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2018-05 21

[Alumni]The Asian Romeo

Shin Sang-keun (Voice, '94), also known as Andrea Shin, has successfully made his debut at the New York Metropolitan Opera House (New York Met) as Romeo. Being the first Asian to perform at the New York Met, Shin has opened a new road for future potential opera singers who wish to perform on a more global scale. His successful debut at the New York Met Although this is his second season at the New York Met, it was this season that he was referred to as making his official debut at the Met, being able to perform on the opening stage of Romeo and Juliet. It is exceptional for an Asian opera singer to lead the whole stage as a main character, as there have been certain glass ceilings that have existed against non-white singers. Shin showed his satisfaction towards this particular performance due to the fact that there were two more Asian opera singers who were able to share the stage with him. Shin Sang-keun (Voice,'94) starring as Romeo in Romeo and Juliet held at the New York Metropolitan Opera House. Having a successful debut this season, Shin is the first Asian to be staged on the New York Met (Photo courtesy of Shin). “Out of ten total Opera performers, even two Asian singers are considered to be too many. Likewise, the proportion of Asian opera singers who have been able to stand on foreign stages has been relatively low,” maintained Shin during the interview. For this reason, Shin was even more touched at the audiences’ high applause after his performance as Romeo at the New York Met. The applause and fiery response from the audience allowed Shin to feel that he had succeeded in actually giving "some kind of inspiration" to the audience. He explained his most touching experience of when he moved from the Karlsruhe Theater to the Hanover Theater in Germany. After his last concert at the Karlsruhe Theater, the executive of the theater popped open a bottle of champagne on stage. The audience responded with enthusiastic applause and shouted out for Shin to stay longer at the Karlsruhe Theater. It is this kind of experience that Shin finds most rewarding, in that he has succeeded in inspiring and communicating with his audience. Hardships to overcome Despite his successful career as a tenor, Shin has had to overcome many difficulties. Loneliness was a main hardship that he had to overcome, especially when performing in foreign countries. Although he had two Asian companions this season at the Met, he talked about how he had to become used to the sense of being alone when performing in other global theaters. This was also related to Shin having to stay away from his family for long time periods. Shin, being a successful tenor who performs on many stages worldwide, only has around three months to stay with his family. Even these three months are usually split into weekly terms, making them feel even shorter. Uncertainty was another factor that hindered Shin during his career. Majoring in the musical field has relatively higher risks when searching for a stable position. Even after barely finding his first job, it was strenuous for Shin to be cast at a fine theater doing opera. “The time and cost input are met with high levels of uncertainty that hinder potential opera singers from following their path,” added Shin during the interview. In order to overcome such hardships, Shin provided advice to his potential colleagues. “Instead of pouring everything into a short-term plan, you have to look at the long-term goal. It is more like running a marathon,” advised Shin. He talked about the importance of being able to maintain one’s fitness rather than exhausting oneself in a short period of time. As for those who have the goal of performing in foreign theaters, Shin stated the importance of understanding the foreign culture and delivering the correct text to the audience. He explained that Korean opera singers are already highly accomplished in technical aspects, yet in order to deliver the right text, studying the verbal sense and details of the particular language is also important. Shin's poster of the Un Ballo in Maschera (A Masked Ball), which was held during his career at the Karlsruhe Theater in Germany (Photo Courtesy of Shin) Shin ended the interview by sharing his future goals as an opera singer. Already following a successful path as a tenor, Shin now has the aim of showing higher quality performances to the audience. He also wishes to see an increased number of Korean opera singers in the major global opera theaters. Shin wrapped up by saying that “Korea is often referred to as a major country in the field of opera. In order to enhance its stance, it is now the details that have to be concentrated on. By focusing on the details, Korea will see its opera singers expanding into major global opera theaters.” Choi Seo-yong tjdyd1@hanyang.ac.kr

2018-05 21

[Alumni]Capturing the World in a Photo

From the 1st to the 15th of April, a photo exhibition called ESSE was held at the Incheon Art Platform by a photographer, Lee Jung-hyun (English Language and Literature, ’13). Lee is a photographer full of willpower who traveled around 18 countries for 654 days, starting with less than 100,000 won. Through just 27 pictures out of the 20,000 pictures he edited, he developed a storyline of his journey, and successfully finished his photo exhibition. Starting from scratch News H met Lee in a quiet cafe, on a sunny weekend. Lee lived his life as an English instructor in his early and mid-twenties, earning more than seven million won per month. After his military service, however, he felt despondent about his life, and decided to escape from his initial life. “I just didn’t want to search for a normal job, nor did I think I was suited to an organizational environment as I learned during my military experiences,” said Lee. He had interest in photography, and wished to test whether he wholeheartedly liked this hobby through the trip. Therefore, he booked his ticket to China, got his visa, and blindly started off on his journey. “I had exactly 73,432 won in my bank account when I got on the plane,” reminisced Lee. He received 500 dollars of support in Beijing, as it was his second hometown since he had lived there for nine years to study. Then he left to Southeast Asia, barely surviving every single day. He traveled with three promises to himself. First, not to earn money directly from photography; second, to receive sponsorship with gratitude; and lastly, to keep this promise for at least a year. “I believed that I could be certain I loved photography if I could love this for over a year, without any relations of loss or gain,” explained Lee. He would live in a guesthouse as a staff member, so that he could solve his accommodation issues. Then, he took pictures of all guests visiting the guesthouse, thoroughly edited them, and gave printed copies of the pictures with a sincere note. He didn’t receive any payment for these actions, but he frequently received financial support from the people who were deeply impressed by his pictures after they left the guesthouse. Lee would receive questions from his acquaintances asking why he put all his effort into the pictures. “If I couldn’t do my best in something I believe I love the most, I thought that I wouldn’t be able to do anything else,” said Lee. Focusing on the goal After his 654 day journey, he successfully finished his photo exhibition. He had millions of photos, but could easily select the 27 pictures he wanted to use in his exhibition. “There are a lot more people who take better photos than me. However, I believe that the people who can successfully have exhibitions are the people who have their own sincere story to tell through their photos,” explained Lee. The name of his exhibition, ESSE, is a Latin word for "being present," which leads to the word essence. He believes that living life as itself, possessing and dividing when needed, without obsession is the best method to live one’s life’s essence. Now Lee is living his life as a wedding photographer and a photography lecturer. However, while he takes wedding photos, he dislikes made-up concept photos. “The couples might not like the photos made naturally, since they probably don’t look as pretty as they wished to. However, these photos would be the ones that have the most to talk about in the future, since they have unique episodes in each cut,” said Lee. Lee will continue to take photos with stories and a firm subject in each cut now, and in the future, to tell everyone about each and every story in all photos. On Jung-yun jessica0818@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Kang Cho-hyun

2018-05 14

[Faculty]Finding the True Meaning of Engineering

Although Medecins Sans Frontieres (Doctors Without Borders), which has the mission of international humanitarian medical treatment, is a familiar organization to the public, not many are intimate with Scientists and Engineers without Borders (SEWB). First started in 2009, the SEWB has endeavored to develop and provide the "appropriate technology" to developing countries. Professor Kim Yong-soo (Department of Nuclear Engineering) was elected as the fourth president of this organization on the 9th of this month, with an office term of two years. The Scientists and Engineers without Borders The main purpose of the SEWB is to provide aid to developing countries through the application of scientific and engineering methods. However, as developing countries have low standards of scientific technology, the SEWB mainly focuses on appropriate technology, which is a form of technology that takes the social infrastructure of a particular society into consideration and provides the adequate technical standards that can be sustainably developed and consumed within the society. Neglected classes of people exist in every field, including science and technology. According to Kim, there are currently 1.4 billion people who are unable to access electricity. For these neglected classes, it is important that their actual quality of life is improved. Rather than simply providing them with cutting-edge technology, the SEWB aims to supply adequate technology that can be used within their scientific boundaries while meeting the direct needs of the people. Kim Yong-soo (Department of Nuclear Engineering), the newly elected president of Scientists and Engineers without Borders, explains the concept of appropriate technology and how its application has been the main purpose of the organization. A good example of an appropriate technology given by Kim was that there are groups of people in Cambodia who must use rainwater as their drinkable water due to the poor water supply system. Providing these people with a water filtration system that is inexpensive and approachable would greatly enhance the quality of their lives. Supplying such systems in an adequate way is the main theme of appropriate technology and a main purpose of the SEWB organization. Kim mentioned, “We want to find a way in which every single person benefits from scientific technology and improves their quality of life through such privilege.” Future plans as the new president Until now, there have been limitations on the SEWB's ability to take action. Keeping up with its name, Kim now plans to extend the organization's efforts across borders into developing countries. In order to magnify the organization’s base, collaboration projects with other organizations are in order. Cooperation with other companies, based on corporate social responsibility actions, is how Kim is designing the application of technology on the actual sites of developing countries. Furthermore, Kim has also been focusing on how the science and technology sectors are becoming an expanding interest of the Korean government’s official development assistance business, referring to aid offered to developing countries with the purpose of economic development, social improvement, and welfare promotion. The United Nations has also set poverty as its main sustainable development goal, which is in line with the SEWB 's purpose in tackling such issues through the application of scientific technology. Positioned upon such interests, Kim views the positive potentials of collaborative work with these major associations. Kim is also putting effort into trying to divide the SEWB into various sectors such as energy, water and health, and medical treatment. This would enable science technicians to unite diverse fields with enhanced expertise. Mainly focusing on the reinforcement of the overall organization, Kim, with the help of the former president, is going to overcome the existing limitations of the SEWB. As a professor at Hanyang University As a professor of an engineering field, Kim has the purpose of contributing to the advancement of engineering and challenging himself with the task of social restoration. Achieving his former goal of becoming a renowned figure in the field of nuclear decommissioning, even being registered on the Marquis Who’s Who, one of the three major biographical dictionaries, Kim is now moving onto accomplishing his second ambition. Having pursued this field for the last seven years, Kim is persisting in his actions of disseminating appropriate technology. Kim expressed proudness of his performance in Hanyang and how his presidential nomination represented these well-paid efforts. Kim mentioned that he was proud at the thought that his election to president represented the well-formed groundwork of Hanyang, which has long shown efforts to pursue appropriate technology, being the only school to have a research society among its professors. The university students have also recently made a group named A-Prime, which focuses on appropriate technology and its application in developing countries. Established by Kim, the Volunteer Corps of Hanyang University Alumni have also applied actions of appropriate technology, especially when conducting volunteer work in developing countries like Cambodia and the Philippines. According to Kim, where there is light there are shadows that exist. The rapid development of technology has greatly enhanced the overall lives of the human race, yet there are classes that have been alienated from even the most basic technologies. He ended the interview by stating, “I hope Hanyang students acknowledge such situations and feel thankful for all that they have received. A student that senses such gratitude will be strongly aware of his or her future actions.” Choi Seo-yong tjdyd1@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Hwang Yu-jin

2018-05 14

[Alumni]Healing Hearts and Minds

The psychological realm of human beings has always been full of unsolved mysteries that attract people in attempts to figure out what goes on in the hearts and minds of others. One’s mental state can affect one’s life to the point where it becomes necessary to see a consultant just like how we need doctors for health checkups. Kim Ji-in (Department of Art Psychotherapy, ’17) works as a psychotherapist through artistic measures to touch the hearts of those in need. The root of Kim's passion According to Kim, working as a therapist has long been her dream, as she has been interested in psychology since she was a high school student. Unfortunately, the field was not well-known in Korea, which discouraged her from boldly diving into it. Instead, she read many books related to psychology and philosophy to quench her thirst. Things all changed when she went on a trip to Nepal with her husband as a volunteer in 2009. She was there as an educator, and while teaching the kids, she felt that they were psychologically pressured. “It was heartbreaking to see young children who are supposed to be innocent and carefree suppressed like that. However, there were no professionals to help these children. I was also in a bad place back then, so I decided that I should take on that role.” In 2012, Kim started studying educational psychology as soon as she returned to Korea. Kim Ji-in (Department of Art Psychotherapy, ’17) at Korea Art Treatment Association, 2016 (Photo courtesy of Kim) When she first started out, psychology was not a field that interested many people. It was relatively hard to find a specific major that dealt with psychology. Many people found it peculiar that she was even interested in such a thing. However, this did not stop Kim from giving it a try. “While I was interested in psychology, I was also into music so I studied music composition when I was a senior in high school. Studying music allowed me to meet many different people, to whom I would always recommend different musical pieces to depending on their current psychological state.” Art psychotherapy During her masters as an art psychotherapy student, Kim recalls that most of her professors were art majors. They introduced her to numerous works of art that allowed her to somehow understand, relate, and analyze the psychology of the artists. She says that it was the most helpful thing she had discovered in university, since it was a skill that was not only based on foundational psychological theories, but was also always applicable to real life situations, even today. Aside from being academically passionate, she was also an active volunteer which allowed her to meet many different people in many types of situations. “The session always has to be client-oriented. I’m not afraid to prescribe medication along with the artistic therapy sessions, because I think it is of utmost importance to try to find realistic ways to help these clients.” Upon graduation, Kim started working as a psychotherapist who treats clients using artistic measures. Her clients include a wide range from children to adults, but most of them are children around the age of five, who show symptoms of separation anxiety from their mothers. There are also quite a few teenagers who also show signs of anxiety, depression, and disruptive behavior who sometimes personally reach out to her for help. Kim would use different artistic measures, such as drawing, role-play, working with play dough, storytelling, and listening to music to help these clients build trust and toheal. “Back in the 90s I used to use classical music, but nowadays people just can’t relate to it. Some people much prefer drawing over talking, while some much prefer creating their own music. I even provide raps from High School Rappers, a popular Korean TV program, so that her teenage patients can change the lyrics to them, or use the beats to create their own pieces. Then I try to analyze their works to better understand them.” As a therapist Currently, Kim is working at a Good Neighbors (NGO) center. She also has experience in working in public sectors, psychiatric wards, and as a therapist giving lectures and therapy sessions to teenagers. Kim recalls her proudest moments to be whenever a mother or the head of a center decides that the child is now free to end therapy sessions. “Upon the end of the session, the child who had been suffering from separation anxiety has now completely changed so that he doesn’t need his mother to be next to him all the time. He trusts other people and can actually have fun like any other child does on the playground.” She notes that after the sessions have ended, the parents also go through a major change with the help of her constant advice, as it is crucial for the parents to change in order for the children to change as well. “All the moments – from the beginning till the very end of the session, fly before my eyes like a film.” When asked about some of her hardships, Kim instantly said, “whenever I meet a child with a devastating background.” “This child I remember, her parent couldn’t really take care of her and her drawings always broke my heart. Knowing what her mother was also going through, also pained me because there was nothing I could do to realistically help them out of the situation.” Kim mentioned how she sometimes cried while driving home and felt the need to practice separating her life as a therapist and her personal life, because it was just too emotionally consuming. “In the end though, it’s all still worth it and I am very happy with my work. People always said that I’m a very hopeful person, and they’re right because I always had a dream or a goal. I strongly believe in returning what you’ve learned. I would love to learn more even in the future, to put my knowledge to good use for society.” Park Joo-hyun julia1114@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Lee Jin-myung

2018-05 06

[Alumni]Reinterpreting Korean Culture Through Fashion

“I love my design style because it is so direct,” smiled Jang Yoon-kyung (Jewelry & Fashion Design, ERICA, '18). News H met Jang, who is the designer for SET SET SET, on a chilly spring day. She was recognizeable even before she entered the café because of her unique earrings of her own creation and their catchy look. It was as if she was silently screaming, "I’m a fashion designer!" "The brand name means three things; the three members (three in Korean, pronounced 'set'), the set clothes as we often design, and Sse-sse-sse (a Korean traditional hand-clapping game)," explained Jang Yoon-kyung, in a café near her office on Sunday, May 6th. A Vancouver Fashion Week participating designer When asked how she felt about receiving the invitation to Vancouver Fashion Week in 2017, Jang replied “I thought it was a scam at first,” with a playful smile. Jang and her brand SET SET SET were invited to the Vancouver Fashion Show for two seasons in a row - 2018 Spring/Summer season and 2018 Fall/Winter season. SET SET SET is a designer brand that launched on July 28th, 2016. As the founder and the only designer for the brand, Jang places the emphasis of Korean culture as their core identity. “We use cultural aspects of Korea in making the textiles of our clothes. For example, our theme for last season was the new year’s blessing (bok) culture in Korea,” mentioned Jang. After receiving the dreamlike invitation to the international stage, Jang and her crew worked day and night for two months to complete the collection of 46 pieces. SET SET SET definitely made an impression on the fashion world, receiving love calls from Tokyo and Seoul after their debut. Nonetheless, it has not all been such an easy road for Jang. SET SET SET started out as a start-up club on ERICA campus with two other friends. Hanyang University provided a lot of help and supplies before they launched the brand, but after the business registration, it was all up to Jang. “The biggest issue was money, of course.” Despite of the precarious situation, Jang did not want to make clothes that would just "sell well." She emphasized that SET SET SET was and still is a brand that pursues her design spiri: kitsch and direct. “The invitation to Vancouver arrived when I was devastated and had almost given up,” reminisced Jang. Pursuing her identity through the brand, telling the story of Korean culture through clothes, Jang was able to seize this big opportunity. Left: Jang's personal favorite from the recent 2018 F/W collection. Right: A skirt and a t-shirt from the 2018 S/S collection. The theme was Samul-nori, a Korean traditional instrument, so the pattern of the skirt (enlarged in the bottom right corner) has traditional musical instruments such as Jang-gu or Book. (Photo courtesy of Jang) Do it to know it “I was only able to discover my aptitude for business after I actually started,” smiled Jang. She recommends people "go out and do something" to experience for themselves what they like - and even more importantly - what they don't like. Jang herself was able to realize that she fancies designing more than actually making the clothes after joining the ELAB (Erica Lab) club that required her to intensely make clothes. Her thought on this matter became even clearer when she took a yearlong break from school after her first year and studied fashion design skills in depth. The same applied to her entrepreneurship. Jang mentioned that she was only able to venture into the fashion business because she was so young and naïve. Her friends and seniors advised against her launching the brand without experiencing the industry as part of a company, but she thinks that a loss of innocent brought about by experience in the industry would have kept her from actually starting her own business. Is it for her experience-based career? Jang seemed like a person with ambition. She did not hide her passion and trust in her design style throughout the interview. “I want SET SET SET to be the first thing that comes into people’s minds when they think of Korean culture...I believe that my brand will grow big sometime in the future.” While striving to provide a unique and new standpoint in recreating Korean culture, Jang aims to debut in Tokyo, London, and New York in two years. News H also wishes Jang and SET SET SET success to thrive on a bigger stage. Kim So-yun dash070@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Kang Cho-hyun

2018-04 30

[Alumni]Don't Set Your Limits, You Can Become Anything

Have you ever wondered what kind of people work at Google and YouTube? For the amount of workload and the complexity of the technology involved, the workers must be geniuses, right? This week, News H had an opportunity to meet one of the geniuses, a proud alumnus of Hanyang, Jeon Joon-hee (Mathematics, ’95). News H had an opportunity to briefly interview Jeon Joon-hee on the 24th of April, right before his lecture for Hanyang students who are planning to start their own businesses. Although it was a short interview, Jeon passionately and energetically answered some questions. Work, work and more work! Jeon’s life so far has been a full-time, ceaseless factory. Starting his career with his college friends by developing software called 21st Century Word Processor, they founded a company named ESTsoft in 1991. At that time, there were no programs usng iKorean text that enabled people to open multiple documents at once or change the size of the fonts. To make matters worse, the length of a document was limited. “With the invention of the word processor, people started to switch from writing bothersome work such as papers for a class by hand to typing them,” mentioned Jeon. With the increasing demand for technology and the unexplored trait of the industry, Jeon detected a possibility. However, the barrier for the latecomer was higher than expected. “After pouring our lives into the poject for about a year and a half, we came up with version 1.8, right around the time when Hangul 2.0 was released,” reminisced Jeon with a bitter smile. Hangul emerged in the word processor market five years earlier than Jeon’s 21st Century Word Processor, and was also developed by college students. Jeon was not let down by the market barrier. He and his friend worked harder to encompass as many features as Hangul had and to develop original ideas as well. Also, they targeted a specific customer of computer academies who could not afford the expensive license of Hangul. ESTsoft Corporation still persists in the market with their leading product of ALZip, and Jeon still consults for the company with affection. To the unknown land of America Jeon is now working as an Engineering Director for YouTube TV, in charge of the whole project team. Surprisingly enough, he was not fluent in English nor had he planned to get a job in the states from the beginning. Jeon left Seoul to expand his online game business that he started with his friend after his second job at Hanmeoft Corp, with a million-pound investment from a Korean-British official. With the hope of succeeding in the birthplace of online gaming, Jeon found out that the investor had passed away due to a heart attack. “I called my wife and she told me not to come back,” he chuckled. Getting a job in a foreign land where you do not speak their language well was challenging. It was especially difficult for Jeon who had never written a resume nor gone to a job interview. “After some trial and error, I was able to understand and forecast the interview questions. I put down all the possible questions, memorized them to the bones, and then the interviews suddenly felt so easy,” smiled Jeon. The first job he had in the U.S. unfortunately was acquired by a larger company soon, with the economic recession led by the bursting of the dot com bubble. The second job was interesting but the task was somewhat repetitive. That is when he was offered a position at Google. “I wanted to do something fun and innovative,” said Jeon. Jeon is enthusiastically giving a lecture to Hanyang sudents on the 24th of April, as part of the Hanyang Global Startup Mentor Session, "Start Your Business Like Google." Setting the bar high When asked what enabled him to race so hard and so far, Jeon smiled and replied, “I don’t set my limits. I believe I can do or become anything.” Listening to his stories, Jeon’s life has had its ups and downs. He encountered a huge barrier with his first project, was devastated by the death of his investor, and had his company subjected to a hostile acquisition, but after all these setbacks he was able to dust off, stand up, and start running again because he had faith in what he could become. “I believe that who you are now is the collection of thoughts you had in the past,” said Jeon, with a bright, warm smile. Kim So-yun dash070@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Kang Cho-hyun

2018-04 23

[Alumni]A World Where Everybody is a Farmer

Food, clothes, and housing are considered the three essentials, the most basic factors of life. Kim Hye-yeon (Department of Electronics and Communications Engineering, 04’), the CEO of N.Thing, argues that among them, food is the most important. “It’s a matter of fact that we can still survive without clothing or housing. But as for food, people can’t last very long without it.” There, a question was posed to Kim. With such dependency on food as a means for survival, why is no one these days willing to become farmers? Indeed, it is rare to see someone in the present day, dreaming of becoming a farmer. In fact, the percentage of farmers in Korea has decreased to less than 5% of the population. Kim’s solution to this rather contradictive situation was the company N.Thing. Created to increase public accessibility to farming, Kim explained his grand plan in great detail. Kim explained that his involvement in the technological and agricultural industry was a result of his past experiences. Introducing N.Thing The company name, N.Thing, refers to the n number of "things," or challenges that the firm plans to pursue in the future. Its futuristic tendencies clearly show that the company experiments with the latest technology, most notably Internet of Things (IoT), to fulfill its goals of revolutionizing every inch of the agriculture industry. N.Thing started off as a small start-up project among a group of friends, led by Kim during his undergraduate years. Their first product was a smart flowerpot by the name of Planty. It was a planter that could be connected to a smartphone, which would inform the user of the various conditions of the plant such as temperature, humidity, and air pressure. It could even be used to water the plant remotely. “Though the big picture of the firm and its plans were etched in my mind, the limited resources available at the time could only allow us to take such small steps,” answered Kim. Now, the firm has expanded to the scale of smart farms, integrating technology and farming on a scale and depth which has never been done before. Kim added that his ultimate goal was to create the first farm on Mars, a vision he hopes to achieve by the year 2020. To delve into the specific details of Kim’s business, the firm currently works to create a more efficient ecosystem for farming. Although their main products and services focus on providing the technological tools and data needed to reach the optimal productivity of farms, the company also makes an effort to change the organizational structure of current farms. The traditional structure leaves every process up to the farmers: the decision of which crops to plant, the entire farming process, and even the sale of their crops. Kim believed that this structure itself was inadequate and inefficient. First, it should be the consumers who place orders for the crops to be planted, thereby allowing people to take a bigger role in the agriculture industry. Furthermore, after the growing and harvesting of the crops, farmers should not have to deal with business interactions. In the same manner that mobile games are easily available to consumers via applications, publishing channels for farming should be developed to create higher accessibility to the public. With developments in each of these stages underway, N.Thing is devoted to creating an environment where everyone can take part in farming, thus becoming farmers. "Farming was an essential part of people's lives merely a few decades ago." In the process of pioneering a new field of agriculture, various difficulties naturally followed. However, Kim answered that there was no single striking memory of hardship. “Of course it was hard. Dealing with people, money, and regulations, nothing came easily. But I never dwelled on an issue more than was necessary. It was always just a natural part of building a company." Emphasizing the importance of individual perspectives, Kim answered that for him, an element of excitement was innate in every past obstacle. Furthermore, the hardships always led him to a valuable relationship with someone who helped him out of the ditch. Kim did, however, underline the intensity of the stress of leading a company. “Having worked in a company under a supervisor, I can confidently say that the mental pressure of leading one far surpasses the stress from simply working in one." As a result of his experience, Kim confessed that he never indulges other people to pursue entrepreneurship. “Rather, as entrepreneurship is closer to a lifestyle, people with the calling will naturally make the choices to that path." Life prior to entrepreneurship According to Kim, he had the dream of starting his own company as a high school student. Back then, he had a deep interest in web development, and had even managed the website for his school. In addition, he made a school club in which they would circle the local shops in the area and offer to design a website for them. In return, they would receive a small amount of money. In a sense, this was his first step in the field of startups. Hoping to meet a wider scope of talented people, he set foot in Hanyang University, a school he was drawn to for its deep devotion to technological advancement. There he achieved his initial goal, having met the people he now runs a company with. As he recounted his years as a university student, Kim confessed that he had been a bit of an outlier. Devoted to his belief that life should be a pursuit of his desires, he took many classes irrelevant to his department and increased interaction with people from other majors, which later on profoundly helped him manage his company. Adhering to his motto, he also took up jobs in entertainment, trend analysis, entrepreneurship, and agriculture. He added that where he stood now was a result of connecting the dots of his past experiences. Kim believes that without sufficient trials and errors, it is difficult for a person to establish a dream. As a word of advice for Hanyang students, Kim emphasized the importance of trial and error. “Though I had followed my passion, I always felt worried about straying from what was “normal.” Everyone around me was focusing on their grades, qualification exams, and employment. It took immense courage for me to break free from that frame." However, it was due to this transcendence that Kim was able to get to where he is now. In the same sense, Kim urged students of Hanyang to get out and try something they find the smallest hint of interest in. According to Kim, if something is given thought for too long, it will never lead to action. As the societal position of a university student is a very safe and stable one, it is easy to fall into this pattern. Kim’s advice is to get started on the exact day of the inspiration. “It’s kind of like playing golf. At first you swing hard towards the green, and then work on getting the ball in the hole. If you focus too much about getting the ball in from the start, you’ll never make the first swing." Lee Chang-hyun pizz1125@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Lee Jin-myung

2018-04 23

[Alumni]Algorithm for Everyone’s Inactive Health

The word "IoT" is no longer an unfamiliar technological notion anymore. Standing for the "Internet of Things," we are in control of various everyday devices even without making physical contact. Nowadays, it’s not solely "devices" that are in control. Pieces of furniture are also being included to the list of IoT compatible objects. Cha Gil-hwan (Physics, 06’), the CEO of Algorigo, is leading this area by designing chairs that fit into the world of IoT. For better inactive life “We spend the majority of the day being inactive – sleeping, sitting down, or even doing a slight action like walking,” started off Cha. Cha’s startup company, Algorigo, is trying to help this very problem. “Algorigo is a company that has designed an algorithm that can help us live our lives in a more effective, healthier way.” This company, unlike other businesses, concentrates not on materialistic objects but on the algorithm - an unambiguous specification of how to solve a class of problems - required to improve our lives with the assistance of technology. News H met Cha in his office which held a variety of eye-catching chairs. As the first project of Algorigo, Cha entered into a partnership with the well-known chair company, Duoback, to incorporate their products with Algorigo’s technology. The Duoback On is a smart chair that they invented for children. By analyzing body pressure distribution measurements read inside the seat board of the chair, Algorigo allows users to have detailed knowledge of our bodies when we sit. Through the sensors in the chair, data is sent to an IoT platform named Smart Home which is managed by SK Telecom. This chair is the first piece of furniture listed on this platform. Once this data is sent to the platform, the user, or the child’s parents in this case, can view details about this inactive motion of sitting down. They can not only be informed about the length of time their child was in the chair, but also her or his sitting position. The sensors records whether the user is sitting down straight or slouching in any direction. Through continued use of this chair, the user can find out the most frequently made posture, and can use their awareness to change it later on if necessary. “Healthy posture is extremely important for growing children – not only for their physical growth, but also for their mental abilities such as concentration. Being able to receive detailed scientific feedback would definitely be helpful in this regard,” said Cha. A picture explaining the platforms this chair is connected to (Photo courtesy of Duoback) The algorithm of Cha’s growth Cha’s challenge in beginning his startup was planning it out ahead of time, just like an algorithm. “Unlike other people who start their own businesses right away, I realized I needed more knowledge and practical business experience to better run my company,” reminisced Cha. He studied overseas to improve his English as well as studying intensively in his major. Even though a lot of physics majors fail to study abroad, Cha was proudly accepted to an exchange program and experienced what his friends couldn’t. As he certainly had a definite goal with a detailed roadmap, he was able to work hard for his career. He graduated with honors, worked in a major firm for three years, and eventually started his company, Algorigo. Now he is planning to expand his company to include chairs for teenagers and adults, and eventually plans to design a standard Algorigo that can directly help improve people’s quality of life and health. Although this concept of sensors is still unfamiliar to most people, Cha continuously emphasized the health derived from still actions. “For a lot of students and businessman, almost two-thirds of the day is spent sitting or lying down. However, most health-related platforms are currently only concentrated on physical activity and sports. Solutions for the actions we spend the most time doing are not concrete, so I hope that I can offer help in this field,” said Cha. Cha still has endless passion to develop Algorigo. Cha also had his ups and downs as he pursued his career. However, through firm trust in himself, he is making it through with increasing realization in his work. He emphasized being desperate and urgent in what one plans to achieve. “To anyone who is planning a startup and also for those who are not, I wish all Hanyangians have a goal and reach for it with a mindset that it’s the only goal you wish to achieve!” On Jung-yun jessica0818@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Lee Jin-myeong

2018-04 16

[Student]A Lion in the Sky

As of February 2018, there are more than 30 countries worldwide depending on nuclear power, with about 510 reactors and 160 currently in development. Moreover, there are five remaining Nuclear Weapon States (NWS) in the world. Despite the huge amount of electricity that nuclear reactors generate, the world is heading towards nonproliferation and inhibition of further development due to various security and health issues that could potentially affect everyone on the planet. The Korea Advanced Institute of Science & Technology's (KAIST's) Nuclear Nonproliferation Education and Research Center (NEREC) offers a scholarship to a limited number of excellent students in Korea, and Jung Yu-jin (Political Science and International Studies, Master’s program) was the first Hanyangian to be nominated in its three-year history. News H met Jung on a lovely spring afternoon. Nuclear nonproliferation One of the main agendas in the quest for international security is nuclear proliferation, due to the terrorizing destructiveness of the weapon. Although it is left in the hands of international relations professionals, many social science students face a psychological barrier when dealing with the technical aspect of the nuclear energy. Understanding the highly complicated process of nuclear division and the fundamentals of weaponizing it or using it as a power source is somewhat critical, setting a limit for social science students. The same applies for nuclear engineering students too. KAIST, one of the leading science institutes, along with Hanyang University, in Korea, founded the NEREC fellowship program aiming to co-research with social science majors in their master's or doctoral program on the issue of nuclear nonproliferation. Counting its third year in 2018, the research fellows have come from various prestigious schools, while Jung is the first Hanyangian member of the group. Jung submitted a research plan with the focus on international nuclear nonproliferation policies in relation to hegemony (leadership or dominance by one country). “The details of the paper will constantly change in the process,” mentioned Jung. The research fellows will conduct their own research until October, having monthly meetings with their academic advisors. A screen capture of Jung's personal webpage. Her biography and past experiences are well organized. (https://sites.google.com/view/yujinjuliajung/) (Photo courtesy of Jung) International politics as a life career Jung first found her interest in the field when she volunteered at the 2012 Nuclear Security Summit. “I was a third year Policy Studies student, who only knew that this summit was internationally significant but nothing else,” smiled Jung. By having the chance to closely observe the decision making and conference process, her academic interest in nuclear policies grew. This led her to join the Work English Study Travel (WEST) program to work in big organizations that are based in Washington D.C. “When I was working for the Voice of America, I was able to interview and march with the people who support affirmative action. The experience helped me a lot when studying American politics later on,” mentioned Jung. As such, she persued her interest in international politics and nuclear policies trying to experience as much as she could. “I decided to study further after such experiences, especially at Hanyang where the faculty is great and I feel comfortable,” emphasized Jung. She also mentioned that watching theories being applied to real life helped her to cultivate her academic imagination and still inspires her so much. Because studying and experiencing international politics is so exciting for Jung, she plans to apply to begin studying for her doctorate degree this year. “I should focus on the research project in NEREC and my graduation paper; then I look forward to working in research facilities in Korea before I set off to the U.S. for my doctorate degree,” planned Jung with sparkling eyes. Kim So-yun dash070@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Choi Min-ju

2018-04 11

[Alumni]Jinbo, the 'Super Freak'

Bangtan Boys (BTS), Red Velvet, Twice, Beenzino, Shinee - these are all pretty successful and globally famous idols in the K-pop industry. What they have in common is that they have all had Jinbo (Economics and Finance, ‘09) feature in some of their popular songs. Jinbo is a talented producer and vocalist whose curiosity and passion keeps him open to all music genres and trends. Jinbo, to progress Jinbo is one of those musicians who has both talent and perseverance that has led him to where he is now. Luckily, he was born into a musical family where he was constantly exposed to different genres and trends of music throughout his childhood. He was heavily influenced by his two older brothers, who enjoyed both classical and revolutionary selections at the time. He was also made their practice partner, which got him used to performing in front of others from a very early age. What really got him to decide to take a musician's path was when he first listened to the song "Happy" by Pharrell Williams. “Farrell Williams may not be exceptionally good at singing, rapping or playing an instrument, but he is fearless and daring as a producer and an artist. This inspired me to take on the challenge of being a producer and an artist as well.” (Photo courtesy of Jinbo) Although he graduated with an economics and finance degree due to his parents’ strong suggestion, it did not stop him from pursuing his dream as a producer and a vocalist. That was when he took on his stage name “Jinbo,” which in Korean means “to progress.” “I have five working principles. It is to be global, positive, futuristic, romantic, and progressive. I always want to stay open and be flexible, moving forward along with the changing times and trends. Hence, the name Jinbo.” Jinbo and Super Freak After diving into the industry, Jinbo successfully pushed his sense and style of music which later grabbed the attention of many different artists. He even created his own recording company called "Super Freak." His main focus genre may be R&B, but he is never hesitant when it comes to trying out or mixing different genres as well. As a result, many reached out to either collaborate with him, or even have him feature in their songs. “I’m not as interested in creating a whole new genre of music. Rather than creating something from the scratch, I’m more interested in creating a new mix from a variety of styles or genres that already exist.” “Music is like a language I am fluent in. But I hope one day I can proudly say that it is a toy that I can handle with fun and flexibility.” (Photo courtesy of Jinbo) Of course, even Jinbo went through some hardships. In his case, it was his health problems that got in the way. “I used to work overnight. But when I started having health issues resulting from it, even if I had a brilliant idea that I needed to quickly work on before losing it, the excruciating neck and back pain would prevent me. Now I try to have a more stable daily routine.” To the next step Having been awarded with Korean Music Awards (KMA) in both R&B record and song in 2011 and 2014 respectively, Jinbo wishes to continue working as an acknowledged producer and vocalist until the very end like Quincy Jones and James Brown did. “My dream is to have this name “Jinbo” become iconic so that people will think of it as a milestone in music history, rather than simply thinking of it as some political term.” When asked if he had any last words for his fellow Hanyang students, he said that as a university student, networking is important. As time goes by, the new generation will always experience something different and unprecedented. With that, combined with the experience and knowledge of the older generation, we will always be able to create something novel. That is why even he himself is always open to people regardless of ethnicity or age, so that whoever wishes to contact him, even just to share ideas with him, should not be hesitant. "봄이 오는 소리" - Jinbo (Video courtesy of youtube.com) Jinbo (SuperFreak Records) Instagram: jinbosuperfreak Park Joo-hyun julia1114@hanyang.ac.kr