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2017-10 15

[Student]Winners of 2017 International Robot Contest

Held annually in the Korea International Exhibition and Convention Center (KINTEX), the International Robot Contest (IRC) is the largest robotic event in Korea. In October of 2017, IRC once again welcomed contestants from various countries such as Japan, Singapore, and Malaysia. Of several categories of the contest, the gold prize winner of the TurtleBot Auto Race area is the team Real Bapdodook (rice thief), consisting of four students from the Department of Robotics: Jung Hyun-cheol (3rd year), Lee Do-gyu (2nd year), Cho Min-soo (3rd year) and Jung Min-jae (3rd year). Real Bapdodook's gold prize (on the left) and their finished product Ganjang-gae-jang (on the right) (Photo courtesy of Real Bapdodook) Intense concentration as when eating “The Department of Robotics was established in 2013, and we are the first group of students to be admitted into the department. The contest let four of us to come together.” TurtleBot is a robot with open-source software, which is the main item used for the event. All four students were highly interested in it, which became a main motive for them to team up together. The name of the team seems quite unique to be a robotic contest entry. Rice thief, Bapdodook in Korean, is a term referring to food so delicious that it arouses an appetite to the point where one finishes a bowl of rice instantly. The members decided to name their team Real Bapdodook because when people are eating “rice thieves,” they concentrate on eating so much that they become silent. Similarly, the team wanted to focus their TurtleBot to the extent where they become wordless. Fittingly, the name of their robot is Ganjang-gaejang (soy sauce marinated crab), because the finished look of their work resembles the shape of a crab—soy sauce marinated crab is one type of Korean food considered to be a bapdodook. “We decided to participate in the contest because even though it had been three years since we entered the department, we had not really had any opportunity to actually make robots or create an algorithm that goes along with it. With the desire to utilize what we have learned, we searched for robotic contests and came across the IRC TurtleBot Auto Race." Besides, they wanted to put robot operating system (ROS) into use and get a real-life lesson from experience. From left to right: Jung Min-jae, Jung Hyun-cheol, Cho Min-soo, and Lee Do-gyu. (Photo courtesy of Real Bapdodook) The gold mine of efforts “By the time we finished preparing for the contest, we wished to have some extra days of breaks, but the new semester greeted us.” Preparing for the contest throughout their entire summer break, there were largely three impasses the team had to jump over. First and the most difficult barrier was studying ROS (coding system of communication among sensors of the robot). Since TurtleBot was an ROS-based device, not knowing it will make it impossible to start the project. The team had no helping hand to tutor them with the equipment, so they started from scratch by studying with online materials. Another barrier was assembling different parts. No matter how supreme a single part is, it is of no use if it does not fit into the robot. From finding out how an equipment works to figuring out how to harmonize the whole system, there were piles of problems to solve. Lastly, “tuning” the robot to the course of the contest field was a big issue. In order to make the robot run perfectly on its own, this step was essential. This step took the longest because there was simply no other way than to test with trial and error. The track of TurtleBot Auto Race. (Photo courtesy of Real Bapdodook) “Hard work pays off” is what the team said after going through long, exhausting periods of preparation and finally tasting victory. Ganjang-gaejang was outstanding in its speed and stability, but it was especially praised for staying close to the basic, provided materials. While other teams dismantled the TurtleBot and added additional parts that costed much, Real Bapdodook focused on maximizing the efficiency with what was given, proving that winning requires no fancy accessories. The contest offered no cash prize but an upgrade of the TurtleBot, which the team is willing to use for the department’s ROS education. Ganjang-gaejang was excellent in line-tracing as well, which was a crucial factor in making it the winner. From discerning lights, signs, and barricade to safely passing tunnels, the team’s robot successfully completed the given missions. Finishing the track with impressive line-tracing at a speed faster than other teams, the team Real Bapdodook proved its competency. Looking forward to participating in more robotic contests in the future, the members are proudly holding the gold prize in their hands. (Photo courtesy of Real Bapdodook) Jeon Chae-yun chaeyun111@hanyang.ac.kr

2017-10 02

[Alumni]Don’t be Afraid to Follow Your Values

The third top box office hit in the history of Korean documentary films, Our President (2017) is directed by a Hanyang alumni, Lee Chang-jae (Policy Studies, ’94). He studied engineering before coming to Hanyang, and studied law in our school. After graduation, he worked in the field of journalism, then media. Now he is a documentary movie director, a writer, and a professor. News H visited Lee this week to have a closer look into his past and recent work. Lee is enthusiastically explaining how leading one's life by oneself is important. What seems like a winding path “If I look back, it was not all so meaningless after all,” said Lee, thinking back to his past. Lee studied law because of his parent’s will. He originally wanted to study history, but his parents told him he would never get a job majoring in history. During his college years, he wanted to discover and prove what he liked and was good at. He figured writing was his path, and applied for numerous competitions, all of which he did not win. Dramatically, he won first place in the Hanyang Literature Competition. “Thinking ‘I wanted to walk this path’ in my mind only seemed like it would fly away so easily. I had to prove myself before really going into the other direction.” After being discharged from the military, Lee felt that he must climb the tree to eat the fruit. Hoping to study journalism, he desperately felt the need for more information. There were not a lot of graduates, nor peers to help him. Therefore, he knocked on the doors of the Executive Vice President and Head of the Office of Planning. He demanded a preparation group for the press exam, which is now the preparation course for the press examination. In his first and second job, he felt he lost the dominance over his life once again. Leading a hectic life and being promoted fast, time flew, and he had sipped his bridle away. Hence, he went to Chicago to learn film. Poster of Lee's latest movie, Our President (2017) One step forward at the edge of a cliff There is a saying in Buddhism, ‘百尺竿頭進一步’. It means to take a step forward at the edge of a hundred ‘chuck’ (a traditional measure length of a hand, 33.3cm.) cliff. Going to Chicago and coming back to Korea was a big step for Lee. Making a movie took about three years, and with him having nothing left in Korea made him feel heavy. That’s when he was offered a position with the school. Lee makes movies on the topics he is interested in. The movie, On the Road (2013) was based on the reflection he had 20 years ago, seriously considering entering the Buddhist priesthood. The latest movie, Our President (2017) started on Lee’s hope to remind Korean citizens that we once had a time when people chose their own presidential candidates and the president. “Just like superheroes go and save the world when they are told of their super-power, I wanted to give our citizens a reminder that they own their country.” Lee mentioned that because another documentary movie on the late Roh’s life was released just a few months before Lee’s movie, he had to look for the clips that were not used in the other movie. Looking through the 60 hour long material, the last moment when Roh says, “I am Roh Moo-hyun” and turns his back caught Lee’s eyes. “It felt like the clip was left unused for me.” That’s when he decided the ending moment of the entire film. “Out of 9000 minutes of the interview, only 40 minutes are used in the documentary. That’s why I need to look back at the materials and take some time for myself to contemplate.” Lee always notices himself being changed after a film. “I have to be completely immersed into one’s life in order to make a documentary film. Change in my perspective is almost inevitable,” said Lee. He pointed that introspection and learning has to be balanced to form a truly dimensional self. That is why he always writes a book after a film. Lee plans to start on another project around the upcoming December. “Whenever I make a new movie, external success is not my goal. Only my inner values that I pursue truly fulfills me,” said Lee with a peaceful smile on his face. Kim So-yun dash070@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Kim Youn-soo

2017-10 02

[Student]A Donor and a Champion

“A lot of people say I am already successful, and they congratulate me for my achievements. However, I only think this is the beginning,” remarked Won Doo-jae (Sports and Well-being, 2nd year). Won is the key player of Hanyang’s soccer team and one of the members of the national team, U-18 and U-19. In the summer of 2017, he has also joined the J2 League’s Avispa Fukuoka team, proving his competence. On top of his achievements, Won has made headlines because he has donated one hundred million won to Hanyang University (HYU), claiming that Hanyang is the place of his growth. Ups and downs As everything starts small and trivial, Won’s interest in soccer first sprouted when he was in elementary school. First regarding soccer as his hobby and the subject of his special activity club at school, he stepped into what later became his career path, unknowingly. Entering middle school is when he was determined that he wanted to be engaged in soccer professionally, deeply consulting his parents about his decision for the first time. This led him to enter a middle school that had a soccer team and that provided him the opportunity to receive lessons and training. This continued throughout his high school days. By the end of his high school years, Won was put on the brink of going through a surgery due to his sports hernia (a symptom in the pubis are common to sports players). It was the time he was about to join the national representative’s team, so Won was put in a serious dilemma. His desire to join the team, in the end, overpowered his necessity to go through the surgery. Enduring both pain and fear of his symptom, he says, “was the most difficult time for me so far.” He postponed his surgery to a future time by which his symptom was not only on the right side of his pubis but also on his left. Won's back number in the team Avispa Fukuoka is 6. (Photo courtesy of Sportal Korea) Climbing the long way and overcoming hardship, Won became who he is today. He recalled, “I would say my professional debut game was the most memorable game of all. The game was held in July of 2017 against Yamagata, the home team of the league. I was more excited than nervous because I went through so much harsh training.” Won is currently taking a year off due to his tight schedule of matches and training. He had the urge to become an official soccer player so enthusiastically that it became his priority over academics. “I guess soccer was a louder call,” chuckled Won. He is playing in the league in Japan now! Before matches, Won says he watches a lot of videos of soccer matches and listens to energizing music. Right before going to the match, he makes sounds with his hands to prevent himself from being too nervous. The secret to maintaining his stamina, according to Won, is running in the games, since soccer is a sport that involves a large field and the players incessantly run. “Participating in many games and going through training as a team beforehand helps to keep up my stamina.” During the game, however, he does not have the conscience to think about anything else but to focus on the game. "Untill I reach my full potential!" (second to the right on top) (Photo courtesy of Korea Football Association) Shoot goal to the next stage! “What I find attractive about soccer is its usage of the feet, perhaps the most difficult part of the body to handle, to maneuver the ball so freely,” remarked Won. Soccer is his passion, career, and life. He expressed his gratitude to all his coaches and especially to HYU. “Hanyang is the place of my growth” is what Won said when donating a hundred million won to the school. To elaborate, he described Hanyang as the place he grew up through activities and lessons. Just like he did in middle and high school, he met a great coach and received constructive advice and training that led him to become who he is. His times of acquiring skills and accumulating experience has surely seemed to pay off. “My achievements so far are the beginning of my life. I believe there is a long path lying in front of me, and I can do better, infinitely. To reach my full potential, I’m never stopping or giving up!” cheered Won. His goal is to become a better soccer player than he is today, nourishing his potential with his passion. He believes there is no stop to improving, which explains all his hard work and relentless effort to pave the path that lies ahead of him. "Hanyang is where I grew up." Jeon Chae-yun chaeyun111@hanyang.ac.kr

2017-09 26

[Student]Two Brave Hanyangians Saving Lives

Stepping into emergency situations requires a great deal of courage and training. This week, News H met two of the brave lions of Hanyang, Lee Mok-wang (Division of Sport Science, 3rd year) and Lee Beum-hee (Chinese Language & Literature, 1st year). Both students saved a man’s life by operating cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Lee Mok-wang is explaining the situation. Q1. Could you explain the situation when you found the patient? Beom-hee: I was on patrol in the Dongdaemun area with a police lieutenant as usual when a couple walking in front of us reported the patient. The man was laying on the ground and his body was stiff, breath being short. His eyes were flipped, so I immediately felt something was wrong with him. Mok-wang: An evening before Memorial Day, I went to Korea Integrated Freight Terminal for a one day part time job. While I was working, a man about five meters away from me collapsed while grabbing a bar. Nobody knew he was having cardiac arrest. We all just thought he was taking a break. I had my eyes on him because I felt something was going on. Then I realized his breath was abnormally rapid and deep. Q2. Why were you around the area? Beom-hee: I am serving as a tourist police, and a tourist policeperson patrols tourist attractions such as Dongdaemun, Myung-dong, and Hongdae in rotation. I have never seen a person passed out on the ground on my past patrols, though. Mok-wang: I was working in the terminal as a daily part timer. I was planning to donate the daily wage to the Ansan Shalom Welfare Center because I always wanted to share with people in need. I find it very lucky for someone who can perform CPR to be there at the moment to save a man’s life. Q3. What was the first thought that came into your mind? Beom-hee: To be honest, I was scared at first. I am a policeperson but I have never seen anyone like that. But the uniform gave me a big sense of responsibility. Q4. What were the people around you doing at the time? Beom-hee: The police lieutenant that I was accompanied with told me that we have to tilt the patient’s head to open the airway. That’s when we realized his head was bleeding. As there were no more people than us and the initial reporters, I asked them to call for the ambulance. But they were already calling. The couple explained the situation to the paramedic on the phone and told me what he said. Mok-wang: They were in a state of panic, not knowing what to do. I asked a person to call the ambulance while performing CPR. It took about 10 to 15 minutes for the ambulance to come. Lee Beum-hee is holding an award from the Seoul Metropolitan Police Agency. (Photo courtesy of Lee) Q5. How long did you operate CPR? What thoughts did you have during the operation? Beom-hee: It took about four to five minutes, but I wasn't so sure. Performing CPR was harder than I thought because I had to put all my weight to my arms. During the operation, the patient’s wife and young daughter came and were crying. Looking at his family being so worried, I couldn’t stop. Mok-wang: I performed for about 10 to 15 minutes, and it was tiring. But, because I major in sports, I work our regularly, and I think it helped a lot. Q6. When did you know that the patient would be okay? Beon-hee: As I was performing CPR, right before the ambulance arrived, the patient’s eyes came back to a normal position, and he was able to breathe on his own. I could feel he was coming back. I was so relieved. Because for the past four minutes of operation, he did not move or react at all. I was also frantic at that time, but I still remembered hearing an old gentleman saying, ‘oh, he’s alive now.’ Q7. When did you learn how to perform CPR? Beom-hee: I learned CPR in the army recruits’ training center. I couldn’t remember everything I learned at the moment, but I did everything that I remembered. Mok-wang: I learned it for the first time when I entered the military in the army recruits’ training center. After I was discharged from the military, I had an opportunity to learn once again in school. (Left) Lee Mok-wang is delivering his daily wage to the Ansan Shalom Welfare Center. (Right) Lee recieved an achievement award from the Dean of College of Sports and Arts. Q8. Did you get in contact with the patient after they got better? Beom-hee: Unfortunately I didn't. About two weeks after the incident, I heard that he was a professor in Macau through a news article, so I tried to find his contact on the university homepage. However, I could not find him. I did ask for his contact in the hospital when I saw him for the last time, but his wife told me they don’t have any contact in Korea. Mok-wang: I did not personally get in touch with him, but I heard that he is living in a tough environment. I am not expecting any thanks because I did what I had to do. I just wish he gets well soon. Q9. Is there a thing you would like to mention to others? Beom-hee: I would like to say something to the people who will learn CPR in the future. You might wonder if you will ever perform CPR in your life, but unexpected things happen in life in unexpected moments. I recommend you teach CPR to your family members, as anyone can have cardiac arrest, even at home. Mok-wang: Please pay attention during the CPR education. Many people disregard the precious education and let it pass by. However, if you learn the operation properly, someday you will be able to handle emergency situations well. We need to be conscious that cardiac arrest can happen to your family and friends. "I was able to realize the weight of a uniform through this incident. I hope I can manage future emergency situations better and more calmly." Kim So-yun dash070@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Kim Youn-soo and Park Young-min

2017-09 26

[Alumni]True Educator of Korean Arts

Always dreaming of becoming the best pansori performer, Wang has always pictured himself being on the stage, under bright spotlights highlighting his every movement ever since he was a student. Although he now performs on the stage, Wang dreams of something different. “We not only try to raise the students as artists, but as a person with righteous manners before being glamorous artists,” said Wang. From student to being a teacher Wang was the first student in Hanyang University (HYU) to have majored in Korean traditional song, pansori. Since it was the first year that HYU started the curriculum for Korean traditional music majors, there was much chaos. Wang recalls, “There was no pansori performer who could teach me in my freshman year. The curriculum just wasn’t ready at the time. Still, we did have some great professors from my second year.” Since Wang’s family was not affluent at the time, he could have stopped his career from his second year. “My teacher, Park Gui-hee took me to the Korean Culture and Arts Foundation and asked the dean for a scholarship herself,” commented Wang. "Overcoming diverse obstacles in life will lead to growth somehow." As Park was the mentor for Wang and a former founder of the National Middle & High School of Traditional Korean Arts, Wang was able to work as a part time teacher during his fourth year at HYU. “I didn’t have many classes to take in my last year at school and I had to do something to earn money,” added Wang. Right after his graduation from HYU, Wang was offered to teach at the School of Traditional Korean Arts as a proper teacher since he completed a course in teaching. “I couldn’t let her down. After all the things she had done for me,” commented Wang. Although he wanted to enter The National Changguk Company of Korea and perform as a pansori performer, the dream had to wait for a while. From performer to being a principal After 13 years of teaching at the National Middle & High School of Traditional Korean Arts, Wang finally got the chance to enter the National Changguk Company of Korea in 1999. “I always had that craving for performance inside me. Even when I was the teacher at the school, I would take my students to see the performances or go to watch it on my own,” chuckled Wang. Due to his talents, Wang has starred in diverse traditional Korean operas as the main actor and produced a lot of his own as well. After 15 years of performances, Wang returned to the school to as a principal. “I think I took my tests to prove that I was worthy of becoming the principal of this school. That is why I am so proud to be here,” commented Wang. Although he could have asked for better treatment of being a professor or to not agree to take the tests for becoming the principal, Wang accepted the terms suggested from the school to be proud of himself. Moreover, it was the school that Wang had spent his early career which made it more emotionally attaching for him. “I felt the necessity to return to this school to lead my students into the world of Korean arts. I would love to be the role model for them,” added Wang. “Since I have diverse experiences from the past to the present, I wish to be the type of principal that students can always lean on.” "I wish to be the type of principal that students can always lean on.” Kim Seung Jun nzdave94@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Choi Minju

2017-09 19

[Faculty]Robotics is for Everyone

“I will be riding a huge robot like in the cartoons in 100 years, and I’ll live forever,” smiled Professor Han Jea-kweon (Department of Interdisciplinary Robit Engineering ). Han in his office in the late afternoon gave two vastly contrasting impressions of a pure child and an agile scholar. News H met with Han to hear more stories about his recent developments and insight in robotics. Han is explaining how much experience is valuable. Get out of the library “It’s really sad that most students ask me the question because it implies how much the young generation of our society is suffering from uncertainty, especially on their future.” When asked, ‘What made you become a robot engineer?’, Han answered both sarcastically and empathetically. He did have a special reason on becoming the person who he is now, but he wanted to make sure that the readers do not fall into the frame of thought that a person needs ‘the moment’ or ‘the reason’ to decide what to do in the future. Han went on to explain that a person passes by hundreds and thousands of opportunities in his or her lifetime, but it is what gives them fun and joy that they are truly attracted to. And ‘the thing’ is not found in books but in experiences. Han himself has also accumulated abundant experiences as a foundation of being one of the leading scholar in the field. Han has always wanted to make robots, but due to the lack of opportunities in Korea at that time, he proceeded with his study in graduate school in automobiles. Then, he got a job in a major company as mainstream society had told him to. “But there was always this unfulfilled thirst inside telling me, ‘this is not your life! You are not born to do this, go on and do what you really want to do,” recalled Han. So, he chose to study in the States to overcome such lack of opportunity. “At that time, I did not foresee my salary to be cut in half,” laughed Han. Geek in the lab Han expressed the most enthusiasm and seriousness when he talked about his work. “I really was a geek before. Watching robot animation is still one of the most important parts of my day,” said Han. The first robot he ever made was a ‘Humvee’, a transformer-like robot. The Humvee was made over the course of one week, during my summer vacation back in 2007, when the movie Transformers (2007) was first released. Han and his wife rebuilt an RC car ‘hummer’ and gave it arms and legs. The Humvee video ‘Real Transformer NO C.G. Upgrade Version -Humvee Bioloid-‘ uploaded on Youtube hit more than 342,000 views to this date. Han’s passion for robots only grew over time while he studied in the United States for his doctoral degree. After coming back to Korea, Han participated in DARPA (Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency) Robotics Challenge that lasted for three years from 2012 to 2015. Coming back from the States, Han was bitterly surprised at the situation of the Korean robotics field. The biggest challenge he felt was the lack of intelligence. “The people we had, one by one, were brighter than the ones I’ve seen in the States, but the absolute number was too small.” Han compared the situation with the professional baseball league, where other countries such as Japan or the US have lots of back up players to change in every match, but we do not. That is the moment when he decided to get involved in education. EDIE, one of Han's robots. EDIE is a type of Human Robot interaction robot, intricately structured to communicate and bond with humans. Robots WILL create jobs “Humanity has been worried about robots and machines taking their jobs since the 1760s,” smiled Han. He advised that we need to search for what we can do ‘with’ the robots instead of being worried about what they will take from us. Traditional elites good at calculation and memorizing will lose jobs. But people with intuition, sense and creativity will flourish in unlimited possibilities. That is because robotics requires people from all fields with the aforementioned qualities. For instance, it took a designer, psychologists, and screen play experts in creating a Human Robot Interaction (HRI) robot EDIE. “Robot is a tool needed in our daily lives. Students now need to contemplate on how to progress one step ahead with robots and create social values.” Han plans to focus on three main topics in robotics; humanoid robots, HRI and disaster inspection robots for the short term. Kim So-yun dash070@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Park Yong-min

2017-09 17

[Alumni]Peru’s Finest Dessert

Just as the conquistadors have set their foot on South America in search of gold bars, Pyo Ji-do (Business, ’16) has opened up his own dessert café in Peru and named it Mister Bingsu (ice flakes with syrup). Peru is known to be very warm all around the year that even in the winter, temperatures would only fall to 17 to 19 degrees. After experiencing Peru during an exchange student program, Pyo has immediately fallen in love with the country. Ice flakes where no snow falls In 2014, Pyo had the opportunity to live in Peru for a year during his exchange student program. With his mind focused on starting his own business, Pyo started looking for items that would catch the eyes of Peruvians. “They love ice cream due to the warm weather, but there were not a lot of choices to choose from,” recalled Pyo. Ice flakes with syrup along with diverse types of fresh fruits were what Pyo came up with immediately. “At the moment, we only have five types of bingsu; strawberry, mango, chocolate, cheese, and melon. We are planning to expand our menu choices later on,” added Pyo. Kim (left) and Pyo (right) taking pictures with customers. (Courtesy of Pyo) After returning to Korea, Pyo contacted his high school friend and started preparing to open Mister Bingsu. “We were planning to open up our business in December 2016 but due to the delay in paperwork, we were able to start in April 2017,” commented Pyo. As Pyo has experienced, South American culture always maintains its leisurely manner which was one of the hardships that Pyo has faced. “Sometimes, I faced problems with translating formal paperwork, but I was able to achieve all this thanks to my homestay family.” Success in Peru “Peruvians loved experiencing bingsu for the first time in their lives. We were able to become successful through TV programs,” chuckled Pyo. Right after 2 weeks of starting Mister Bingsu, Peru’s biggest national broadcasting team have filmed Pyo’s store. In addition, a lot of Peruvians have advertised Mister Bingsu through social network services as well. “I think we were quite lucky to have such great opportunities,” mentioned Pyo. Before starting up the business in Peru, Pyo studied about diverse bingsu while working in Sulbing, one of the biggest bingsu franchise stores in Korea. “A lot of the recipes, famous in Korea, could not be used due to the high cost. Instead, we decided to localize our menus.” Peruvians line up to experience Mister Bingsu. (Courtesy of Pyo) Pyo is preparing to expand his business all around South America. “We are receiving diverse love calls from other regions in Peru and even neighboring countries,” explained Pyo. Yet there are some obstacles that Pyo has to overcome. “Our sales dropped during the winter which is why we are preparing to diversify our menus,” added Pyo. As Pyo enjoys cooking from time to time, he has further wishes of opening Korean restaurants as well. “We are far from a success yet. We will work harder to spread our Korean culture and food.” Kim Seung Jun nzdave94@hanyang.ac.kr

2017-09 10

[Student]Being the Eye For the Blind

Staring deep into the horizon, a man was sitting by the sea watching the waves splashing against the thirty-foot cliff. Although this is not a sentence with diverse adjectives, people who have been to the sea at least once in their lives and have seen it with their very own eyes would be able to picture the scene quite visually in their own ways. “Because blind people are lacking one of their senses, they seem to be missing out on a lot of fun in the world, which is why we have decided to become the eye for them,” commented Shin Jung-ah (Information System, 3rd year). Team Hues, consisting of Shin, Sung Young-jae (Business, 4th year) and two developers from different colleges have created “Miris: Memorable Iris”, which is a device that enables blind people to hear the texts being read out into speech. Sung and Shin discuss the developments necessary for the Miris. Team Hues, light and hope for All Team Hues have already won grand prizes in several contests with their brilliant technological idea for its high degree of completion and marketability. Over 90 percent of blind people are illiterate in Korea, meaning that only 10 percent of blind people in Korea are able to read braille. Yet there are not so many devices that enable blind people to be able to read or study. Most of the devices are targeted towards the 10 percent of the literate blind since it is much cheaper to develop and is easier to do so through braille. What team Hues have targeted were those in the 90 percent majority of blind people who cannot read braille, although they could speak Korean. “It is very obvious that knowledge inequality comes from not the disability itself, but rather from the lack of developers trying to help blind people eager to learn more,” pointed out Shin. Miris is a small camera device that people can wear like glasses and connects with the earphones to let them hear the texts being read out. Through the text to speech (TTS) technology, the camera would analyze the fonts which would let the people “hear” the books they wish to read. What is more interesting is that Miris would have a bookmark system which would let blind people find the book they were reading, plus mark the pages that they have read. Through the RFID and NFC chips, the Miris sensors would scan the microchips and would react to the sensor. Since there are so many cutting-edge technologies involved in this one machine, such as image processing technology, OCR, the text to speech, and so on, Miris has yet to be commercialized as the miniaturization process has yet to be developed. As the team name represents, team Hues will continue to suggest new pathways of enlightenment for the blind. They believe true knowledge comes from books, even with the development of the Internet--and Hues is determined to bring a new dimension to the educational sector for the blind. "We would love to be the eye for the blind and help them read books." Kim Seung Jun nzdave94@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Choi Minju

2017-09 04

[Alumni]White Rabbit Guiding You to the Musical Wonderland

“Oh dear! Oh dear! I shall be too late!” mutters the white rabbit in Lewis Carroll’s book Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland. The rabbit eventually leads Alice down into the rabbit hole where the wonderland begins. Cho Chung-hee of the Department of Korean Language and Literature, is currently a jazz vocalist of the Band “Rabbit of March,” and a professor at the Department of Applied Music. Let’s follow Cho to the wonderland of jazz music! Cho is a solo jazz vocalist and also a leader of band "Rabbit of March." Fearless 20’s and music “I had no fear for my dreams in my 20’s,” said Cho. After four years of studying Korean language and literature at college, Cho made a decision to follow her heart towards music. “I always knew that deep inside me, I wanted to become a musician,” reminisced Cho. Once Cho made up her mind, she wanted to be told that this path is right so she sang a song in front of her senior. “Although my senior told me to give up on music, my decision was still firmly set," laughed out Cho. Without any support from her parents who wished her to become Korean language teacher, Cho began to build up her music career and worked for part-time jobs for living. “My favorite music was not fixed at that time. I explored for various genres and songs, wandered from time to time, and then found out that jazz is the one that I was looking for when I became 30,” explained Cho. Cho then was absorbed into the attractiveness of jazz. “Whilst my practice, my acquaintance suggested me musicians who could amplify the music together. Harmony with Hwang Sung-yong and John Vasconcello through our band has always been one of the luckiest moments in my life,” smiled Cho. Cooperation of the trio produced popular jazz music that opened up for the public. Jazz through “Rabbit of March” was no more a ‘league of their own,’ but a music everyone can enjoy. Song of Wind is one of the most popular songs by "Rabbit of March." (Video courtesy of Darichaola1's Youtube) Your roles in the cyclical life Cho is also a professor at the Department of Applied Music at Hanyang University, ERICA. Bearing responsibilities rising from various roles may give lemons to Cho. However, she rather enjoys the large spectrum of her life. “The job called professor taught be to become a better person before teaching students. Teaching requires my ability to know and explain from the very fundamental knowledge, which I was always unaware of,” said Cho. Her another dream is to become a performance producer. “Jazz was a hard music for the public to access, which I disliked about. So I want to design jazz performances that can be popular among people’s everyday lives,” explained Cho. Until now, Cho followed her own hope to become a jazz musician. “Jazz has no restrictions. Within a given frame of music, I can do whatever I wish to by playing with the rhythm, melody, improvisation, and more. However, this general audience might find such elements difficult,” said Cho. Thus, Cho wishes to create a jazz performance that includes intricate explanation of music to the audience and conversation between the audience and musicians. Within this, Cho can become an emcee, producer, song writer, and a musician. Cho encourages Hanyangians to find out their own definition of happiness. Cho is now planning to make jazz a present. “I wish my music can become presents representing four seasons for the audience. For example, when its Christmas, listeners can open the winter CD. Also, I want to make jazz music based on lullabies. I have so many dreams!” Cho says that it’s never cliché to tell others to pursue what they want. “Things you can do and want to do are correlated and cyclical. Look at me! I majored in Korean literature and it helps my music. I hope students of Hanyang will try out everything their hearts desire!” Kim Ju-hyun kimster9421@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Kim Youn-soo

2017-09 03

[Student]Writing as a Comprehensive Skill

What makes up a good song? Some would say good melody while others say good lyrics. Then, where do good melody or lyrics come from? Kang says, at least for the lyrics, it comes from everyday life. Kang Min-gu (Korean Language and Literature, Doctoral Program), a musician and a poet, unearthed his talent in writing when he was a young boy and developed that talent into his career. His discovery and strength in writing led him to become who he is today, an indie singer-songwriter and a poet by the name of Kang Baek-soo. A friend and the band Kang was schooled in all-boys middle school and high school in Korea, which completely eliminated any possible chance of school romance. When his friend presented a tempting idea, to make a band and perform at a all-girls high school, Kang could not help but accept the suggestion. This seemingly petty reason was the turning point of Kang’s life—this is how Kang began music. “I tried to have different hobbies such as sports and photography but they all didn't last long. Music is the only hobby that captivated my interest.” Entering Hanyang University and belonging to the College of Humanities, Kang naturally joined the band of the department, Dasalnolae. His ability of handling different instruments led him to be the main member of the band, especially in the times when only a few people joined the band. On one insignificant day, Kang saw his fellow member writing a song and making music. “At that moment, it looked easy and I thought, ‘why don’t I try writing a song myself?’” This is how he began writing songs. The lyrics of Kang’s songs come from his daily life as well. Just as he gets inspired by the little happenings in his life, his songs reflect the ordinary parts of his life and arouse a wave of empathy from the people who listens to his music. “I drink with my friends pretty often and every time, on my way back home at nights, I think about the memorable conversations I had because they could give me ideas for the lyrics.” One of his song, titled Wangsimni (click to listen), is a song based on his bitter feeling when he visited Wangsimni after graduating. The lyrics of his songs are easily relatable to those who have similar experience because they are not extraordinary. As an indie musician, Kang performs in music festivals, cafes, and other concerts he is called for. His nearest concert, The Wander Concert, will be held in few weeks on the shore of a cafe located in Incheon. Currently having seven music albums, hundreds of poems written, and four essays in books, Kang is actively engaged in his writing life. (Photo courtesy of Kang) A fine artist As a poet, on a different note, Kang insists on something of his own. When composing a song, he tends to take other people’s opinions into consideration because he aspires to produce music that people can feel attachment to. However, when it comes to poems, his own thoughts are all that matters. “To me, poems are like my identity. I take no other opinions and evaluate and judge my own poems on my own. No other peoples’ opinions are to be incorporated,” stated Kang, sternly. While his songs are for the public, his poems are for himself exclusively. Though he started his band and music by a coincidental chance, he firmly believes that his life path would still have navigated toward writing anyway. As a Korean Language and Literature major with his specialty in modern poetry, he regards his main job as a poet. Kang is preparing to publish his first collection of poems. He has written hundreds of poems so far and he is currently in the process of selecting the best ones of all. “I want to maintain my creative stamina and consistently produce my works.” He wants to be someone who maintains his job and be proud of the stacks of works he produces as time goes by. Reflecting his relatable and interesting songs and their lyrics, his collection of poems sure sounds unique and exciting to see. “Writing is my job. If I write on a manuscript paper, then it’s a poem. If on a music paper, it’s a song.” (Photo courtesy of Kang) Jeon Chae-yun chaeyun111@hanyang.ac.kr