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2019-03 12

[Alumni]From an Architect to an Illustrator

While some university students choose their double majors in accordance with their academic preferences and passions, others only apply for the majors that correspond to certain conditions such as grades. For the latter group, it is important that they find their true interest during their college years. Jung Jin-ho (Department of Architecture, ’13) is an illustrator from the Department of Architecture who went through such a situation. His life-long dream of becoming an architect changed into the dream of being an illustrator who inspires and pleases young readers. Jung Jin-ho (Department of Architecture, ’13) is an illustrator who is an alumnus of the Department of Architecture. He is reading his award-winning picture book Wall. Originally, Jung’s dream was to become a renowned architect, which is why he chose the Department of Architecture. During his 4th year, he signed a contract for a year-long internship at the architecture company he always wanted to join. However, the reality was considerably different from his expectations, and this internship experience became the turning point of reconsidering his original dream. Jung struggled to find a job that genuinely suited his passion during his 5th year of college, since his life-long goal to become a successful architect had suddenly collapsed due to the experience of the frustrating reality of the field. While he was contemplating his future, Jung recalled that since his childhood he had always liked reading picture books. Due to a serious burn he had received, Jung had to spend most of his time in the hospital. “I made a lot of friends at the hospital. Some of them were seriously ill. I remember a friend who had lost an arm. However, I had no prejudice against them. They were just like ordinary people and I felt no sense of difference between us. Through this experience at the hospital, I learned that having such bias was meaningless,” Jung stated. As activities for children are quite limited in the hospital, it was natural that he read a lot of picture books, which eventually became a major hobby that lasted to his adulthood. Considering his childhood background, Jung decided to create a picture book that also included a story of his 5th year of university life. Jung made four pieces in total that year. An Elephant Living in My House illustration (우리집에 코끼리가 산다) by Jung Jin-ho (Photo courtesy of Jung's Grafolio) The books Look up! (위를 봐요!), Wall (벽), Soil and a Worm (벽과 지렁이), and Owl (부엉이), received great attention and love from the public, and also won Jung an award. The piece Look up! was especially highly evaluated in terms of architecture. He applied what he had learned in university over four years to his book, and this challenging spirit and refreshing attempt gained recognition from experts. Jung notes, “Whereas many authors get inspiration from other peoples’ stories, I focus on my past experiences. In Wall I reflected the knowledge I learned from my major, and in 3 Second Diving I reflected on my elementary school life. Since my first piece, which was the primary momentum to become an illustrator-author, reflects the most about my personal story, I feel the greatest attachment to it.” After receiving several awards, he gets numerous calls from interested libraries and schools. Jung also has been giving lectures to both teenagers and adults since 2015. The content of the lectures differs depending on the audiences' level of understanding level about art. For younger generations, he prepares a variety of activities such as building blocks and drawing simple pictures, while giving theoretical explanations of picture books to adults. While he travels around giving lectures, he plans to write one or two books a year at the same time. Jung hopes university students find their genuine interest. It was lucky for him to debut in the field of illustration and novels, as Professor Kang Min-kyung from the College of Humanities sent Jung’s pieces to several publishing companies, all of which offered a positive response. Jung’s goal is not grand. He just wants to maintain his career in this field for a lifetime; however, many illustrators are unable to due to inconsistent income. Jung said, “There was one respectable professor that I really liked. He always insisted that becoming a master is achieved when you constantly put forth a strong effort without craving for it. I just want to survive in this field and work for my true interest.” Jung adds, “Many people work in a different area that is irrelevant to their major, but it’s okay. By doing so, they can make their own attractive story. Broaden your perspective and be confident. Everything you have learned can always be helpful to what you will be in the future.” Kim Min-jae fhffl5781@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Lee Hyeon-seon

2019-03 11

[Alumni]The 2019 Icon of Korean Tradition

The Brand Prize Award, hosted by The Korean Herald, is given to those who have made a significant achievement in their field over the year. Having been recognized for her efforts with the gayageum, also known as the Korean harp, Park Ji-yun (Department of Korean Traditional Music, Doctorate, '16) was awarded the Grand Prize for the Arts Sector of the 2019 Brand Prize Award. As a traditional musician who has played the gayageum for over 30 years, Park's new goal has been to pass her knowledge on to her students, starting her life as a teacher. As a musician Starting with playing the piano during her early years, Park showed a talent for music. She first encountered the gayageum as a hobby, having been attracted by its monophonic features. Switching from the piano to the gayageum when she was 13, it has been over 30 years since Park has played the traditional Korean instrument. During her long years of devotion, Park has managed to make major achievements within the field. Park successfully put on a concert last December with the Seocho Philharmoniker, being the first to have an accompanied performance with a symphony orchestra. (Click to go to the video of Park's accompanied performance) “The gayageum is often regarded as a boring and dull form of music by many. I wanted to overcome this wrong belief that many carry, and in order to do so, I had to take some new departures,” explained Park. She further explained how the orchestra is often considered main stream within the musical field and, thus, she wanted to show how the gayageum can be successfully collaborated with other more popular forms of music. Park is also preparing two albums which she is planning to release by next year at the latest. Park has long put in efforts towards making the gayageum closer to the public. (Photo courtesy of Park) Park stated that her first album is one that is going to focus on the traditional features of the gayageum. Having entered her forties, Park explained that she wanted to record and share her recitals, which have now been accumulated with over 30 years of practice. On the other hand, the second album is to be a duet with the electone, an electronic organ that has features of automatic accompaniments and tone modulation, which is a new challenge to the gayageum. Such efforts show Park’s long desire of bringing the gayageum closer to the public through various innovations, while still stressing its traditional features. As a professor Having majored in the gayageum during her high school and college years, Park further pursued her studies at Hanyang University, receiving both her master's and doctorate degrees in the field of traditional Korean music. Park first focused on gaining practical experience by joining an orchestra after her college graduation. After playing with the orchestra until her early thirties, however, Park decided to change her career path towards becoming an instructor and sharing her knowledge of the gayageum. First starting her teaching career at Gugak National High School, it was during these years that Park became determined to pursue her studies within the field. While studying for her doctorate, Park was also given the opportunity to teach at Hanyang University. In addition to having lessons with the students majoring in Korean traditional music, Park has also taught courses for other majors such as the Department of Composition, as they had to widen their scope of music. During her teaching career, Park stated that it is when her students are praised by others that she feels the most worthwhile. Park is now focusing on transferring her deep knowledge of the gayageum along to her students as a professor. (Photo courtesy of Park) Now holding an additional post as a professor for the Department of Korean Traditional Music in Hanyang University, Park maintained that her main goal as a professor is to bring honor to both the department and the school. In order to do so, she stated that she will not only pursue her own career in the field of the gayageum, but also help her students become musicians of higher levels within their own field. More than thirty years have passed since she first started playing the gayageum, and it seems as if Park’s passion is filled both as a musician and a professor. Choi Seo-yong tjdyd1@hanyang.ac.kr

2019-02 18

[Student]MOYE, a Brand Created by Students From the Department of Clothing and Textiles

MOYE is a fashion brand created by a group of students from the Department of Clothing and Textiles. Its name consists of two meanings: it is a shortened word that comes from the sentence 'moduga yesoolgada,' which means ‘everyone is an artist’ in Korean, originally quoted by the artist Joseph Beuys; it also has the meaning of putting together the elderly and children, according to the dictionary. In this sense, MOYE implies that every ordinary person is an artist. For their project this time, the artists involved were elderly women from the Sageun-dong Elderly Welfare Center. This week, the creators of the brand, MOYE shared their brand story. (From left) Head officer Song Ha-yoon (Department of Clothing and Textiles, 3rd year), financial officer and designer Kim Seung-hyun (Department of Clothing and Textiles, 2nd year) and marketing officer and designer Lee Eun-joo (Department of Clothing and Textiles, 4th year) of MOYE As its name implies, the designers for MOYE are ordinary people. For their new project, MOYE decided to make elderly women their artists. Their reason for doing so was because the date of their project launch was on February 12th, which was after the Lunar New Year’s Day when the concept of a generation gap was felt the most. There is a reason behind why MOYE chose to use communication as the core identity of the brand. “I had the experience of transferring to different schools many times. From that, I realized the importance of having someone to talk to. I value everyone's story, so I wanted to listen to and deliver them through the medium of clothes,” said Song, the head officer of MOYE. The artists of MOYE’s project, the elderly from Sageun-dong Elderly Welfare Center, are drawing the designs for clothing. (Photo courtesy of Song) While there are many paths available for those wishing to launch a brand, the creators of MOYE decided to raise a funding at Wadiz, which is a crowd funding platform. This was a decision resulting from lessons the founders had learned last summer when their project was promoted off line. They faced the limitations of initial capital, lack of item diversity caused by mass production, and difficulty delivering the story behind their designed products. MOYE’s clothing line was created through four steps. First, the designers listened to and sympathized with the elderly at Sageun-dong Elderly Welfare Center. During this process, the MOYE designers caught a story with an impactful impression and asked them to draw their story. Finally, the designers refined the drawings and the stories are now being delivered through the completed clothing. One of MOYE's clothing designs called ‘Portrait’, which is the most sought-after clothing piece that depicts the lifetime of an artist in one single line. The colorful colors describe the emotions that follow a life event. (Photo courtesy of Song) “I was surprised to hear that a 73 year old artist that I worked with had learned photoshopping skills when she was younger. It sounds like a new generation's skill that the generation gap started to seem obscure to me,” recalled Kim. Beginning next week, MOYE’s next project is going to have children as their target, from vulnerable social groups. MOYE follows by the ideology that while they have artists from vulnerable social classes, they do not sell through emotional appeal. Rather, they plan to prove the excellence of pure imagination of children through commercial values. “I hope our next project will implant courage to the children, despite the insufficient love they might have received in the past.” A picture of the designers from team MOYE and their model. All models and photographers are from the Department of Clothing and Textiles. (Photo courtesy of Song) Clothes are worn and consumed by people every day, and MOYE successfully fulfilled their objective to communicate and deliver one’s story through clothing. While their online funding ends on March 3rd, MOYE plans on donating 100 percent of the net gains to the Sageun-dong Elderly Welfare Center. They will continue their projects by creating an official club on campus, with the aim of breaking down the stereotypes for beginning start-ups and the notion that finding employment is impossibly tough. Click here to view MOYE's clothing lines Kim Hyun-soo soosoupkimmy@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Park Geun-hyung

2019-02 07

[Student]Hanyang Welcomes Kim Hyang-gi!

Gathering more than 20 million viewers with her recent movie series, ‘Alongside With the Gods' (2017, 2018), Kim Hyang-gi (Department of Theater and Film, 1st year) received the title of a ‘ten-million actress,’ a term used to refer to actors and actresses who have gathered over ten million viewers in one movie. Her achievement has led to her becoming the youngest actress to receive the ‘Best Supporting Actress Award’ at the ‘2018 39th Blue Dragon Awards.’ Turning 20 years old in 2019, Kim has been admitted to Hanyang University's Department of Theater and Film, becoming a freshman for the upcoming semester beginning in March. Putting a period to her teenage life and embarking on her new chapter of life in her twenties, Kim shared her impressions as both a university student and as a soaring actress. Kim Hyang-gi (Department of Theater and Film, 1st year) is known as a ‘ten-million actress’ who filmed numerous top-ranking movies. Becoming a student of Hanyang Q. What led you to apply for Hanyang University? Kim: During my high school years, I long desired to pursue my studies in the field of film and theater. After the deliberate process of asking for advice and comparing the available options, I was able to make the final decision of applying for the Department of Theater and Film in Hanyang University. Q. Do you have any fantasy of being a university student? Kim: From an academic perspective, I am really looking forward to taking the courses offered at school. It is those related to ‘playwright’ that I am excited about the most, as it has a distinct intellectual benefit for actors. As it is something that I have never encountered before, the curiosity and interest towards the field have naturally grew in me. As for the expectations related to my school life as a university student, I want to participate in extracurricular activities. However, it is not certain yet which type of activity I want to participate in, as every activity has a different vibe that I may not be familiar with. I do not think it would be too late to choose after adapting to the school atmosphere first. Additionally, although it may seem as a trivial thing, I really want to try eating at the school cafeteria. Q. Your teenage life is over and you are turning 20. When do you feel it the most? Kim: To be honest, I am not feeling anything yet. I think it will take about a year before I actually acknowledge that I have truly become an adult. As for now, I want to concentrate on adapting to my school life as a freshman. Kim is holding a Hylion in front of a cardboard. Q. Is there any remark that you would like to share with your fellow freshmen? Kim: To my fellow freshman, I believe we are all having the nervousness and excitement that every freshmen must go through. I hope that we all have a meaningful and healthy school life together, sharing enjoyment when we can and pursuing our studies when we must! Q. Kim also improvised an acrostic poem to the school philosophy ‘Love in Deed and Truth(사랑의 실천)' 사: 사자와 함께 (Alongside a lion) 랑: 낭낭한 마음으로 (With a pleasurable heart) 의: 의젓한 대학생으로서의 생활을 힘내봅시다 (We should keep the efforts of living as mature university students) 실: 실천의 중요성 모두 알고 계시죠? (You all know the importance of acting in deed, right?) 천: 천만배 더 멋진 사람이 되기 위해 노력하는 한양인이 됩시다 (Let us all become students of Hanyang that can shine ten-thousand times brighter) Kim's career as an actress Q. What is your most meaningful movie? Kim: Although every single movie throughout my career is important and meaningful to me, I believe that it is ‘Heart Is' (2006) that is the most meaningful, considering that it was the movie that allowed me to first set foot in my career as an actress. As I was only six years old at the time, I do not have very clear memories, yet a lasting one is that my mother read me the script as if it was a fairy tale because I was too young to read it myself and understand it. Q. Is there any specific role that you would like to play in the future? Kim: In the past, when I had that same question, my answer was that I wanted to perform a character with a multiple personality. However, having more thoughts now, I believe it is hard for me to name one specific role. It is because, rather than focusing on the role itself, it is more about how the character is shaped within the plot, with various emotions and situations guiding the formation. Kim is explaining her career as an actress. Q. Do you know your strength as an actress? Kim: As I like acting, I act every character with full sincerity, which I believe is my main strength. As for my specific philosophy of acting, I do not have one, yet I do like the saying, ‘in-hyang-man-li’ (인향만리, a four-character Chinese idiom that has the meaning of ‘a person's scent lasts over a long distance’). Even apart from the fact that the idiom is associable to my name (the word hyanggi means 'scent' in Korean), I also like the meaning itself in that I want to become an actress that always remains nearby. Q. How would you define the term 'acting'? Kim: I believe that acting is similar to creating a mind-map. While having a certain model as an actress that I desire at the center of my mind, I have to spread numerous branches from it to fit myself into that certain model. With no limitations in its growth, every experience and every lesson that I learn can be linked together within the mind-map, eventually all forming into the model actress that I desire to become. Q. Can you introduce your newly-released movie, ‘Innocent Witness' (2019)? Kim: ‘Innocent Witness’(2019) has the main story of Yang Soon-ho (played by Jung Woo-sung), a lawyer assigned to a murder case, meeting the only witness of the case, Lim Ji-woo (played by Kim Hyang-gi) who has an autistic disorder. Planned to be released on February 13th, 2019, it is a heartwarming movie that is getting the attention of many. After the interview, Kim is taking a photo in front of the Hanyang University Museum. Q. What are your future plans? Kim: Rather than looking far into the future, I want to concentrate on my near future, which is my life as a university student and a freshman of Hanyang University. As an actress, I would like to learn and improve step by step, while pursuing my acting career. Choi Seo-yong tjdyd1@hanyang.ac.kr

2019-01 07

[Student]The Next Step to Accomplishing His Dreams for the National Defense Development

In South Korea, mandatory military service takes around two years, which may differ depending on the type or army one is in. The current government had promised to shorten the length of service to solve some of the societal clashes that were aroused, but the obligation still puts a lot of pressure on many students, as age and timing is one of the most crucial factors that affect one’s career in Korea. Some students, however, have taken this opportunity and turned it into a career as a military officer. Luckily, Korea does have several programs that support this career path, and one of them is the “Professional Officers in S&T for the National Defense Program.” Despite its tough admissions process, Bae Jae-kyung (Division of Mechanical Engineering, 2nd year) was selected for the program for the first time in Hanyang's history. Bae Jae-kyung (Division of Mechanical Engineering, 2nd year) is thoroughly explaining the application process for the Professional Officers in S&T for the National Defense program. The Professional Officers in S&T for the National Defense program is executed by the Ministry of Science and ICT and the Ministry of National Defense. It benchmarks Israel’s elite program called the Talpiot program, which trains recruits who have demonstrated an outstanding academic ability in the sciences as well as in their leadership potential with the goal of developing new technologies for the army. The Talpiot program was inaugurated in 1979 after Israel’s loss in the Yom Kippur War. A similar program was established in Korea with the goal of fostering young talent by turning them into a professional in their field and prevent a severely disadvantaged career due to mandatory military service. Bae’s interest and application for this program was not just out of a whim. His passion for military technology in defense and security stems from his childhood and his father’s teachings. Bae’s father was also an officer and had taught Bae all about patriotism, loyalty, and sacrifice. “My father always taught me that one’s leadership and ability alone can contribute to defending the country. This has always inspired me. After searching for ways to become an officer like my father, I came across this program and decided that it really befitted my interests and passion.” "I am honored to be the 5th batch of the program and the first from HYU to be selected. It's a tough and competitive process. I would like to emphasize my thanks to the dean, staff, and the professors who have helped me throughout this process." The selection process is divided into three rounds. The first round is the document evaluation, consisting of a GPA and personal statement screening. Candidates need at least a 4.0 GPA, as the most who pass have that equivalent score or higher. As for personal statements, it is better to base it on honesty and a field that truly interests you. The second round consists of interviews. After you pass the first round, you go on to a physical examination and personality test. Only after you pass these two can you then move on to the actual interview and the evaluation of duty execution. The interviews are based on the depth of your knowledge from your major and your personal statement. That is why everybody has different interview questions. 60 to 70 percent of the questions are based on the depth of your knowledge from your major, while the remaining 30 to 40 percent are based on your personal statement. There were five interviewers, and the interviews take place in three different locations of approximately 30 minutes. The duty execution evaluation also takes place in a different location and can take a short time, up to 40 minutes depending on the person. The third round is the final evaluation, and after you pass this round, you are admitted to the program. Once admitted to the program, trainees can then study and work at the Agency for Defense Development (ADD). Only sophomores can apply, as they are expected take courses at ADD every vacation until graduation. Then, they carry out joint research with the current researchers for three years upon graduation instead of going to the army for two years. During the three years, they are allowed to study for a master’s or doctor’s degree as well. The first batch was selected back in 2014, and 20 students from the science and tech-related institutions such as KAIST, POSTECH, UNIST, and GIST were selected. As time has passed, opportunity has spread, and now, 20 to 25 male and female students from all over the country from various fields such as electronics, machinery, aircraft technology, and computers are also selected after a tough selection process. Bae looks forward to accomplishing his dream of developing stealth technology at ADD. According to Bae, candidates with an electronics major were selected the most in previous batches. However, as things have been changing along with the program’s progress, about eight mechanics, four computer majors, and one to two from other fields were selected for this batch. “I am very interested in stealth technology. Korea is currently working with the U.S. on developing this technology, but it is still at an elementary level, so I want to join in this research and contribute. I wouldn’t have been accepted without the help of the HYU dean, the College of Engineering's Administration Office staff, and my major professors. It took me a long time to prepare for this program, but it’s all worth it. I hope I can one day help pave a path for our HYU hubaes who are interested.” Park Joo-hyun julia1114@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Lee Jin-myung

2019-01 07

[Student]The Barrier-Free Map version 2.0

The Barrier-Free Map, a map specially designed for the convenience of the disabled, has recently released its version 2.0. First planned by the Hanyang University Social Innovation Center and the students of the Hanyang University Disabled Student Association (HUDSA), the map has been upgraded from the first version by widening its range and including the districts outside of school. According to Lee Jeong-in (School of Business, 2nd year), the current vice-president of the HUDSA, the Barrier-Free Map Project was first started with the purpose of creating a map that provides valuable information to the disabled, especially within the campus of Hanyang University. The team consisted of mainly nine students, with eight being the members of the HUDSA and Kim Chan-joo (Department of Architectural Engineering, 1st year) who received recommendations from such members. Lee Jeong-in (School of Business, 2nd year) is explainig how the whole Barrier-Free Map project came to fruition. The nine students first focused upon the whereabouts within campus, checking the existence of features such as the doors, toilets, and parking spaces that are provided for the use of the disabled. Collaborating with the Seoul Map Company ‘Tagging,’ they succeeded in making the prototype of the Barrier-Free Map 1.0, which marks such valuable information additional to the current campus map of Hayang University. Version 2.0 takes off from this particular stage adding information that covers the districts of Wangsimni and several subway stations within Seoul. Receiving support from the SK Happiness Foundation, the second version of the map was completed this year, adding information of such features within the stores of the Wangsimni district. The team also investigated the subway stations of Sindorim, Seokgye, Oksu, and Yaksu, finding the most convenient transfer gates for the disabled users. All relevant information was gathered personally by the team members, visiting all the transfer gates and stores both on and off campus. (click to view the map of Hanyang University Campus and Wangsimni; click to view the Seoul Metro Map for the Disabled) Lee Tan (School of Business, 3rd year), the former president of the HUDSA, said that they had many difficulties when collecting the needed information, as the road pavement was not suitable for those who use a wheelchair. Having to make the map with a small number of team members within a limited time was also a difficulty that the team had to face during the production process. Lee also added that he was surprised at the fact that most places did not provide even the most basic features that are required for disabled users. Lee Tan (School of Business, 3rd year) and Lee Jeong-in demonstrate their hopes that the Barrier-Free Map can contribute to making a world that is 'Barrier-Free.' With the second version having recently been finished, both Lee Jeong-in and Lee Tan have stated that this is not the end of the Barrier-Free Map. They have demonstrated their hopes toward the map being improved and extended towards national districts, coming to the aid of a wider pool of users. When asked of future plans, Lee Jeong-in answered, “we hope that the map does not end in simply notifying the difficulties that many people have within their everyday lives but actually leads to an actual improvement within the facilities. The most ideal plan is to make a completely barrier-free world that does not require such specially designed maps.” Choi Seo-yong tjdyd1@daum.net Photos by Kang Cho-hyun

2018-12 24

[Faculty]Thoughts on Korean English Education

Although English is not an official language in Korea, it is still considered a mandatory part of education from primary to college. Especially because English exam scores have become a basic requirement for jobs or any other program applications today, gaining competency in the language is now a competition for Korean students from an early age. Lee Kwang-hee, a professor in the Department of English Language and Literature and a current member of the board of directors at Korea Munhwasa (한국문화사), a renowned publishing company in Korea, has shared his life story and thoughts on this phenomenon. Lee Kwang-hee (Department of English Language and Literature) is sharing his life story and thoughts during the interview in his office at Korea Munhwasa (한국문화사). Lee’s deep affection for English began in his college years at Hanyang. With his profound love for the school, Lee completed all his bachelor's, master's, and doctor's degrees at Hanyang University, all in the department of English Language and Literature. According to Lee, his choice of department was not due to his passion but because his highest score was in English, which made him think he had a talent in it. However, life as a student in this department completely changed his path. “You don’t learn how to speak better English in this department. Rather, you learn about the literature and human language, which is part of our life and instinct. In other words, you study about life and human nature, while using English instead of Korean,” said Lee. Despite his skills and competency, Lee had not always planned on becoming a professor from the start. According to Lee, his life as an English department student was always unclear, especially as the Korean economy was at its lowest point at that time due to IMF. Luckily, Lee found some recruitment advertisements for English academies and decided to apply to become an English teacher. However, he had to face constant rejections as he was quite young, and HYU was renowned more for its technology departments than language departments. “In the end, my desperation got me through. I was finally teaching in one of the academies, but because I wasn’t getting enough students or teaching bigger classes, I was barely surviving with the minimum wage,” said Lee. Lee also has over 15 books published that are loved and used by students throughout the country. Fortunately for Lee, he was able to quickly gain his popularity and recognition as an English teacher after substituting for one of the bigger classes. With this turn of events, he quickly became one of the high-earning, popular teachers that taught classes everyday. There were endless calls for him, and at one point, he thought he was living the best life. However, years had passed, and Lee was constantly feeling a void that could not be filled. One day during a class, he realized that he had become a simple technician and a parrot that teaches students on how to solve questions, rather than why they work that way. With a recommendation from his professor, Lee went on to obtain his master's degree at HYU. “I remember why I fell in love with learning English. Learning a language is like developing a whole new world in you. A language has its own system and mechanisms like science, and one should be able to utilize it with intuition. I realized that that is what English education in Korea has been lacking. When I'm teaching, I mostly see students that are simply trained to speak English. They don’t speak the language because they truly understand it. Students treat it like it’s some sort of simple technical equation because that’s what they’ve been trained to do their whole lives, and this applies to all languages being taught in Korea.” "I hope more talented intellectuals or even students with creative ideas for bettering the Brown Study would feel free to contact me. It's an open, digitalized platform for everyone." To the current situation, Lee added that the intellectuals are also at fault. “I think that this kind of problem exists because the studies and realizations that us intellectuals have remain in our own league. There needs to be better communication among the language intellectuals as educators and students." Lee commented that it would be the best if those with a language degree from universities become teachers at English academies and pass on what they have learned in universities to their students. With this in mind, Lee has created an online study platform called the Brown Study in hopes of creating an open, digitalized platform with all kinds of study materials in the language and humanities field that anyone can access. This way, even professors who have retired or any other intellectuals can leave their work online and teach the students who wish to truly learn more than just the simple technicalities. “I hope this can become a communication outlet for both students and intellectuals. I believe that as long as you’re always intellectually curious and keep an open mind, you will always succeed,” said Lee. Park Joo-hyun julia1114@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Lee Jin-myung

2018-12 17

[Student]When a Lion Goes to School

The student-made YouTube channel that represents Hanyang University, “When a Lion Goes to School," now has over 14,000 subscribers. Uploading video content related to school life in Hanyang University, Choi E-re (Department of Industrial Engineering, 2nd year), who often undertakes the role of an emcee in the video making process, spoke about the process of starting a Youtube channel that Hanyang University students can relate to, and the story of owning and growing a channel led by students themselves. The YouTube channel, "When a Lion Goes to School" currently has more than 14,000 subscribers and 29 videos. (Photo courtesy of "When a Lion Goes to School") Choi E-re (Department of Industrial Engineering, 2nd year) talked about the YouTube channel that he and his crew run, known as, “When a lion goes to school" on December 14th, 2018. The beginning It was this March that things first started with the “When a Lion Goes to School” channel on Youtube when three students from the Department of Industrial Engineering came up with the idea. Unquestionably, editing is a crucial part of making video production, so they even went on to contact the dean of the Department of Media Communication to gather editors for their crew. For the first video, which is titled, “We asked Hanyang University engineering students," was uploaded on April 20th. They introduced the stereotypes that people usually have of students from the Department of Engineering. When they were first starting out in YouTube, one of the major concerns was regarding whether to target Hanyang University students or college students in general. They ended up targeting Hanyang University because a channel dedicated to introducing academic information to the life styles of Hanyang University students did not exist. There are a total of eight members who work as a team for “When a Lion Goes to School.” Rather than assigning a specific role to each members, they strive to all work together. Working together through the whole process has both pros and cons, according to Choi. It can be hard to gather ideas effectively since there are so many people participating, but it does give them the feeling of accomplishment by working as a team and watching the channel grow together. Process of making a video Making and uploading a video takes two weeks. The members have to hold a meeting on Sundays to share their ideas on new content, and after that, they decide on a topic and begin writing a questionnaire for the interviewees. “When a Lion Goes to School” team recruits guests through social media, they first begin by uploading a form asking for volunteers that match with the theme of the video for that week. They then contact the guests, find the right schedule, and ready themselves to film by completing the questionnaire with 9 to 10 questions and finalize a written script that helps emcee the whole process. They edit the video using photoshop, captions, background music, and special effects. Then the video is uploaded that weekend. The filming of the video in a studio (Photo courtesy of "When a Lion Goes to School") As one of the more memorable times since starting this channel, in one of the early videos titled, “Hanyang University Culture Sock!,” the crew had to look for exchange students from foreign countries but did not know how. They started to look in Hanyang Plaza, a global lounge of Sarang-bang, the lobby of the International Building, the amphitheater, and so on. Exchange students who joined the interview later thanked the crew for making a memorable experience for them in Korea. For a future video, the crew hopes to interview graduate students who have successfully found their position in society. "We want to loosen up the seriousness that the topic of employment brings and make a helpful mentor video for undergraduates,” said Choi. Future goals “When a lion goes to school” team would first like to grow into a channel that all students in Hanyang University are aware of. They would then like to widen their target viewers and share the stories of college students in general. “One common wish that all crew members share is that we hope the channel will continue on even after the starters of this channel graduate and leave. That is our strongest wish.” Said Choi Ee-rae. Warm hearted comments that students from Hanyang University wrote on the initial videos are still remembered by the crew members. One comment said that these videos could be the competitive edge for our school. “Thank you for giving us great support. I don’t wish for much but I hope you keep watching our videos with open hearts.” The crew members of "When a Lion Goes to School" (Photo courtesy of Choi) Kim Hyun-soo soosoupkimmy@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Kang Cho-hyun

2018-12 10

[Alumni]Passing the 41st Actuaries Examination

The new International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS17) will be implemented for insurance companies by 2022, which will change the debt evaluation standard from a prime cost to a market price. This means more actuaries are in need in order to prevent an increase in debt and reduction in capital for insurance companies. Under such conditions, a banner that congratulated those who passed the 41st actuaries examination at the ERICA campus put a smile on many. Two students among the three listed are among the first accepted from the Department of Actuarial Science. (From left) Kim Bo-geun (Department of Actuarial Science, 4th hear), Seo Ye-ji (Department of Actuarial Science, '17), and Joo Hyung-min (Master's Degree in Insurance and Finance) The first-round exam scores out of a 100, and all subjects except English must be above 40 points with the average being above 60 in order to pass. Those who passed the first round exam are qualified to take the second round exam within the next 5 years, including the year that they passed the first exam. All 5 subjects must achieve a score of 60 or higher in order to pass the final exam. The first-round exam consists of 5 subjects: The first subject includes insurance contract law, insurance business acts, and employee retirement benefit security act. The rest are insurance mathematics, principles of economics, accounting principles, and English, which is a subject that can be replaced by official English test scores. In the first-round exam, Kim Bo-geun and Seo Ye-ji both found accounting difficult because they usually study the subject by writing out descriptive answers to problems, whereas the exam had multiple choice questions. They repeatedly practiced solving various questions and tried to memorize the format. The subjects covered in the second-round exam are actuarial risk management, actuarial mathematics, pension science, actuarial model theory, and lastly, financial management and financial engineering. The interviewees all agreed that financial management and financial engineering was the toughest part to study. “You only need a 100 in order to pass the exam, but the examination covers 300,” said Kim Bo-geun. Seo Ye-ji (Department of Actuarial Science, ’17) and Joo Hyung-min (Master's Degree in Insurance and Finance) prepared for the exam while working at an insurance company, and Kim Bo-geun (Department of Actuarial Science, 4th year) is currently attending the last semester before his early graduation and has already found a position at an insurance company. Seo and Kim began to learn more about what an actuary does when they were sophomores in college, and the department of Actuarial Science actively supported the career paths of students in becoming actuaries. The interviewees emphasized that becoming an actuary gives you pride that you have a specialized job. As for their struggles for the exam, Kim said he did not go through a slump, thanks to the timely trips that he took once in a while, and an hour of daily exercise that helped him stay healthy inside and out. Seo prevented any slumps by trying not to be shaken by her emotions and having enough sleep. Joo agreed that he was not stressed much during the exam preparation period. He said that he had fun studying for the Society of Actuaries (SOA), which is an American actuaries exam because it felt as if he was studying English. “The passing of the SOA exam was a big motivation for me to do better in the Korean actuaries exam.” The SOA exams cover a lot of content that the Korean exam is tested on. All three of them passed the SOA exam as well. Although there are unexpected fluctuations in actuaries exams each year, the exam is gradually becoming easier. A total of 124 people passed the exam this year, which is 62 more people than last year. Studying for the exam is important, but business practice and work experience is what gives you an advantage when looking for a job, said Seo Ye-ji. “I was surprised at first by the gap between the real work and the things I studied. Company work is much more complicated than just finding an answer in a book. I recommend you to look for work experience whether it is part time work or working as an intern at a company. You need to have an idea of how things work around here.” Seo Ye-ji went on to say that she wants to thank the school and the professors for making a department that majors in actuarial science and for building an atmosphere where students could effectively chase a dream of becoming an actuary. Kim Hyun-soo soosoupkimmy@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Kang Cho-hyun

2018-12 04

[Alumni]Onestar on a Steady Rise

BTS, TWICE, Super Junior – these are only a few of the K-pop idol groups that enjoy global attention. Before influencers became a thing, becoming an idol was one of the top dreams of young Korean teenagers. However, as many have tried, it is extremely hard to pass through cut throat competitions, let alone hit the charts with a song loved and supported by the public. Lim Han-byul (Department of Information Sociology, ERICA campus, '15) was one of the exceptional cases that proved that years of hard work and a sprinkle of talent can get you to places. Ever since Lim was young, he had a strong passion for singing. Naturally, he wanted to become a singer and was officially able to become a trainee at the age of 19. Luckily for Lim, he was able to make his debut in just a year as the main vocal in an idol group called “Monday Kiz.” “My trainee period wasn’t that long as it only took me a year to debut. I don’t think I was that good, but I’m guessing they saw some potential in me. The group also needed a main vocalist, so I was lucky. Of course, life as a trainee and a student wasn’t easy. I had to take many breaks from school because the training itself was strenuous." “I've worked so hard to earn my nickname as a 'vocal-textbook,' and I will always strive to do so.” Lim Han-byul (Department of Information Sociology, ERICA campus, '15) (Photo courtesy by Most Contents) After five years of his life as an idol, Lim made the decision to stand out as a solo artist. On his first few attempts during practice, he realized how difficult it was to finish one song. “After years of on-stage experience, I never thought finishing one song by myself would be a problem. It hit me hard that I was basically formulated into singing as a group member, not a solo artist. It took me a year or two just practicing until I finally got on track. That’s also when I started my YouTube channel,” said Lim. Lim's cover on M.C THE MAX - No Matter Where (Video courtesy of Lim's YouTube channel) Lim is not only known as an ex-member of Monday Kiz, but also as a YouTuber with over 157 thousand subscribers. “I think it was around 2015 when I opened my channel. Back then, YouTube hadn't gained its popularity yet, and there weren’t that many covers on it either. I wasn’t looking for fame. I was simply looking for a platform where I could share my progress with my fans, and YouTube seemed like a great opportunity,” said Lim. As an interesting fact, 97 percent of Lim’s viewers are known to be male. To this fact, Lim commented, “I think it’s because I mostly sang pieces that guys would like. I don’t think I’m the best singer out there so they see how hard I try and feel that vicarious satisfaction. Some also practice with me.” “Multiple failures actually made me stronger. I was able to make many valuable artist friends and focus on studying music." (Photo courtesy of Lim) Lim is also an acknowledged and steady-growing singer-songwriter as well as a vocal guide. He was known for having participated in numerous songs of V.O.S., JYJ, Sunnyhill, Super Junior, NCT Dream and many more. “I didn’t have anything to lose. After Monday Kidz disbanded, I started from the very bottom again and worked as a trainer and a vocal guide. Right now, I am working with Mono Tree, a global music production and publishing company also known for working with a lot of SM artists. My new digital single, “The Way to Say Goodbye” is also with that company,” said Lim. “I'm trying to find the right balance as a singer and a songwriter. My experience as an artist in such broad fields has taught me how to look at the bigger scheme of things over the years and to think from a staff member's perspective." “The Way to Say Goodbye” is a song that depicts the story of a person on his way to end his relationship. As it is Lim’s first digital single, it took a special place in his heart. According to Lim, since he is not a genius, he gets his inspiration after hours of focusing, contemplating, and editing. His new single was also a product of many weeks of listening to numerous “good” music on top of a rough sketch that fairly reflects his turbulent twenties. Lim plans on releasing his next single album early next year. Despite the continuous build-up of success as a solo artist, Lim was astonishingly humble. Throughout the interview, he did not stop mentioning how much he needed to improve. When asked if such manner of speech could indirectly bring negative influence on his self-respect, Lim chuckled and said, “I am the type of person to easily feel proud and maybe even a bit conceited. If you really think about it, I had years of experience as an idol, as a vocal trainer, a guide, and a singer-songwriter. But this is also because I had failed as an idol which left me in a place to keep pushing myself. In my case, there’s only a fine line between failure and success. The moment I think I’m actually doing great, I start slacking off and be well on my way to failure again.” "Good music is whatever sounds good to you." (Photo courtesy by Lim) “We all have different values, so I don’t really believe in giving advice. However, there is one thing I do want to say and that’s to get your priorities straight, and act upon it accordingly. Don’t be afraid to make mistakes because opportunities do come and when they do, make sure to take it.” The Way to Say Goodbye - Onestar / Lim Han-byul (Video courtesy by Lim's YouTube channel) Hee Jae - Lim Han-byul Cover (Video courtesy by Lim's YouTube channel) Mono Tree's Facebook Page Most Contents (Lim's management company) Park Joo-hyun julia1114@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Lee Jin-myung