Total 164Articles
News list
Content Forum List
2018-04 11

[Alumni]Jinbo, the 'Super Freak'

Bangtan Boys (BTS), Red Velvet, Twice, Beenzino, Shinee - these are all pretty successful and globally famous idols in the K-pop industry. What they have in common is that they have all had Jinbo (Economics and Finance, ‘09) feature in some of their popular songs. Jinbo is a talented producer and vocalist whose curiosity and passion keeps him open to all music genres and trends. Jinbo, to progress Jinbo is one of those musicians who has both talent and perseverance that has led him to where he is now. Luckily, he was born into a musical family where he was constantly exposed to different genres and trends of music throughout his childhood. He was heavily influenced by his two older brothers, who enjoyed both classical and revolutionary selections at the time. He was also made their practice partner, which got him used to performing in front of others from a very early age. What really got him to decide to take a musician's path was when he first listened to the song "Happy" by Pharrell Williams. “Farrell Williams may not be exceptionally good at singing, rapping or playing an instrument, but he is fearless and daring as a producer and an artist. This inspired me to take on the challenge of being a producer and an artist as well.” (Photo courtesy of Jinbo) Although he graduated with an economics and finance degree due to his parents’ strong suggestion, it did not stop him from pursuing his dream as a producer and a vocalist. That was when he took on his stage name “Jinbo,” which in Korean means “to progress.” “I have five working principles. It is to be global, positive, futuristic, romantic, and progressive. I always want to stay open and be flexible, moving forward along with the changing times and trends. Hence, the name Jinbo.” Jinbo and Super Freak After diving into the industry, Jinbo successfully pushed his sense and style of music which later grabbed the attention of many different artists. He even created his own recording company called "Super Freak." His main focus genre may be R&B, but he is never hesitant when it comes to trying out or mixing different genres as well. As a result, many reached out to either collaborate with him, or even have him feature in their songs. “I’m not as interested in creating a whole new genre of music. Rather than creating something from the scratch, I’m more interested in creating a new mix from a variety of styles or genres that already exist.” “Music is like a language I am fluent in. But I hope one day I can proudly say that it is a toy that I can handle with fun and flexibility.” (Photo courtesy of Jinbo) Of course, even Jinbo went through some hardships. In his case, it was his health problems that got in the way. “I used to work overnight. But when I started having health issues resulting from it, even if I had a brilliant idea that I needed to quickly work on before losing it, the excruciating neck and back pain would prevent me. Now I try to have a more stable daily routine.” To the next step Having been awarded with Korean Music Awards (KMA) in both R&B record and song in 2011 and 2014 respectively, Jinbo wishes to continue working as an acknowledged producer and vocalist until the very end like Quincy Jones and James Brown did. “My dream is to have this name “Jinbo” become iconic so that people will think of it as a milestone in music history, rather than simply thinking of it as some political term.” When asked if he had any last words for his fellow Hanyang students, he said that as a university student, networking is important. As time goes by, the new generation will always experience something different and unprecedented. With that, combined with the experience and knowledge of the older generation, we will always be able to create something novel. That is why even he himself is always open to people regardless of ethnicity or age, so that whoever wishes to contact him, even just to share ideas with him, should not be hesitant. "봄이 오는 소리" - Jinbo (Video courtesy of youtube.com) Jinbo (SuperFreak Records) Instagram: jinbosuperfreak Park Joo-hyun julia1114@hanyang.ac.kr

2018-04 10

[Alumni]Jack of All Trades

It is hard for one to imagine a person who majors in piano writing articles based on art for a newspaper. Kim Soo-hyun (Department of Piano, '11) has pursued her interests in both fields by not only majoring in piano, but also publishing serial articles in the Kyungnam Daily Newspaper. Through her activities which transcend borders, Kim works persistently to bring art closer to the public. Kim as a pianist Kim first started playing the piano when she was five years olds with her younger sister Kim So-yeon (Department of Piano, '10). From then on, the two sisters were both friends and rivals as future pianists. However, according to Kim, it was her younger sister who always came first in concours, due to her personal anxiety of going up on stage. She also added that such stage fright also had an impact when entering Hanyang University, which is why her younger sister entered the university one year earlier than Kim. A photo with professor Lee Dae-wook (left) (Photo courtesy of Kim) After entering Hanyang University, Kim had many opportunities to pursue her dream of becoming a pianist. Hanyang’s various facilities in the Music Department, such as the practice room and the music library, provided an ideal environment for Kim to nurture her interests. The meetings held with Professor Lee Dae-wook (Department of Piano) are still meaningful in her life. It was Professor Lee who helped Kim realize the importance of classical music and deeper study into the field. According to Kim, the memories of her first concert never get old. Starting from renting the concert hall to designing the concert poster and pamphlet, everything was prepared by Kim herself. Although it required 7 hours of travel roundtrip, as the concert was held in Jeonju City, Kim devoted every minute of her time to preparing for the concert. The concert was meaningful in that it was devoted to her parents. It contained not only a solo by Kim, but also a duet with her younger sister. Life as a music teacher While pursuing her dream of becoming a pianist, Kim also found her interests in the academic field. She completed a course in academic profession, with the belief that her experiences as a teacher would be helpful in the future. For Kim, teaching students was difficult as she had to follow a particular class schedule and prepare tests for her students. Kim believed that her students becoming friendly to music was more important than simply learning music theories. Kim during her days as a music teacher (Photo courtesy of Kim) Providing various opportunities that allowed the students to listen to music in a more comfortable environment was Kim’s main concern as a music teacher. She came up with class agendas such as expressing emotions after listening to music and drawing cartoons of the history of popular music. Kim believed that having such experiences through the activities attracted the students' interests and enabled them to increase their enthusiasm about music. In addition, Kim learned that music can serve as a powerful tool in the process of interactions between people. The Netherlands as another home Although the Netherlands is not a popular country that most classic-majors go to study, Kim chose to go to the country based on her personal experiences in Europe. While traveling in Europe for three weeks after graduating from Hanyang University, Kim decided to go back and pursue her studies in the European nation. The fact that 80 percent of the Dutch use English, which would lighten her burden of having to learn a third language, convinced Kim to choose the country. In addition, her interest in the representative Dutch painters Van Gogh, Rembrandt, and Mondriaan were another important reason she chose the Netherlands as her destination. Kim first started her pursuit in the field of arts due to her belief that collaborating art and music would help her gain a better understanding of the respective fields. She stated that “When researching about a particular artist, they were somehow related to the musicians who performed in a similar environment." In order to inform people of her findings in the Netherlands, Kim started to publish serial articles in the Kyungnam Daily Newspaper. Kim's article published in the Kyungnam Daily Newspaper (Photo courtesy of Kim) WIth the initial intention being to introducte the Netherlands to her readers, Kim now hopes that her writings make the Netherlands a place that one wishes to visit. As the Netherlands is a relatively uncommon destination for Korean tourists when compared to other countries such as France or England, Kim hopes that her writings help widen the opportunities for tourism in this country. According to Kim, “There are so many wonderful places in the Netherlands, yet tourists tend to simply stay in Amsterdam. However, other than Amsterdam, there are many other cities that have various attractions for traveling.” Future plans Kim is currently developing social contents through which people can easily understand works of art and music. While preparing a tour program on The Van Gogh Museum and The Rijksmuseum for Korean tourists who travel to the Netherlands, Kim is expecting to gain more professionalism by pursuing studies in museology. Furthermore, she has the goal of publishing a book, in her own name, based upon her writings. Kim ended the interview by adding, “I hope that I can contribute to art's becoming closer to the public”. Choi Seo-yong tjdyd1@hanyang.ac.kr

2018-04 09

[Alumni]Providing Hope for Students

According to a survey conducted by the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), Korea’s youth unemployment rate was calculated to be 10.3 percent as of 2017. In comparison to other countries, Korea is ranked as the 16th highest, and has more or less maintained this level for the past five years. However, despite the fact that the rate of youth unemployment has remained at a similar number for a while, the difficulty of unemployment felt by young people was recorded to be the worst. As always in times of hardship, no matter how devastating they may be, there is hope. Two exemplary cases of employment by Kim Na-young (Department of Media Communication, 13’) and Lim Yu-jin (Department of Policy Studies, 10’), offer a ray of hope and encouragement to Hanyangian students. The Hanyang Work Experience Program Among the number of programs that Hanyang University has employed to address the challenges of employment for its students, one of the most prominent initiatives is the Hanyang Work Experience Program (HYWEP). Simply put, HYWEP can be explained as a program for providing students with internship opportunities. Every semester, a list of corporations with internship openings are posted online, along with the job description, number of positions, and the pay rate. A competitive edge of HYWEP is that as the program is co-established with the school, students can earn academic credits through the internship. Through this system, students can save a significant amount of time, since they do not have to take time off school to pursue work experience. Furthermore, the internships could lead to potential employment opportunities. Lim felt that her first three months of internship had not been sufficient enough to learn about the job of an accountant; this led her to return for a second internship. The path to employment There are a number of similarities and differences between the stories of Kim and Lim. To begin with the differences, Kim works at an advertisement company. After completing her exchange student program in the United States, she applied for an internship through HYWEP. Although Kim’s aspiration as an undergraduate student was to become a television show producer, working in the advertisement industry was a dream she had held as a child. “I consider myself very lucky. I tried something I liked, found I was good at it, and one thing led to another”. On the other hand, Lim works as an accountant. For Lim, a career as an accountant was a goal that had been set some time ago. After having completed an internship in an accounting department situated abroad, she felt the desire to work in Korea. Through the HYWEP program, Lim was able to find a firm that suited her conditions. After two consecutive internships, she was offered a position at the firm. Kim and Lim also shares some significant similarities. For one, they both work for an international company. The two students both pursued an internship period of six months in their respective firms prior to their recruitment. Finally, they both made extensive use of the Hanyang Career Development Center and the HYWEP program. Some advantages of the HYWEP program that Lim mentioned were the kindness of the employees at the Career Development Center. When she had been contemplating which company to apply for, she brought a list of potential companies to the center, where one of the managers gave an analysis on each of the potential firms. After receiving counseling on her career path, she was given a final recommendation. Furthermore, since the internship was done through the school, she felt that the “Hanyang” title was attached to her throughout her experience. Thus, she had to work with a firm sense of responsibility. Kim added that another advantage of HYWEP was that it was a good source of information. Often times, internship possibilities require some research, and personal effort is necessary to find good openings. However, the list of openings that the HYWEP program provides is itself an extremely helpful source. Furthermore, as the application is done through the school, there may be a lower level of competition for the position. Kim answered that working at an advertisement firm was an unexpected fortune. Working on the promotion of movies, every project was new, so she never felt bored. Some room for improvement as suggested by Lim and Kim was that a wider array of positions from more industries would be desirable. According to Kim, although there is some variety in the offered openings every semester, there still lacks a fundamental variety to the types of industries that are open for application. She also added that an assessment of the firms would be extremely helpful for those contemplating which company to apply for. Although she was fortunate enough to have worked in a friendly work environment, she had witnessed others who having to work overtime, and generally be mistreated. Kim believes that having an overall assessment record could prevent such happenings. Meanwhile, Lim suggested that an interim evaluation would be helpful for students. In the current state, the Career Development Center does not engage with the students after the internship begins. However, some follow-up services thoughout the duration of the internship could greatly benefit the students. Advice for students Both alumna stressed the importance of a long-term internship. “Internships usually come in 3, 6, and 9 month terms, but 3 months is too short a time to really learn anything,” mentioned Kim. Lim also added that for foreign companies, an internship period is an opportunity to prove one’s competence. “Foreign firms especially have a tendency of not hiring people lacking any work experience. Therefore, the period of internship can act as a great window to prove your capabilities.” The two graduates also emphasize the importance of internships themselves, as there are striking differences in how a school and a company approach the same thing. “The academic and practical approaches to the same phenomenon are very different in terms of attitude and purpose,” added Kim. Lim also agrees that her internships were a great chance to learn the realities of a student’s desired career path. Lee Chang-hyun pizz1125@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Lee Jin-myung

2018-04 03

[Faculty]A Dancer and an Educator

In the words of the cherished German philosopher Friedrich von Schlegel, “Every art should become science, and every science should become art.” This is the very belief that College of Performing Arts and Sports Dean Kim Un-mi holds true for dance and education. Constantly emphasizing the importance of connectivity between educational theory and practice, Kim shared with News H some of her thoughts on being awarded the Korea Dance Association Art Award. Kim was recognized for having contributed to the field of Korean Dance, especially for having established the Research Institute of Korea Traditional Dance. The Korea Dance Association Art Award Dating back to 1961, the Korea Dance Association is the largest and most deeply rooted organization in the domestic field of dance. Every year, people who have made great advancements, not just in the field of dance but in regional developments and education as well, have been recognized and awarded by the organization. Nevertheless, with the awardees of the Art Award traditionally having been dancers, Kim answered that it was a great honor for her to have received the honor as an educator. Kim was highly praised in contributing to the preservation and advancement of Korean traditional dance through the Research Institute of Korea Traditional Dance. It was clear that Kim held immense passion for Korean dance as she talked about the background of its establishment. In addition to researching and teaching the theories of dancing, Kim stated that she still dances to this day. (Photo courtesy of Kim) According to Kim, it all began with a performance in Australia. It was a composition dance, where the choreography was built around the theme of a Korean traditional wedding. From stage editing to costumes and music, the Korean traditional style had been adapted. Even more important was the choreography. Kim desired to deliver the very essence of the traditional ceremony, with an emphasis on the emotions of the bride. “The traditionally long event had to be compressed into a 30-minute sequence, which was a challenge for me.” From anxiety to excitement, joy, and happiness, Kim directed the performance in a manner through which the emotions of the bride on the day of the wedding could be felt by the audience. Eventually accruing great praise and recognition for the performance, Kim was offered support to expand her activities and research, which was when she proposed the idea of the research institute. Established well before the currently ubiquitous concept of convergence research, the Research Institute of Korea Traditional Dance utilized the two separate fields of Korean dance and engineering for one purpose: the preservation and advancement of Korean traditional dance. Not only does the institute conduct historical research, digging deeper into the roots of Korean dance, but it also analyzes the virtue and spirit that is contained in it. Various concepts are devised to capture abstract meanings in the dance. Furthermore, methods to install these values and ultimately design them into choreography are studied there. A photo of Kim instructing her students (Photo courtesy of Kim) Born to dance “My first memories are that of dancing.” With her mother also a dancer and an educator, Kim stated that she had always danced. However, that does not mean that it was only out of external influence. According to Kim, she had always been captivated by the stage, and there was always an exhilarating emotion that arose seconds after she started dancing. As a student, she was also very studious. Determined to prove to herself that the Korean stereotype of dancers and musicians being academically underachieved is wrong, she always set aside time to study. In fact, Kim graduated from the Department of Dance at the top of her class. “It was, however, never for the sake of coming in first." As an educator, Kim wishes to teach her students how to endow meaning to their dance. “Our students are very passionate. Having such passion to move, dance, and train the body for dancing requires just as much time and effort as studying.” However, deeply influenced by the Korean system of college preparation, Kim worries that most students dance out of instruction. According to Kim, there should always be a motive for each movement, and as dancers, students need to think profusely about how they move and dance. This is the very core of her idea in emphasizing the importance of theoretical aspects of dancing. “The theoretical foundations of dancing could result in profound changes in their movements.” Kim is very keen on communicating with her students, which was quite evident by the array of letters that she had received in her office. As a word of wisdom for the students of Hanyang, Kim refers to the Hanyang motto, "Love in deed." “What I want to stress is the "deed" part. By that I mean that all studying must be followed with some practical actions.” According to Kim, whether it is dancing, studying, or even breathing for the sake of living, things must have meaning. For that, we must engage in theoretical and cognitive research, and follow with some appropriate actions. She believes that this will create results deeper in meaning and satisfaction. “People must move. And to move, people must think. One does not carry meaning without the other.” Kim stated that she hopes to see more students able to think and act for themselves, and pursue achievements as proud students of Hanyang. Lee Chang-hyun pizz1125@naver.com Photos by Choi Min-ju

2018-03 26

[Faculty]Story of a Self-Taught Professional Mountain Photographer

Known as a mountainous country, South Korea is famous for the year-round beauty of both small and huge mountains along with never-ending groups of hikers. Despite the obvious attraction of the mountains’ natural aspects, it is still possible for people to miss the hidden beauty in the depths of the mountains. It is these moments that Cho Myung-hwan (Department of Electronic Engineering, ’82), the passionate self-made photographer, likes to catch. Turning Point at the Age 50 Cho was not a professional photographer from the start. In fact, ever since Cho graduated from Hanyang University (HYU) as an electronic engineering student, he had been working at a few IT related companies for about 10 years before voluntary retirement at the age 50. According to Cho, he had promised himself that when he turned 50, he would do something that he truly loved and had passion for. However, this did not mean he switched to photography right away. “Now that I look back, I did love photography ever since I was a HYU student. I was a part of a photography circle that I truly preferred over classes.” According to Cho, in 2004 he started hiking Baekdu Mountain and ran into a friend with whom he promised to later complete the whole Baekdudaegan Mountain Range hiking course. Every Saturday for 2 years, they hiked together, and Cho used the opportunities to take pictures which he then uploaded on his blog, attracting much attention and praise from his surrounding followers. “I’m a self-taught professional mountain photographer of 14 years, and I am still working and studying very hard everyday to improve,” said Cho. As a mountain photographer When asked if he had ever been interested in taking photos of other subjects, Cho instantly replied that he is only interested in mountains. He believes that Korean mountains hold the true Korean soul and identity, and that he wants to capture and show it through his pictures. He also does not like what has been touched and trampled on by people, so he only wants to capture the raw beauty of nature. That is why all the photo books he has self-published include “raw things” in the title. Cho said, “What I’m doing is a form of art and expression. You need to learn how to appreciate and understand the mountain in order to take good pictures. If you hike just to take pictures, those pictures are never going to become more than just ‘a picture.’” For years he had gone hiking day and night regardless of the time in order to capture the rare moments of natural beauty. His schedule, thus, was never fixed as he had to hike on rainy and snowy days, and even at dawn and the deepest darkest nights. He believes that creativity is always the most important part of art and has never been afraid to take on challenges to photograph these untouched parts and moments of the mountain that most hikers are not really aware of. However, it is not always easy, even for an experienced hiker like Cho, as it is quite common for him to hike for more than 6 hours and take hundreds of pictures without getting any satisfactory results. “Even if it is supposedly one of the worst situations you can ever be in, you should learn to accept it and give it your all. If it still doesn’t turn out the way you would have liked, then learn to be satisfied with what you have then.” Never-ending passion Cho has also consistently been working on calendars and books and opening photo galleries in order to give the public more access to his pictures. He mentioned that the hardest part of being a photographer was not in the physical, but financial aspects. For 14 years he did not have stable income even with the ID photo studio that he owns. He has also had to find ways to publish all the books and calendars of his photos at a cheaper price. Later on he even learned how to design them from scratch himself and sold them on the internet. “This is why a lot of people are scared to try something new. I also wouldn’t recommend for young people to simply go for it, to be honest. If you’re old like me, that’s a different story. If you’re young, I’d say you have a stable job first, and then try it as a side job,” said Cho. Along with his realistic advice, Cho mentioned how he wants to continue hiking and photographing the raw beauty of mountains in Korea, but also in other countries if he ever gets the chance to. Park Joo-hyun julia1114@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Choi Min-ju

2018-03 20

[Student]Two Chinese Goblins

From February 9th to 25th, South Korea hosted the 2018 Winter Olympics in Pyeongchang. As the 23rd Winter Olympics were to be held in a country perennially making headlines with their brothers in the North, it caught the special attention of manywho wondered how the country known for its rapid growth and technology would host the international event. Luckily, South Korea’s usage of 1,218 drones and other jaw-dropping performances satisfied the high expectations of global eyes. Out of all the Hanyang Univeristy (HYU) students that participated in the opening performance of the 2018 Pyeongchang Winter Olympics, there were only two Chinese foreign students, Liu Tianyi (刘天艺, Department of Dance) and Chen Tianxiao (陈天笑, Graduate School of Dance), who were nominated to be part of the crew. How It All Began Liu and Chen were not just students with natural talent. Ever since they were little, they attended arts and dance schools where they would train in traditional Chinese dance everyday. Before attending Hanyang’s graduate school, Chen had majored in dance at a Chinese university. By then he was already a renowned dance prodigy, as he had started officially performing from the age of 16. His first and very well-known performance was, in fact, on the opening stage of the 2008 Summer Olympics in Beijing, right when the Olympic Torch relay arrived in Yangzhou. As a passionate and talented student, he also attended a dance competition held in Korea, where he began his new passion for modern dance, and chose to study in Korea. Liu (left) and Chen (right) As for Liu, she had an exceptional interest in Korea and its culture ever since she was young. She started studying Korean when she was 14 with the help of her many Korean friends in Qingdao. Having studied traditional dance for more than 10 years, she also grew interested in modern dance after watching a performance on television. “The field of modern dance feels quite different as it is of Western origin. I really like how it allows me to use my body creatively, and as Korea is more advanced in this field, and especially since Hanyang University (HYU) is one of the top ranking schools for arts and performances, I decided to apply to this school,” said Liu. Passion for dance When asked how they first started, Chen simply replied that he has always loved dancing, and that he believed dance is the best form of language there can be. However, Liu gave an unexpected answer, saying, “when I was little, I didn’t really have a neck. My mom was worried about my short neck so she made me start dancing and stretching. Luckily, I now have one.” With laughs and jokes aside, Liu also showed her passion for dance, calling it the expression of connection between art and the soul. She emphasized how she wanted to show other students that she was giving her all everyday to get to where she is now, and to also achieve her goals in the future. "I now have a neck!" (Photo courtesy of Liu) With their drive and years of practice, the two dancers really stood out. They were recommended by Professor Son, an influential professor within the department, to perform on the opening stage of the 2018 Pyeongchang Winter Olympics. After months of strictly confidential practices under harsh weather conditions, they successfully performed as Korean traditional goblins alongside the world’s top ranking and renowned Korean dance group. “It wasn’t easy. Pyeongchang was so cold that it took a lot of energy just to stay focused. One of the students was severely injured while practicing and ended up having to take a long break from dancing entirely,” said Liu. Future discourse Already having gained popularity and recognition in the dance field, Chen talked in detail about his dream of becoming a choreographer. “In the future, I want to try fusing Chinese and Korean dance together. It would be interesting to see bits of traditional and modern elements in a performance. In that sense, I want to live in Korea because it’s a more efficient environment.” For Liu, despite her passion for dance, her dream is to become a Chinese-Korean translator. “I love dance, but I love Korea as well. I have been in love with the culture and language ever since I was little, and I’m now thinking about attending graduate school for this next step,” said Liu. Park Joo-hyun julia1114@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Lee Jin-myung

2018-03 19

[Alumni]Where Brands and I Meet: Brandi

Shopping online is no longer magical for most people. E-commerce has bloomed and blossomed in our computers and mobile phones, too. Now there are thousands of personal sellers through their Instagram and blogs. Seo Jung-min (Business, ’07) pondered two questions: Why do all markets have to be scattered all around the internet? Why not make a platform for all markets? Brandi, a marketplace for no-brand apparel Brandi is a mobile application and platform launched in July 2016, which provides a gateway between individual merchandizers and consumers in the female clothing market, especially the ones without a brand. The application enables consumers to easily purchase clothes without logging in or making accounts on individual websites, which saves a lot of hassle for the buyers. The reply from the consumers was great, recording over 20 million accumulated downloads and 12 million users so far. Brandi, designed for a mobile environment that emphasizes a simple and catchy user interface, allows consumers to look through what is new and trending as if shopping is their hobby. Screen captures of the Brandi application. Filters enable customers to find products in the desired price range and popularity rating. The last picture shows that you can view the rankings of individual stores. (Photo courtesy of Brandi) More than 3000 sellers from blogs and Instagram markets are listed in Brandi, and that has led to over 400 milllion won in transactions to be made just last year. The reason behind such progress seems like Seo’s emphasis on the quality of service. All sellers are subject to internal standards that give penalty points whenever a delivery is late or there is no regular update on the market. Also, Seo strived to create unique characteristics of Brandi that differentiate it from other competitors. First, the application has a clear focus on women’s clothing. “If an application covers too many categories, a user would have to scroll through several pages to find exactly what she or he is interested in. If that experience is repeated, the user will not click the app again,” mentioned Seo. That is the reason why the company recently launched another application called HIVER for branded clothes. Moreover, Brandi simplified its purchasing process, which connects all the markets on the application seamlessly. Yet, through its diversity of sellers, the application still provides a wide variety of options for customers to choose from. "The first three years of venture was extremely hard, because I basically knew nothing. But after three years, I think I understood what I had gotten myself into," laughed Seo. A Young Entrepreneur Seo’s first adventure in the venture world started right after his military discharge, while he was still a third grade college student. “My immaturity gave me some hard times, but I was able to throw myself into the world as there was not much for me to lose,” smiled Seo. The business he started at that time was also in the fashion industry, where customers could select their own design of t-shirts. The business was operated by Seo himself for seven years and was then acquired by a big corporation. After two years working in the company, Seo decided to take off on his second journey, Brandi. “I always knew I was meant to be a businessperson,” said Seo, determined. Behind all the success and progress he made, there was hard work. Seo worked as an apprentice in Hanyang Venture Alumni since his third year of college, when at that time there were only people in their mid-30s or 40s in the alumni group. He participated in the Hanyang Start-up Competition in 2007, too. “I was always an enthusiastic student back in the days. Eager to learn and challenge myself,” mentioned Seo. When asked if planning to put men's apparel in Brandi, Seo shook his head, determined. Seo considers simplicity and focus the key of a mobile appication. Because Seo himself is a start-up businessperson, he tries to create a company culture where “founders like me would also want to stay and work.” He said, “Young people these days, including myself, cannot stand the rules and stiff conditions, especially when they seem unnecessary.” Therefore, Brandi does not regulate its employee’s working hours, usage of holidays, dress codes, or even workspaces. “You can take your work downstairs to Starbucks if you want to,” smiled Seo. Instead, the company is operated around work objectives set by individual employees and Key Performance Indicators (KPI). The environment Seo created is "no matter where or how you work, what matters is that you do your job." Seo aims to grow Brandi to the extent where it is acknowledged as Korea’s number one fashion-tech company. “There are not many fashion-tech companies in Korea as there are overseas,” lamented Seo. He believes that it is time for Korea to follow the global trend. Kim So-yun dash070@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Choi Min-ju

2018-03 19

[Student]Proud Achievements as a Foreigner

On the 1st of February, certificates were given to those on the Dean’s List of Research Records, in the HIT Building. Run by the Industry-University Cooperation Foundation, the research results of graduate school students from January to December were reviewed. Awards were given in three different categories to 12 students in total. Out of these outstanding performers, an international student stood out. Successful research achieved in another country Xing Jiuqiang (Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Engineering, Integrated Master’s – Doctor’s Program) was a proud Chinese Hanyangian on the Dean’s list, as an outstanding researcher. Hanyang University (HYU) is constantly helping and supporting students to make the best research results as the future leaders of the world, as creative and talented people are required in this fourth industrial revolution era. Out of the many graduate students working and researching day and night, Xing proudly put his name on the list. Xing proudly put his name on the Dean's list. “I am so honored to receive this award, even though I went through such hardships as an international student in HYU,” started off Xing. 2018 is his sixth year in Korea, away from his home country. “I’m still not fluent in Korean and still working in my research. I am very thankful I received such a meaningful award even though I am still working on my research,” said Xing. Xing researched the biological purification of underwater pollutive chemicals using microalgae. As this is his 5th year since 2014, he has continued on his research in great depth. His professor, Jeon Byong-hun (Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Engineering), led him to try and study in a range of areas, eventually leading to Xing’s success. “I not only concentrated on chemicals, but also researched on wastewater and other pollutive substances. There are also various types of algae, which gives more chances of different results,” explained Xing. Life of an international student The life of a Chinese student in Korea was tough with a high language barrier. Xing started learning Korean in a language school in Korea, from the very beginning. “I couldn’t even order a single menu item in the cafeteria at first. I had so many difficulties to solve the basic things I needed in life,” reminisced Xing. In an unfamiliar land with an unfamiliar language, he was able to meet a reassuring mentor, Professor Jeon. “I call him my father. He was such a big help to me,” commented Xing. A picture of Xing with his lab members. (Photo courtesy of Xing) Xing started his career in the Bioenergy and Environmental Remediation Laboratory since March of 2014, following Professor Jeon. The professor came as a great help to Xing both emotionally and academically. “Even in my research, there were a lot of things I wouldn’t even have thought of if it weren't for Professor Jeon,” reminisced Xing. Xing’s life is still tough, both as a foreigner and a as graduate school student. “I come to school around 10 in the morning and go back home late at night. I used to be extremely frustrated due to the fallacies in my research. Now, I’m enjoying every single moment,” said Xing. Graduate school research isn’t something everyone can do. Therefore, even for Xing, endless trials and errors were required to proceed with his research. He had to spend weeks to deduct a result he wished. Xing commented that he is now familiar with his work and is enjoying it. Xing is planning to continue on with his research. He still has a lot to do in front of him. “I want to continue my career in molecular organisms. I want to go back to China as a great researcher,” said Xing. His dream motivated him to carry on. He, as an international student in Korea, will again try his best to achieve the best he can. On Jung-yun jessica0818@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Lee Jin-myeong

2018-03 13

[Alumni]Breaking Barriers for the Future of Medicine

Becoming a doctor is a common childhood dream for many children. However, after growing up and realizing how challenging such a dream is, a large number of dreamers abandon their pursuit. This pattern is similar for computer scientists. The study of computer engineering, just like every other subset of engineering, is notorious for being extremely demanding. Now imagine attaining a doctorate degree in both of these fields. As impossible as it sounds, Hyun Wook Han (Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, ‘94), currently a head professor at Cha University, has achieved such goals, and is now paving a new path that combines the potential possibilities of the two fields. This is Health Care Big Data Recently having published the book, This is Health Care Big Data, Han expressed his deep passion for big data technology. Referring to his book as an introductory guideline to understanding this relatively new concept, Han emphasized the need for technical knowledge. “As much as big data is gaining attention in light of the 4th industrial revolution, there are not many books that handle the technical aspect of it. Most books are written by non-engineers. Although these books hold profound insight into the entrepreneurial and social aspects of big data, they lack explanation on the technical elements fundamental to truly understanding this technology.” Han, therefore, drew from academic information, personal experiences, and the columns that he had occasionally written, to create an extensive book on big data. Largely connecting the concept of health care and telecommunications technology, he wrote about the common area where the two fields meet. Furthermore, while compounding this information, Han also took into consideration the importance of readability, since the targeted readers for the book were the majority of the public. He explained that the book does not delve too deeply into the field, which is the reason why he called it “introductory.” Han has always liked writing. "I used to write poems as a student." Big data and health care artificial intelligence Immersed in clinical research and development, Han described his research as “networking fields of medicine.” According to Han, the various departments of medicine each have a significant amount of accumulated data. A problem with the status quo is that not a single pair of departments inspect the possibility of a relationship between data from their respective fields. “Simply speaking, what I do is discover the relationship between two objects. These objects could be diseases, particles, genes, and so on. A key characteristic of my research is that the pool of factors that I draw from transcends a single department of medicine. Curiously, not many people study two departments at the same time.” With the development of new drugs stagnant due to increasing restrictions and limitations, Han explained that new paradigms to comprehend and approach diseases were in demand. In this process, big data is the key. Due to the nearly infinite volume of data, big data is the only technology that allows the user to process and analyze the data set. Furthermore, big data is an essential, fundamental tool that enables the development of an Artificial Intelligence program for health care. “An AI for health care would be another breakthrough for mankind. The spotlight, especially from the government, is focused on creating an AI program." Han, however, explained that it is still a distant technology. One of the biggest problems that he noted was the lack of clinical data. “Most researchers today try to compete with AI algorithms, without extensive insight into clinical data. This sets a critical limit on its practicality. The reason that the major hospitals in Korea do not use AI programs is because of instability.” As an illustration for his argument, Han took the example of cancer. As cancer is a deeply genetic disease with diversified treatment processes, it cannot be generalized for practical uses. An extensive set of clinical data will be the only solution to provide practicality for AI algorithms. Han works with a number of medical firms, seeking ways to implement big data and block chain technology. To enable big data analysis and AI development becomes possible, an extensive accumulation of accurate information is extremely crucial. However, this process is nearly impossible for several reasons. First, the formats of medical records and documents are different at each hospital, making it difficult to collect and organize the data in a consistent manner. Second, there is a phenomenon called “doctor shopping” in Korea. This refers to patients picking out the hospital and doctor they want to see. After receiving diagnoses from any number of desired doctors, patients then decide on the hospital that they wish to receive treatment from. This means that even if some hospitals have data on disease diagnosis, they do not necessarily have a accompanying record on treatment. This phenomenon scatters medical information everywhere. Even the data on treatment can become fractured when a patient decides to move around hospitals for the best treatment. Finally, even if it was somehow possible to collect the fragmented medical data in a consistent manner, current medical laws ban the use of medical data from being exported to another entity. According to Han, all these obstacles can be overcome with a key technology: block chain. Block chain technology is the building block of crypto currency, allowing the creation of a virtual ledger that cannot be meddled with. This endows security and stability to the newly surfacing form of currency. The same manner of utilization can be adapted for medical data. The reason why medical records were entrusted to hospitals was because they were the only entity deemed responsible enough not to modify medical documents for their own benefit. However, with the block chain technology, medical records and data can be entrusted to the individual, allowing the possibility of attaining data legitimately. Furthermore, the diagnosis and treatment will no longer be fragmented, ensuring the profundity of the data set. The development and implementation of this technology is steadily underway. Han added that one of his current research topics is focused on creating the environment that enables the purchase and sale of medical data. “Personal medical data will inevitably be a valuable asset that companies will seek to purchase. What I want to prepare is a new market for this transaction.” Han’s journey The department of computer engineering was not established when Han went to school. The department of electrical and electronic engineering had an integrated curriculum, providing classes in computer engineering and electrical engineering. Han made the decision to take classes in system engineering, computer programming, and so on. After graduation, Han went to Seoul National University's graduate school of electronics and computer engineering where he focused his research on databases. What drew him to the medical field was a single seminar. Among the large number of seminars at the time, Han participated in the one where the speaker talked about the infinite data created by cells and how they could be used (the term, “big data” was non-existent at the time). This concept was a great shock at the time, and it has grasped Han’s interest since then. Han stated that though his studies were tough, he felt a genuine interest in his classes. During the short period of employment after attaining his master’s degree, Han decided to pursue a career in bioinformatics. After extensive contemplation, as well as consultation, Han concluded that an analyst would be as far as he could get in the field without extensive knowledge in biology or medicine. After some consideration, he enrolled in Cha Medical University. His courses there revolved around clinical research, a direction he continues to this day. “It was very difficult studying both fields. Having studied subjects such as math, physics, and systems logic, I’ve never had to memorize much for my classes. They were more focused on comprehension. On the other hand, the field of medicine was about memorizing, from beginning to end. At a relatively old age, it was hard to memorize so much information. I think I studied about three times as much as my peers did. The process was definitely not easy. However, after completing my studies, I could really feel the synergy coming into play when I began my doctorate courses. I could communicate the language in both fields, reading and referring from research papers in respective fields. This helped out a lot.” Drawn from his life experience, Han emphasized the importance of connectivity for young students. “In school, different subjects are studied independently. There are hardly any classes that teach students how to connect and integrate different fields. As of now, it is up to the students to grow the ability to do so.” Han wished to advise students to learn to connect different domains. According to Han, this insight through integration can often create an opportunity of “burst.” Lee Chang-hyun pizz1125@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Kang Cho-hyun

2018-03 08

[Faculty]Hanyang College of Engineering’s Dean Becoming the President of all Engineering Deans

Engineering education has been growing in importance in Korean society ever since the beginning. Now it is emphasized more than ever as the Fourth Industrial Revolution or Industry 4.0 has started to prevail in our lives. Industry 4.0 is a name for the current trend of automation and data exchange in manufacturing technologies. It includes cyber-physical systems, the Internet of things, cloud computing, and cognitive computing. News H met Jung at his office in a sunny day. Although he must have been busy as the school was starting, he was very embracing and welcoming. This year, Hanyang University’s Dean from the College of Engineering, Jung Sung-hoon was elected as the president of Korean Engineering Deans’ Association. The association was founded in 1991 to promote and better the engineering education in Korea. News H visited Jung to congratulate him on his election and to hear more of his stories. Q. Congratulations on your election! How do you feel? A. Well, first of all, it is a big honor for me having this big position. And I am very thankful that I can hand this honor to Hanyang University, as HYU’s dean is the president of the Deans’ Association across the nation. Q. What does the Korean Engineering Deans’ Association do exactly? A. We collect opinions and discuss the current problems in the engineering education, and try to fix the problems through delivering our opinion to government bodies such as the Ministries of Trade, Industry, and Energy. I have a meeting with the vice vice-ministers from the Ministries of Trade, Industry, and Energy and the Ministry of Science and ICT. Q. What do you aim to accomplish during your time in office? A. There are about 160 colleges that are members of the Association, but only about 60 schools are actively participating now. I personally hope that I can bring more participation during my time, as engineering education is becoming more important these days. I feel sorry for the fact that not many schools are implementing new curriculums that can nurture competent students who are apt in this Industry 4.0 era. Q. What do you think was the key to your election? A. First of all, the Association appoints its president from Seoul and the other areas in turn, and this year was Seoul’s turn. And since Hanyang University is nearly the representative of the Korean engineering education,I was nominated as the candidate. It’s a bit embarrassing for me to say it out loud for myself, but I was elected unanimously. (laughter) Jung emphasized that Hanyang Graduate School of Engineering is world class, so students who are interested in advancing their academics should not hesitate to enroll in the graduate school in Hanyang. Jung and the word “engineering” are inseparable, as he graduated from HYU College of Engineering himself, came back as a professor, held the position of vice-dean and dean, and is now becoming the President of the Deans’ Association. “I would not have been able to come this far without love for engineering,” smiled Jung. He recalls that the three years of working in the textile factory right after graduation also helped him to gain profound insight into the industry. Jung mentioned that engineering is in the field rather than in books. That is why he still encourages his students to go work in the factory, even for months. “Students nowadays do not prefer working in the factories, but it really helps them understand and apply what they have learned in class. That will be the engine for their future careers, whatever they do,” said Jung, with a bitter smile. Jung is in the office from the 1st of March 2018 to the end of February 2019. With the passion and enthusiasm that has led him so far, we expect him to bring about the betterment of engineering education in Korea too. Kim So-yun dash070@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Choi Min-ju