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2017-09 19

[Event]Delivering Dynamic Spirits Through Their Breaths

With a strong sound of the timpani, the 2017 Hanyang Wind Orchestra raised its curtain on Sunday, September 17. Wind Orchestra is named after the characteristics of the instruments used in the performance. Wind instruments such as the flute, oboe and clarinet fill most of the stage with percussion and some string instruments. “Wind Orchestra can fulfill both artistic and public needs in music as percussion and wind instruments create dynamic sounds.” Said Park Min-ji, from the Department of String & Wind Intsruments. Members of the Wind Orchestra, collaborator Lim Jae-woong (Department of String & Wind Intsruments, 4th year) and conductor Kim Eung-du (Adjunct professor, Department of String & Wind Intsruments) are on stage for the rehearsal. Pieces with diverse emotions Dynamica written by Jan Van der Roost was the first song to welcome the audience with a bright and powerful mood. The piece instantly filled the KBS hall in Yeouido with joy and glee, making the audience anticipate the next number. The song then turned into another phase where it instantly changed the whole atmosphere. Minor codes running off fast imposed a nervous feeling, as if the orchestra was being chased by something. Concertino da camera introduced one of the stars of the night, Lim Jae-woong (Department of String & Wind Intsruments, 4th year). Lim played fast and complicated notes with a saxophone and made it look so easy, almost without a blink. As the main collaborator, Lim competed against more than 10 students for the spotlight. “It sounded like an OST from a TV soap opera. The grand music was almost overwhelming” said Lee ye-rim (10), daughter of an anonymous graduate from the Department of Urban Planning. “We came to see one of our old friends, and decided to take our kids for educational purposes.” The Lee family is taking a photo at KBS hall during the intermission. Lee Ye-rim (10) in the top middle and the anonymous alumni, far right. The following piece, Angels in the Architecture presents a somewhat unfamiliar instrument called ‘whirlies’. This instrument creates a beautiful wind sound that falls perfectly with the soprano’s voice (featuring as ‘angel’) and the title of the song. The composer Frank Ticheli noted that the whirlies are supposed to represent the halo of the angel, too. Irmak Akoglu, an exchange student majoring in biomedical engineering revealed that this is her first time at an orchestral performance, and said, “the songs they chose were amazing. It gave me so many different emotions." University of Texas Wind Ensemble is performing Angels in the Architecture with the composer and conductor, Frank Ticheli. The white ribbon-like instruments being waved around are the whirlies. (Photo courtesy of The University of Texas Band) An interactive performance After the 15 minute intermission, four songs were given: Lento, Scherzo, Mesto and Allegro Giocoso as part of the Third Symphony. Then, loud applause broke out for a long time, long enough for the conductor Kim to introduce every member of the orchestra. "Encore!” “Bravo!” as several audience members shouted out their excitement. Part of the brochure of the 2017 Hanyang Wind Orchestra. (Photo courtesy of College of Music) Two encore songs followed, including Hanyang’s official school song. The first one was absolutely the most impressive encore of all time. Conductor Kim held a microphone and showed gratitude for all the people who came to see the performance, and he excitedly went on to say, “I want to take you all to an amusement park. If I give you a sign, please scream for 30 seconds as you are riding a rollercoaster. Please do scream out loud as much as the lights can fall out from the ceiling!” The performers moved their body back and forth while playing the instruments to truly bring out the mood for the audience and when Kim signed, they raised their arms and screamed enthusiastically. Along with ovation that again lasted for a long time, this year’s Hanyang Wind Orchestra closed its curtain. "All seats of the performance are free of charge and based on invitation every year to enlarge the opportunities for Hanyang students and faculty members so that they can be exposed in this unique form of orchestra,” said Park. If you have missed this year’s show, there still is a chance soon on November 2, as the orchestra was invited to a college orchestra festival. Kim So-yun dash070@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Park Young-min

2017-08 31

[Academics][Researcher of the Month] What Makes People Pro-Environment? (1)

“Whenever I go on a trip or big festivals, I always worry about all the trashes people throw away. It’s just too much.” Professor Hyun Sung-hyup of the Division of Tourism recently published his paper, "Fostering customers’ pro-environmental behavior at museum". The paper thoroughly investigates the affective and cognitive factors of individuals visiting museums and analyzes which factor has the most impact on their pro-environmental intentions. Hyun emphasized that most people are very environmentally friendly in their house. They recycle well, try not to waste food or water. However, the point is that the very same people behave entirely differently from the moment they leave their house. Trashes are disposed not separately, which then has to be combusted, letting carbon into the air. Tissues, water, food and all kinds of resources are wasted. Hyun wondered what is behind the people’s paradoxical behavior. He also wanted to figure out what needs to be triggered in order to resolve such paradox and to motivate eco-friendly behavior from the general public. A table showing relations of each factor and their effects (Photo courtesy of Hyun) Over the course of a year, Hyun went to a broad range of museums which deal with themes like art, war, and tradition to interview, survey and observe the visitors. From the data collected from 321 tourists, he ran statistical analysis simulation program to construct a conceptual framework that can predict people’s behavior in public spaces. He also sought for professional advice from other fields such as environmental specialists or professors in engineering for further insight. Based on his field research with dozens and hundreds of related papers he studied, Hyun found out that ‘Environmental Knowledge (EK)’ out of five cognitive factors, was the most significant factor in determining one’s environmentally responsible decision-making process. Hyun is explaining the process of his research. Hyun asserted that environmental education on a regular basis is essential. People with more professional knowledge on the vulnerability of the environment or the impact of their action is more inclined to show consistent behavior both in and outside of their home. "It seems like a lot of people lack education regarding the environment in both public and private sectors," said Hyun. Lamenting at such reality, Hyun wishes environmental education to be part of the public education curriculum in the near future. When asked what inspired him to become a researcher in Tourism, Hyun smiled and answered that his professors during college years influenced him a lot. “Hanyang University offers the best curriculum on Tourism, with respectful professors. I always looked up to them.” Hyun said he decided to study further because there are so much intriguing topics to research in the field of Tourism. He encourages future researchers in the field to boldly try out, because tourism is very future oriented, interdisciplinary and economically significant field of study. Hyun himself plans to vigorously research further on issues related with environment and tourism. “Researching while lecturing, mentoring and living personal life is tough but I still enjoy it,” said Hyun, with affection to his work. Kim So-yun dash070@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Choi Min-ju

2017-08 22

[Academics]Beyond the Matter of Life and Death

Most people do not enjoy postoperative scars, especially on the visible parts of their body. Professor Tae Kyung of Department of Medicine recently reported the outcomes of newly developed operation method in his paper “Functional and cosmetic outcomes of robot-assisted neck dissection by a postauricular facelift approach for head and neck cancer”. As from the title Tae’s research compared surgical outcomes of both conventional neck dissection and his new facelift approach, which takes cosmetic aspects of the patients into account. “Nowadays, it is more than just life and death. Quality of life after the operation is also important.” (Photo courtesy of Tae) In the case of patients with head and neck cancer, cancer cell often spreads to the lymph node of cervical (neck) area. The conventional surgical method to treat the lymph node metastasis is to give vertical and transverse cervical incision (cut), which leaves permanent mark in the patient’s neck. As always having interest in plastic surgery – which is part of Otolaryngology (Head and Neck Surgery) – Tae concerned for postoperative quality of life. Therefore, he took the facelift approach which is still mostly used for cosmetic purposes, especially to unwrinkle one’s face. This way, the scar is left in the back side of the patient’s ear alongside the hairline, which is significantly less visible. The paper “Functional and cosmetic outcomes of robot-assisted neck dissection by a postauricular facelift approach for head and neck cancer” specifically reports the postoperative outcomes of the revolutionary implication as short as one day after the surgery to as long as 12 months. From 2013 Tae and his co-researchers collected data of 113 patients who underwent unilateral neck dissection both through the particular approach and the conventional approach. As a result, the team led by Tae was able to compare the functional and cosmetic outcomes which proved that Tae’s method is advantageous. Namely, patients suffered from less neck edema (swelling of neck) and sensory loss. Cosmetically patients reported significantly lower satisfaction scores. (Note that the higher the satisfaction is, the lower the scores are.) Both neck edema and sensory loss is lower in the robotic procedure, as shown in the tables. (Photo courtesy of Tae) Another specialty of Tae’s method of operation is that it requires robotic assist called Da Vinci robot because the operation makes a very thin tunnel inside the neck, making it physically impossible for the surgeons otherwise. Tae, as one of the first person in the world to conduct robotic neck dissection wanted to further develop the method and evaluate it. This report is one of his efforts trying to keep evaluating and improving his new surgical method. “It is still early to report the cure rate of cancer through this method, but now we know about the postoperative sensory loss, motion limitations, and the satisfaction of patients through this research,” said Tae. Tae also struggles to improve Otolaryngology in Korea and Asia. He mentioned that he chose to become head and neck surgeon because the area was less developed and researched at that time, and that challenged him. Now he is a general secretary of Asia Pacific Society of Thyroid Surgery which he founded, wishing well for the future of the field. “I wish my students to improve Korea as much to be the leading country in Otolaryngology and become global leaders.” Kim So-yun dash070@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Choi Min-ju