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2018-07 30

[Student]The Dreams We Hold

From July 21st to 22nd, students from Hanyang University’s Department of Theater and Film performed a play they produced named The Night Stars (밤별), at Sungsoo Art Hall. The play was held in cooperation with Seongdong Foundation for Arts and Culture and in commemoration of the institution’s third year anniversary. The actors from the Department of Theater and Film are Kim Soo-jin, Jeong Sol-ah, Kim Yul-ah, Kim Joo-hun, Kwon Do-gyun, Kang Jeong-mook, Hong Sang-hyeon, and Kim Se-hee. The director and playwright Kim Ha-ram (Department of theater and film, 2nd year) spoke about the motives for writing the script for the play and what she learned after the performance. The journey of The Night Stars began last year when it was selected by the Creative Development Program at Hanyang University, which was then chosen to be officially presented to the public. The play goes back and forth between the past and present and gives the characters a chance to look back on their childhood and the dreams they used to have, which contrast strongly with the reality they are currently living in. The play The Night Stars is about "stars," which can either mean someone’s dream or a person valuable to another, but come to be lost as time goes. The actors that took part in the play told us that they practiced four hours a day during the semester, and more during vacations. They were all laughing when they traced back their memories to when Kim Ju-heun, one of the lead actors in the play, spoke about the time when he had an allergic reaction on stage, only to find out that the play setup was made of oak and birch wood, which he was allergic to. The director of the play Kim Ha-ram also wrote the play's script. “I was always a kid with a dream, so I thought I was sparkly,” she said when speaking about the motives of writing the script. “However, as I grew up, the person that I wanted to be had faded a little. I felt like I wasn’t shining anymore, and I hated that. I wanted to write a play about the stars, which led me to think that the dreams that we had as children are stars, but that the city’s lights could be stars, too.” The last scene of the play shows two main characters looking over the stars and the lights coming from the city, thinking that those two lights are similar in a way. (Photo courtesy of Kim Ha-ram) The play ends with a scene where the two main characters have grown up to be quite different from the people they dreamed of becoming as children. Two imperfect beings may have settled for the present, but they realize after watching the city’s lights in the night sky that city lights can be stars, too. The play gives the audience the lesson that the hopes and dreams they had as children are special, of course, but that the people they have become in the present is just as special. The strong story line engaged the audience, and the actors’ fluent, professional acting made them laugh and cry throughout the play. The eight actors of the play are posing in front of the photo wall of Sungsoo Art Hall. “A play is an act possible when people gather to form one. I believe that a play is a life, and you can’t really live life without people. I used to think of only my goals, but now I think I’ve learned to take a look around at my surroundings, while running for my goals,” said Kim Ha-ram. Kim Hyun-soo soosoupkimmy@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Choi Min-ju

2018-07 17

[Faculty]Old Poetry Gathered into a Book

People say that being a parent is a whole new experience that brings so many unexperienced emotions and thoughts into one's life. Professor Pak Dong-uk (Korean Language & Literature) felt the same as any other father. With his son being born at a relatively late age for him, he was mesmerized by the feelings the little one gave him. He did not stop there but put his overflowing feelings into poem and searched more vigorously through old Korean poems written about family and being a father. Pak recently published his third book on the subject, No Flower Better that You. The title of this collection of poems sounds as if it is a love story or a love letter and indeed, it is. It all started with a question: Did fathers from the Joseon dynasty really disregard their daughters as portrayed in the dramas? It is widely known that Joseon – a country that later became the Republic of Korea – believed strongly in Confucianism. One commonly held belief was that women deserved fewer rights and respect than they do in contemporary Korean society. Wives who were forced back to work the day after giving birth to a daughter instead of a precious son are commonly portrayed in films and dramas that take place on the pages of our history. But as a father, Pak wondered if that would be true. News H interviewed Pak Dong-uk (Korean Language & Literature) in the Engineering BuildingⅡ. Pak's No Flower Better than You was published on May 18th. Using his early morning time before going to his 9 a.m. classes, Pak was able to find dozens of old poems written by fathers to their daughters, filled with nothing but love. “I figured fathers loved their daughters throughout history,” smiled Pak. His work does not necessarily say that all daughters during the Joseon Dynasty were loved as much as the daughters of the contemporary world, but it does point out that ladies in affluent families (enough for their father to be literate) were loved by their fathers, unlike the common misconception. It has been seven years since my daughter has been born, I can’t let her go out the doors now. A crow reminds you playing with ink, And a bracken reminds of your small hands picking up chestnuts. You wouldn’t have gotten used to getting ready in the morning with your mother. Who would comfort you when you cry for dad at night? Just wait child, for I will hug you the first thing I get back home, Even before I get my coats off. <Thinking of my daughter>, Jo Wee-han Pak himself defines a father as "a person who does not fall." He remarked that he feels so much more responsibility to his family and that having a child has widened his perspective of the world. “I now treat my students differently, because I keep thinking how precious they must be to their own parents.” Two more books on the topic of married couples will be published later this year. Pak still has endless topics he would love to write, collect and introduce old poems about. He gave readers of News H a special sneak peek into his upcoming book that will be published later this year. He said “It's about a truely genius poet named Lee Un-jin, who died at the age of 27. He wrote a series of poems with 170 poems in it, and that's all I can reveal now,” smiled Pak. The professor was humorous for the entire interview, yet he had much seriousness in his face. Kim So-yun dash070@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Kang Cho-hyun

2018-07 16

[Student]Creating Lasting Memories in the Division of International Studies

The term melting pot refers to the phenomenon of melting different elements together into a harmonious whole. The word is frequently used in today's globalized society as diverse cultures are becoming more and more integrated. Borrowing the term, the anthem for the Division of International Studies (DIS), "The Melting Pot," was written by Kim Cheon-woo (DIS, 3rd year). As it was introduced on the official blog page of the DIS, the song has the meaning of making a harmonious environment for DIS students. Kim Cheon-woo (DIS, 3rd year) shared his experience of making an anthem for the DIS in order to make lasting memories with his fellow students. Having an interest in music since his middle school years, Kim has continuously engaged himself in musical activities. It was Kim who rejuvenated DISound, the band club of the DIS in 2014, which was his first year at Hanyang University. Based upon such activities, Kim managed to gather five more members to make the anthem together. “Returning to school after finishing my military service, I wanted to do something meaningful with my friends that would actually be helpful to our department," recalled Kim during the interview. He explained that it was a disappointment how he and his classmates had to seperate due to internships and exchange study programs. Teaming up with Kim Ha-rim, Shin Joon-ho, Park Jun-hyung, Shin Jae-ah (DIS, 3rd year), and Park Ju-hyun (DIS, 4th year), Kim was able to complete the song "Melting Pot." The term was chosen by Kim, knowing the diversity of ethnicities in the DIS. The diversity includes living in various countries abroad, and how they are able to come together as everything molds together within the same pot. Such various students are able to come together and show respect towards each other while taking the same courses and communicating with each other throughout their school years in the DIS. Kim shared his future plans of pursuing his musical dreams. Going to the U.S. as an exchange student next semester, Kim mentioned how he wants to find his own musical colors during the exchange program. Kim mentioned that the term melting pot was first used to represent the DIS, yet it is not only limited to this particular division but can be applied to Hanyang University as a whole. He showed strong enthusiasm for making a representative song for Hanyang University also. “Although I did use the term melting pot for the anthem, I believe that there is still room for improvement. Just because someone is different, it does not mean that they are wrong. I hope that a culture where everyone is warmly welcomed and respected is set,” concluded Kim. A direct link to the official blog of Hanyang DIS: https://m.blog.naver.com/PostView.nhn?blogId=officialhanyangdis&logNo=221289100572&proxyReferer= A direct link to Kim’s Instagram page: https://www.instagram.com/1000guitar/ A direct link to Kim’s Youtube page: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9GUZdF9O63o Choi Seo-yong tjdyd1@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Park Kuen-hyung

2018-07 16

[Faculty]Population Problems of the Aging Korean Society

Hanyang University's Institute of Aging Society, according to Professor Lee Sam-sik (Department of Policy Science), has a lot of advantages as an academic institute with such an interest. Having Lee as the director, the institute was established in 2008 and has been dedicated to conducting research regarding today's aging society problems in Korea. This week, Lee spoke about the role of the institute and the ongoing population problem regarding the aging society in South Korea. Professor Lee Sam-sik (Department of Policy Science), the director of the Institute of Aging Society at Hanyang University, explained the research in progress at the institute on July 13th, 2018. The main goal of the Institute of Aging Society is to fuse the field of engineering with that of humanities and social science to achieve social innovation. This institution strives to realize “active aging,” which is intended to “inform discussion and the formulation of action plans that promote healthy and active aging,” according to the World Health Organization (WHO). There are six subsidiary research organizations of the Institute of Aging Society and Lee is the representative of the population strategy research group. This organization often forms a study group of external associations to develop and suggest the nation’s policies, vision, and strategy. The smart health aging research group involves the engineering field, where it is put to use in order to solve problems that the elderly face. The fruits of this group will increase the quality of people’s lives domestically, and motivate the growth of the international market. The advanced wellndess research group focuses on studies of exercise, food, and nutrition. Humans' taste organs degrade the most as they age. This group researches ways that the brain can register unsavory food as something delicious, or to protect the elderly from the damage of a fall, by developing textiles that act as an airbag. “Just like Spiderman’s clothing,” he smiled while he explained the logic of the idea. The lifecare research group conducts studies on ways to handle emergency situations. Age-friendly cities and communities research group targets making the whole city senior-friendly. Last but not least, the “third age” (referring to the 30 years after the age 40) research group conducts further research on leisure and the cultural life of the seniors. From 2006, the Korean government started to implement policies to supplement the nation’s low birth rate and the rapidly aging society in Korea. Lee emphasized the importance to strengthen not only the field of engineering but field of humanities and social sciences at Hanyang University. “The fusion of those two studies will not only bring important contributions to society but will also bring practical and creative solutions to population problems that our generation faces today,” said Lee. The gist of the population problem is that the growth rate of senior citizens is increasing at an unprecedented speed while there are increasingly fewer of the younger generations to support them. The average age of senior citizens is increasing, with most of them being 80 or older. In addition, households with a senior citizen living alone is increasing as well. The engineering departments have come up with the idea of creating big data by using a sensor to detect all circumstantial behaviors of the elderly. This way, it would be easier to spot any abnormal behavior and prevent accidents from happening. Professor Lee Sam-sik emphasized the importance of fusion research of diverse fields in pursuit of solving the problems that Korean society faces due to its rapidly aging population. “The way to handle the fast approach of an aging society is to resolve population problems. This is not something that can be solved at once, so we must look into and ameliorate things that we can handle for now. As we live in a time where human beings can live up past age 100, the balance between money, health, and civilized living for the elderly has become more important than ever. The government and institutions like the Institute of Aging Society at Hanyang University should make greater efforts to lessen the burden that the younger generation holds to support their elders, while seeking optimal welfare for the senior citizens.” Kim Hyun-soo soosoupkimmy@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Park Geun-hyung

2018-07 09

[Alumni]Different Paths Toward the Same Dream

Becoming a police officer is not a common career path that students from the Division of International Studies (DIS) pursue. However, two students, Suh Joon (DIS ’15) and Chong Hyun-joong (DIS ’16), have fulfilled their dream of wearing the blue police officer's uniform that they always dreamed of. Chong Hyun-joong (DIS' 16) and Suh Joon (DIS' 15) shared their experience of becoming and working as a police officer. Suh is currently working in the International Cooperation Division. He became a police officer through a special employment system, which is for foreign language specialists. As the practicality examination takes a large portion of the special employment system, Suh mainly focused on enhancing his language proficiency and translation skills. “Matching the time limit was my main concern when preparing for the exam. Solving sample questions from previous tests and reading the English newspaper were a great help for me,” recalled Suh. Referred to as the ministry of foreign affairs within the Korean National Police Agency (KNPA), the International Cooperation Division has the main purpose of maintaining a strong relationship with foreign police agencies. Maintaining such relationships allows the KNPA to provide protection to the many Korean citizens who are currently abroad and outside of its jurisdiction. Suh provided an example of Korean citizens being detained for false accusations and how the cooperation with foreign police agencies is crucial in tackling such situations. Suh is translating for Lee Chul-sung, the former Chief of the Korean National Police Agency, during a meeting with the Philippine president Rodrigo Duterte. (From left, Lee, Suh, and Duterte) (Photo Courtesy of Suh) On the contrary, unlike Suh, Chong joined the KNPA through open recruitment. Fulfilling his military service as an conscripted policeman, it was his experience as an officer that allowed him to become aware of the recruitment examination. Taking time off from school to focus on the recruitment process, Chong prepared for the exam with his back against the wall. Managing to achieve a successful result with a single year of preparation, Chong is currently working at the Recruitment Bureau of the Education Policy Department as an inspector. The Recruitment Bureau has the biggest focus on the overall recruitment system of the KNPA. It is responsible for not only the formal, open recruitment system but also many special employment systems, which are consulted on with other departments that need new personnel. Additionally, the legislation related to recruitment is also managed and revised by this division. According to Chong, Hanyang University has agreed to provide a location for the recruitment examination of the second half of this year. Chong explained how he first became aware of the KNPA recruitment examination during his military service as a conscripted police officer. Both Suh and Chong mentioned that studying in the DIS gave them a definite advantage when preparing for the police test. Suh mentioned how the interdisciplinary approach of the DIS curriculum covers a wide span of subjects that helped him with not only the recruitment examination but also with his current work at the KNPA. Chong emphasized the police administration course in DIS, which helped him understand the fields of international law and foreign police affairs. As for advice to those who are preparing for the police recruitment examination, both officers maintained the importance of asking for guidance from predecessors rather than being troubled alone. They also mentioned that one must be prepared to accept hard working hours and high levels of stress. Chong explained that as their work is open to the press, one must be skillful in controlling his or her own emotions. Suh added, "Meeting with the dark side of society is not a pleasurable experience, and thus, it is important that one be prepared both physically and emotionally. Still there is no doubt that the work itself is worthwhile and highly rewarding." Choi Seo-yong tjdyd1@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Park Kuen-hyung

2018-07 09

[Student]A Step Toward Resolving Past Mistakes (2)

A briefing session on the retrial regarding a teenage boy who was arrested for violating an emergency measure in 1976, was held by the Hanyang University Legal Clinic on June 1st on the 2nd floor of Law Building II. Four students participated, all of whom are sophomores of the School of Law: Jung Ji-won, Lee Hye-lin, Lee Sun-young and Lim Jun-seong. Sophomore students of the School of Law are taking turns presenting details of the case in a briefing session held on June 1st, 2018. (Photo courtesy of Lee Hye-lin) An emergency measure is the right afforded to the president that was issued in 1972 as part of Article 53 of the Yushin Constitution. At the time, President Park Jung-hee had the authority to put a ban on citizens’ constitutional rights by enacting an emergency measure. The 9th emergency measure was one of the very core clauses of the act that helped to limit people’s freedom to act. As an example, citizens were banned from any actions that opposed, distorted, or slandered the constitutional law of South Korea, and also restricted them from claiming reformation or abolition of the law. The standards for the “unlawful conduct” implied here were very vague, and it was thus exhaustively used against the people of Korea. It all started in the year 1975, when the undertrial had graduated high school and was studying to retake the college entrance exam. In 1976, the victim was drunk when he criticized the dictatorship of President Park’s administration. The boy was then taken by police officers in Daegu who did not even have an arrest warrant, and was brutally tortured. He was declared guilty during the first trial. As a teenager at the time, he was later sent to juvenile court and received the juvenile adjudication in his second trial. The victim was released a year later. In 2013, other victims who had received criminal penalties because of the emergency measure were declared innocent after the statute was proven to be against the constitution by the constitutional court. The core of this case, however is that the undertrial was charged according to juvenile law at the time, which makes the victim unable to receive a retrial. Retrial can only occur when one has been convicted, not dispatched to the juvenile court, as he was in this particular case. As a consequence of the failure of the retrial, demands for national compensation are currently ongoing through the efforts of his attorney, but so far they have lost the first trial. Since there are no more ways to help the victim according to current code of criminal procedure, they plan on executing constitutional petitions. “I signed up for the legal clinic program because I wanted to make practical use of the knowledge I acquired at school. I met professor Park Sun-ah (School of Law) who is especially interested in public interest litigation, which is how I learned about and got to participate in this case. I have heard stories about many people that still live in pain caused by our nation’s history, and I thought it would be meaningful if I used my studies to help out,” said Seonyeong Lee. Students that took charge of this case spoke about the ripple effects it will have on society if this case succeeds in protecting the undertrial’s rights. They claimed that it will be practical help to the victims if the judiciary officially admits the nation’s blunder, and it could prevent similar cases from taking place in the future. On social terms, they said that such opportunity will give us as citizens the chance to reflect on our nation’s history. Professor Park Sun-ah (School of Law) and her students in Legal Clinics course next to a banner that reads “The Boy’s Tears: a case demanding a retrial regarding the boy that violated an emergency measure.” (Photo courtesy of Lee Hye-lin) Students went on to say that for ordinary citizens who lack specialized knowledge in the field of law, expressing concerns about issues in society and sending authentic sympathy to the victims are the best way they can contribute. The vitalization of national petitions today is a very good example of the power of citizens' sympathy. Aside from the endeavors of the attorney and the persons directly involved, encouraging social atmosphere, an active civil society, a righteous judiciary, and aconscientious media are all crucial factors to successfully settling social issues. Kim Hyun-soo soosoupkimmy@hanyang.ac.kr

2018-07 09

[Alumni]Woo In-chul, the Former Mayoral Candidate of Seoul

Although the importance of politics is well-known, it Is hard to see young Koreans actively and directly involved in the field. Former mayoral candidate of Seoul, Woo In-chul (Department of Molecular and Life Science, ERICA '12), unfolded his story of diving into politics soon after his graduation. Despite his major being rather unrelated to politics, Woo has always been interested in political issues regarding Korean youth, such as the 2011 Korean university tuition crisis. As a senior in 2011, Woo became actively involved in youth forums, debates and seminars that dealt with various problems that degraded the living standards of Korean youth. “I think being able to participate in politics regardless of your major, age, or background, is the fundamental aspect of having a democratic society. I wanted to become more directly involved in politics, so I decided to take action.” Woo In-chul (Department of Molecular and Life Science, ERICA '12) at the Woori Mirae office on June 6th, 2018. Woo strongly believed that as a democratic citizen, changes in our lives must be made through politics. Together with his friends, he formed the Youth Party in 2011. This wasn’t easy as they needed to gather at least 5,000 party members. They also needed a candidate, and Woo stepped up to take assume that role. Even after they successfully formed the party, there were more mountains to overcome as they needed a deposit of at least 15-million-won, in addition to other election campaign fees. “I didn’t run for the election to win. I at least wanted to spread the awareness that we, as young people of Korea have problems to solve, and should take matters into our own hands.” After the impeachment of former President Park, Woo decided that it was their chance to start an era of new politics where the young would be the main actors. This led to the formation of Woori Mirae (우리미래당), which is a developed version of the Youth Party. Many university students in Korea are still financially struggling to keep up with high tuition fees, living expenses, housing expenses and more. All the politicians who hadincluded such youth related issues in their campaign promises, seemed to completely forget about them after winning their elections. “It’s because it’s not their priority. That’s why we ourselves need to take action, because nobody else will do it for us,” said Woo. Woo protesting in the "youth tent" for the youth rental house project on April 21st . After running for the general election, Woo’s Party failed to receive enough votes and was forced to disband. However, this did not stop Woo from re-forming the party in 2017. “Our society needs to heal, and I believe this can be done through politics. Forming a party is not just a form of representation. It’s to try to change the policies, systems, institutions, and to give political hope to young people,” said Woo. He also noted that the majority of Korean politicians are from an older generation, which naturally creates a weaker bond of empathy with the younger generation. Although not saying that all politicians must be from the younger generation, he emphasized that most people fail to realize that youth issues are directly linked to societal issues and issues of all generations, due to lack of empathy. Recently Woo ran for the office of mayor of Seoul. He noted that he wanted to first and foremost ask the young Koreans, if they are doing well. The reality for youth is harsh as most take the first step into the society with heavy student loans and the struggles of keeping up with other expenses. This prevents them from challenging themselves and trying out new things, as they are so caught up with just trying to make ends meet. Woo re-emphasized how empathy is key here. “Empathy allows people to take an interest in others. We need that sort of interest because that’s where change starts. The spread of awareness and addressing of problems will lead to changes in policies in the long run. Other institutional changes will follow.” Woo hopes for the future of many young Korean "elites." After the elections, Woo is now a chair in the party, hosting various programs and sessions for not just youth but also for those from older generations as well, in hopes of creating a bond and fostering more understanding between generations. With four party representatives, the Woori Mirae will run for future elections with hopes of changing the political culture. “All those who are interested in social political issues, or trying to take action are "elites." I hope more of the current younger generation will become elites,” said Woo. Woori Mirae official website: http://makeourfuture.kr/%EC%86%8C%EA%B0%9C/#intro Park Joo-hyun julia1114@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Lee Jin-myung

2018-06 26

[Faculty]Increasing the Efficiency of Solar Batteries

Global warming is a clear threat to the human race. After long disputes over the validity of the phenomenon for nearly a quarter of a century, it has been revealed after an investigation of the fossil fuel industry that global warming is a real threat. The past scientific disputes had in fact been a result of interventions by the industry to protect their business. So what now? Aside from bringing justice to these corporations, one of the biggest assignments facing humanity is the creation of sustainable energy. For this task, the recent finding by Professor Park Jea-gun (Department of Electronic Engineering) has shed a new light of hope. Park Jea-gun (Department of Electronic Engineering) explains global warming. Simply put, Professor Park found a new way to improve the power conversion efficiency of our standard solar batteries. However, the process had been far from simple, and many complications had confronted Park on his journey. Solar power is among the few established sources of sustainable energy, which include tidal, wind, and hydraulic power. However, despite the research and development of solar batteries over the past 20 years, the highest power conversion efficiency, meaning the rate of the electrical energy that is converted from its original form, remained a staggering two percent. Park’s research had raised this rate to 4.11 percent. To give a brief explanation on the mechanics of solar energy, sunlight includes three types of rays: ultraviolet rays, infrared rays, and visible rays. These rays are projected in a form of waves, which are essentially energy. Currently, our solar batteries convert only visible rays, which is where Park began questioning a possible improvement. What Park did was to install quantum dots, a core semiconductor that is capped by an outer cell, on the silicone surface of the standard solar battery. A size smaller than 10 nanometers, quantum dots convert UV rays into visible rays, a process referred to as ‘energy-down-shift’. With this conversion, solar batteries could begin to convert a proportion of UV rays. An illustration of how a quantum dot converts UV rays for solar batteries (Photo courtesy of Park) This initial finding, published in 2014, improved the power conversion efficiency of solar batteries to three percent. Park was yet to be satisfied. Building on the scientific fact that the yield of energy from visible rays are greatest in the colors red and green, Park quickly moved to improve the new model. The problem was that the standard quantum dots converted UV rays to blue visible rays. Park resorted another process of quantum mechanics called ‘energy tuning’, which allowed the standard quantum dot to finally convert UV rays in a yellowish light, well between the rays of red and green. His new finding improved the power conversion efficiency to four percent. Now comes the final stage of Parks recent journey. Although his improvements to the standard solar battery was immensely significant, one flaw of his model was that it was composed of cadmium, a heavily regulated material. To make his model feasible for commercialized use, Park had to find a replacement for cadmium, which he found in a material called gallium. With his new improvement, Park’s research had been recognized and published in one of the most internationally renowned scientific journal, Advanced Energy Materials. Park’s research had been recognized and published in Advanced Energy Materials. As a word of advice to students aspiring to follow a scientific career, Park emphasized the importance of attitude. According to Park, the rate of development of scientific technology has grown exponentially within the past few decades. Students need to be aware of this, and needs to make an effort to follow recent discoveries and trending methods as opposed to focusing on traditional learning through textbooks. He also advised students to be well studied in software technologies, as they have grown much more significant in all domains of engineering. “The key is fundamental base, and a prepared attitude,” commented Park. Lee Chang-hyun pizz1125@hanyang.ac.kr Photo by Park Geun-hyung

2018-06 25

[Faculty]Childhood Inspiration Shared With Pupils

Some people have ‘that moment’ when they decide what career path to pursue. For Kim Eung-soo (Department of String and Wind Instruments), it was when he first listened to Mozart’s Violin Concertos when he was in elementary school. After about 30 years, Kim organized a concert with his students to play his childhood inspiration at Paiknam Art hall, on April 30th. Not a lot of concert play the entire concertos (comprised of five songs) in one occassion, as the pieces are long and very difficult to play. It is most likely that Kim’s performance was the first one in Korean musical history to play the whole set of songs at once. To perfect the songs, Kim and ensemble SOL practiced for two months for the concert. Kim Hyung-eun (String & Wind Instruments,4th year) mentioned “after this concert, preparing other songs and concerts felt whole lot easier.” Unlike other concerts, where there are separate team to organize the event, the performers had to do everything from advertising, contacting journalists and putting up posters on the wall. Kim Eung-soo (Department of String and Wind Instruments) is explaining about the meaning of ensemble SOL at Paiknam Art hall, on April 30th. The ensemble members all students of Kim, with 15 violin players. It is not common for a professor and students to play in a same concert, as there are unignorable gaps between the performers. What Kim wanted to make through the event is to make a “fence” for his students to keep in touch and to cooperate with eath other even after the graduation. Kim, the student, also agreed on the point commenting “through overcoming the hardships together, the performers became really close.” She also thanked her professor for making the concert possible. Kim graduated all three universities; University of Music and Performing arts Vienna, University of Music and Performing arts Gratz and Hannover Universty of Music, Drama and Media summa kum laude (first of class, meaning ‘with highest honor’ in English). However, despite of his awards and career, I could tell he is a very humble person through his remarks such as “I personally don’t think I am good enough to teach anyone,” “I am honored to participate in one of the most great things humanly possible, education.” Kim also emphasized that Hanyang University students have the necessary skills to become top musicians, so that they need to have more pride in our school and be more self-content. Kim and some of his students, namely Kim Hyung-eun, is participating in Korean Chamber Music Concert on coming 27th and 29th of June, at Seoul Arts Center. He also plans to make more events where he can harmonize with his students sometime next month. With the love and passion for both violin and his students, his plans seem bright. "Have more confidence" was the encouragement message Kim wants to give to his students. Kim so-yun dash070@naver.com Photos by Kang Cho-hyun

2018-06 25

[Faculty]Going Against Dominant Paradigms

Professor Eun Yong-soo (Department of Political Science and International Studies) recently published a new book, What is at Stake in Building "Non-Western" International Relations Theory?, this March, following his former book Regionalizing Global Crises which was released in 2016. Both writings were published by major publishers Routledge and Palgrave, respectively. Both publishers are renowned companies with their published writings being considered must-read materials within the field of diplomatic politics. Eun's recently published book What is at Stake in Building "Non-Western" International Relations Theory? focuses upon the existing dominant paradigms of the Western region, and how effective alternatives can be harmoniously placed from an Eastern perspective. This is going further in depth into the subject of his former book, which shed light on the theoretical backgrounds of such dominant paradigms and questioned whether the newly arising alternatives would provide an absolute replacement or act as a supplement to the existing theories. Professor Eun Yong-soo (Department of Political Science and International Studies) recently published his book What is at Stake in Building "Non-Western" International Relations Theory? In the book, Eun tries to provide solutions to the current dominant Western paradigms from the perspectives of other regions. Eun takes the stance that the existing dominant Western paradigms must be seen from an Eastern perspective, while finding harmonious frameworks in which the newly suggested theories can be applied to a non-Western culture. This goes against two extreme stances that the dominant Western paradigms are suitable from a global stance, whereas the other argues that the Western paradigms should be completely replaced with new theories that meet the needs of non-Western regions. "By taking a midway stance, I had to be ready to take the criticisms of both extreme perspectives," explained Eun during the interview. Eun also mentioned the strict evaluation process of the major publishers as a hardship while writing his recent book. Routledge and Palgrave, both being major publishers, which are highly sought-after by many writers in the field, have a strict examination process that goes over four major trials. They have a double blind review, which assures the anonymity of both the author and examiners in order to maintain an impartial examination process that is focused upon the proposed content only. As having two books published by these major companies has a significant meaning to him as a scholar within this particular field, Eun stated that awaiting the long trial process was a difficult task for him. When asked of his future plans, Eun answered that he is planning to conduct research upon the concept of emotion. He explained how the collective emotion of the public can represent a national sentiment and furthermore be used as a methodological tool for understanding international relations. From this perspective, understanding the formation and conversion process of a national sentiment can help the consolidation between nations, especially within the North-East Asian region. The whole premise of this research project began with an examination of the belief that emotion is an opposing concept of rationality, as it was long seen throughout history. Eun shared his research principles during the interview: continuously challenging and questioning the already accepted social norms, which goes alongside his newly planned research on collective emotion. Such thoughts go alongside with Eun's research principles, which put an emphasis upon challenging already accepted social norms. Most of his research started upon questioning whether the social norms that we have accepted are really right. He gave an example of how most of the Western paradigms were simply applied within the Korean context, yet Eun questioned this whole application process in the introduction of his recent research. He stated that, “As a professor and scholar, I believe that finding a hole within a box is my job. Widening and passing through this hole is a task that future students must fulfill.” Choi Seo-yong tjdyd1@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Park Kuen-hyung