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2018-06 22

[Student]Singer, Student, and Star

Many of us have tuned in for Mnet’s Super Star K for several years now. One competitor on Super Star K 4 (2012) who made it to the top 12 chose to attend Hanyang University and is now preparing to graduate. News H met Lee Ji Hye (Applied Music, 4th year) on a sunny summer afternoon at an aesthetic café in front of ERICA campus. Lee, on June 20th. She was just like any other Hanyang student, happy for her semester to finally be over. Lee was 17 when she auditioned for Super Star K, and this was her first audition ever. Lee loved music, especially playing musical instruments such as classical piano and Cello. She also loved singing from a young age, but the dream of becoming a singer did not seem like an option for her due to her parents’ disapproval. Nevertheless, Lee stepped up and participated in the audition program, wanting to see how good she was. Lee definitely made a positive impression on the public with her singing. However, there were rumors and hateful comments as well - a harsh thing for a 17-year-old student to handle. “I have still never watched a single episode of the show. But I was able to get through the hard times with my mother’s support and her positivity. We used to laugh at the comments because while they were all very mean, they also praised my singing,” smiled Lee. Through the experience, she believes she has gotten stronger and more careful about talking about celebrities or even friends on the topic of unidentified rumors. Despite the harsh criticism she has received, Lee is thankful for the experience she had, especially the Super Star K Concert in Olympic Park, which was attended by an audience of several thousand people. The high school student grew up to become a mature artist and student at Hanyang who writes her own lyrics. Lee is now officially listed as a songwriter after her recent digital single, "No Spring After All" (2017). The emotional, sorrowful lyrics are partly based on her experiences during college, especially the lessons she learned through break-ups, she had through break-ups. Lee mentioned that “the hardest part while writing a song was to confine my thoughts into a fixed melody. I didn’t want to write lyrics like all the other love songs out there; I wanted to put my feelings and thoughts into it, but it felt like it would be hard for the public to really understand it if I only told it with my own words. Finding the right balance between the two was difficult.” Lee performing on stage. She emphasizes the importance of lyrics and the delivery of emotion through them. (Photo courtesy of Lee) Like the song "No Spring After All" (2017), most of Lee’s songs are ballads. Lee commented that her voice and tone fit with emotional lines, but she has recently started listening to rock music and happy songs as part of an effort to ‘"not be too sad." Lee strives to grow as an artist. She tries especially hard to deliver emotion and sensations through her songs. Now preparing for the upcoming graduation show this October, she is looking forward to being able to impact more and more audiences in the future. Kim So-yun dash070@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Lee Jin-myung

2018-06 19

[Student]The Washington Center (TWC) Internship Program

As the school's nickname “Engine of Korea” suggests, Hanyang University (HYU) offers many programs for outgoing students to build sophisticated skills for independent thinking and to foster knowledge and wisdom through extensive experiences. The Washington Center (TWC) Internship Program is one of the school's programs which provides students with the opportunity to work as interns at desired organizations all located in Washington D.C. The center itself was created in 1975 for the purpose of connecting students and helping them to translate college majors into career paths. It is a unique program in the sense that it is available not only to Korean students but also to those from all around the world, allowing students the chance to work in a real international environment. Lim Gi-hwan (Department of Financial Management, 4th year) and Shin Jae-ah (Division of International Studies, 3rd year) are two students who took part in the TWC program in January 2017 and January 2018. Lim Gi-hwan (Department of Financial Management, 4th year) took part in The Washington Center program in 2017 and 2018. “I actually didn't know about TWC until I got a message from the school. Being able to work in the capital seemed really attractive and that's what got me to apply for the program," said Lim. Shin on the other hand, was well aware of the program since her freshman year, and applied as soon as she became a junior. "It seemed like a great opportunity to build some practical experience in the States, which I'd never been to before.” The whole process was harder than they had first anticipated. After successfully applying to the TWC program, it is entirely up to the students to apply for the final internship interview. Fortunately, the center guides them through each step and tries to match them with organizations that best matches their major, goals, skills, and most important of all, field of interest. There is also no limitation on the number of organizations one can apply for. Lim was able to work at the Department of Small and Local Development, which is a governmental organization that deals with small and medium-sized enterprises. Shin also worked at a governmental organization called the American Association of State Colleges and Universities (AASCU), dealing with SNS analysis, annual reports on civic engagement, and content creation. Shin Jae-ah (Division of International Studies, 3rd year) at AASCU in Washington D.C. (Photo courtesy of Shin) When asked about some of the hardships faced while working in the States, Lim said “I wasn't really fluent in English, so in the beginning I had some difficulties at work. So I would bring a recorder with me to work and record everything my boss or my colleagues would say, so I could replay it afterwards and practice my English.” Shin reflected on some of the moments of culture shock she had, ranging from different ways of housekeeping to living in relatively "unsafe" residential area due to recent shootings. However, Lim and Shin both emphasized how their lives in the States were enriching thanks to highly accessible and abundant museums, galleries, and academic seminars. “I used to live a very work-oriented life in Korea. After living in the States, I've learned to relax and really enjoy every moment of my life," said Shin. “After completing the program and having lived with roommates from different countries for a few months, I was able to get rid of some of the cultural prejudices I had held before working in the States," said Lim. Shin agreed that despite having lived overseas during her childhood, she realized that she was still culturally biased and was able to learn how to become more understanding of others. "It's not worth judging others. I learned to use my time on other things that are more valuable to me," said Shin. Shin (left) and Lim (right) during the interview on June 15th, 2018. Lim, graduating this semester, will be working at Hyundai Motors, while Shin will continue to complete her junior year. Both strongly recommended the program as it has helped them gain not only the experience of working overseas, but also other valuable life lessons. "I strongly encourage students to just give it a try as there's nothing to lose. It may not be the ideal work experience you've envisioned but it's important to keep in mind the possibility of finding value outside of work as well," said Lim. Shin added, "There are many students who want to work as interns overseas just because it sounds cool, but don't get too caught up in that and focus on what kind of work you really want to do. That will truly allow you to develop yourself as a person and help you grasp a clearer idea of your future path.” Park Joo-hyun julia1114@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Park Geun-hyung

2018-06 18

[Faculty]Professor Kim Ki-hyun, Laureate of the Science Technology And Researcher (STAR) Award

Over the course of the past few years, public awareness and concern for the level of air pollution has increased rapidly. More people have begun to monitor the level of fine dust concentration on a regular basis, and sanitary masks have become an indispensable daily item. In addition, air purifiers have become a key home appliance, now that opening the window brings in polluted air. In the midst of this growing awareness, the research achievements of Professor Kim Ki-hyun (Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering) is more illuminated than ever. Having been recognized for his significant contribution to air preservation, Kim received the Science Technology And Researcher (STAR) award in June. The STAR award is a prestigious award presented monthly to scientists in the fields of education, research, and industry. It was created in 1997 to promote the scientific and technological minds to the public, while boosting the morale of scientists in various sectors of the country. Kim was recognized by the committee for his creation of a nano-material that enables the assessment and control of pollutants in the air at a more effective rate. Through his research achievements, Kim Ki-hyun (Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering), the recipient of the Science Technology And Researcher (STAR) Award, has become internationally recognized as a prominent researcher in his field. To delve into the details of the research, Kim created the Metal Organic Framework (MOF), essentially a web of metals connected by an organic substance. This new material was created to act as a nano-level filter that could reduce pollutants in the air at a more effective rate. Furthermore, he made improvements in the standard environmental analysis system, making it more efficient to eliminate volatile organic compounds (VOC) and odor-causing substances in the air. “The current level of air purification technology is quite effective. However, there is a limit to the ability to detect and eliminate VOC,” explained Kim. Unlike dust, which is a solid form of pollutant, VOC includes substances such as benzene and formaldehyde, which are in the form of gas. As byproducts of household activities like cooking, these materials are highly toxic; unfortunately, only 40 to 50 percent of them can be eliminated by a standard air purifier. When considering that people spend 80 percent of their time indoors on average, the damage from these substances could be significant. Kim is hopeful about the prospects of his research and predicts that he will someday find a method to eliminate gas pollutants all together. When asked for a comment on receiving the award, Kim answered that it was the result of hard work. As a researcher devoted to the interface between human activities and the environment, Kim has spent his life attempting to raise the public's awareness and interest in environmental issues. After working on the discovery and monitoring of pollution levels, Kim set out on a path to reduce them. “I feel fortunate and grateful," answered Kim, who felt that his devotion to the field had been recognized. Kim offering a tour around his laboratory on the 13th of June. Kim's current goal is to break down the limitations of reducing VOC in the air. Although it is currently possible under the condition of the air being stagnant, the dynamic nature of air necessitates the creation of a technology that will make it possible under all conditions. In the long run, Kim hopes to create a road map that stipulates the various hazards created under different conditions, and how to address them. In his last comment, Kim raised his concerns of the public's discretion in accepting environmental facts. Although he recognizes the increase in public awareness, he pointed out that we should be more critical of what we consider facts, as well as our actions.“Nothing strikes me as more ignorant than a smoker who puts on air filter masks,” added Kim. Though our hearts may be in the right place, there is a need for the public to critically review their life patterns in making efforts to combat pollution. Lee Chang-hyun pizz1125@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Lee Jin-myung

2018-06 11

[Alumni]Following a True Career Path

Bang Hyun-soo (Mechanical Engineering, '08), the founder of Photographic BKOON, was invited as a guest speaker at the recently held relay talk-show hosted by the Women in Engineering at Hanyang Center on June 4th. Due to many students showing high concerns about their future career paths, the talk-show aimed to enable students to approach their career from a much more reasonable perspective. Just before the talk-show, Bang was able to share his ideas about career paths through an interview with NewsH. Bang Hyun-soo (Mechanical Engineering, '08) is giving a lecture at the relay talk-show, held on the 4th of June, on the theme of finding one's true career path. Bang explained how he managed to become a photographic lecturer, which is completely irrelevant to his major of mechanical engineering. Bang first established Photographic BKOON in 2015, which is a one-man business that focuses on photography lectures using smart-phones. His lectures consist of two big parts: photography and editing, and have the goal of allowing everyone to become artists in their everyday lives simply by using a smartphone. Irrelevant to his major of mechanical engineering, Bang explained how he managed to pursue this particular career path. First entering Hanyang University with the dream of becoming a professor, Bang was a student whose dreams changed often. In 2010, due to his father’s recommendations, Bang followed the path of becoming a lecturer. However, after finishing second in a photographic audition in November 2011, his dream changed. It was not until he gave his first lecture at Frip, a business platform that arranges various lectures, that Bang was able to put these two dreams together. Bang recalled his first lecture at Frip as an ever-lasting memory. To start, Frip was supposed to arrange the overall location and setting of the lecture, yet the location was suddenly changed on short notice. When Bang arrived at the newly changed location there was nothing prepared for his lecture. Still, Bang did not give up and successfully finished his lecture only with what was available. He recalled that if he had given up at that time with the excuse that nothing was readily prepared, the current Bang who makes photographic lectures would not exist. Bang explained how one should not be worried about failure even before trying. He shared his experience of his first lecture, where nothing was prepared, yet he seized the opportunity by at least doing something that he could. He stated that this was an important decision to his current career path. “There are over 200,000 registered jobs currently, yet only about 20 of them are somewhat familiar,” commented Bang. He noted that in order to create a job, there has to be a cyclical process in which one delivers certain values and others are willing to pay for the value provided. In this sense, Bang first concentrated on the values that he delivered and came up with the idea of putting lectures and photography together, becoming the busiest photographic lecturer today. Now, successfully settling down as a lecturer with his photographic lectures, Bang has future plans of developing a newly coined lecture theme that he can deliver. He has three stages of his lifetime plans, which are earning an hourly wage of 100,000 Korean Won by age 29, 1 million Korean Won by 39 and 10 million Korean Won by 49. Meeting his first stage goal, he is now focusing upon attaining his second goal. Rather than simply targeting monetary figures, Bang explained that he set such goals to come up with a lecture that would deliver values suitable to the stated amounts. Bang ended the interview by offering some advice for students who are concerned with their future career path. "It is important to take the first step along your future path," remarked Bang. He explained that it is never too late to make a decision when meeting another crossroad, yet being afraid to follow the path even before walking on it is meaningless. Bang also added, “University is a good place to find your dreams without being concerned about failure. Rather than worrying if you are walking on the right path, simply experiencing the path you choose is much more important.” Choi Seo-yong tjdyd1@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Kang Cho-hyun

2018-06 04

[Alumni]Dance What Words Cannot Describe

One of the two modern dance companies in Korea, Daegu Contemporary Dance Company, is greeting its seventh art director Kim Sung-yong (Dance, '00). News H interviewed Kim at a café near Suseo station on Saturday, June 2nd. Kim Sung-yong (Dance, ’00) in his recent repertoire Taking. Kim defined creation as "taking something that already exists and putting a meaning to it' in this particular choreography. (Photo courtesy of Kim) Kim started his career in an arts high school, through a teacher’s recommendation from middle school. As a young performer, Kim dreamed of one day being the director of Daegu Contemporary Dance Company. “I couldn’t believe it,” said Kim, reminiscing the moment he got the final offer from the company. He was as excellent a dancer as he is as a choreographer. With "Chaconne in G Minor" by Tomaso Antonio Vitali, Kim won 1st prize at the Dong-A Dance Competition at the age of 20. Winning in 1997, he is still the youngest winner in the history of the competition. After graduation, Kim became a semi-finalist in the third Japan International Ballet and Modern Dance Competition. That led to endless job offers from Japan, and later from Europe and North America. When asked what the hardest part of such a long and ongoing career of dancing was, Kim replied "personal relations." He explained, “Dancing itself was never too hard or exhausting. I never thought of quitting dancing in my life,” smiled Kim. The foremost value of dancing for Kim is to express what words cannot. He described dancing as metaphoric and intangible but stronger than physical objects or words. Through such visual expression, Kim wishes people, including the audience, dancers, and himself to discover feelings that they did not know existed before. That was the idea at the core of the more than 130 routines he coreographed. For instance, in his most recent and the first piece as the director of Daegu Contemporary Dance Company, Goon-joong (The Crowd), he tried to convey his contemplation on the idea of violence. Why are some people violent? Are all offenders simply offenders, or are they also victims? In the end, he came to the conclusion that the bystanders doing nothing about the violence are the worst people. Kim’s term ends in two years, and it seems like his schedule is fully booked for the coming years. He and his team have various festivals and performances to participate in both in Korea and abroad. Despite the busy schedule and the hectic life he is leading, Kim’s eyes shined with passion and interest throughout the interview. Kim So-yun dash070@hanyang.ac.kr

2018-06 04

[Student]Beyond A Business

An art exhibition took place in the Business Administration building, starting from the 25th until the 28th of May. The exhibition was held by three students: Lee Jae-gi (Financial Management, '14), Lee Sang-Ah (Business, '16) and Ong Uk-man (Business, ‘15), who first met each other at the Hanyang New Business Development Lab. While sharing their interests in art, the three students were able to meet the goal of expanding the start-up company Picto Sales. An art exhibition was held at the Business School building from the 25th until the 28th of May, by the start-up company Picto Sales. The Hanyang Business School has established the Hanyang Biz-Lab in the form of a holding company, and has registered as an institution for field-experience by providing internship opportunities to Hanyang students. It consists of seven departments, including the New Business Development Lab (New-Biz Lab), which mainly focuses on providing support to the participating students establishing a start-up company. It was through this program that the three students were able to meet and share their ideas about the expansion of the newly started Picto Sales company. Being the third management class of the Business School’s New-Biz program, the three students have been able to further expand the Picto Sales business portfolio, which was first conceived by the second generation. The company has the chief goal of providing a transmission platform for little known artists and potential consumers who are willing to purchase low-priced works of art. By displaying artworks of unfamed authors at a relatively low price, Picto Sales tries to benefit both the artists and consumers. Lee Jae-gi (right), the team leader, was responsible for external cooperation, such as meeting and contacting the artists and galleries. Lee Sang-ah (left) had the main role of design and promotion. Although it has the form of a start-up company, Picto Sales prioritizes meeting its corporate social responsibilities over making profits. This was due the agreement of the three students to focus on providing a steady platform where artists can share their artistic creations rather than to simply sell artwork and make profit for the company. While most transmission businesses in the art industry take half of the profit from sales, Picto Sales takes only around 30 percent. Thus, while providing a platform where amateur artists can share their artwork, the company also remits a higher portion of profit to them. Prior to the current exhibition, Picto Sales has already managed to display two exhibitions outside of campus. The first exhibition was held from the 30th of April until the 11th of May at a gallery café located in Hongdae, whereas the second was held at the Kangdong Community Center from May 23rd to the 26th. Lee was careful when selecting the locations for the two exhibitions. The accessibility, parking space, and levels of collaboration were all taken into consideration. Additionally, low rental payments were a priority, as Picto Sales does not have a high budget. Although the rental fees of gallery cafés are known to be high, Lee was able to rent the location without any costs by promoting their actions of providing artistic opportunities to unfamed artists. The pamplets of the two previous exhibitions held by Picto Sales, which were designed by Lee herself. (Photo Courtesy of Picto Sales) Despite their successful exhibitions, there were hardships that Picto Sales had to overcome. The tight budget of the company resulted in the students starting from scratch. They visited over 30 places in order to find an adequate location for the exhibition, and even once the location was arranged, they had to carry the works of art to the exhibition locations themselves. The vacuum of an art major among the members was another difficulty, as they also had to learn how to deal with artwork. “Despite all three of us sharing a great interest in art, there was more for us to learn when dealing with artwork. It was through this experience that I first learned how to attach backing-paper when handling oriental paintings in order to prevent them from wrinkling,” mentioned Lee. While overcoming such hardships, the gratitude they received from the artists whose work they were displaying motivated them the most. The platform that Picto Sales is trying to construct is a wonderful opportunity for them. Aside from the gratitude received by the artists, the high enthusiasm that consumers showed towards the exhibitions was another factor that inspired the members of Picto Sales. According to Lee, despite how hard preparing the exhibition was, once they saw people finding the exhibition and showing interest towards the displayed work, their fatigue lightened. Lee mentioned how he was uaware that the purchase of domestic artwork with a foreign credit card was illegal. Having success with three exhibitions, two outside and one within campus, Picto Sales is now planning their fourth and the last exhibition in June. The three students, being the third generation of the New-Biz Lab, are now ready to pass their company to the fourth generation as their internship ends this semester. Although, it is up to the succeeding generation whether they will enlarge Picto Sales or start a new business, the three students have shown their hopes towards the further expansion of the company. While showing their concerns toward the succeeding generation having passion for art and the promotion of amateur artists, they did not forget to share their advice. "Managing a start-up company requires high levels of preparation. Although it is important to be ready in various aspects, being prepared in legal issues would especially help one to manage his or her business and to spread their passion.” Choi Seo-yong tjdyd1@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Kang Cho-hyun

2018-06 04

[Faculty]Look Far, and Take Steady Steps

Looking back on his long career which includes serving as the vice minister of the Ministry of Trade, Industry, and Energy as well as the president of the Korea Trade-Investment Promotion Agency (KOTRA), Kim Jae-hong (Department of Public Administration) summarizes the lessons that he had learned over the years into one phrase: “As a large bird flies over great distance.” Taken from an ancient Chinese teaching, it is a phrase that emphasizes the importance of looking far and taking steady steps. “The large bird in the phrase is a massive mythical creature, with immeasurable wing span and size. The point is that once this bird takes off, it won't land in the middle of its flight for anything without great value,” explained Kim. In the same sense, it teaches us not to be swayed by immediate, marginal profits and to look at the long picture. Kim Jae-hong (Department of Public Administration) recalled during the interview on the 31st that the lesson, "look far and take steady steps" was first taught to him by his middle school teacher. This phrase also happens to be the title of the book that Kim published recently, covering his life career as well as his insights into the industry that he has committed his life to. The first part of his career was as a public servant, eventually rising to take the role of the vice-minister of the Ministry of Trade, Industry, and Energy. Kim had specialized in the industry and trade throughout his 31 years of service. According to Kim, the most difficult part of leading in a public role is maintaining the values of objectivity and fairness. “In all public policies, there tends to be people who benefit, and those who face a loss. Sometimes people facing a loss take drastic measures to oppose certain policies, and it takes a great deal of consideration and negotiation to satisfy all parties involved,” recounted Kim. Furthermore, as the position entails great influence, Kim was sometimes approached by interested parties, often times in very subtle ways. To maintain objectivity in these situations also required great effort. Kim also devoted a large portion of his book to explaining how the our trade patterns and domestic industries should change to create a sustainable economic environment. The second part of his career was his three years as the president of KOTRA. After decades of creating public policies on trade and industries, this was his time to actually see through the practical practice. According to Kim, he was able to see and experience various processes that he had not been able to witness as a policy maker. Even the marginal exhibits required complicated regulations and detailed preparations, and it was a great experience for him to gain further expertise in the field. Finally, Kim concludes his book by explaining the life lessons that he has learned through his career. Returning again to the old teaching, "to look far and take steady steps," Kim explained that this principle should be adopted by all domains. Public policies need to be made with significant long-term vision, and the national trade pattern needs to brush aside immediate surpluses and establish deeper trade relationships. Kim refers to this principle in his advice to students of Hanyang. He was most concerned with students’ tendency to seek "stable" jobs. According to Kim, this goes against the value of youth, where challenges and adventures should take place. He advised students to come up with bigger dreams and to work hard for them. “In the course of my life, I have witnessed that if you have a dream, and work hard for it, you eventually get there. One way or another. So take great breaths and look far. Don’t remain short sighted,” encouraged Kim. Lee Chang-hyun pizz1125@hanyang.ac.kr Photo by Lee Jin-myung

2018-05 21

[Alumni]The Asian Romeo

Shin Sang-keun (Voice, '94), also known as Andrea Shin, has successfully made his debut at the New York Metropolitan Opera House (New York Met) as Romeo. Being the first Asian to perform at the New York Met, Shin has opened a new road for future potential opera singers who wish to perform on a more global scale. His successful debut at the New York Met Although this is his second season at the New York Met, it was this season that he was referred to as making his official debut at the Met, being able to perform on the opening stage of Romeo and Juliet. It is exceptional for an Asian opera singer to lead the whole stage as a main character, as there have been certain glass ceilings that have existed against non-white singers. Shin showed his satisfaction towards this particular performance due to the fact that there were two more Asian opera singers who were able to share the stage with him. Shin Sang-keun (Voice,'94) starring as Romeo in Romeo and Juliet held at the New York Metropolitan Opera House. Having a successful debut this season, Shin is the first Asian to be staged on the New York Met (Photo courtesy of Shin). “Out of ten total Opera performers, even two Asian singers are considered to be too many. Likewise, the proportion of Asian opera singers who have been able to stand on foreign stages has been relatively low,” maintained Shin during the interview. For this reason, Shin was even more touched at the audiences’ high applause after his performance as Romeo at the New York Met. The applause and fiery response from the audience allowed Shin to feel that he had succeeded in actually giving "some kind of inspiration" to the audience. He explained his most touching experience of when he moved from the Karlsruhe Theater to the Hanover Theater in Germany. After his last concert at the Karlsruhe Theater, the executive of the theater popped open a bottle of champagne on stage. The audience responded with enthusiastic applause and shouted out for Shin to stay longer at the Karlsruhe Theater. It is this kind of experience that Shin finds most rewarding, in that he has succeeded in inspiring and communicating with his audience. Hardships to overcome Despite his successful career as a tenor, Shin has had to overcome many difficulties. Loneliness was a main hardship that he had to overcome, especially when performing in foreign countries. Although he had two Asian companions this season at the Met, he talked about how he had to become used to the sense of being alone when performing in other global theaters. This was also related to Shin having to stay away from his family for long time periods. Shin, being a successful tenor who performs on many stages worldwide, only has around three months to stay with his family. Even these three months are usually split into weekly terms, making them feel even shorter. Uncertainty was another factor that hindered Shin during his career. Majoring in the musical field has relatively higher risks when searching for a stable position. Even after barely finding his first job, it was strenuous for Shin to be cast at a fine theater doing opera. “The time and cost input are met with high levels of uncertainty that hinder potential opera singers from following their path,” added Shin during the interview. In order to overcome such hardships, Shin provided advice to his potential colleagues. “Instead of pouring everything into a short-term plan, you have to look at the long-term goal. It is more like running a marathon,” advised Shin. He talked about the importance of being able to maintain one’s fitness rather than exhausting oneself in a short period of time. As for those who have the goal of performing in foreign theaters, Shin stated the importance of understanding the foreign culture and delivering the correct text to the audience. He explained that Korean opera singers are already highly accomplished in technical aspects, yet in order to deliver the right text, studying the verbal sense and details of the particular language is also important. Shin's poster of the Un Ballo in Maschera (A Masked Ball), which was held during his career at the Karlsruhe Theater in Germany (Photo Courtesy of Shin) Shin ended the interview by sharing his future goals as an opera singer. Already following a successful path as a tenor, Shin now has the aim of showing higher quality performances to the audience. He also wishes to see an increased number of Korean opera singers in the major global opera theaters. Shin wrapped up by saying that “Korea is often referred to as a major country in the field of opera. In order to enhance its stance, it is now the details that have to be concentrated on. By focusing on the details, Korea will see its opera singers expanding into major global opera theaters.” Choi Seo-yong tjdyd1@hanyang.ac.kr

2018-05 21

[Alumni]Capturing the World in a Photo

From the 1st to the 15th of April, a photo exhibition called ESSE was held at the Incheon Art Platform by a photographer, Lee Jung-hyun (English Language and Literature, ’13). Lee is a photographer full of willpower who traveled around 18 countries for 654 days, starting with less than 100,000 won. Through just 27 pictures out of the 20,000 pictures he edited, he developed a storyline of his journey, and successfully finished his photo exhibition. Starting from scratch News H met Lee in a quiet cafe, on a sunny weekend. Lee lived his life as an English instructor in his early and mid-twenties, earning more than seven million won per month. After his military service, however, he felt despondent about his life, and decided to escape from his initial life. “I just didn’t want to search for a normal job, nor did I think I was suited to an organizational environment as I learned during my military experiences,” said Lee. He had interest in photography, and wished to test whether he wholeheartedly liked this hobby through the trip. Therefore, he booked his ticket to China, got his visa, and blindly started off on his journey. “I had exactly 73,432 won in my bank account when I got on the plane,” reminisced Lee. He received 500 dollars of support in Beijing, as it was his second hometown since he had lived there for nine years to study. Then he left to Southeast Asia, barely surviving every single day. He traveled with three promises to himself. First, not to earn money directly from photography; second, to receive sponsorship with gratitude; and lastly, to keep this promise for at least a year. “I believed that I could be certain I loved photography if I could love this for over a year, without any relations of loss or gain,” explained Lee. He would live in a guesthouse as a staff member, so that he could solve his accommodation issues. Then, he took pictures of all guests visiting the guesthouse, thoroughly edited them, and gave printed copies of the pictures with a sincere note. He didn’t receive any payment for these actions, but he frequently received financial support from the people who were deeply impressed by his pictures after they left the guesthouse. Lee would receive questions from his acquaintances asking why he put all his effort into the pictures. “If I couldn’t do my best in something I believe I love the most, I thought that I wouldn’t be able to do anything else,” said Lee. Focusing on the goal After his 654 day journey, he successfully finished his photo exhibition. He had millions of photos, but could easily select the 27 pictures he wanted to use in his exhibition. “There are a lot more people who take better photos than me. However, I believe that the people who can successfully have exhibitions are the people who have their own sincere story to tell through their photos,” explained Lee. The name of his exhibition, ESSE, is a Latin word for "being present," which leads to the word essence. He believes that living life as itself, possessing and dividing when needed, without obsession is the best method to live one’s life’s essence. Now Lee is living his life as a wedding photographer and a photography lecturer. However, while he takes wedding photos, he dislikes made-up concept photos. “The couples might not like the photos made naturally, since they probably don’t look as pretty as they wished to. However, these photos would be the ones that have the most to talk about in the future, since they have unique episodes in each cut,” said Lee. Lee will continue to take photos with stories and a firm subject in each cut now, and in the future, to tell everyone about each and every story in all photos. On Jung-yun jessica0818@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Kang Cho-hyun

2018-05 14

[Faculty]Finding the True Meaning of Engineering

Although Medecins Sans Frontieres (Doctors Without Borders), which has the mission of international humanitarian medical treatment, is a familiar organization to the public, not many are intimate with Scientists and Engineers without Borders (SEWB). First started in 2009, the SEWB has endeavored to develop and provide the "appropriate technology" to developing countries. Professor Kim Yong-soo (Department of Nuclear Engineering) was elected as the fourth president of this organization on the 9th of this month, with an office term of two years. The Scientists and Engineers without Borders The main purpose of the SEWB is to provide aid to developing countries through the application of scientific and engineering methods. However, as developing countries have low standards of scientific technology, the SEWB mainly focuses on appropriate technology, which is a form of technology that takes the social infrastructure of a particular society into consideration and provides the adequate technical standards that can be sustainably developed and consumed within the society. Neglected classes of people exist in every field, including science and technology. According to Kim, there are currently 1.4 billion people who are unable to access electricity. For these neglected classes, it is important that their actual quality of life is improved. Rather than simply providing them with cutting-edge technology, the SEWB aims to supply adequate technology that can be used within their scientific boundaries while meeting the direct needs of the people. Kim Yong-soo (Department of Nuclear Engineering), the newly elected president of Scientists and Engineers without Borders, explains the concept of appropriate technology and how its application has been the main purpose of the organization. A good example of an appropriate technology given by Kim was that there are groups of people in Cambodia who must use rainwater as their drinkable water due to the poor water supply system. Providing these people with a water filtration system that is inexpensive and approachable would greatly enhance the quality of their lives. Supplying such systems in an adequate way is the main theme of appropriate technology and a main purpose of the SEWB organization. Kim mentioned, “We want to find a way in which every single person benefits from scientific technology and improves their quality of life through such privilege.” Future plans as the new president Until now, there have been limitations on the SEWB's ability to take action. Keeping up with its name, Kim now plans to extend the organization's efforts across borders into developing countries. In order to magnify the organization’s base, collaboration projects with other organizations are in order. Cooperation with other companies, based on corporate social responsibility actions, is how Kim is designing the application of technology on the actual sites of developing countries. Furthermore, Kim has also been focusing on how the science and technology sectors are becoming an expanding interest of the Korean government’s official development assistance business, referring to aid offered to developing countries with the purpose of economic development, social improvement, and welfare promotion. The United Nations has also set poverty as its main sustainable development goal, which is in line with the SEWB 's purpose in tackling such issues through the application of scientific technology. Positioned upon such interests, Kim views the positive potentials of collaborative work with these major associations. Kim is also putting effort into trying to divide the SEWB into various sectors such as energy, water and health, and medical treatment. This would enable science technicians to unite diverse fields with enhanced expertise. Mainly focusing on the reinforcement of the overall organization, Kim, with the help of the former president, is going to overcome the existing limitations of the SEWB. As a professor at Hanyang University As a professor of an engineering field, Kim has the purpose of contributing to the advancement of engineering and challenging himself with the task of social restoration. Achieving his former goal of becoming a renowned figure in the field of nuclear decommissioning, even being registered on the Marquis Who’s Who, one of the three major biographical dictionaries, Kim is now moving onto accomplishing his second ambition. Having pursued this field for the last seven years, Kim is persisting in his actions of disseminating appropriate technology. Kim expressed proudness of his performance in Hanyang and how his presidential nomination represented these well-paid efforts. Kim mentioned that he was proud at the thought that his election to president represented the well-formed groundwork of Hanyang, which has long shown efforts to pursue appropriate technology, being the only school to have a research society among its professors. The university students have also recently made a group named A-Prime, which focuses on appropriate technology and its application in developing countries. Established by Kim, the Volunteer Corps of Hanyang University Alumni have also applied actions of appropriate technology, especially when conducting volunteer work in developing countries like Cambodia and the Philippines. According to Kim, where there is light there are shadows that exist. The rapid development of technology has greatly enhanced the overall lives of the human race, yet there are classes that have been alienated from even the most basic technologies. He ended the interview by stating, “I hope Hanyang students acknowledge such situations and feel thankful for all that they have received. A student that senses such gratitude will be strongly aware of his or her future actions.” Choi Seo-yong tjdyd1@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Hwang Yu-jin