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2017-11 13

[Alumni]88 Ways of Speaking: To Keep Myself

“Tigers die and leave their skins: People die and leave their names.” This is a famous proverb that points a great master’s name that lives on. Son Hwa-shin (Korean Language & Literature, ’09) as a high school student thought she also wanted to pass her name down, especially through her writing. “The idea that you eventually die, but your work lives for eternity is so fascinating,” said Son, with her eyes glowing with enthusiasm. News H met Son, a beginning essayist who just published her first book through Daum Kakao’s amateur writing platform, ‘brunch beta’. "I wish to write an essay that can be called a masterpiece." “He was a person who knew exactly what he wanted.” Son always had a passion for writing, and that led her to major in Korean language and literature. Nevertheless, she did not realize that writing can also be a breadwinning career. While having a minor identity crisis, Son went to an exhibition to clear her head during the summer of 2015. That is when she read the quote: “He was a person who knew exactly what he wanted.” “I was genuinely stunned by the words,” said Son. That was the moment when she realized that the root of her crisis starts from ignorance of her own wills. Son said what comes between ‘I am just a’ and a period truly represents oneself. Son thought ‘writer’ fills her blank. "I am just a _____ ." What fills your blank? Luckily enough, she encountered the notice for ‘brunch project’ online which promised its first-place winner with an opportunity to publish his or her book through Kakao. “This is it,” thought Son. She wanted the blue ribbon so bad to quit her job and focus on writing. “It would be a lie if I say I was never worried, but I had faith. The blue ribbon felt like mine, and I wanted to turn my life around with this award,” mentioned Son. However, life gave her a lemon. She did not make it to the first place but to second. Son, however, turned it into a lemonade instead. Second-place, unlike the first, is awarded with some funds to support the writer to publish a book on one's own. The process of writing a book proposal, sending them to several dozens of publishers, and having meetings taught her a lot. “Come to think of it, I feel lucky to win the second-place instead of first,” reminisced Son. The book 88 Ways of Speaking: To Keep Myself (2016). Click the image to purchase the book. (Photo courtesy of Sam and Parkers) Writing as a way to love oneself Son’s book ’88 Ways of Speaking: To Keep Myself (2016)’ contains 88 brunch posts that tell everyone to ‘talk like oneself’. “I felt like in this fast-changing world, people keep losing and forgetting who they are. In that context, I perceive life as battle to keep who you are.” Son strongly asserted that in order to talk like yourself, you first have to know yourself, which can be accomplished through writing. For most of the people who are afraid of writing due to various reasons, Son recommends them to write about what you like. It might lighten your burden by writing on an external subject, but in the end, all writings encompass the thoughts and logic of the writer. Once you get used to writing, Son emphasizes having one’s own style is also important. Left is Amedeo Modiglian's 'Portrait of Jeanne Hebuterne in a large hat (1918)', and the right piece is Edvard Munch's 'The Scream(1893)'. Both paintings uncover the essence through distortion. (Photo courtesy of Wikipedia) Wanting to have excellence in writing, Son also studiously develops her own writing style. She aims at highly connotative, contextual writings through writing less. “I often think of art when I write,” said Son. Amedeo Modigliani or Edvard Munch reveals the essence of a subject not through depicting it in a realistic and specific way, but rather through simplifying and distorting it. Son also enjoys adding her literary touch to her news articles. “If you think of an article, it feels cold and simply informative. But an article can ironically provide a better understanding through literary approaches,” mentioned Son. This technique is called ‘not tell but show’. For instance, Son could simply write ‘the reporter met actor Hong at a café in Samchung-dong’, but by adding ‘a café with a beautiful chandelier’, readers can instantly picture the place where the interview took place. Son is a young dreamer with an affection and enthusiam for writing. Son definitely plans to publish more essays in the future. “I’ve never really thought of myself as an essayist, but by being called as one, I am even more motivated to write more essays,” said Son with excitement. Throughout the interview, Son turned into a young dreamer whenever she talked about her writing. With such passion and diligence, News H is looking forward to reading more of her works. To catch up what has already been uploaded, click HERE. Kim So-yun dash070@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Choi Min-ju

2017-11 13

[Student]Giving Motivation to Live

On the 18th to the 20th of October, a symposium was held by The Korean Society for Preventive Medicine. Four teams who passed the preliminary rounds were given a session to present their research in the Grand Hotel in Haeundae, Busan. Five students, Cho Seung-won (Medicine, 2nd year), Moon Seong-geun (Medicine, 2nd year), Lee Woo-yeon (Medicine, 1st year), Jin Yoo-hyeon (Medicine, 1st year) and Shin Ji-sook (Medicine, 1st year), proudly won the third prize in this symposium, with research named ‘Factors Affecting Suicidal Ideation of Univeristy Students: Based on a comparison to Their Non-University-Attending Peers‘. News H met three of these students- Cho, Lee and Jin- in a quiet café, early in the morning, to hear more about their unique experience. Contrary to the graveness of their paper, they brightened up the whole cafe during the interview. Enthusiasm combined in a single paper Almost all of the university students who major in medical science go through a subject named "preventive medicine". In order to study this subject, they use textbooks made by The Korean Society for Preventive Medicine. This society, therefore, holds a symposium every year with a purpose to return their profits to the students. This year, the 70th symposium was held with a theme of ‘From cure to prevention of illness, a paradigm shift of national health promotion fund strategy’. Various university students form teams and submit papers related to the topic, and only four teams receive a chance to present their research on the spot. The team consisting of five Hanyangians received this chance and explained their paper on the suicides of the 20’s, which was an area where a lot of research has been lacking. “We first met each other in a suicide prevention club made for students in Seoul majoring in medical science,” reminisced Cho. They visited mental health centers to help those in need and persistently studied these areas. This gave them the motivation to participate in this symposium together. They were so enthusiastic in their research that they devoted the majority of their vacation into their research. Although Hanyangians majoring in medicine only have three to five weeks of vacation, this team met constantly for two weeks to proceed their research. They studied the factors of the 20’s suicides by analyzing statistics by themselves. As a result of their diligent effort, they could present unique research and also receive a great outcome. Cho gave a great presentation that led to a successful result. (Photo courtesy of Lee) The 20’s suicides: out of the government’s picture Their paper did not have an easy theme to proceed with. There had been a lot of research on the reasons of suicides in various ages groups such as teenagers and the elderly. However, this team found out that there was not enough information on the people who just stepped into the society. The ‘adult’ category defined by the government contained ages from the 20’s to the 40’s, and these Hanyangians felt that this category couldn’t fully explain the reasons for 20’s suicides. Throughout their research, they concentrated on the difference between the people who entered university and the people who didn’t. Even within the same age group, the students were concerned the two parties would have different thoughts as they go through vastly different experiences, such as jobs or personal relationships. They, therefore, analyzed the social survey of the National Statistical Office. “We made an exemption on all of those who had any experience in a university. We, therefore, had four different groups: by their gender and their experience in university,” commented Lee. They came to a conclusion that there was a visible difference between these groups on the ratio of people who had ever thought about suicide. “Females who didn’t go to university ranked the highest percentage for suicidal thinking at 11 percent, while men who went to university ranked the lowest at 3.5 percent,” explained Lee. As proud Hanyangians After their symposium, they are now making a brief plan for their follow-up study. Jin explained, “We are curious if this difference we found had the same traits in the past. This party itself has not been focused on in previous studies, so we are just making an abstract frame.” They, indeed, are busy students studying medicine, but they still find a way out to pursue what they want. “Me and Yoo-hyeon also participate in a book club, and all of us try to attend all seminars associated with preventive medicine. It might look tough, but it’s simply something we do to relieve our academic stress,” chuckled Lee. "We wish the prejudice on mental health clinics could change over time." They seemed confident and enthusiastic in their field of research throughout the whole interview. However, they also had their deep, personal concerns. “As I started this research, I felt uncertain if I could practically represent those facing hardships. Generally, most students in our major live a fortunate life with less economic concerns. We, sometimes, feel the burden that we might not be able to estimate their situations as much. I just want to let other people know that there are still people like us who truly care about them,” commented Cho. These students will continue working for their own goals, and they will succeed in motivating others to live. On Jung-yun jessica0818@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Choi Min-ju

2017-11 06

[Alumni]Blocks of Opinions Making the Hall of Fame, Glowpick

The cosmetic market in Korea has been booming for a long time, releasing numerous new brands and products. Unlike in the past, where ‘road shop products’ and ‘department store products’ had a clear division in their quality and price, many consumers are now lost in the wide array of choices available. CEO of GLOWDAYZ, Kong Jun-sik (Journalism & Mass Communication, ’11) proposed a solution in this confusing era. Kong wanted to make Glowpick as a medium of wise cosmetics shopping for consumers. Honest reviews as road signs “Glowpick is a mobile application that provides information to consumers in the form of a ranking, 100 percent based on their reviews,” said Kong. Realizing the fact that people are lost in the sea of information, Kong decided to collect reviews from ordinary people, the actual consumers of makeup. “Making a choice must have been difficult, especially when many beauty shows or blogs have accepted paid advertisements in order to flourish, without providing straightforward suggestions” lamented Kong. Therefore, unlike many review applications, Glowpick does not sensor customer reviews, even if they may seem extreme or contain swear words. Kong mentioned that he wants to create a comfortable environment as if the users are talking to their friends offline. The standard of a ‘good cosmetic product’ may differ for every person and every beauty application. Some value the components, and others value the professional’s opinion. In Glowpick’s case, Kong believes the product that has been recommended the most by the largest number of people is the best product. That is why Kong had striven to collect more than 2 million frank opinions from the past. Through such effort, Kong was able to bring the attention of major brands and marketing operators on the importance of consumer reports. “Now we can process and provide the information to cosmetic companies so that they can consider the public opinion in developing new products,” said Kong, proudly. A screen capture of the Glowpick (Photo courtesy of Glowpick) Now more than just a ranking application When the two reporters from News H had congratulated him on making Glowpick’s first offline store in Shinsegae Gangnam, Kong waved his hands with modesty. Now GLOWDAYZ has made its first step in the offline distribution channel, but Kong has bigger dreams. “It’s only part of the plan,” said Kong. The ultimate goal of the company, he mentioned, is to equip its own distribution channel. He aims to develop Glowpick to provide accurate information that fits with individual skin type, and the consumers can conveniently purchase the product without having to leave the application. Behind all the glowing success, Kong has experienced two times the bitter failures. Kong first grew his interest in IT business in his first job at a media company. Media trend at that time was changing from traditional newspapers to mobile news, so Kong created new media contents in the company. Then, after graduation, Kong started his own venture both in Korea and in the States. “Both didn’t really work out too well for various reasons. But thinking back, those experiences became stepping stones for me,” recalled Kong. He also asserted that Korean society has to be more open to failures. "That way, more people, including the younger generation, should feel safer to bring their ideas into the world, which they should. I myself wouidn't be able to overcome the obstacles I faced," said Kong with a warm smile. The offline store of Glowpick in Shinsegae Gangnam (Photo courtesy of Glowpick) Kim So-yun dash070@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Kim Youn-soo

2017-11 05

[Alumni]Sound of the Regional Idiosyncrasies

Pansori is a genre of Korean musical storytelling performed in a duet by a vocalist and a drummer. The vocalist or the singer is called the sorikkun, and the drummer is called the gosu. The term pansori is a derivation of two words pan and sori, meaning a place where many people gather and sound, respectively. Kim Ji-hee (Department of Traditional Korean Music, ‘96) is a sorikkun who never hesitates to go to a pan where she can hear new sori. Having moved to the countryside to explore the undisclosed sori of the elderly, Kim has been accumulating unrecognized sori of the people from the Gangwon-do Province and has performed on a stage on the first day of November. New place, new sound The title of the concert was “Walking on a Path”, which connotes multiple aspects of Kim’s life and the paths that she has been walking on. The concert, consisting of 10 songs Kim composed from the sori she gathered while staying close to the people of Gangwon-do Province, speaks for Kim’s life as a sorikkun. After graduating from Hanyang, Kim spent busy days engaging herself in various musical dramas, traditional Korean outdoor performances (madangnori), and musicals. A pivotal point in her busy life that diverted her path was at the age of 30 when Kim moved down to Gangwon-do Province and married her farmer husband, after which she experienced and discovered the true charm of rural sounds carried by the elderly. As she spent her life in this new place, Kim had plenty of opportunity to approach rural area sounds, from the elderly Kim worked side by side with on the farm. Picking up the lines of work songs that the locals sang and collecting the idiosyncratic facets of the music, Kim acquainted herself with the true sori of the rural area and decided that she would dedicate her life as a sorikkun to preserve and propagate the endangered, beautiful sound of the people. “It’s truly pitiful how this unique style of sound is disappearing, as more and more elderly pass away without leaving a record of them. As a sorrikun, I believe my role is to get myself familiar with their sori and produce music so that people can recognize them,” remarked Kim. "I found myself pursuing happiness that was driven by giving the elderly enjoyment." The path of one’s life The title of the concert, “Walking on a Path” has a special meaning to it, which is associated with Kim’s life. The path refers to her life path, which has been varying in its direction. “I sometimes look back and wonder if I’m walking on the right path. But I think believing that you are on the right road and continue moving forward is the goal of life. On this path of my life so far, I’ve met many different people and their sori, all of which I have wanted to compile in my songs.” Everyone has their own path in life, and Kim wanted to convey the message that pursuing a dream from one's heart is the essence of life. Kim felt a different kind of happiness when she saw the smiles on the faces of the elderly after performing in front of them, which was different from the round of applause she had received after performing in a big theater. The candy that an old lady gave and a can of Sprite the other offered meant a lot to her. “I’ve felt the uniqueness of this happiness through my life in Gangwon-do Province. There are too many sorikkun who can flawlessly perform Chunhyangga and Shimchungga, the representative pansori songs. I believe doing the sori is the best path for my life.” "Doing what I can is the right direction for my life path." (Photo courtesy of Kim) Jeon Chae-yun chaeyun111@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Kim Youn-soo

2017-10 31

[Alumni]Introducing the Mastermind Behind the Prime Lounge Project

In celebration of the construction of the Prime Lounges in the Hanyang ERICA Campus, News H interviewed the mastermind behind the many lounges enthusiastically used by the students of the campus. Park Euna (Industrial Design, '04), led a one-person design firm called Design EU, passionately pursuing her calling for design. Park runs a single-person interior architecture firm. Designing her alma mater Her first step in designing her old school began when the LINC+ Foundation, requested the design of the Knowledge Factory in 2012. The construction, with the purpose to facilitate start-up ideas, was such a success that it was expanded to “Knowledge Studio” in 2014. This served as the next step in the relationship. It was generally unusual for a school to focus on the design of its interiors. Nevertheless, it was a small beginning that she was happy to take part of. Then, she took charge of the Prime Lounge Project for the development of the student environment. For the last two years, she has designed lounges for various department buildings. She did not have this type of environment as a student and felt great empathy to the cause--providing a better studying environment for students. A crucial purpose of the project was to move the students, who usually studied in cafes, into the campus by providing a similar environment. In designing different lounges, her goal was to understand and utilize the unique characteristics of each department. She wanted to provide diversity to the students. For every project, there were key words such as ‘expansion’, ‘expression’, ‘change’, and so on. The lightings and space design were done with these concepts in mind. In retrospect, Park views the project as a fresh and stimulating experience. She jokingly added that it was exciting just to be back on campus as it had been nearly 10 years since her graduation. Park emphasized that she never turned down a new opportunity. The journey to starting a one-person firm Park had a clear purpose since her university years. She considers herself lucky to have had the calling and environment. She sought a job that she could have fun and learn. After working in a domestic design company for five years, she felt the necessity to find her own color and voice in her designs. Thus, she took all of her savings and went to New York in 2008 with the purpose to learn, relax, and find inspiration. According to Park, she had studied straight through college, eager to begin her career, but she suddenly felt the need to pack things up and leave. New York was different in that she was more respected as a professional despite her lack of English proficiency. The fact that her initial plans for a project came out exactly how she had intended showed that her views in design were highly reputed. This was not so common in Korea, where the clients are considered to be the “king” or the ultimate decision makers. However, despite her freedom to create, one limitation that she felt while working in New York was that she did not have enough time to study. She eventually returned to Korea to satisfy her thirst for learning and proceeded to a graduate program in Hanyang soon after her return. She never had the idea of running a firm in mind, but as she began to receive numerous project proposals, it just seemed natural to do so. The realization that she could make others truly happy through her work was a big influence on her decision. The name of her firm, Design EU, stands for the reason for her designs, as well as the message that every design has a reason and purpose. Philosophy and advice Park believes that there is a right time for everything. She advises students, “Don’t try to extend your status as a student. You can always come back and study. You can learn much more when you realize the reason and purpose for studying.” For her, going to New York, proceeding to graduate school, and starting her firm all came as natural; it was always the “right time” to do so. One affirmation she had was that the purpose of her life was to design, and the purpose of her design was to spread happiness. This provided a firm ground for all of her decisions. "Nothing is easy. Every aspect of it has a process. Just know this: If you persist, anything is really impossible. Also, don’t stay in one place. Knock on doors, travel, and grab opportunities." Lee Chang-hyun pizz1125@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Kim Youn-soo, Kang Cho-hyun

2017-10 31

[Faculty]Celebrating the “Beautiful Foundation”

“I happened to be” was a phrase often referred to by Professor Ye Jong-seok (Business Administration) in his effort to remain humble when asked about his long list of achievements. Nevertheless, the array of awards and appreciation plaques that filled the shelves of his office gave more than a hint of just how valued he was by countless people and organizations. One of his most distinguished achievements is the co-establishment and nurturing of the “Beautiful Foundation.” The foundation, with its purpose of being the development and proliferation of a charity culture, was founded in 2000. The once small organization with nothing but a calling for charity has now grown to a massive institution that spends 3.1 billion won a year on public projects. Ye was a part of the foundation since its establishment and has been serving as the chairman of the board from 2012 to this day. Ye attending a ceremony of "The Beautiful Foundation" (Photo courtesy of Dong-hwa) Re-establishing the Korean charity culture Ye picked out Dale Carnegie as the epitome of American charity culture. Deeply drawn to his philosophy and legacy, Ye described how Carnegie practiced what he preached, spending his lifetime fortune to give back to society by building 2500 libraries, countless foundations, and a university. Inspired by Carnegie, entrepreneurs such as John Rockefeller, Henry Ford, and George Soros followed in his footsteps to bring about the height of American charity. Ye desired to reenact this kind of culture in Korea. The concept of donations in Korea is in strict contrast to that of the United States in many ways. For example, most of the donations in Korea are made through corporate donations, whereas most donations are made privately in the US. Furthermore, these promises of donations from domestic conglomerates are rarely carried out. This a fundamental flaw in terms of the Korean charity culture. Thus, Ye sought to change the sources of donation from a small number of large donors to a large number of small donors. The structure of the Beautiful Foundation was designed by benchmarking the community foundations in the US. At the time, the concept of foundation had a negative image in Korean society, seen as a means of tax evasion during the chaebols inheritance process. Needless to say, the Beautiful Foundation had to start from rock bottom. Not only have they had a negative perception, but people were also hesitant to donate to an infant organization with no credentials. A turning point for the initial hardship of the foundation was the donation from an elderly lady named Kim Boon-ja. Kim was a victim of sexual slavery in the era of Japanese imperialism and had donated her 50 million won worth of compensation money that she had received as a form of indemnification to the Beautiful Foundation. This donation of immense value served as a seed capital to establish a foundation that has collected over 50 billion won during the past 17 years. Another obstacle that the foundation had to overcome was the underlying conflict between charity organizations and conglomerates when it came to donation. In such circumstances, Ye utilized his experiences and acquaintances in both of these areas to facilitate an atmosphere of cooperation. Ye expressed deep passion for the desire to change the Korean charity culture. (Photo courtesy of The Hankyoreh) Personal philosophy and drive Aside from his hardships in restructuring the Beautiful Foundation to rely less on a small number of large conglomerate donations, Ye had faced numerous obstacles during his years of studying abroad and contemplation on his career path. After having served in over 100 corporate and non-profit organization, Ye claims with full confidence that the key to success is doing what you love: “I enjoy doing things I love. Obviously, I avoid taking roles that I dislike. Taking up a job that you hate will literally make you ill.” As if to prove his point, Ye, well into mid-sixties, seems robust and full of energy. Genuinely interested in liberal arts, he takes his free time to devote himself to an array of fields, such as cuisines, art, and even sports. One example would be his affection for skiing. Having been a devoted fan for the past 50 years, his involvement in skiing to “take a break” has led him to become a key member of the upcoming Winter Olympics. Upon his retirement in the coming year, he plans to lead a “new life” devoted to his pursuit of full-time writing. The shelves on Ye's office were stacked with photos depicting a variety of activities. Advice Ye expressed concerns for the next generation. The Fourth Industrial Revolution, said to bring about rapid and fundamental changes, surpasses the total impact of change seen in the society for the past two decades. About 65 percent of existing jobs are expected to disappear. In this approaching era of unprecedented change, Ye underlined the importance of students’ discretion in choosing a career path. At the request for advice to students, Ye bluntly answered, “Choose a goal, and work extremely hard.” Above all, he emphasized the importance of choosing the right goal. His definition of a “right” goal was something that can provide joy. “It’s hard to lead a healthy life doing something you dislike. Find something you can commit your life to,” expressed Ye. Lee Chang-hyun pizz1125@hanyang.ac.kr Photo by Chae Guen-baek

2017-10 30

[Alumni]Discovery on the Beauty of Imperial Wallpapers

Changdeokgung Palace Complex is a landmark of Korea built in the Joseon Dynasty and is currently designated as a UNESCO (the United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization) World Heritage site. The world has been captivated by the beauty of the palace’s outlook and Confucian values inherent in the architecture. However, one thing that all architects omitted was the wallpaper and its values. Chang Soon-yong, (Architectural Engineering,'72) has displayed his past collection of imperial wallpapers at the “Act Facing Act” exhibition hosted by artist Yeon Ki-baek to underscore the importance of royal wallpapers that are rare and novel to the architectural history. Chang is an expert in papering architecture study of Korean royal palaces. Time to restore dignity Chang has spent his entire life devoting his passion to architecture, especially in the royal papering area. The interest stemmed from his 1973 field investigation on Unhyeongung Palace after graduation. “I have read in the Joseon Dynasty’s uigye (royal protocols) that there were more than 70 different kinds of wallpapers used for royal palaces. However, the restored version of palaces these days only utilized hanji (Korean traditional paper made of mulberry trees) with no distinctive characteristics, and I began to wonder what the past wallpapers were like,” explained Chang. At the site investigation, Chang fortunately received a sample of a royal wallpaper about to be discarded. “I macerated the sample inside the bathtub with warm water and discovered that there are more than 10 papers stacked and repapered to forge plywood like walls,” said Chang. Chang’s passion for royal wallpapers was augmented as he carried out more site explorations. He received samples from Changdeokgung Palace Complex maintenance work and and Deoksugung Palace and researched the roots, papering method, and patterns of the wallpapers that were about to be deserted. “The most impressive discovery I found in the piles of paper dumps was the Yongbongmun pattern (Korean traditional pattern of dragons and phoenix) that was mentioned in the uigye, but has never been spotted,” said Chang. Chang's data on imperial wallpapers is displayed at Amado Art Space. Chang has always hoped that the Korean architectural society and the government would be concerned with even the small part of architecture--papering. He has been working excessively hard in the field to promote the importance of royal wallpapers, but the governmental authority has denied his efforts. “I realized that papering may not be considered vital for official authorities. But, this is a shame in that World Heritage palaces have anachronously monotonous papering after all,” said Chang. This concern has led Chang to allow artist Yeon to utilize his past collection to display the importance of imperial papering. Attention for the indifference In order to restore the dignity of grand palaces built in the Joseon Dynasty, Chang collected samples out of dumps in every field investigation he went on. “I was shocked when the government official visited my office for advice to reconstruct Changdeokgung Palace five years ago. He told me that he is going to paper the walls with luxurious silk, and I was startled because the Joseon Dynasty’s Confucian places emphasized frugality,” explained Chang. The moment Chang realized that there is a deficient amount of data on royal papers, he decided to create his own data on them. However, Chang had to face a tragic moment when he favorably provided his data to an official in charge of reconstruction of Unhyeongung Palace. When the repair was finalized, the official lost all the data Chang had lent them. “Out of frustration, I wrote how I felt about that moment in my diary along with my decision to collect even more data on royal papering,” reminisced Chang. Currently, the diary is also displayed at Yeon’s exhibition along with his collection of imperial papers. Chang's diaries are displayed at the exhibition. The left was written on the day Chang found out about the loss of his data, and the right is on the papering method of Joseon Dynasty. Chang has an unusual family history in regards to architecture. His father was a professor at Hanyang University’s Department of Architecture while Chang’s son is also an architect. “I can guarantee that my family has devoted our life and passion to architecture. I hope our efforts will pay off with the public’s attention on royal papering and their preservation,” said Chang. Chang is rooting for the youth of Hanyang University to believe in their path. “Sometimes, all humans feel that the path they're walking on may be wrong. But, when your walk is not rooted from money but from passion, it will pay off one day,” advised Chang for the students of Hanyang University. Chang’s collection and diaries are displayed at artist Yeon Ki-baek’s exhibition at Amado Art Space. Kim Ju-hyun kimster9421@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Choi Min-ju

2017-10 25

[Faculty]Imperial Ambition through Bird’s Eye

Imagine that a bird is observing the world while flying over the sky. The holistic insight of a bird’s-eye view displayed at Hanyang University’s museum may overwhelm the audience. A bird’s-eye view designed and drawn by Hatsusaburo Yoshida during the Japanese colonization is evaluated as a creative and fresh masterpiece of the era. However, professor Han Dong-su and Seo Dong-chun of Far East Architectural History Lab have discovered that the vast coverage and amplification of specific geography behind the bird’s-eye view may imply the colonial ambition of Japan. The exhibition <Japan Draws the Ambition on Bird's-Eye View> is currently hosted at Hanyang University's museum. Ambitious bird flies over the world Bird’s-eye views drawn by Hatsusaburo Yoshida contains not only the geography of Japan, but also that of Korea, China, Europe, and further America. “It is hard to exactly beg the question that the intention behind this bird’s-eye view is for the colonial purpose due to the different stance between Korea and Japan. However, Korea’s assertion can be supported by several historical and architectural evidence,” said Seo. First point of focus is the view’s extensive, yet unnecessary coverage of geography. “Unlike the early views drawn in 1913, the 1922 view created during the peak of the Japanese Colonization era is peculiar in that the view resembles more of a world map conquered by Japan,” said Seo. The 1913 view has a narrow perspective of geography focusing only on Japan and the surrounding countries, while the 1922 view has an enormous spectrum of the world in Japan’s interest at the time. Bird's-eye view drawn by Yoshida pinpoints several colonial sites with extreme amplification. Another aspect to pay attention is from whom Yoshida received requests to draw more than 3,000 views. “We thought that if we discover who asked for these views, it can help explain the intention behind the map. The investigation was worth it because the client was the Japanese Railroad Administration, the key organization of colonization,” said Seo. In addition, Yoshida himself has arbitrarily served in the war in 1940, which supports the claim. “It is also eccentric that Yoshida magnified specific locations and buildings in the view, which were vital buildings to colonization, such as the Japanese Government General of Korea or shrines,” said Seo. Complementary history and architecture Far East Architectural History Lab has hosted several architectural history exhibitions including this year’s bird’s eye view. “Professor Han’s ultimate goal was to collect as much data on Korea’s architecture for his junior researchers that have been lost due to numerous wars and colonization.” Seo has been working with Han for 15 years to create the central historical axis of the three East Asian countires- Korea, Japan, and China. “Korea has lost a lot of historical reference on architecture despite the fact that our forefathers built great edifices. To restore all the data and develop future architecture in the sense of Korean traditional style, we must approach architecture in the perspective of the entire far east,” explained Seo. Three countries of the far east have been in close relationship since the early history. Through long-time interactions, cultures were exchanged including architecture, and the lab suggests that Koreans pay attention to Chinese and Japanese culture by analyzing the past interchanges. “Historical background of Korean architecture after the Japanese colonization is sometimes depressing in that we had to lose all the great work of our ancestors. However, it is now the time that we build a new beginning cheerfully,” said Seo. “Architecture is not just a building that we live in or see. It embodies the history, sorrow, happiness, and memories, and I wish all potential architects of Hanyang will polish up this holistic perspective.” Kim Ju-hyun kimster9421@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Kim Youn-soo

2017-10 23

[Student]Hanyang's Volleyball Player Stepping Up into the Pro Game

The 2017-18 season V League successfully started its first game on October 14th. The Skywalkers, the team of Hyundai Capital, also started off with a victory. In this sky-rocketing team, rookies were selected through a draft on the 25th of September, enjoying their first victory as a professional. Hong Min-gi (Division of Sports and Well-being, 5th year, the ERICA Campus), was selected by the Skywalkers as a center this day and is now living his life as a professional volleyball player. From Hanyang to Skywalkers Most players start their life as a professional through the draft. Seven pro volleyball teams in Korea pick their new team members in order, by placing a player’s name from the board to their own team’s board. Once the players are of age, they can freely participate in the draft according to their own will. “All players are extremely nervous during this process. Most of them look pale since this decides their life as a professional,” reminisced Hong. In this state of tension, Hong was proudly selected in the first round, by the Skywalkers, for his noticeable skills in blocking. He also added, “It still feels like I’m dreaming. My head is full of volleyball 24 hours these days.” Hong explaining his draft day experience Hong, now, stays together in the ‘Castle of Skywalkers’, a base camp in Cheon-an with his team members for training. As a rookie, he had to fit into a whole new environment with new people. “The team generally has a free atmosphere. I did feel afraid of the training before I entered the Skywalkers. However, after personally experiencing it, I realized I am training in a more effective way,” said Hong. It has not been long since the season started, so he explained that he is currently doing his best to blend well into the group. He constantly showed gratitude to his team members who helped him feel comfortable in a new environment. Hong also reminisced about his life in Hanyang University’s volleyball team. Hanyang University has been constantly participating in the universities’ volleyball leagues and is showing fine grades. 16 students participate in the volleyball team, and they practice enthusiastically. “It is definitely an outstanding team. Most players have talent, making the team expect development every day,” explained Hong. However, he also explained about his hardships. Since his major had classes on the ERICA campus, he and other students had to travel to the Seoul campus after classes ended. He remembered, “We had to put extra care into our health since it was a harsh schedule. But it was truly worth it.” Pictures of Hong in Hanyang university and the Skywalkers. (Photo courtesy of Hong) Life of volleyball Hong's volleyball career is comparatively shorter than that of other players. He first started volleyball when he was in high school, even though he initially prepared for a sports major. “I had no interest in my studies, leaving me with no decent choice of universities. My parents, looking at me doing nothing, recommended me to at least find a thing I can do consistently. That’s how I started volleyball.” After he started volleyball, he found not only an interest but also talent in volleyball. He loved practicing volleyball and was fascinated by it. He realized he started it way later than others, and therefore devoted more hours into volleyball. He would come earlier than others, and practice movements he wasn’t good at. His effort eventually did give him a wonderful result. Hong’s life, however, wasn’t all that ideal. To sports players, their body condition is crucial. Especially when a lot of jumping is required, the cruciate ligaments of a knee plays an important role. During a match in university, his cruciate ligament was ruptured when he bumped into another player. Moreover, this fact did not cause a major problem. Hong reminisced, “I was too arrogant with my body when I wasn’t supposed to. My body recovered better than others, so I ignored the precautions and continued playing games.” His cruciate ligament therefore ruptured again in the same year and came to a point when the doctor suggested him to quit volleyball. “I deeply thought about what I can truly enjoy other than volleyball that whole day. However, I came to a conclusion there is nothing other than volleyball that makes me happy and enthusiastic. The next day, I told my mother in earnest I would give it one last try.” This incident became a turning point to Hong. He also explained the fears that came along with an injury. “It’s not the injury itself that’s most threatening. It’s not the fact you can’t perform as well. The most threatening part is that you start making an excuse for why you shouldn’t try your best. You start self-justifying yourself and that’s actually the very problem a lot of the players quit after their injuries.” After he overcame his injuries, he is now back up again showing what he has. When asked for his happiest moment in his volleyball life, he didn’t pick a particular incident. “I am happy every single moment I play volleyball. I now have a job of what I like the most. Why should I have a particular moment?” smiled Hong. "I love every moment I play volleyball." Now, as a professional volleyball player, he is planning to do his best again in his status. “Most volleyball players wish to become a member of the national team, and that’s my final dream as well. It’s definitely not easy, but I want to be able to play games with the Taegeuk mark on my chest,” wished Hong. As he explained that volleyball is not a game that is decided by the individual abilities, he elucidated, "it is a sport with the power of unity that is the most emphasized since players have to sacrifice themselves for a better attack." He promised, “As a rookie, I want to show my liveliness and passion for the Skywalkers. I wish to be a player who can excel while fitting well into the team.” On Jung-yun jessica0818@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Park young-min

2017-10 16

[Student]Hanyangian Ballerina Blossoms Korean Dream on World Stage

There is an old saying that “ballet is like dreaming on your feet.” Kim Min-ah (Dance and Well-being, the ERICA campus, 4th year) has recently become the dream of South Korea, as she won the 2016 IDO World Ballet and Modern Jazz Championship. It was the first time in history that an Asian ballerina has taken the crown of the IDO (International Dance Organization). Currently, Kim received an Invitation to perform at the IDO World Gala (social occasion with special performances) in Poland. News H met Kim to hear her stories on the life-long desire for contemporary ballet and further hopes to achieve. Kim is last year's winner of the IDO World Ballet and Modern Jazz Championship. Destined dream of ballet It was in her third grade in elementary school that Kim first became intimate with dance. “All of my school friends were learning jazz dance at the moment. So I followed the trend and joined the club,” laughed Kim. After learning jazz dance for three years, Kim was informed about the beauty of ballet. “Even though I was learning and studying ballet, I felt like I was playing and dancing to the music with joy. That is when I thought ballet might be my destiny,” explained Kim. Kim was a gifted child with artistic talents. From music and dancing to art, Kim had tried out a variety of artistic subjects. However, the one that always interested Kim was ballet. “All the other subjects bored me out, except for one--ballet. Since ballet costs a lot for lessons, I decided that this would be my goal to dedicate all my passion into for good,” said Kim. Kim's performance at the IDO 2016 (Video courtesy of IDO) Kim is now majoring in contemporary ballet which is a genre that incorporates both classic ballet and modern dance. Expressing emotions that Kim felt in certain experiences or events often becomes the main theme of the performance. Usually, the choreographer sets specific dance movements to the music. However, the three minute long gala performance is choreographed by Kim herself. “The piece that I will perform at the gala is about the Syrian refuge crisis. The picture of a small child bleeding in the midst of war inspired me to perform the dance,” said Kim. Hopes to popularize ballet Despite her young age, Kim has numerous magnificent, grand titles such as ‘first in South Korea’ or ‘first Asian winner.’ However, with her family and friends rooting for her, Kim is not afraid of the pressure. “When I feel down, I try to walk around the city and empty my thoughts. After reminding myself of how important ballet is to me, and how everyone I cherish cheers for me, I can return to my original position and continue practicing,” said Kim. The biggest motivation of Kim to pour more ardor into ballet comes from the improvement of her dance. “When I see myself improving through video clips, I feel more energetic and passionate,” explained Kim. However, Kim is also worried that contemporary ballet is not popular among the public, and she feels the duty to convey the beauty of ballet to people. “I think it is also my responsibility to excel at all ballet contests so that I can let more Koreans to be aware of the beauty in it,” smiled Kim. "Improvement makes me more passionate, and passion leads to greater development." As a senior at Hanyang University (HYU), Kim is now preparing for a new path for her future. Her current dream is entering a dance company abroad to learn more on ballet in depth. “I was the fortunate girl to find my talents at a young age. I hope all of my fellow friends at HYU will also find the right path and feel the joy in it!” Kim Ju-hyun kimster9421@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Park Young-min