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2017-05 22

[Faculty]Winner of the Paiknam Scholar Award

During his 12 years at Hanyang University, Professor Kang Yong-soo of the Department of Energy Engineering has demonstrating the virtues of an educator and a researcher. For his endeavor, Kang was awarded the Paiknam Scholar Award on the 78th school anniversary. Expecting to retire in 2018, Kang reminisces his life as scientist and professor. Life as a scholar Kang began his teaching career at the Department of Chemical Engineering in 2005. While at HYU, Kang pioneered and led a new discipline from the basics to the application of the "facilitated transport phenomena in the solid state" and obtained excellent results by applying it to membranes and solar cells. As a result, about 185 papers were published in SCI international journals from 2005 to 2017 and Kang was able to win several awards, including the Paiknam Scholar Award. “The Paiknam Award was a great honor for me, and it leads me to think of myself as a lucky person. I should attribute all the credit to my lab students, who followed and supported me,” said Kang. One of Kang’s best research is on the facilitated transport phenomena in the solid state and their various applications. The beginning of his research dates back to when Kang was working at KIST (Korea Institute of Science and Technology). “The first project assigned to me at KIST was separating oxygen and nitrogen from air. Each element can be utilized pragmatically in practical life, and the usage of the separation membrane was the key,” emphasized Kang. After great research findings, Kang was recognized as the greatest scholar at Hanyang University this year. Since then, Kang's interest has changed to the separation of olefin such as ethylene or propylene because it is one of the most difficult tasks to solve. “I was sponsored one billion won for this Creative Research Program by the NRF (National Research Foundation of Korea) to develop this fuekd for 10 years, which was a tremendous opportunity for me,” reminisced Kang. After 10 years at KIST, Kang realized that his specialization lies in the basic understanding of principles, not practical applications. As a result, he left KIST to become an educator at HYU. Multi-player in research and education In addition to personal academic achievement, Kang’s BK21 Project and the ERC (Energy Research Center) of the Leading Research Center Support Project also ushered science at Hanyang to advance. Kang also undertook the role as chairman and editor-in-chief of various academic societies at home and abroad, contributing to the development of the school as well as the broader society. When Kang came to Hanyang University, he realized that he could not bring the research funds provided by KIST to his school lab. In need of research funds to satisfy the scientific desires of his and his students, Kang made a difficult decision. “I just called an executive director of Samsung Institute of Science, Dr. Kim Jong-min, to ask for research funding. He would have been very confused, because we have only met a few times before, but Kim decided to support me for the development of science,” said Kang. After such vicissitudes in life, Kang was able to investigate how to overcome low ionic conductivity in polymer electrolyte for dye-sensitized solar cell and improving the separation performance of membranes. These are each utilized on strengthening solar cells and curtailing petrochemistry’s high energy consumption, enormous cost and inefficient use of space. Kang sends gratitudes to his fellow students at the school and at his lab. The Best Teacher Award is Kang’s most favorite prize as professor. “This award is given by students that I teach. I wish my students will have pride in themselves when learning about science and life,” said Kang. According to him, calmly waiting for opportunities while preparing one's own unique characteristics will help students realize their dreams. Kim Ju-hyun kimster9421@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Kim Sang-yeon

2017-05 22

[Student]Writing Songs of Memory

“Under the deep ocean, hundreds of unbloomed flowers…” starts the song Flower of Truth, composed by Park Soo-jung (Department of Applied Music, 2nd year, ERICA Campus). Believing in the necessity of remembering the MV Sewol tragedy, Park, as a young composer, has been writing songs about Sewol in hopes of reminding people about the incident. Collaborating with the youth musicians supporting organization Sing About Chu, Park recently presented her new tribute song Flower of Truth. She expresses her deep sorrow and regret over the disastrous event through the song. Flower of Truth Commemorating the 3rd anniversary of the MV Sewol incident, Park wrote and dedicated this song to the students and their families, as an attempt to represent the consolation and condolences of the public. The overall mood of the song is dismal and depressing as it tries to reflect the reality surrounding the incident. The underlying message she tried to convey was criticism toward society’s changing perspective of the event which grows more and more nonchalant and negligent. She pointed out the nonsensical attitude of some people, and wrote this song in compensation of those negativities. Flower of Truth criticizes the inappropriate attitute toward Sewol and its victims. “I sometimes see ridiculous remarks by people online such as ‘enough with Sewol,’ ‘I’m tired of hearing about this issue already,’ ‘It's had enough attention’ and so on. It makes me angry to see how cruel and indifferent people are.” By including the line “someone’s pain is someone’s mockery,” Park intended to reproach those who spoke improperly of the Sewol incident. Repeated in the song is the lyrics “make it bloom, make it full bloom,” by which she meant the bloom of flowers in people’s minds, the flower of truth, and never forget what happened. “I was taking a nap on the day of Sewol’s third anniversary, and I had a strange dream. In it, I was drowning in the ocean, which gave me enough fear and pain to wake up terrorized. I will never be able to imagine or understand the students’ awful horrors that they went through that day,” expressed Park. Such vividness solidifed in her mind that the pain and terror of the students, not to mention the scars left on their families, should never be overlooked and nor be forgotten. Park and Composition When composing a song, Park gets inspiration from anywhere and everywhere. The little thoughts and ideas that pass by her mind or the objects she sees develop into lyrics and melodies. For Flower of Truth, she found the melody after a shower. As a music major, she has written many songs, the most representative one being The World, dedicated to people who have low self-confidence and many insecurities, to boost their confidence and to shift their minds towards a more positive view of themselves. “I chose to major in composing music because as a high school student, the only joy and hobby I had was playing the guitar and singing along. I was emotionally going through hard times, but I was able to find comfort in music.” As a young composer, Park’s dream is to one day become a composer whose name is synonymous with great music and the music in which people find energy and strength. "I want to compose music that lifts people up." Click to watch Park's Flower of Truth Jeon Chae-yun chaeyun111@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Kim Hye-im

2017-05 01 Important News

[Student]Hanyangian Brothers on the Soccer Field

When players flutter their sweat and passion in the air on a soccer field, the fans watch the direction a ball is heading to with bated breath. The fierce competition, earnest desire for victory, and both psychological and physical pressure are what soccer players must bear on the ground. In Hanyang University, there are two brothers who chose to walk this path- Lee Dong-hee of the Division of Sports and Well-Being and Lee Gun-hee of the Department of Sports Industry. Life of Hanyang soccer players Even though they were brothers grown at same home, their beginnings of soccer life were different. Dong-hee: I began playing soccer in my first year at elementary school. My father, who had a dream of becoming an athlete in his early age, suggested me to do so. From then, I lived with my coaches or my teammates, only to practice soccer. Gun-hee: My start was a bit different, because I had no interests in sports. When I was in my sixth grade at elementary school, I just became a goalkeeper for no reason. When I found out that I was a fast runner, I became an offense, and I began to grow my dream as a soccer player. Dong-hee: I went to a high school located in the rural area, so it was hard to be recognized by the coaches in Seoul. I had lucky opportunities to play against Hanyang University during my high school years for three times. This way, I could be scouted by my coach and come to HYU. I hope more opportunities will come to players at rural areas, because many of them have skills and efforts that deserve chances. Gun-hee: Unlike my older brother, I went to a high school in Seoul, and got accepted to Hanyang University. I thought that HYU would be a great home for me, because my brother is there and, also because of its environment. The coaches are nice and the facilities are considerate of players. I am blissful about my soccer life at HYU, except for my brother’s high temper. (laugh) Dong-hee: Just like Gun-hee said, the coach always tries to solicitude us, considering our conditions, schedules, and needs. As a sub-captain of a team, I have burdens that I have to encourage and criticize teammates at the same time. Also, managing soccer schedules and school education is another nuisance for us. Lee Dong-hee (left) and Lee Gun-hee (right) are talking about their soccer life. One year is a long run for Hanyangian soccer players. From February, Hanyang team participates in the Spring Soccer League, and the U-League (University League), until September. Also, between June and August, players compete against 16 other teams at the National Sports Festival. When most of the leagues are over, Hanyang soccer team leaves for the off-season training during the winter to constantly fit in shape. The Lee brothers on the field Both brothers take great responsibilities on the soccer field. The older brother Dong-hee is a midfielder and Gun-hee is a front-line offense. Despite the great pressure they must bear, Dong-hee is now a sub-captain and Gun-hee has already scored multi-goals at the U-league. Q. What are some aspects of each other that you want to take after? Dong-hee: My brother Gun-hee is sincere on the field. Before playing games, be manages his mental conditions and is able to calmly score at games. Gun-hee: Dong-hee embodies great fundamental skills and fitness. Even though I try to be calm when faced with the goalpost, it is still hard for me to take care of my health conditions. I am affected by the time when I play soccer, but Dong-hee is consistently good during the game, whether it is morning or evening. Q. What are your ultimate goals? Dong-hee: I want to enter a K-League (Korean League) team in South Korea. Also, I wish to wear a Tae-guk mark (South Korean Flag) on my uniform and represent my country with my brother. Fame is not what I desire, but long-lasting soccer life. Thus, I will always confront soccer earnestly, also to satisfy my grateful coach who trusts me. Gun-hee: I want to become a memorable player in the end. My favorite soccer player is Lewandowski of FC Bayern. Just like him, I want to be the best offense who results in constant scores. The two passionate brothers stand as the bright future of HYU. Parents of the Lee brothers are very proud of their sons, but try not to root for them intensely. They lower their sons’ conceit, if they have to. Under such wise parents, the Lee brothers are always immersed into soccer and practicing. “When I visited Germany from HYU, I realized that general environments such as facilities, coaches, and self-pride are different from Korea. I wish our country will someday provide such comforts and considerations for all our players,” said Lee. Kim Ju-hyun kimster9421@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Moon Ha-na

2017-04 25

[Alumni]CEO of Design Egg

Among fierce competition in the entertainment and design industry, there came a glittering 'star' company: Design Egg. With the launch of the program “Tap Tap Como” on the Seoul Broadcasting System, the CEO of Design Egg, Jung Je-won (Department of Entertainment Design, ERICA Campus, '07), is working on his creative design tasks more ardently. News H met him to hear the path he has taken, and the future he is paving for. Jung is explaining the path he has taken to found Design Egg. When others break an egg, it is fried egg, but when you break it, it is a chick Company Design Egg has been founded on 2007 and its task force is divided into two spheres: commercial and contents. The commercial part concentrates on the tasks handed over by other subcontracting companies, while the contents part focuses on its creative self-development. “With the financial surplus earned from the commercial sector, we invest all our ability to develop new animations, designs, and contents within our creativity. Thus, the contents part is what we value the most,” said Jung. The name 'Design Egg' was founded 10 years ago, when Jung and three of his fellow colleagues gathered round. “There’s a saying that when an egg is broken by others, it becomes fried egg, but when it is broken by itself, it becomes a chick. We tried to embed this meaning in our company- blooming prosperity and creativeness,” emphasized Jung. Design Egg's booth at a character fair is boomed by children. (Photo courtesy of Jung) Due to Jung’s experience at the Designing industry, he cherished the hope to ameliorate the poor environment. “After the graduation, I worked at the designing company to build wider personal connections and experiences. But, the low income and harsh welfare made me grasp the magnitude of this industry,” said Jung. In the attempt the set the better example and path to his juniors, he decided to found a company of just environment with his colleagues. When you’re lonely and tired, Como will tap-tap you Animation created by Design Egg “Tap Tap Como” brought Jung and his crew a significant amount of opportunity and fortune. However, the production process was a continuous adversity. The target was children and the animation itself was six to seven minutes long, which was immensely longer than what Design Egg has been producing for their commercial goods. Even so, they made steady progress. “To define children’s tastes, we aired an incomplete piece in kindergartens and tried to communicate often with moms around us,” noted Jung. As a result, the heart of the animation was born: the Tap-Tap dance of Como. <Tap-Tap Dance of Como, Video courtesy of Design Egg> Como in the animation is the main character and a baby chick. Como’s friends are Toto, who came from the urban area, Wormy, a worm whom Como did not eat but became friends with, and Uba, who is a warm-hearted baby duck. Together, they learn the goodness in life, solicitude, and love. “Babies are the kindest beings. I have a faith that this purity in animation will remind adults of the innocence and naivety they once had.” Jung strives for the betterment of the entertainment design industry for his juniors. Jung’s ultimate goal is not limited- it adds up as he seeks betterment. “It is the most blissful moment when my babbling baby giggles when Como is being played.” Developing Design Egg into a sustainable and welfare-based company like Disney or Zebra is now propelling Jung onwards. Kim Ju-hyun kimster9421@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Kim Youn-soo

2017-04 17

[Alumni]A Pro in Both Fields; Pansori and Gayageum

Just as a guitar player may also sing beautifully, Choi Min-hyouk is a professional player and singer of gayageum, or Korean zither, and pansori, a type of Korean traditional music. His field of music is called Gayageum sanjo mit byeongchang in Korean. Hi diligence and passion enabled him to master gayageum and pansori to complete the course of Intangible Cultural Property .23 designated by the South Korean government. Recently, Choi was awarded the prestigious Ureuk Grand Prize at the 26th National Ureuk Gayageum Contest, a nationwide competition for gayageum players and pansori singers, held on March 31st to April 1st. Also working as a chief member of Daejeon Yeonjung Korean Music Center, an organization whose mission is to preserve Korean traditional music, or Gukak, he endeavors to deliver the excellence of Gukak to Korea and the world’s general public. For the first time, a male contestant, Choi won the grand prize at the 26th National Ureuk Gayageum Contest. (Photo courtesy of Choi) The 26th Grand Prize Winner of the National Ureuk Gayageum Contest The largest number of contestants consisting of of 214 teams participated in this year's contest. Choi was the first male competitor to win the Grand Prize. “Despite my skills that need more refining, it was luck that awarded me this fruitful outcome. I’ll use this opportunity to work harder and devote myself more deeply.” he modestly revealed. The songs Choi sang and played with his gayageum are 'Hwaryongdo' from Jeokbyeokga in the preliminary round and ‘On the way to the castle’ from Simcheongga in the finals. Jeokbyokga, a Chinese war story, and Simcheongga, a tale which a devoted daughter helps to recover eyesight of her blind father and subsequently becoming a queen in her homeland, are famous pansori songs from the Joseon Dynasty. ‘“Hwaryongdo' depicts scenes of fierce war and ‘On the way to the castle’ vividly describes the blind father well. The two songs made it easier for me to showcase the charm of a male pansori singeri, ” he explained. Choi singing pansori and playing his gayageum. (Photo courtesy of Choi) Efforts To Preserve and Maintain Traditional Music Currently a chief member of Daejeon Yeonjung Korean Music Center, Choi takes part in various music performances in and out of the country and teaches gayageum and pansori. “Today, pansori is perceived as something old and boring by the general audience. As a gukak performer, I believe prejudice is the problem we have to overcome. I am working hard to teach gukak easily and make it more approachable to the general public,” he said. In addition to practicing his music, Choi also focuses on communication and harmony between other members of the group. Choi began practicing pansori when he was ten-years-old, at the suggestion of his father. Choosing pansori as his major, he started studying gayageum after taking classes as his minor. From his classes, he first met his teacher Gang Jeong-suk, who had much knowledge and skills for Intangible Cultural Property No.23 Gayageum sanjo mit byeongchang. Becoming a disciple of Gang, and after four years of training, he was selected as the gukak musician to complete the necessary course as a receiver of Intangible Cultural Property No.23. “My motto is ilchaeyushimjo(一切唯心造), which is a term from Buddhism that means everything depends on how you think. Positive thinking and incessant exertion reap good results for certain,” Choi claimed. Choi also believes that the performer of music needs to be a good person first in order to play good music. Therefore, his prime objective is to become a good person who plays good music. “Nowadays, all gugak majors learn both purely traditional and crossover music. However, I believe that only when the root of the tradition is firmly established can there be room for creative crossover music, ” he advised. Choi believes that the performer of music needs to be a good person first in order to play good music. (Photo courtesy of Choi) Jang Soo-hyun luxkari@hanyang.ac.kr

2017-04 10

[Student]Marathon, Veni, Vidi, Vici!

“At least I ran all the way” is a famous quote by Murakami Haruki, a famous novelist who gets motivated to write through running. Moon Sam-sung (Department of Sports Industry, 4th year) is also a runner who doesn't believe in quitting. Although he injured his fibula (a bone parallel to tibia) 5 weeks before the Seoul Marathon, held on March 19th, Moon decided to run all the way, and he won the Master’s division. Career as a runner Moon started his career as a runner at the age of 10. Moon was Jung Jin-hyuk's training partner for about 7 years. Jung is currently a marathon runner at KEPCO. Living ust a few meters away from each other in the same neighborhood, Moon was able to run alongside Jung, while holding to his dream of becoming the best runner in Korea. “My partner Jung has been the greatest gift that I could ever hope for. Thanks to him, I was able to win the biggest tournament in my middle school years twice in a row,” recalled Moon. The concept of a running partner is of great importance since partners motivate each other to reach their fullest potential and achieve the best in a shorter period of time compared to training alone. Moon remembers his childhood years as a runner. One tip that Moon gave when dealing with injuries was to never stop exercising. Even if you are injured, according to Moon, workout routines must be kept although not to your fullest capacity. “Your running ability will eventually return once you are able to train again. There is no need to be pressured mentally even though others may be training harder than you are,” said Moon. He claims that marathons all come down to mental strength after the 35km mark. “Anyone can train to run up to 35km. It’s after the 35km mark that people fail,” said Moon. He likens that stage as “not being able to eat anything for one week, being out of breath, and hammers being thrown on the legs with every step." Hard work pays off The 2017 Seoul Marathon was the first tournament where Elites (Korea Athletics Federation Runners) and Masters (Non-professional runners) started the race at the same time. Moon won the Masters division this year. Right after entering Hanyang University in 2011 on a full-scholarship, Moon quit his career as a professional runner due to a knee injury. After five years of inactivity, Moon started preparing for marathon running again last year. “Although people warned me not to run in this race, I wanted to try my best due to the hard work that I had put in my training sessions.” Moon, running in the 2017 Seoul Marathon. During his period of inactivity, Moon worked as personal trainer and recently started working as a coach at 'Bang Sun-hee Academy'. After completing military service, he tried saving up money for university by working as a personal trainer. “As I worked, I realized that I should eventually attend university and get a degree,” said Moon. He started running half marathons last year, and, in order to be ready for the full marathon, he had to lose about 10kg. “I prepared for the Seoul Marathon for about 100 days, and I was proud to win the race and prove my skills as a coach,” said Moon. In the first month, Moon trained on sprints, the second month on endurance, and the last month on both speed and endurance. Moon wishes to participate in the 2020 Tokyo Olympics. Although it has been a hard race so far, life itself is a marathon, and Moon plans on preparing for the realization of a bigger dream. “I want to participate in the Tokyo Olympics in 2020 along with my former partner Jung,” said Moon. With such vivid dreams, we have yet to await Moon’s next step as a professional runner. Kim Seung-jun nzdave94@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Moon Hana

2017-04 03 Important News

[Student]Spreading Warmth through Handwritten Letters

On a peaceful street called gamgodanggil of Jongno-gu, Seoul, stands a pink postbox. The black sign shows that after writing letters about one’s worries, the replies will come back within one or two weeks. Pausing at the sign for a moment, people then decide to stop by to disclose their worries to somebody unknown. The postbox named ongi, meaning warmth in Korean, is installed by Cho Hyun-sik (Department of International Studies, 4th yr), after reading “Miracles of the Namiya General Store” by Keigo Higashino by chance. “The overall plot of the book is that the characters from the past write letters about their worries to the characters of the future. I focused on the idea of revealing worries and being comforted through exchanging letters,” Cho said. Cho explaining the reporter about the operations of Ongi Postbox. The power of slowness and sincerity The plan was carried out due to his thought that even though SNS is popular these days, there are few people who listen carefully to others’ stories by heart. On the contrary to today’s social conditions which handwritten letters are disappearing, due to the discomfort that comes from slowness, Kim believes that there is a special value of the letters. “The slowness of handwritten letters would allow people to be relaxed enough to open up their hearts and disclose their stories,” Cho emphasized. Cho is the chief manager of Ongi General Store, with three other managers and 60 or so volunteers or ‘clerks’. The managers and the clerks write replies to the worries of people sent through Ongi Postbox. The installation of the postbox was on late Feburary this year, and the place of its location was chosen due to Cho’s personal preference of the street’s quiet, comfortable, and slow atmosphere. “I found ten people who wanted to be clerks of the Ongi General Store from the Internet, but then we wound up getting lots of letters which were more than we expected, ” Cho said. Merely a week after the installment of the post box, over 150 to 200 letters were sent by anonymous people. People visit the Ongi Postbox to write about their worries. . (Photo courtesy of Cho) “I didn’t know that there were going to be such a lot of letters, and that is why I came to decide more people were needed to reply them. There were no special requirements or even an interview. The most important thing was sincerity which people who applied to become clerks already possessed,” Cho said. As the manager of ongi general store, he spends his time discussing the management of Ongi General Store with other managers every day, and writing letters with his clerks in a café near Iwha Womans University on Monday, Tuesday, Friday. Each day, with a team of 15 clerks composed of different age group, they read, choose the person who is most relatable with the stories of the letters, and then reply their letters for two hours. As for the expenses for operating the postbox, such as the costs of stamps, letter papers, and envelopes, Cho provides through private tutoring. "The most difficult letters to reply were from children who felt that they were too fat and ugly. To the former letter, I wrote that time will solve the problem. To the latter, I replied that she would find other charms as she grows. I spend a lot of time and be careful with what I'm saying when I sending letters to children." (Photo courtesy of Cho) The importance of the freedom of choice in life According to Cho, he puts a lot of value in helping people, continuously participating in volunteering, such as helping prepare events for patients with Lou Gehrig’s disease. His belief was set after his grandmother’s death. “I was very close to my grandmother because she took care of me when I was young. When she was diagnosed with lung cancer and met her death, I thought a lot about how human life is so limited and how we will benefit from helping each other instead of having meaninglessly competitions, ” Cho reminisced. “My current plan is to increase the number of the postbox, and set up a booth complete with two writing tables as an extension of the postbox. I want people to be more comfortable and thus have more time to write out their worries. I’m preparing a crowdfunding for the project now. Then, I wish that Ongi General Store can develop into a non-profit organization to help comfort more people,” Cho said. "I believe in the value of helping people." (Photo courtesy of Cho) According to Cho, consistent reading and the experiences from his life help sympathize with the letters. "I was a very diligent student before I decided to take a leave of absence. I began to feel skeptical of dull, mindless studying although everybody else believes it is the right answer of life," he said. After he took a leave of absence, he tried running a street vendor, worked in a social enterprise, and went on traveling. He felt that there is no right answer but to live one’s own life. “If I write a letter to my past self, I want to tell myself that although I once worried a lot, all the difficult things turned out to help me instead. Nobody else lives for you, and the one who feel happiness from your life is yourself. So try what you truly want to do without regret or worries, ” Cho smiled. Cho's effort to spread warmth through heartfelt concerns about others' worries shines like sunlight. Jang Soo-hyun luxkari@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Kim Youn-soo

2017-03 27 Important News

[Alumni]Effort as the Mother, Modesty as the Father

“In a universe of ambiguity, this kind of certainty comes only once, and never again, no matter how many lifetimes you live.” Ardent love story from the movie “The Bridges of Madison County” has been reborn as a musical in South Korea. Fateful memories that Francesca and Robert recall, perhaps, is full of emotions that ordinary actors can’t express. There is a musical actor Park Eun-tae, an alumnus of Hanyang University’s Business School, who fully absorbed himself into Robert Kincaid. Acting with passion From ‘Phantom’ and ‘Frankenstein’ to ‘The Bridges of Madison County,’ Park has filled his 11 years with 25 performances. Despite the tight schedule, Park is referred by the media as one of the most improved musical stars in South Korea. One of his most favorable pieces is ‘Frankenstein. Musical ‘Frankenstein’ reveals the brotherhood of characters Victor and Henry, which later becomes defamed due to Henry’s modification into a monster. ’“Switching my role from one musical to another is an emotional burden, because I have to become another me. Leaving Henry from ‘Frankenstein’ behind was especially strenuous,” recalled Park. Another musical that Park feels an affection to is ‘Phantom.’ Along with the charming characteristic and background stories of the role Eric, the musical register perfectly suited Park’s voice. “Escaping from the role Eric was a toil, since I was so captivated by his life and my all emotions were devoted to him,” said Park. Musical <The Bridges of Madison County> raises its curtain on April 15th at Chungmu Art Center. (Photo courtesy of Prain Global Incorporation) Under the breathtaking schedule of the musical world, the most recent musical choice of Park was “The Bridges of Madison County.” The musical is about an ordinary mother Francesca, who reveals the course of discovering woman in herself through Robert’s love. “When I was first offered with the role, I refused it because I knew the original Robert is a persona beyond my capacity. However, the production company dramatized Robert into a younger and frisky man, which intrigued all my interests to apply here,” said Park. The new journey of Park is about to begin, as he is practicing daily at Chungmoo Art Center. Things you give up for what you want In his high school years, Park expected to enter the Korea Military Academy or the Police Institute. “Since I was young, I loved getting attentions from the audience and being praised. So I often volunteered for school presidents and more,” recalled Park. However, Park realized that this does not suit his career. Even when he came to the Business School of Hanyang University, he could not give up on his dream- musical actor. He kept singing at the school club as a vocal, and he finally decided to achieve his long-cherished desire after a long contemplation. Becoming a musical actor was a long road, but maintaining his position was an ordeal. On the day of the interview, americano-lover Park was drinking a banana juice for the health of his vocal cords. “Hearing the audience applauding after the curtain call is the happiest moment in my life. However, after delights follow responsibilities,” stressed Park. The hardest part of managing his body condition is maintaining the voice health, since the vocal muscles are not visible. Along with this, art and emotion should be expressed altogether. “In the early age, I thought there are special methods to managing body conditions, but now I grasped that usual habits are the key,” reminded Park. Getting halted for the ‘Frankenstein’ performance due to vocal cord nodules was the most bitter slump Park experienced. “This is the path I chose. Giving up petty happiness with friends, family, alcohol, and other habits is what I sacrifice. In return, I’m compensated with the accomplishments and joy,” emphasized Park. Park is preparing to become Robert Kincaid. Because Park’s major at college was business studies, it was a dilemma for him to wonder whether his practice and development speed is fast enough, compared to other musical actors. However, he realized that efforts never betray. “Concentrate on your own clock only. Other clocks do not matter,” advised Park for those who agonize over their dreams. Kim Ju-hyun kimster9421@hanyang.ac.kr

2017-03 27

[Student]Touring Around Hanyang With 'Tambang Tambang'

Nowadays, with the official launch of Pokémon Go in Korea, augmented reality games have become more familiar to people. ‘Tambang Tambang’ (tambang being a Korean word, meaning 'explore') is an augmented reality game which leads users to tour around the Hanyang campus while completing missions. The application was released on March 15th this year. Tambang Tambang was created by four students: its founder and leader Shin Kang-soo (Department of Policy Studies, 3rd year) and three members, Noh Ung-gi (Department of Sports Industry, 3rd year), Kim Na-yeun (Department of Applied Art Education, 4th year), and Yoo Eun-seo (Department of Applied Art Education, 4th year). Shin and No spoke about the stories behind Tambang Tambang. Let’s go tambang in HYU Playing Tambang Tambang is fairly easy, which makes it greatly accessible. One simply has to take a photo of a required sculpture or an object suggested in silhouette to pass each course. Once one completes a mission, he or she will be allowed to continue onto the next destination within the game. A major characteristic of the game lies in its feature that allows users to gain further information about an object or a specific place while playing the game, visiting the actual spot at the same time. The picture shows the future game display model. Displayed on the left is the overall map, and the mission page is shown on the right. (Photo courtesy of Tambang Tambang) The initiative model of Tambang Tambang is currently based on the HYU Seoul Campus. “As there are hundreds of high school or middle school students visiting HYU, we thought it could be hard for them to tour around the campus more effectively without a proper guide,” said Shin. Tambang Tambang aims to target those students, as playing the game will naturally lead them to learn about the campus as well. Currently, as one of the main way to advertise the game, they have collaborated with Saranghandae, the school's student ambassador group. “We designed the courses along with Saranghandae, the courses will include the school’s important spots like the Lion’s Rumble, Paiknam Library, and 88-stairs. The game will be later used in the campus tour program by Saranghandae,” said Noh. From assignment to business Four students with different majors first met one another through a lecture called ‘Social Entrepreneurship’, where students were expected to build and plan their own social business. “Our final assignment was to present our whole plan in front of the professor and the director of HYU social innovation center, Seo Jin-seok. After the presentation, Shin and his members received a suggestion from the director to make their project as an application. “I was really excited to be given the opportunity to proceed with the project. It wasn’t the first time that I had participated in a start-up business, but it was new for me to be the founder while leading the whole team,” explained Shin. Noh (left) and Shin (right) said that the release of Tambang Tambang was only possible because of every members' effort. For Shin and the members, making proper content, like the campus trajectories, and developing an application based on that was surely arduous work. “We had to spend hours actually visiting places we hadn't actually had a chance to visit. We got help from an existing walking course called Doollehgil, HYU’s campus trails that encompasses the campus’s 8 scenic points,” said Noh. Through enough research and incorporation of recommendations they received from their fellow students, Shin and his team were soon able to discover more spots worth taking note of. Making the overall contents of the game was the job of Shin and Noh. Designing was taken on by Kim and Yoo, who are capable of dealing with related computer programs. With financial support from HYU Social Innovation Center, they are currently being helped out with other technical problems through outsourcing. Shin shows how to complete a mission on Tambang Tambang. Learning through playing Currently, Shin and Noh said the number of downloads for Tambang Tambang stands at about 200. Of course, they aren't fully satisfied with the results, which is why they have been planning on creating bigger business models to upgrade Tambang Tambang. “We thought of creating Tambang Tambang as part of another game to introduce museums that exhibits materials regarding history, especially Korean history,” said Shin. Just like how Tambang Tambang can be played on HYU's Seoul Campus, the new version will work as a medium between museums and visitors. “We found out that the current methods of learning Korean history contributes negatively to its understanding among teenagers. There are various reasons for that, but the most critical one is that it usually fails to retain students’ attention as the subject itself is oriented towards memorizing,” said Shin. Tambang Tambang aims to increase students' interest in Korean history by making the learning process more entertaining. Certainly, there is still a long way for Shin and his team to go. “Three months was definitely not enough time for us to complete all the necessary work. We'll have to upgrade the game on many different aspects such as its music and effects,” mentioned Noh. “In the near future, we hope to become successful enough to support students who are living far away from Seoul to give them a chance to come to HYU,” said Shin and Noh. Tambang Tambang will be developed continuously in tandem with the team's higher goals. Yun Ji-hyun uni27@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Moon Hana

2017-03 20

[Alumni]Passion, Love, and Yacht

Not all university students are able to formulate a definite life goal or create a systematic plan for an ideal future. In fact, most struggle to find out what they truly want to do as they mature and complete their studies while at university. As an ordinary university student, Chang Jae-ik (Department of Sports Industry ’09) went on a trip to Europe when he was in his 4th year at Hanyang and discovered what he aspired to do all his life: sailing all over the world on a yacht. A dream in the Netherlands ▲ Chang (left) made it to the finish line. Chang visited Marseille, France, when he was a senior at Hanyang and witnessed a sight that touched his soul: hundreds of white yachts floating beautifully on an emerald ocean. At the time, he merely thought it would be nice to own one of those yachts and then forgot about it. But when Chang visited Amsterdam in the Netherlands, he caught sight of another mesmerizing view that shattered his prejudice. “I always thought that going on a cruise aboard a yacht was a privilege only for the rich because of its extravagant cost. That was how the prototypical image of yachting is portrayed in movies and dramas,” confessed Chang. What he saw at the port was about 20 yachts getting ready to sail off at midnight, all of which were occupied by individual families. Parents were preparing the yacht for sail and the little children on each yacht were waving from afar to people on land. That sight taught him that yachts are accessible to ordinary people. After coming back to Korea and being discharged from military service, Chang was determined to learn how to sail a yacht and become a yachtmaster. Chang accumulated a small fortune while he was in the army, which he had gladly spent on a working holiday to the Netherlands. Chang settled in Rotterdam and became a member of Rotterdamse Studenten Zeil Vereniging, a student yacht club in Rotterdam. In the process of becoming a yachtmaster under the Royal Yachting Association, Chang had sailed about 5000km, stopping off at a number of countries including the Netherlands, Belgium, England, France, Spain and Portugal. ▲ "I wish yachting was more easily accessible to ordinary people in Korea." Entering the 2016 Rolex Sydney Hobart Yacht Race in a team named 'Sonic', Chang acquired another valuable experience. Sonic came 24th out of 88 teams, some consisting of prominent professionals who took part in the race several times in the past. His was the very first to have participated as a Korean team which made Sonic even more special. “Given that there were many amazing yacht professionals participating in the race, I think our accomplishment is impressive and remarkable. I am honored to have participated in such a big-scale competition and thankful to have had a crew composed of wonderful people,” exclaimed Chang. Journeying aboard a yacht “On the voyage, I was engulfed by soot-black nights with millions of stars studded in the sky, even shooting stars on occasion. The yacht was suspended on a bottomless ocean, accompanied by countless dolphins,” reminisced Chang. He stated that the most charming aspect of sailing on a yacht is the advantage of being able to visit every little unknown ports and docks, allowing you to experience the indigenous and uninfluenced culture of any given region. “I stopped at so many countries, giving myself the opportunity to encounter people of all ages who came from a sundry of unique cultures.” Chang gained priceless memories and experiences during his expeditions, which he hopes to treasure throughout his life. ▲ "One day, I'm going to go on an around-the-world journey with my wife." Jeon Chae-yun chaeyun111@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Moon Ha-na