cultural exchange not only among its team members but to those outside the group, which makes its achievement even more outstanding. “This program provided me with an opportunity to get closer with people who I may have simply regarded as a temporary group project teammate.” Jeon Chae-yun chaeyun111@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Choi Min-ju