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2017-09 19

[Faculty]Robotics is for Everyone

“I will be riding a huge robot like in the cartoons in 100 years, and I’ll live forever,” smiled Professor Han Jea-kweon (Department of Interdisciplinary Robit Engineering ). Han in his office in the late afternoon gave two vastly contrasting impressions of a pure child and an agile scholar. News H met with Han to hear more stories about his recent developments and insight in robotics. Han is explaining how much experience is valuable. Get out of the library “It’s really sad that most students ask me the question because it implies how much the young generation of our society is suffering from uncertainty, especially on their future.” When asked, ‘What made you become a robot engineer?’, Han answered both sarcastically and empathetically. He did have a special reason on becoming the person who he is now, but he wanted to make sure that the readers do not fall into the frame of thought that a person needs ‘the moment’ or ‘the reason’ to decide what to do in the future. Han went on to explain that a person passes by hundreds and thousands of opportunities in his or her lifetime, but it is what gives them fun and joy that they are truly attracted to. And ‘the thing’ is not found in books but in experiences. Han himself has also accumulated abundant experiences as a foundation of being one of the leading scholar in the field. Han has always wanted to make robots, but due to the lack of opportunities in Korea at that time, he proceeded with his study in graduate school in automobiles. Then, he got a job in a major company as mainstream society had told him to. “But there was always this unfulfilled thirst inside telling me, ‘this is not your life! You are not born to do this, go on and do what you really want to do,” recalled Han. So, he chose to study in the States to overcome such lack of opportunity. “At that time, I did not foresee my salary to be cut in half,” laughed Han. Geek in the lab Han expressed the most enthusiasm and seriousness when he talked about his work. “I really was a geek before. Watching robot animation is still one of the most important parts of my day,” said Han. The first robot he ever made was a ‘Humvee’, a transformer-like robot. The Humvee was made over the course of one week, during my summer vacation back in 2007, when the movie Transformers (2007) was first released. Han and his wife rebuilt an RC car ‘hummer’ and gave it arms and legs. The Humvee video ‘Real Transformer NO C.G. Upgrade Version -Humvee Bioloid-‘ uploaded on Youtube hit more than 342,000 views to this date. Han’s passion for robots only grew over time while he studied in the United States for his doctoral degree. After coming back to Korea, Han participated in DARPA (Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency) Robotics Challenge that lasted for three years from 2012 to 2015. Coming back from the States, Han was bitterly surprised at the situation of the Korean robotics field. The biggest challenge he felt was the lack of intelligence. “The people we had, one by one, were brighter than the ones I’ve seen in the States, but the absolute number was too small.” Han compared the situation with the professional baseball league, where other countries such as Japan or the US have lots of back up players to change in every match, but we do not. That is the moment when he decided to get involved in education. EDIE, one of Han's robots. EDIE is a type of Human Robot interaction robot, intricately structured to communicate and bond with humans. Robots WILL create jobs “Humanity has been worried about robots and machines taking their jobs since the 1760s,” smiled Han. He advised that we need to search for what we can do ‘with’ the robots instead of being worried about what they will take from us. Traditional elites good at calculation and memorizing will lose jobs. But people with intuition, sense and creativity will flourish in unlimited possibilities. That is because robotics requires people from all fields with the aforementioned qualities. For instance, it took a designer, psychologists, and screen play experts in creating a Human Robot Interaction (HRI) robot EDIE. “Robot is a tool needed in our daily lives. Students now need to contemplate on how to progress one step ahead with robots and create social values.” Han plans to focus on three main topics in robotics; humanoid robots, HRI and disaster inspection robots for the short term. Kim So-yun dash070@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Park Yong-min

2017-09 17

[Alumni]Peru’s Finest Dessert

Just as the conquistadors have set their foot on South America in search of gold bars, Pyo Ji-do (Business, ’16) has opened up his own dessert café in Peru and named it Mister Bingsu (ice flakes with syrup). Peru is known to be very warm all around the year that even in the winter, temperatures would only fall to 17 to 19 degrees. After experiencing Peru during an exchange student program, Pyo has immediately fallen in love with the country. Ice flakes where no snow falls In 2014, Pyo had the opportunity to live in Peru for a year during his exchange student program. With his mind focused on starting his own business, Pyo started looking for items that would catch the eyes of Peruvians. “They love ice cream due to the warm weather, but there were not a lot of choices to choose from,” recalled Pyo. Ice flakes with syrup along with diverse types of fresh fruits were what Pyo came up with immediately. “At the moment, we only have five types of bingsu; strawberry, mango, chocolate, cheese, and melon. We are planning to expand our menu choices later on,” added Pyo. Kim (left) and Pyo (right) taking pictures with customers. (Courtesy of Pyo) After returning to Korea, Pyo contacted his high school friend and started preparing to open Mister Bingsu. “We were planning to open up our business in December 2016 but due to the delay in paperwork, we were able to start in April 2017,” commented Pyo. As Pyo has experienced, South American culture always maintains its leisurely manner which was one of the hardships that Pyo has faced. “Sometimes, I faced problems with translating formal paperwork, but I was able to achieve all this thanks to my homestay family.” Success in Peru “Peruvians loved experiencing bingsu for the first time in their lives. We were able to become successful through TV programs,” chuckled Pyo. Right after 2 weeks of starting Mister Bingsu, Peru’s biggest national broadcasting team have filmed Pyo’s store. In addition, a lot of Peruvians have advertised Mister Bingsu through social network services as well. “I think we were quite lucky to have such great opportunities,” mentioned Pyo. Before starting up the business in Peru, Pyo studied about diverse bingsu while working in Sulbing, one of the biggest bingsu franchise stores in Korea. “A lot of the recipes, famous in Korea, could not be used due to the high cost. Instead, we decided to localize our menus.” Peruvians line up to experience Mister Bingsu. (Courtesy of Pyo) Pyo is preparing to expand his business all around South America. “We are receiving diverse love calls from other regions in Peru and even neighboring countries,” explained Pyo. Yet there are some obstacles that Pyo has to overcome. “Our sales dropped during the winter which is why we are preparing to diversify our menus,” added Pyo. As Pyo enjoys cooking from time to time, he has further wishes of opening Korean restaurants as well. “We are far from a success yet. We will work harder to spread our Korean culture and food.” Kim Seung Jun nzdave94@hanyang.ac.kr

2017-09 10

[Student]Being the Eye For the Blind

Staring deep into the horizon, a man was sitting by the sea watching the waves splashing against the thirty-foot cliff. Although this is not a sentence with diverse adjectives, people who have been to the sea at least once in their lives and have seen it with their very own eyes would be able to picture the scene quite visually in their own ways. “Because blind people are lacking one of their senses, they seem to be missing out on a lot of fun in the world, which is why we have decided to become the eye for them,” commented Shin Jung-ah (Information System, 3rd year). Team Hues, consisting of Shin, Sung Young-jae (Business, 4th year) and two developers from different colleges have created “Miris: Memorable Iris”, which is a device that enables blind people to hear the texts being read out into speech. Sung and Shin discuss the developments necessary for the Miris. Team Hues, light and hope for All Team Hues have already won grand prizes in several contests with their brilliant technological idea for its high degree of completion and marketability. Over 90 percent of blind people are illiterate in Korea, meaning that only 10 percent of blind people in Korea are able to read braille. Yet there are not so many devices that enable blind people to be able to read or study. Most of the devices are targeted towards the 10 percent of the literate blind since it is much cheaper to develop and is easier to do so through braille. What team Hues have targeted were those in the 90 percent majority of blind people who cannot read braille, although they could speak Korean. “It is very obvious that knowledge inequality comes from not the disability itself, but rather from the lack of developers trying to help blind people eager to learn more,” pointed out Shin. Miris is a small camera device that people can wear like glasses and connects with the earphones to let them hear the texts being read out. Through the text to speech (TTS) technology, the camera would analyze the fonts which would let the people “hear” the books they wish to read. What is more interesting is that Miris would have a bookmark system which would let blind people find the book they were reading, plus mark the pages that they have read. Through the RFID and NFC chips, the Miris sensors would scan the microchips and would react to the sensor. Since there are so many cutting-edge technologies involved in this one machine, such as image processing technology, OCR, the text to speech, and so on, Miris has yet to be commercialized as the miniaturization process has yet to be developed. As the team name represents, team Hues will continue to suggest new pathways of enlightenment for the blind. They believe true knowledge comes from books, even with the development of the Internet--and Hues is determined to bring a new dimension to the educational sector for the blind. "We would love to be the eye for the blind and help them read books." Kim Seung Jun nzdave94@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Choi Minju

2017-09 04

[Alumni]White Rabbit Guiding You to the Musical Wonderland

“Oh dear! Oh dear! I shall be too late!” mutters the white rabbit in Lewis Carroll’s book Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland. The rabbit eventually leads Alice down into the rabbit hole where the wonderland begins. Cho Chung-hee of the Department of Korean Language and Literature, is currently a jazz vocalist of the Band “Rabbit of March,” and a professor at the Department of Applied Music. Let’s follow Cho to the wonderland of jazz music! Cho is a solo jazz vocalist and also a leader of band "Rabbit of March." Fearless 20’s and music “I had no fear for my dreams in my 20’s,” said Cho. After four years of studying Korean language and literature at college, Cho made a decision to follow her heart towards music. “I always knew that deep inside me, I wanted to become a musician,” reminisced Cho. Once Cho made up her mind, she wanted to be told that this path is right so she sang a song in front of her senior. “Although my senior told me to give up on music, my decision was still firmly set," laughed out Cho. Without any support from her parents who wished her to become Korean language teacher, Cho began to build up her music career and worked for part-time jobs for living. “My favorite music was not fixed at that time. I explored for various genres and songs, wandered from time to time, and then found out that jazz is the one that I was looking for when I became 30,” explained Cho. Cho then was absorbed into the attractiveness of jazz. “Whilst my practice, my acquaintance suggested me musicians who could amplify the music together. Harmony with Hwang Sung-yong and John Vasconcello through our band has always been one of the luckiest moments in my life,” smiled Cho. Cooperation of the trio produced popular jazz music that opened up for the public. Jazz through “Rabbit of March” was no more a ‘league of their own,’ but a music everyone can enjoy. Song of Wind is one of the most popular songs by "Rabbit of March." (Video courtesy of Darichaola1's Youtube) Your roles in the cyclical life Cho is also a professor at the Department of Applied Music at Hanyang University, ERICA. Bearing responsibilities rising from various roles may give lemons to Cho. However, she rather enjoys the large spectrum of her life. “The job called professor taught be to become a better person before teaching students. Teaching requires my ability to know and explain from the very fundamental knowledge, which I was always unaware of,” said Cho. Her another dream is to become a performance producer. “Jazz was a hard music for the public to access, which I disliked about. So I want to design jazz performances that can be popular among people’s everyday lives,” explained Cho. Until now, Cho followed her own hope to become a jazz musician. “Jazz has no restrictions. Within a given frame of music, I can do whatever I wish to by playing with the rhythm, melody, improvisation, and more. However, this general audience might find such elements difficult,” said Cho. Thus, Cho wishes to create a jazz performance that includes intricate explanation of music to the audience and conversation between the audience and musicians. Within this, Cho can become an emcee, producer, song writer, and a musician. Cho encourages Hanyangians to find out their own definition of happiness. Cho is now planning to make jazz a present. “I wish my music can become presents representing four seasons for the audience. For example, when its Christmas, listeners can open the winter CD. Also, I want to make jazz music based on lullabies. I have so many dreams!” Cho says that it’s never cliché to tell others to pursue what they want. “Things you can do and want to do are correlated and cyclical. Look at me! I majored in Korean literature and it helps my music. I hope students of Hanyang will try out everything their hearts desire!” Kim Ju-hyun kimster9421@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Kim Youn-soo

2017-09 03

[Student]Writing as a Comprehensive Skill

What makes up a good song? Some would say good melody while others say good lyrics. Then, where do good melody or lyrics come from? Kang says, at least for the lyrics, it comes from everyday life. Kang Min-gu (Korean Language and Literature, Doctoral Program), a musician and a poet, unearthed his talent in writing when he was a young boy and developed that talent into his career. His discovery and strength in writing led him to become who he is today, an indie singer-songwriter and a poet by the name of Kang Baek-soo. A friend and the band Kang was schooled in all-boys middle school and high school in Korea, which completely eliminated any possible chance of school romance. When his friend presented a tempting idea, to make a band and perform at a all-girls high school, Kang could not help but accept the suggestion. This seemingly petty reason was the turning point of Kang’s life—this is how Kang began music. “I tried to have different hobbies such as sports and photography but they all didn't last long. Music is the only hobby that captivated my interest.” Entering Hanyang University and belonging to the College of Humanities, Kang naturally joined the band of the department, Dasalnolae. His ability of handling different instruments led him to be the main member of the band, especially in the times when only a few people joined the band. On one insignificant day, Kang saw his fellow member writing a song and making music. “At that moment, it looked easy and I thought, ‘why don’t I try writing a song myself?’” This is how he began writing songs. The lyrics of Kang’s songs come from his daily life as well. Just as he gets inspired by the little happenings in his life, his songs reflect the ordinary parts of his life and arouse a wave of empathy from the people who listens to his music. “I drink with my friends pretty often and every time, on my way back home at nights, I think about the memorable conversations I had because they could give me ideas for the lyrics.” One of his song, titled Wangsimni (click to listen), is a song based on his bitter feeling when he visited Wangsimni after graduating. The lyrics of his songs are easily relatable to those who have similar experience because they are not extraordinary. As an indie musician, Kang performs in music festivals, cafes, and other concerts he is called for. His nearest concert, The Wander Concert, will be held in few weeks on the shore of a cafe located in Incheon. Currently having seven music albums, hundreds of poems written, and four essays in books, Kang is actively engaged in his writing life. (Photo courtesy of Kang) A fine artist As a poet, on a different note, Kang insists on something of his own. When composing a song, he tends to take other people’s opinions into consideration because he aspires to produce music that people can feel attachment to. However, when it comes to poems, his own thoughts are all that matters. “To me, poems are like my identity. I take no other opinions and evaluate and judge my own poems on my own. No other peoples’ opinions are to be incorporated,” stated Kang, sternly. While his songs are for the public, his poems are for himself exclusively. Though he started his band and music by a coincidental chance, he firmly believes that his life path would still have navigated toward writing anyway. As a Korean Language and Literature major with his specialty in modern poetry, he regards his main job as a poet. Kang is preparing to publish his first collection of poems. He has written hundreds of poems so far and he is currently in the process of selecting the best ones of all. “I want to maintain my creative stamina and consistently produce my works.” He wants to be someone who maintains his job and be proud of the stacks of works he produces as time goes by. Reflecting his relatable and interesting songs and their lyrics, his collection of poems sure sounds unique and exciting to see. “Writing is my job. If I write on a manuscript paper, then it’s a poem. If on a music paper, it’s a song.” (Photo courtesy of Kang) Jeon Chae-yun chaeyun111@hanyang.ac.kr

2017-08 21

[Student]Cinderella Law and its Failure

Growing up as a boy who loved to play games, Hong Sung-hyeob (Economics and Finance, Master’s Degree) has been growing his interest and passion for games until he sought his career in the company Nexon, one of the most successful online game producers of Korea. He recently published his master’s thesis on the topic of ineffectiveness of the Cinderella Law in Korea (shutting down of online games for adolescent from midnight to six in the morning) and revealed that the law is far from reaching its goals of guaranteeing teens’ sufficient amount of sleep by reducing the time for online games. “Games are my life!” Nexon was Hong’s first job, which he sought out of his pure enthusiasm for online games. During his interview for the job, Hong’s answer for the question why he applied for Nexon was fascinating: he was born for games, which genuinely reflected his heart for games. While Hong was working in the company, he did not belong to the game development department. Instead, he was doing subsidiary tasks such as managing games and their exports and creating events in the games. As a game lover, however, he wanted to do more than just ancillary jobs and do something worthwhile, incorporating his studies of Economics and Finance. The unprecedented topic he chose for his master’s thesis is regarded as an unique one, as it is somewhat irrelevant to the field. Nonetheless, Hong mentioned, “a lot of professors expressed their positive opinion toward my paper because it was something they’ve never handled before and the fresh topic was being dealt with from the perspective of our field for the first time.” As soon as he entered the graduate school, Hong was determined that his thesis paper would deal with any topics related to online games, because he wanted to research and analyze what he was truly interested in. When it was time for him to decide his topic, he realized that the Cinderella Law is one of the controversies regarding online games, as there has been heated debates on whether the law should be abolished or not. He puts an extra significance on the fact that he chose what he loved for his thesis incorporating what he studied at school. In other words, researching and analyzing statistics and data related to online games from the perspective of an economist was something special for Hong. Hong expressed his passion for games along with why he chose this topic for his paper. Cinderalla Law without returning Cinderellas The whole point of the Cinderella Law was to ensure sufficient amount of sleeping time for adolescent students who love to play games throughout the nights, as sleep critically affects their development. However, as Hong proved in his paper, the law was nowhere near reaching its goal. Statistics show that the amount of time adolescent students sleep before and after the law was implemented was, bizarrely, the same, indicating that the law is simply being futile and pointless. Hong used Korea Media Panel Survey Statistic’s data as the basis for his paper. The statistics testify the age range to time slot of online game players. By analyzing these data, Hong was able to extract the amount of sleep adolescents got before and after the law was implemented. The result, surprisingly, was only five or six minutes difference, and even that difference cannot be accounted by the law. There are three main reasons why the Cinderella Law is ineffective: students take advantage of their parents’ ID or residence number to get around the law, they play smartphone games as much as online games (smartphone games are not targeted by the law), and only domestic games are subject to the law. These reasons account for the failures of the law, clarified Hong in his paper. Hong's master's thesis deals with ineffectiveness of the Cinderella Law. Jeon Chae-yun chaeyun111@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Kim Youn-soo

2017-08 20

[Student]Being Suit-able for All

Under the motto of “better design, better fit”, Ahn Ji-soo and Shin Yo-sup (Chinese Language & Literature) have set up their designer brand, “SUITABLE”. After setting up the brand in 2015, it has expanded its range of clothes from tailor-made suits to ready-made clothes and this year, women’s wear is ready to be launched. Since co-CEO Shin was on vacation, News H have met Ahn to hear about Suitable. Passion for Fashion Ahn was a natural born fashion star who loved to stand out in front of others. “I had the most shocking look out of all the freshmen when I first entered Hanyang University (HYU),” chuckled Ahn. With his Afro-hair bleached white, Ahn was always wearing the trendiest fashion on campus. “I didn’t really join a lot of clubs but I did work with ‘Campus style icon’ finding the fashion icon of different schools,” said Ahn. Being such a fashion star on campus, Ahn was always the one to reach for advice before going shopping. “I remember being so proud when my friend turned up so cool with a nice outfit after consulting with me,” recalled Ahn. After graduation, Ahn and Shin were both accepted to companies that they have always wanted. “I was good at my job but somehow, there was this empty feeling after returning home everyday,” said Ahn. It was the passion for fashion that was missing in Ahn’s life which he eventually realized after two years of work. “Shin first suggested about starting this business and I felt my heart beating so fast,” recalled Ahn. Shin takes care of most of the promotion and planning of the business while Ahn is responsible for designing clothes. “I always contemplate deeply about one issue and it works the same for designing as well,” explained Ahn. Trying to create clothes that he wants to wear everyday, Ahn says that he is proud to be a designer. Ahn tries to provide styling tips for their customers from head to toe. Philosophy in business “We use the best quality fabric that we can find,” explained Ahn. Comparing fabric from all over the world, Ahn and Shin tries to use the best that they could find and it has led to better quality in their finalized products. With high repurchase rate, Suitable is the type of brand that everyone loves after experiencing the product and its services. “We not only try to sell just our products, but we also try to give the best styling tips and advices that would suit our customers the best,” said Ahn. Providing the pride and hope everyday through their clothes is what Ahn wants to achieve. “There are days when we are filled with pride when we wake up in the morning and feel like we can do anything. I want all my customers to feel that way when wearing our product in the morning,” said Ahn. Suitable also exercises a lot of corporate social responsibility in real life through making tailor-made clothes for the disabled as well. “It takes a lot of time and effort to design a different type of shirt from the scratch,” explained Ahn. One time, Ahn had to design and create the shirt all over for a disabled customer and it took over two weeks to make the final product that fits perfectly. “He later visited our office wearing what I made for him and it looked perfect on him. Filled with pride, that customer thanked us which was very heartwarming,” recalled Ahn. Having big dreams of expanding Suitable into a global brand, Ahn and Shin wishes to enter a bigger market. With their philosophy and work ethics, it would be quite sure to please the customers as they have until now. “I hope everyone feels the pride when wearing our brand Suitable,” concluded Ahn. “I hope everyone feels the pride when wearing our brand Suitable.” Kim Seung-jun nzdave94@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Choi Min-ju

2017-08 15

[Alumni]Voice Out Your Voice!

In the beauty of women’s pregnancy and infant care, there’s the sorrow of mother’s impossibility to return to their career. In South Korea, the issue of career break has been a hot potato, which commonly refers to a period out of employment for women to raise their children. Despite the fact that South Korea’s gender inequality is slowly, but constantly being assuaged, there are still barriers to overcome. Lee Jae-eun (German Language and Literature, '02 and Ph.D. in Educational Technology) is a leader of Women’s Life School who suggests the novel ways to view and resolve the problems women face in Korea. Lee is currently a CEO of Women's Life School to counsel and help out women with low self-esteem. As a mother, CEO, writer, wife, and a woman Lee’s college years were full of joy and love with her friends and a lover. However, after her graduation, she had to face parting words from many relationships. “I realized that the main reason why I was hurt so much by the break ups is my tendency to rely on others, just because I was a woman. So, I decided to amend this problem,” reminisced Lee. The first door she knocked on after graduation was a feminist magazine company. As her major had no connection with feminism, she had to appeal her passion to be employed. “I began with becoming a fan of the magazine by commenting on every article posted with the nickname of Ho-Ho Girl,” laughed out Lee. After a few years of working as an official reporter, Lee decided to become a writer to connect scholar feminism to cultural feminism. Then, her first book Women’s Life Dictionary, which is divided into seven chapters to guide healthy mind and lifestyle for women, become one of the bestsellers in South Korea. Its profit was used to found her company- Women's Life School (Click). “I began to have interest in counseling women from university students to married women to have courage. This eventually led me to major in educational technology for my Ph.D. degrees,” said Lee. Women's Life School provides counselling services for women in various situations and ages. (Photo courtesy of wlifeschool) Now, Lee is a mother of one daughter, wife, and even a professor at a Korean university. “Having many roles is arduous, I realized that distribution of time to each role isn’t that much important. Understanding the core philosophy of each role while not losing my own philosophy is the most imperative factor,” said Lee. Lee can be benevolent as a mother and a wife, acute as a CEO, and considerate as a professor. However, she still does not forget that the most important entity to her is herself. Not a career break off, but a career changeover In Korea, there are two words that describe the occupation of mothers- working mom and a housewife. This means, when a working mom gets pregnant and has to quit work either by maternity leaves or resignation for longer infant care, the working mom becomes a housewife. However, Lee points out the flaw of this dichotomous view of portraying mothers. “Working moms and housewives aren’t two different occupations, but coexisting ones. Whenever working mom wants to become a housewife for kids or the housewife wishes to work again as their kids grows older, the career changeover in this aspect should be cyclical,” emphasized Lee. When Lee first set up Women’s Life School, the social reaction wasn’t exactly supporting her. The concept of a life school has not been popularized and feminism was a difficult subject. However, Lee did not gave up on the hope that feminism could become a popular idea and women with low self-respect in the society could gain their courage. “Even in the research, women have lower self-regard than men in Korea. Also, when we do the survey, numbers of young women pick strong, strict female leaders as their role model. But, we all should understand that feminine style can also be strong,” emphasized Lee. Women’s soft and delicate way of talking and caring could also impact the world, and Lee’s ultimate purpose is to bring out this quality to the world. Cover page of Lee's newly published book When You Miss Your Career Again has pictures of blooming flowers and flying butterflies to symbolize the new life of women. Based on her four years of memories at Hanyang University, Lee advised the female youth at the campus. “Many female students often give up on their friendship for their love and GPA. But learning how to balance friendship, economic ability, and love can be the true success of your life!” Kim Ju-hyun kimster9421@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Choi Min-ju

2017-08 14

[Student]Spreading Awareness Through Entertainment (1)

A team named Game In Love (G.I.L) won the 2nd place in the Contest for the Good by Prudential Foundation of Korea recently. News H met the team leader Jung-woo Jin (Culture Contents, 4th year) and one of the team members Park Myung-yong (Culture Contents, 4th year) to hear about the details and motives that made such result possible. Team G.I.L is receiving their award from the Prudential Foundation. From the left, Myung-yong Park (Culture Contents, 4th year), Jung-woo Jin (Culture Contents, 4th year), Ho-suk Yang (Culture Contents, 4th year), and Dong-hyuk Kang (Computer Science,3rd year). (Photo courtesy of Jin.) Have you ever heard of hematopoietic stem cell before? This is the question both Jin and Park has been repeating on and off line for the past 4 months. To raise awareness of hematopoietic stem cell donation and change the common perception that the process must hurt, the G.I.L team went through a lot. After spending 14 days in Jeju just to complete the proposal and to present it in front of the executive members of Prudential Foundation, the G.I.L team made it to the top 10%. Then they had to carry out their actual plans such as developing mobile games or organizing offline campaigns. “We were very hurt when people think we are a bunch of weirdos asking for blood donation,” said Park, thinking back of the offline campaign in Sinchon. The G.I.L team also went to Hanyang ERICA Campus, Hankuk University of Foreign Studies, and Hyupsung University during the festival season in May. Thankfully, many students were interested in the offline games they had in the booth and gladly joined their campaigns. “I still remember that there were a lot of people willing to register as a donor without any prize” reminisced Jin. Through such hard work, the team was able to have 191 people register as donors and make countless people aware of the patients looking for the 0.00005% chance of finding a matching donor. The G.I.L team is running its offline campaign on ERICA Campus. (Photo courtesy of Park) Changing the world slowly yet surely through games “I know it may sound cheesy and even absurd, but that is my motto.” Said Jin, proudly. After graduating Korea Game Science Highschool and coming to Department of Culture Contents, Jin naturally grew interest in social issues due to the geographic location of ERICA Campus. “I wanted to learn more and even solve the social problems through games because that is what I can do,” explained Jin. He is now working as an intern in a welfare foundation to pursue his roadmap. While offline campaigns definitely improved the general public’s awareness of the hematopoietic stem cell and the donation of it, the team’s main focus was an online game called ‘cell in love’. The player must solve mini quizzes to acquire ‘seeds’ to play the actual game, and if the player gets one quiz wrong, they must read related information on hematopoietic stem cell donation. This might look like one of the ‘educational mobile games’ which are in most cases nothing more than a digitized book in disguise, ‘cell in love’ is actually fun and even a bit addictive to play. As an adorable hematopoietic stem cell, a player has to go through cholesterols in blood veins and reach the girl who is waiting for the player’s donation. From the left, the main page, quiz page, study page, and game play page of ‘cell in love’. The game is available on google play store. Unlike Jin who had passion in social issues and resolving them, Park initially had not had much interest in such issues. “At the moment I was off school, I was looking for some experience. That was all,” said Park. However, a four-month long journey made him acknowledge that doing what one can do to make the life of others better and happier can be fun and inspiring, more than he initially thought it would be. “Now we both feel thankful that we can help others with my not-too-great talents,” said Park. Jin and Park now plans to work on various social issues in the future, utilizing games. Kim So-yun dash070@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Kim Youn-soo

2017-08 13

[Alumni]To the Next Victoria's Secret of Asia

“80 % of women don’t know their right bra size and face difficulty wearing it,” explained Kim. Sara’s Fit is a custom-made underwear brand that has been established about one and a half year ago and is gaining great support from a lot of women due to its comfortable and modern design. With its 24 different types of categorization method and one-on-one consulting with every customer that takes from half an hour to an hour, Sara’s Fit tries to deliver the right type of underwear for women. Challenges to find a career Although Kim’s initial dream was to become a professor, her dream has changed completely after experiencing exchange student programs in her junior year. “I started to realize that my dream of becoming a professor was to show off to other people that I have been diligent all my life,” said Kim. After the exchange student program, Kim was attracted to other programs that gave her more chance to interact with foreign countries. Still, even upon her graduation, she could not find what she really wanted to become. After graduation, Kim was studying MBA program at the United States, when she realized that there was a lot of start-up booms in the country. “People were not afraid of starting their own business. In Korea, start-ups were yet to be popular then,” explained Kim. Kim is explaining about the difficulties of finding her dreams. Through Kim’s memories of openness of people regarding underwear in the United States, she started to think that accumulating data of customers would become a huge industry in Korea. Since Kim did not major in fashion design, there were a lot to learn from the beginning. “Underwear design is a very secretive field with high entry barriers. It takes years to learn the critical knowledge since there are only a few designers that could make the right designs,” explained Kim. After recruiting one of the best underwear designers in Korea, Kim and her partner have established Sara’s Fit. “Sara seemed to be a very friendly name in Asia which we decided to name for our clients and the consultants at the same time.” Being the Boss Kim has experienced diverse types of careers from MBA, Samsung SDS to KOTRA after graduation. “There was little that an employee could do in terms of making decisions although there were some good things about belonging in such a huge corporation,” recalled Kim. Since Kim has to take care of the funding to expenditure, there is a lot at stake which gives her the motivation and responsibility at the same time. Algorithms that match customers to their perfect-fit underwear is on its way to put to action. Investments are also on its way. Kim has the dream of making Sara’s Fit into the next custom-made Victoria’s Secret of Asia. “Europe and America has a huge market of custom-made underwear. Asia, however, is on its way of developing at the moment,” added Kim. Expanding to overseas market would be the next step for Sara’s Fit. “It’s all planned out at the moment and we are on our way to open up different line-ups for customers of diverse age groups as well,” said Kim. Heartwarming moments exist when Kim’s customers with different body shapes return to the shop and thank her. “It’s not just what you wear. It’s how you wear it that’s also important and a lot of people don’t know it yet so we will try our best to provide the best for the customers.” Guidelines to how to use Sara's Fit (Courtesy of sarasfit.com) "We want Sara's Fit to be the Victoria's Secret of Asia." (Courtesy of Kim) Kim Seung-jun nzdave94@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Kim Youn-soo