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2018-07 09

[Alumni]Woo In-chul, the Former Mayoral Candidate of Seoul

Although the importance of politics is well-known, it Is hard to see young Koreans actively and directly involved in the field. Former mayoral candidate of Seoul, Woo In-chul (Department of Molecular and Life Science, ERICA '12), unfolded his story of diving into politics soon after his graduation. Despite his major being rather unrelated to politics, Woo has always been interested in political issues regarding Korean youth, such as the 2011 Korean university tuition crisis. As a senior in 2011, Woo became actively involved in youth forums, debates and seminars that dealt with various problems that degraded the living standards of Korean youth. “I think being able to participate in politics regardless of your major, age, or background, is the fundamental aspect of having a democratic society. I wanted to become more directly involved in politics, so I decided to take action.” Woo In-chul (Department of Molecular and Life Science, ERICA '12) at the Woori Mirae office on June 6th, 2018. Woo strongly believed that as a democratic citizen, changes in our lives must be made through politics. Together with his friends, he formed the Youth Party in 2011. This wasn’t easy as they needed to gather at least 5,000 party members. They also needed a candidate, and Woo stepped up to take assume that role. Even after they successfully formed the party, there were more mountains to overcome as they needed a deposit of at least 15-million-won, in addition to other election campaign fees. “I didn’t run for the election to win. I at least wanted to spread the awareness that we, as young people of Korea have problems to solve, and should take matters into our own hands.” After the impeachment of former President Park, Woo decided that it was their chance to start an era of new politics where the young would be the main actors. This led to the formation of Woori Mirae (우리미래당), which is a developed version of the Youth Party. Many university students in Korea are still financially struggling to keep up with high tuition fees, living expenses, housing expenses and more. All the politicians who hadincluded such youth related issues in their campaign promises, seemed to completely forget about them after winning their elections. “It’s because it’s not their priority. That’s why we ourselves need to take action, because nobody else will do it for us,” said Woo. Woo protesting in the "youth tent" for the youth rental house project on April 21st . After running for the general election, Woo’s Party failed to receive enough votes and was forced to disband. However, this did not stop Woo from re-forming the party in 2017. “Our society needs to heal, and I believe this can be done through politics. Forming a party is not just a form of representation. It’s to try to change the policies, systems, institutions, and to give political hope to young people,” said Woo. He also noted that the majority of Korean politicians are from an older generation, which naturally creates a weaker bond of empathy with the younger generation. Although not saying that all politicians must be from the younger generation, he emphasized that most people fail to realize that youth issues are directly linked to societal issues and issues of all generations, due to lack of empathy. Recently Woo ran for the office of mayor of Seoul. He noted that he wanted to first and foremost ask the young Koreans, if they are doing well. The reality for youth is harsh as most take the first step into the society with heavy student loans and the struggles of keeping up with other expenses. This prevents them from challenging themselves and trying out new things, as they are so caught up with just trying to make ends meet. Woo re-emphasized how empathy is key here. “Empathy allows people to take an interest in others. We need that sort of interest because that’s where change starts. The spread of awareness and addressing of problems will lead to changes in policies in the long run. Other institutional changes will follow.” Woo hopes for the future of many young Korean "elites." After the elections, Woo is now a chair in the party, hosting various programs and sessions for not just youth but also for those from older generations as well, in hopes of creating a bond and fostering more understanding between generations. With four party representatives, the Woori Mirae will run for future elections with hopes of changing the political culture. “All those who are interested in social political issues, or trying to take action are "elites." I hope more of the current younger generation will become elites,” said Woo. Woori Mirae official website: http://makeourfuture.kr/%EC%86%8C%EA%B0%9C/#intro Park Joo-hyun julia1114@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Lee Jin-myung

2018-06 26

[Faculty]Increasing the Efficiency of Solar Batteries

Global warming is a clear threat to the human race. After long disputes over the validity of the phenomenon for nearly a quarter of a century, it has been revealed after an investigation of the fossil fuel industry that global warming is a real threat. The past scientific disputes had in fact been a result of interventions by the industry to protect their business. So what now? Aside from bringing justice to these corporations, one of the biggest assignments facing humanity is the creation of sustainable energy. For this task, the recent finding by Professor Park Jea-gun (Department of Electronic Engineering) has shed a new light of hope. Park Jea-gun (Department of Electronic Engineering) explains global warming. Simply put, Professor Park found a new way to improve the power conversion efficiency of our standard solar batteries. However, the process had been far from simple, and many complications had confronted Park on his journey. Solar power is among the few established sources of sustainable energy, which include tidal, wind, and hydraulic power. However, despite the research and development of solar batteries over the past 20 years, the highest power conversion efficiency, meaning the rate of the electrical energy that is converted from its original form, remained a staggering two percent. Park’s research had raised this rate to 4.11 percent. To give a brief explanation on the mechanics of solar energy, sunlight includes three types of rays: ultraviolet rays, infrared rays, and visible rays. These rays are projected in a form of waves, which are essentially energy. Currently, our solar batteries convert only visible rays, which is where Park began questioning a possible improvement. What Park did was to install quantum dots, a core semiconductor that is capped by an outer cell, on the silicone surface of the standard solar battery. A size smaller than 10 nanometers, quantum dots convert UV rays into visible rays, a process referred to as ‘energy-down-shift’. With this conversion, solar batteries could begin to convert a proportion of UV rays. An illustration of how a quantum dot converts UV rays for solar batteries (Photo courtesy of Park) This initial finding, published in 2014, improved the power conversion efficiency of solar batteries to three percent. Park was yet to be satisfied. Building on the scientific fact that the yield of energy from visible rays are greatest in the colors red and green, Park quickly moved to improve the new model. The problem was that the standard quantum dots converted UV rays to blue visible rays. Park resorted another process of quantum mechanics called ‘energy tuning’, which allowed the standard quantum dot to finally convert UV rays in a yellowish light, well between the rays of red and green. His new finding improved the power conversion efficiency to four percent. Now comes the final stage of Parks recent journey. Although his improvements to the standard solar battery was immensely significant, one flaw of his model was that it was composed of cadmium, a heavily regulated material. To make his model feasible for commercialized use, Park had to find a replacement for cadmium, which he found in a material called gallium. With his new improvement, Park’s research had been recognized and published in one of the most internationally renowned scientific journal, Advanced Energy Materials. Park’s research had been recognized and published in Advanced Energy Materials. As a word of advice to students aspiring to follow a scientific career, Park emphasized the importance of attitude. According to Park, the rate of development of scientific technology has grown exponentially within the past few decades. Students need to be aware of this, and needs to make an effort to follow recent discoveries and trending methods as opposed to focusing on traditional learning through textbooks. He also advised students to be well studied in software technologies, as they have grown much more significant in all domains of engineering. “The key is fundamental base, and a prepared attitude,” commented Park. Lee Chang-hyun pizz1125@hanyang.ac.kr Photo by Park Geun-hyung

2018-06 25

[Faculty]Childhood Inspiration Shared With Pupils

Some people have ‘that moment’ when they decide what career path to pursue. For Kim Eung-soo (Department of String and Wind Instruments), it was when he first listened to Mozart’s Violin Concertos when he was in elementary school. After about 30 years, Kim organized a concert with his students to play his childhood inspiration at Paiknam Art hall, on April 30th. Not a lot of concert play the entire concertos (comprised of five songs) in one occassion, as the pieces are long and very difficult to play. It is most likely that Kim’s performance was the first one in Korean musical history to play the whole set of songs at once. To perfect the songs, Kim and ensemble SOL practiced for two months for the concert. Kim Hyung-eun (String & Wind Instruments,4th year) mentioned “after this concert, preparing other songs and concerts felt whole lot easier.” Unlike other concerts, where there are separate team to organize the event, the performers had to do everything from advertising, contacting journalists and putting up posters on the wall. Kim Eung-soo (Department of String and Wind Instruments) is explaining about the meaning of ensemble SOL at Paiknam Art hall, on April 30th. The ensemble members all students of Kim, with 15 violin players. It is not common for a professor and students to play in a same concert, as there are unignorable gaps between the performers. What Kim wanted to make through the event is to make a “fence” for his students to keep in touch and to cooperate with eath other even after the graduation. Kim, the student, also agreed on the point commenting “through overcoming the hardships together, the performers became really close.” She also thanked her professor for making the concert possible. Kim graduated all three universities; University of Music and Performing arts Vienna, University of Music and Performing arts Gratz and Hannover Universty of Music, Drama and Media summa kum laude (first of class, meaning ‘with highest honor’ in English). However, despite of his awards and career, I could tell he is a very humble person through his remarks such as “I personally don’t think I am good enough to teach anyone,” “I am honored to participate in one of the most great things humanly possible, education.” Kim also emphasized that Hanyang University students have the necessary skills to become top musicians, so that they need to have more pride in our school and be more self-content. Kim and some of his students, namely Kim Hyung-eun, is participating in Korean Chamber Music Concert on coming 27th and 29th of June, at Seoul Arts Center. He also plans to make more events where he can harmonize with his students sometime next month. With the love and passion for both violin and his students, his plans seem bright. "Have more confidence" was the encouragement message Kim wants to give to his students. Kim so-yun dash070@naver.com Photos by Kang Cho-hyun

2018-06 25

[Faculty]Going Against Dominant Paradigms

Professor Eun Yong-soo (Department of Political Science and International Studies) recently published a new book, What is at Stake in Building "Non-Western" International Relations Theory?, this March, following his former book Regionalizing Global Crises which was released in 2016. Both writings were published by major publishers Routledge and Palgrave, respectively. Both publishers are renowned companies with their published writings being considered must-read materials within the field of diplomatic politics. Eun's recently published book What is at Stake in Building "Non-Western" International Relations Theory? focuses upon the existing dominant paradigms of the Western region, and how effective alternatives can be harmoniously placed from an Eastern perspective. This is going further in depth into the subject of his former book, which shed light on the theoretical backgrounds of such dominant paradigms and questioned whether the newly arising alternatives would provide an absolute replacement or act as a supplement to the existing theories. Professor Eun Yong-soo (Department of Political Science and International Studies) recently published his book What is at Stake in Building "Non-Western" International Relations Theory? In the book, Eun tries to provide solutions to the current dominant Western paradigms from the perspectives of other regions. Eun takes the stance that the existing dominant Western paradigms must be seen from an Eastern perspective, while finding harmonious frameworks in which the newly suggested theories can be applied to a non-Western culture. This goes against two extreme stances that the dominant Western paradigms are suitable from a global stance, whereas the other argues that the Western paradigms should be completely replaced with new theories that meet the needs of non-Western regions. "By taking a midway stance, I had to be ready to take the criticisms of both extreme perspectives," explained Eun during the interview. Eun also mentioned the strict evaluation process of the major publishers as a hardship while writing his recent book. Routledge and Palgrave, both being major publishers, which are highly sought-after by many writers in the field, have a strict examination process that goes over four major trials. They have a double blind review, which assures the anonymity of both the author and examiners in order to maintain an impartial examination process that is focused upon the proposed content only. As having two books published by these major companies has a significant meaning to him as a scholar within this particular field, Eun stated that awaiting the long trial process was a difficult task for him. When asked of his future plans, Eun answered that he is planning to conduct research upon the concept of emotion. He explained how the collective emotion of the public can represent a national sentiment and furthermore be used as a methodological tool for understanding international relations. From this perspective, understanding the formation and conversion process of a national sentiment can help the consolidation between nations, especially within the North-East Asian region. The whole premise of this research project began with an examination of the belief that emotion is an opposing concept of rationality, as it was long seen throughout history. Eun shared his research principles during the interview: continuously challenging and questioning the already accepted social norms, which goes alongside his newly planned research on collective emotion. Such thoughts go alongside with Eun's research principles, which put an emphasis upon challenging already accepted social norms. Most of his research started upon questioning whether the social norms that we have accepted are really right. He gave an example of how most of the Western paradigms were simply applied within the Korean context, yet Eun questioned this whole application process in the introduction of his recent research. He stated that, “As a professor and scholar, I believe that finding a hole within a box is my job. Widening and passing through this hole is a task that future students must fulfill.” Choi Seo-yong tjdyd1@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Park Kuen-hyung

2018-06 22

[Student]Singer, Student, and Star

Many of us have tuned in for Mnet’s Super Star K for several years now. One competitor on Super Star K 4 (2012) who made it to the top 12 chose to attend Hanyang University and is now preparing to graduate. News H met Lee Ji Hye (Applied Music, 4th year) on a sunny summer afternoon at an aesthetic café in front of ERICA campus. Lee, on June 20th. She was just like any other Hanyang student, happy for her semester to finally be over. Lee was 17 when she auditioned for Super Star K, and this was her first audition ever. Lee loved music, especially playing musical instruments such as classical piano and Cello. She also loved singing from a young age, but the dream of becoming a singer did not seem like an option for her due to her parents’ disapproval. Nevertheless, Lee stepped up and participated in the audition program, wanting to see how good she was. Lee definitely made a positive impression on the public with her singing. However, there were rumors and hateful comments as well - a harsh thing for a 17-year-old student to handle. “I have still never watched a single episode of the show. But I was able to get through the hard times with my mother’s support and her positivity. We used to laugh at the comments because while they were all very mean, they also praised my singing,” smiled Lee. Through the experience, she believes she has gotten stronger and more careful about talking about celebrities or even friends on the topic of unidentified rumors. Despite the harsh criticism she has received, Lee is thankful for the experience she had, especially the Super Star K Concert in Olympic Park, which was attended by an audience of several thousand people. The high school student grew up to become a mature artist and student at Hanyang who writes her own lyrics. Lee is now officially listed as a songwriter after her recent digital single, "No Spring After All" (2017). The emotional, sorrowful lyrics are partly based on her experiences during college, especially the lessons she learned through break-ups, she had through break-ups. Lee mentioned that “the hardest part while writing a song was to confine my thoughts into a fixed melody. I didn’t want to write lyrics like all the other love songs out there; I wanted to put my feelings and thoughts into it, but it felt like it would be hard for the public to really understand it if I only told it with my own words. Finding the right balance between the two was difficult.” Lee performing on stage. She emphasizes the importance of lyrics and the delivery of emotion through them. (Photo courtesy of Lee) Like the song "No Spring After All" (2017), most of Lee’s songs are ballads. Lee commented that her voice and tone fit with emotional lines, but she has recently started listening to rock music and happy songs as part of an effort to ‘"not be too sad." Lee strives to grow as an artist. She tries especially hard to deliver emotion and sensations through her songs. Now preparing for the upcoming graduation show this October, she is looking forward to being able to impact more and more audiences in the future. Kim So-yun dash070@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Lee Jin-myung

2018-06 19

[Student]The Washington Center (TWC) Internship Program

As the school's nickname “Engine of Korea” suggests, Hanyang University (HYU) offers many programs for outgoing students to build sophisticated skills for independent thinking and to foster knowledge and wisdom through extensive experiences. The Washington Center (TWC) Internship Program is one of the school's programs which provides students with the opportunity to work as interns at desired organizations all located in Washington D.C. The center itself was created in 1975 for the purpose of connecting students and helping them to translate college majors into career paths. It is a unique program in the sense that it is available not only to Korean students but also to those from all around the world, allowing students the chance to work in a real international environment. Lim Gi-hwan (Department of Financial Management, 4th year) and Shin Jae-ah (Division of International Studies, 3rd year) are two students who took part in the TWC program in January 2017 and January 2018. Lim Gi-hwan (Department of Financial Management, 4th year) took part in The Washington Center program in 2017 and 2018. “I actually didn't know about TWC until I got a message from the school. Being able to work in the capital seemed really attractive and that's what got me to apply for the program," said Lim. Shin on the other hand, was well aware of the program since her freshman year, and applied as soon as she became a junior. "It seemed like a great opportunity to build some practical experience in the States, which I'd never been to before.” The whole process was harder than they had first anticipated. After successfully applying to the TWC program, it is entirely up to the students to apply for the final internship interview. Fortunately, the center guides them through each step and tries to match them with organizations that best matches their major, goals, skills, and most important of all, field of interest. There is also no limitation on the number of organizations one can apply for. Lim was able to work at the Department of Small and Local Development, which is a governmental organization that deals with small and medium-sized enterprises. Shin also worked at a governmental organization called the American Association of State Colleges and Universities (AASCU), dealing with SNS analysis, annual reports on civic engagement, and content creation. Shin Jae-ah (Division of International Studies, 3rd year) at AASCU in Washington D.C. (Photo courtesy of Shin) When asked about some of the hardships faced while working in the States, Lim said “I wasn't really fluent in English, so in the beginning I had some difficulties at work. So I would bring a recorder with me to work and record everything my boss or my colleagues would say, so I could replay it afterwards and practice my English.” Shin reflected on some of the moments of culture shock she had, ranging from different ways of housekeeping to living in relatively "unsafe" residential area due to recent shootings. However, Lim and Shin both emphasized how their lives in the States were enriching thanks to highly accessible and abundant museums, galleries, and academic seminars. “I used to live a very work-oriented life in Korea. After living in the States, I've learned to relax and really enjoy every moment of my life," said Shin. “After completing the program and having lived with roommates from different countries for a few months, I was able to get rid of some of the cultural prejudices I had held before working in the States," said Lim. Shin agreed that despite having lived overseas during her childhood, she realized that she was still culturally biased and was able to learn how to become more understanding of others. "It's not worth judging others. I learned to use my time on other things that are more valuable to me," said Shin. Shin (left) and Lim (right) during the interview on June 15th, 2018. Lim, graduating this semester, will be working at Hyundai Motors, while Shin will continue to complete her junior year. Both strongly recommended the program as it has helped them gain not only the experience of working overseas, but also other valuable life lessons. "I strongly encourage students to just give it a try as there's nothing to lose. It may not be the ideal work experience you've envisioned but it's important to keep in mind the possibility of finding value outside of work as well," said Lim. Shin added, "There are many students who want to work as interns overseas just because it sounds cool, but don't get too caught up in that and focus on what kind of work you really want to do. That will truly allow you to develop yourself as a person and help you grasp a clearer idea of your future path.” Park Joo-hyun julia1114@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Park Geun-hyung

2018-06 18

[Faculty]Professor Kim Ki-hyun, Laureate of the Science Technology And Researcher (STAR) Award

Over the course of the past few years, public awareness and concern for the level of air pollution has increased rapidly. More people have begun to monitor the level of fine dust concentration on a regular basis, and sanitary masks have become an indispensable daily item. In addition, air purifiers have become a key home appliance, now that opening the window brings in polluted air. In the midst of this growing awareness, the research achievements of Professor Kim Ki-hyun (Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering) is more illuminated than ever. Having been recognized for his significant contribution to air preservation, Kim received the Science Technology And Researcher (STAR) award in June. The STAR award is a prestigious award presented monthly to scientists in the fields of education, research, and industry. It was created in 1997 to promote the scientific and technological minds to the public, while boosting the morale of scientists in various sectors of the country. Kim was recognized by the committee for his creation of a nano-material that enables the assessment and control of pollutants in the air at a more effective rate. Through his research achievements, Kim Ki-hyun (Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering), the recipient of the Science Technology And Researcher (STAR) Award, has become internationally recognized as a prominent researcher in his field. To delve into the details of the research, Kim created the Metal Organic Framework (MOF), essentially a web of metals connected by an organic substance. This new material was created to act as a nano-level filter that could reduce pollutants in the air at a more effective rate. Furthermore, he made improvements in the standard environmental analysis system, making it more efficient to eliminate volatile organic compounds (VOC) and odor-causing substances in the air. “The current level of air purification technology is quite effective. However, there is a limit to the ability to detect and eliminate VOC,” explained Kim. Unlike dust, which is a solid form of pollutant, VOC includes substances such as benzene and formaldehyde, which are in the form of gas. As byproducts of household activities like cooking, these materials are highly toxic; unfortunately, only 40 to 50 percent of them can be eliminated by a standard air purifier. When considering that people spend 80 percent of their time indoors on average, the damage from these substances could be significant. Kim is hopeful about the prospects of his research and predicts that he will someday find a method to eliminate gas pollutants all together. When asked for a comment on receiving the award, Kim answered that it was the result of hard work. As a researcher devoted to the interface between human activities and the environment, Kim has spent his life attempting to raise the public's awareness and interest in environmental issues. After working on the discovery and monitoring of pollution levels, Kim set out on a path to reduce them. “I feel fortunate and grateful," answered Kim, who felt that his devotion to the field had been recognized. Kim offering a tour around his laboratory on the 13th of June. Kim's current goal is to break down the limitations of reducing VOC in the air. Although it is currently possible under the condition of the air being stagnant, the dynamic nature of air necessitates the creation of a technology that will make it possible under all conditions. In the long run, Kim hopes to create a road map that stipulates the various hazards created under different conditions, and how to address them. In his last comment, Kim raised his concerns of the public's discretion in accepting environmental facts. Although he recognizes the increase in public awareness, he pointed out that we should be more critical of what we consider facts, as well as our actions.“Nothing strikes me as more ignorant than a smoker who puts on air filter masks,” added Kim. Though our hearts may be in the right place, there is a need for the public to critically review their life patterns in making efforts to combat pollution. Lee Chang-hyun pizz1125@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Lee Jin-myung

2018-06 11

[Alumni]Following a True Career Path

Bang Hyun-soo (Mechanical Engineering, '08), the founder of Photographic BKOON, was invited as a guest speaker at the recently held relay talk-show hosted by the Women in Engineering at Hanyang Center on June 4th. Due to many students showing high concerns about their future career paths, the talk-show aimed to enable students to approach their career from a much more reasonable perspective. Just before the talk-show, Bang was able to share his ideas about career paths through an interview with NewsH. Bang Hyun-soo (Mechanical Engineering, '08) is giving a lecture at the relay talk-show, held on the 4th of June, on the theme of finding one's true career path. Bang explained how he managed to become a photographic lecturer, which is completely irrelevant to his major of mechanical engineering. Bang first established Photographic BKOON in 2015, which is a one-man business that focuses on photography lectures using smart-phones. His lectures consist of two big parts: photography and editing, and have the goal of allowing everyone to become artists in their everyday lives simply by using a smartphone. Irrelevant to his major of mechanical engineering, Bang explained how he managed to pursue this particular career path. First entering Hanyang University with the dream of becoming a professor, Bang was a student whose dreams changed often. In 2010, due to his father’s recommendations, Bang followed the path of becoming a lecturer. However, after finishing second in a photographic audition in November 2011, his dream changed. It was not until he gave his first lecture at Frip, a business platform that arranges various lectures, that Bang was able to put these two dreams together. Bang recalled his first lecture at Frip as an ever-lasting memory. To start, Frip was supposed to arrange the overall location and setting of the lecture, yet the location was suddenly changed on short notice. When Bang arrived at the newly changed location there was nothing prepared for his lecture. Still, Bang did not give up and successfully finished his lecture only with what was available. He recalled that if he had given up at that time with the excuse that nothing was readily prepared, the current Bang who makes photographic lectures would not exist. Bang explained how one should not be worried about failure even before trying. He shared his experience of his first lecture, where nothing was prepared, yet he seized the opportunity by at least doing something that he could. He stated that this was an important decision to his current career path. “There are over 200,000 registered jobs currently, yet only about 20 of them are somewhat familiar,” commented Bang. He noted that in order to create a job, there has to be a cyclical process in which one delivers certain values and others are willing to pay for the value provided. In this sense, Bang first concentrated on the values that he delivered and came up with the idea of putting lectures and photography together, becoming the busiest photographic lecturer today. Now, successfully settling down as a lecturer with his photographic lectures, Bang has future plans of developing a newly coined lecture theme that he can deliver. He has three stages of his lifetime plans, which are earning an hourly wage of 100,000 Korean Won by age 29, 1 million Korean Won by 39 and 10 million Korean Won by 49. Meeting his first stage goal, he is now focusing upon attaining his second goal. Rather than simply targeting monetary figures, Bang explained that he set such goals to come up with a lecture that would deliver values suitable to the stated amounts. Bang ended the interview by offering some advice for students who are concerned with their future career path. "It is important to take the first step along your future path," remarked Bang. He explained that it is never too late to make a decision when meeting another crossroad, yet being afraid to follow the path even before walking on it is meaningless. Bang also added, “University is a good place to find your dreams without being concerned about failure. Rather than worrying if you are walking on the right path, simply experiencing the path you choose is much more important.” Choi Seo-yong tjdyd1@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Kang Cho-hyun

2018-06 04

[Alumni]Dance What Words Cannot Describe

One of the two modern dance companies in Korea, Daegu Contemporary Dance Company, is greeting its seventh art director Kim Sung-yong (Dance, '00). News H interviewed Kim at a café near Suseo station on Saturday, June 2nd. Kim Sung-yong (Dance, ’00) in his recent repertoire Taking. Kim defined creation as "taking something that already exists and putting a meaning to it' in this particular choreography. (Photo courtesy of Kim) Kim started his career in an arts high school, through a teacher’s recommendation from middle school. As a young performer, Kim dreamed of one day being the director of Daegu Contemporary Dance Company. “I couldn’t believe it,” said Kim, reminiscing the moment he got the final offer from the company. He was as excellent a dancer as he is as a choreographer. With "Chaconne in G Minor" by Tomaso Antonio Vitali, Kim won 1st prize at the Dong-A Dance Competition at the age of 20. Winning in 1997, he is still the youngest winner in the history of the competition. After graduation, Kim became a semi-finalist in the third Japan International Ballet and Modern Dance Competition. That led to endless job offers from Japan, and later from Europe and North America. When asked what the hardest part of such a long and ongoing career of dancing was, Kim replied "personal relations." He explained, “Dancing itself was never too hard or exhausting. I never thought of quitting dancing in my life,” smiled Kim. The foremost value of dancing for Kim is to express what words cannot. He described dancing as metaphoric and intangible but stronger than physical objects or words. Through such visual expression, Kim wishes people, including the audience, dancers, and himself to discover feelings that they did not know existed before. That was the idea at the core of the more than 130 routines he coreographed. For instance, in his most recent and the first piece as the director of Daegu Contemporary Dance Company, Goon-joong (The Crowd), he tried to convey his contemplation on the idea of violence. Why are some people violent? Are all offenders simply offenders, or are they also victims? In the end, he came to the conclusion that the bystanders doing nothing about the violence are the worst people. Kim’s term ends in two years, and it seems like his schedule is fully booked for the coming years. He and his team have various festivals and performances to participate in both in Korea and abroad. Despite the busy schedule and the hectic life he is leading, Kim’s eyes shined with passion and interest throughout the interview. Kim So-yun dash070@hanyang.ac.kr

2018-06 04

[Student]Beyond A Business

An art exhibition took place in the Business Administration building, starting from the 25th until the 28th of May. The exhibition was held by three students: Lee Jae-gi (Financial Management, '14), Lee Sang-Ah (Business, '16) and Ong Uk-man (Business, ‘15), who first met each other at the Hanyang New Business Development Lab. While sharing their interests in art, the three students were able to meet the goal of expanding the start-up company Picto Sales. An art exhibition was held at the Business School building from the 25th until the 28th of May, by the start-up company Picto Sales. The Hanyang Business School has established the Hanyang Biz-Lab in the form of a holding company, and has registered as an institution for field-experience by providing internship opportunities to Hanyang students. It consists of seven departments, including the New Business Development Lab (New-Biz Lab), which mainly focuses on providing support to the participating students establishing a start-up company. It was through this program that the three students were able to meet and share their ideas about the expansion of the newly started Picto Sales company. Being the third management class of the Business School’s New-Biz program, the three students have been able to further expand the Picto Sales business portfolio, which was first conceived by the second generation. The company has the chief goal of providing a transmission platform for little known artists and potential consumers who are willing to purchase low-priced works of art. By displaying artworks of unfamed authors at a relatively low price, Picto Sales tries to benefit both the artists and consumers. Lee Jae-gi (right), the team leader, was responsible for external cooperation, such as meeting and contacting the artists and galleries. Lee Sang-ah (left) had the main role of design and promotion. Although it has the form of a start-up company, Picto Sales prioritizes meeting its corporate social responsibilities over making profits. This was due the agreement of the three students to focus on providing a steady platform where artists can share their artistic creations rather than to simply sell artwork and make profit for the company. While most transmission businesses in the art industry take half of the profit from sales, Picto Sales takes only around 30 percent. Thus, while providing a platform where amateur artists can share their artwork, the company also remits a higher portion of profit to them. Prior to the current exhibition, Picto Sales has already managed to display two exhibitions outside of campus. The first exhibition was held from the 30th of April until the 11th of May at a gallery café located in Hongdae, whereas the second was held at the Kangdong Community Center from May 23rd to the 26th. Lee was careful when selecting the locations for the two exhibitions. The accessibility, parking space, and levels of collaboration were all taken into consideration. Additionally, low rental payments were a priority, as Picto Sales does not have a high budget. Although the rental fees of gallery cafés are known to be high, Lee was able to rent the location without any costs by promoting their actions of providing artistic opportunities to unfamed artists. The pamplets of the two previous exhibitions held by Picto Sales, which were designed by Lee herself. (Photo Courtesy of Picto Sales) Despite their successful exhibitions, there were hardships that Picto Sales had to overcome. The tight budget of the company resulted in the students starting from scratch. They visited over 30 places in order to find an adequate location for the exhibition, and even once the location was arranged, they had to carry the works of art to the exhibition locations themselves. The vacuum of an art major among the members was another difficulty, as they also had to learn how to deal with artwork. “Despite all three of us sharing a great interest in art, there was more for us to learn when dealing with artwork. It was through this experience that I first learned how to attach backing-paper when handling oriental paintings in order to prevent them from wrinkling,” mentioned Lee. While overcoming such hardships, the gratitude they received from the artists whose work they were displaying motivated them the most. The platform that Picto Sales is trying to construct is a wonderful opportunity for them. Aside from the gratitude received by the artists, the high enthusiasm that consumers showed towards the exhibitions was another factor that inspired the members of Picto Sales. According to Lee, despite how hard preparing the exhibition was, once they saw people finding the exhibition and showing interest towards the displayed work, their fatigue lightened. Lee mentioned how he was uaware that the purchase of domestic artwork with a foreign credit card was illegal. Having success with three exhibitions, two outside and one within campus, Picto Sales is now planning their fourth and the last exhibition in June. The three students, being the third generation of the New-Biz Lab, are now ready to pass their company to the fourth generation as their internship ends this semester. Although, it is up to the succeeding generation whether they will enlarge Picto Sales or start a new business, the three students have shown their hopes towards the further expansion of the company. While showing their concerns toward the succeeding generation having passion for art and the promotion of amateur artists, they did not forget to share their advice. "Managing a start-up company requires high levels of preparation. Although it is important to be ready in various aspects, being prepared in legal issues would especially help one to manage his or her business and to spread their passion.” Choi Seo-yong tjdyd1@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Kang Cho-hyun