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2018-01 15

[Alumni]The New Head Coach of the School Basketball Team Expresses Confidence

Once upon a time, there was a shooting guard on the Hanyang University’s (HYU) basketball team who led the team to win the competition. Twenty-three years later, the player returned to his home team to teach his pupils. This week, News H met the new head coach of HYU's basketball team, Chung Jae-hun (Business, ’96). "I am deeply honored to come back home for teaching." About the coach himself A shooting guard is one of the five positions in a basketball game. He or she is the one who mainly attempts long range shots such as Stephen Curry in the modern NBA. Chung used to play as a shooting guard when he was in college. One of the moments that he remembers playing was his turn around shot against the Korea University team. 1995 was the year when HYU shared the top spot with Korea and Chungang University. After graduation, Chung became the founding member of Daegu Orion Orions, which is now called Goyang Orion Orions. The newly appointed head coach further explained his long passion towards leadership. “The frustration became bigger for me to lose a game as a coach, than to lose as a player,” said Chung. That is why he decided to retire from the court in 2002 after winning the 2001 season with the Orions. Now coming back to his home school as a head coach, Chung is inspired to grow the players as big as the alumnus already on the court. “I feel greatly honored and pressured at the same time,” smiled Chung. Hanyang's proud basketball team from last season. We ended up in 8th place last year. (Photo courtesy of HY-Ball) Prospects for the team Chung sees that the biggest strength of the team is speed. However he also recognizes its weakness which is the lack of height and defense. “We have many offensive options on the team but we lack defensive strategies.” Therefore he is planning to focus on improving the defense by emphasizing the centers to get more involved in boxing out, overcome the physical attributes by engaging in zone defense strategies and attempting to trap the opposition in the corners. Boxing out refers to blocking the opposition players from getting involved in rebounds, which is when the ball bounces back from the rim. Zone defense is when players mark the players according to their own respective areas. “Practice makes perfect,” said the head coach, looking determined. The only way to make up such shortcomings is to practice day and night. In the morning, the team is scheduled for weight lifting, defensive strategies in the afternoon, and personal skill training during the night. As Chung remembers his team back in the days in HYU, most players were able to do shoots, passes, dribbles and drives. Nevertheless, he feels like the students nowadays are less impressive, in terms of their abilities. “Still, by working to improve ourselves little by little, we will be able to have competitiveness through the use of various strategies,” mentioned Chung, with hope in his eyes. "Instead of fancy plays that catch the attention of the crowd, I will defend and rebound more to improve the team," said Bae Kyung-sik (Sports Industry, 4th year), the captain of the team. When asked what his goal is for next season, Chung replied with humbleness: “We aim to make it to the play-offs." A playoff is a competition played after the regular season by the top competitors to determine the league champion or a similar accolade. Once our team makes it to the playoffs, Chung believes that the team can possibly reach the final four. “Me and the whole team shares the goal of reaching the final four. Although people might think that we are not a strong team, we aim high,” Chung aspires. The new season starts from March. Let us keep our eyes on the upcoming games and the progress Chung will bring to the team. Kim So-yun dash070@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Choi Geun-baik

2018-01 14

[Student]Monopolizing the First Place

With the slogan ‘The Engine of Korea,’ Hanyang University (HYU) has been one of the main forces in Korea for technology and engineering domains. Having high recognition of its engineering department and other fields of technology, Hanyang has been cultivating numerous outstanding students who have the potential of becoming the future leader of the fields. In this year’s Technique Examination where five out of about 250 people are selected, four Hanyangians proudly returned with the glorious news of occupying four of the five winners’ places. News H introduces two of the four Hanyangians this week: Jeon Ui-geon (Architectural Engineering, ’12) and Cho Won-dam (Chemical Engineering, 4th year). Hard work pays off, eventually Five out of 250 sure is a fierce competition with a ruthless passing ratio. Jeon prepared for the test for almost four years and Cho for an year, the rough time of which surely paid off. When asked what is the secret of winning the competition, Jeon and Cho both gave humble yet determined answers. “I think it’s all about setting the right direction. I always tried to have the best mindset of a diligent student. No matter what I was doing or where I was, I always had my mind on the materials I was studying. By wholly fixating your mind to studying, you can draw the most out of this simple method. I even dreamed of studying in my sleep. Additionally, I relieved my stress by swimming, which helps you to clear your body and mind,” said Jeon. “For me, the reason I was able to pass the test despite the lack of time in the middle of my school semester was because I put focus on the sample questions when I was studying. By analytically studying the sample questions and figuring out the main scope of the test questions, I think I was able to efficiently prepare for the test and obtain the best result,” revealed Cho. Both Jeon and Cho were in Examination Class in Hayang, where they were funded with dormitory, studying facilities and meals. They both joined study groups to find people whom they can study with and to exchange help. They took mock tests together as a group and shared their knowledge, which turned out to be a great studying method. Both of them showed great appreciation to the group members as they were in the similar situation, which means their circumstances and emotions were highly relatable to each other. The examination is largely divided into four stages, which are carried out over five days. This year’s was Jeon’s fourth and the last test, for which he exceptionally did not have a good feeling for. “To be honest, I thought I’d pass the test every year because I had a good feeling. But this year, I had several ominous happenings such as a cockroach climbing onto my toe or breaking my glasses on the first test day, which never happened in three years. However, to overcome the bad feelings, I screamed ‘a crisis is an opportunity!’ on my scooter,” chuckled Jeon. The day before the final test, in Jeon’s dream, countless shooting stars poured onto his head, which gave him hope. In Cho’s case, once again, it depended on her perspective. “I doubted myself at first because I was so anxious. However, I regarded the test as just another test from my school, which I believe helped me to do better unconsciously. Jeon (left) and Cho (right) are two proud Hanyangians who added honor to the school. 99 percent effort, 1 percent luck Interestingly, both Jeon and Cho said that passing the examination was unexpected, not to mention receiving the top scores. They were more than glad and thankful for the result, and they confessed that they felt a little lucky. The outcome of their efforts is deeply meaningful, as their reasons for taking the test was definite. For Jeon, when he was researching for his career when he was 20 years old, he first came across the Technique Examination. Since he wanted to have a job that would greatly contribute to the interest of the public, he was convinced that he would prepare for the test in the future. On the very day he was discharged from the ROTC (Reserve Officers' Training Corps), he went straight into the Examination Class and started studying. Similarly, Cho took the test because she was inspired by his father who is a dedicated public officer who works devotedly for the country. She realized taking the test would lead her to the most desired path that accorded with her values. There were hard times, as their journey was not an easy task. Jeon felt considerable burden as he doubted himself after failing from his first try. He confessed that overcoming that fear was the hardest thing as nothing was guaranteed for sure. For Cho, who had to attend her first semester’s courses, balancing and managing her studying for both her classes and the Technique Examination was not easy. Due to their relatedness in the contents, she was able to handle both of them at the same time. Now that they have passed the first door toward their dream, their goals have been laid ahead. Jeon wants to be a green architecturer who is well-recognized by his peers. He wants to contribute to Korea’s well-being at large, which is why he decided to take the Technique Examination at the first place. On the other hand, Cho wants to contribute to Korea’s energy field. Since Korea does not produce natural resources, she wants to contribute to stabilization of the country by excluding any turbulence caused by energy shortage. "Don't feel too disappointed and never give up!" Jeon Chae-yun chaeyun111@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Choi Min-ju

2018-01 11

[Alumni]Proud International Students of Hanyang

The number of international students in Hanyang University(HYU) are increasing year after year, and now they consists of a certain portion of the school. Over 400 students entered HYU in one semester, from 43 different countries. The international students not only learn the curriculum from our school, but are also giving large outputs as proud Hanyangians. News H met 3 students who came from overseas to study in HYU and decided to continue their career in Korea. A desire to do what I want “I first came to HYU just because it was a sister school of my university in China,” started off Jiao Liu (Mechanical Engineering, ’17). He was interested in the area of computational analysis, and therefore took lectures related to his interests. He had to start off with the basic theories of math, epidemiology, and so on to interpret and analyze data processing professionally. “I had an ardent wish to study in the Applied Aerodynamics Laboratory run by professor Cho Jin-soo. As I exerted my time in his lab, I was able to gain practical experience for my career,” reminisced Liu. Liu is now working in the Hyundai Motors Technology lab of China, working in the Computer Aided Engineering(CAE) department. He analyzes the static stiffness and vibration noise through CAE interpretation, to develop motor vehicles. As a foreigner in Korea, Liu had his own difficulties. “I only had a few friends in Korea as an international student. However, as I stayed in the lab, my professors and colleagues helped me whenever I was sick or in troubles. I sincerely want to thank them for their kindness,” explained Liu. He is now in his second year of work, and thanked HYU for letting him successfully seeking a career in Korea. “I graduated a school which empowers talented people, I will also strive to become a great Hanyangian myself!” "I want to invite my parents to Korea and live together." (Photo courtesy of Liu) Having my own unique outfit “I realized I liked and was talented in designing clothes through after-school activities in China,” said Yuan Ying (Clothing and textiles, Doctoral program 4th year). Yuan achieved her dream of majoring clothing design in an overseas university through HYU. Yuan entered HYU in 2010, majoring in clothing and textiles and continued on her doctoral degree in 2014. In 2016, she entered a start-up club to actualize her dream. Yuan explained “Specific clothing trends change in two weeks term. However, this term is too short to design, produce and commercialize clothing by myself. That’s why I came up with creating a ‘production automation’ platform.” Yuan created an application named ‘Design U’, which includes the functions of production automation. Product automation is an idea which all procedures before the actual sewing could be completed automatically, with anyone’s own idea. Through this application, Yuan allows customers to create their own design, collect people who wish to purchase the same design, and finally receive the clothes individually. “I wanted to provide a method for individuals to purchase clothes with whatever design, colors or fabric. I wish I could better systemize this platform in the near future and extend this to my home country,” commented Yuan. Yuan showing a page of her application, 'Design U'. For the better me ‘Hallyu’ was a major reason that enticed a student to enter a Korean university. “I studied Korean as I entered university, and started to dream of studying in Korea since then,” explained Han Ximeng (Accounting, Doctoral program ’17). Financial accounting was a familiar area for Han, as one of her family members was engaged in the field. She had been preparing for her Chinese Certified Public Accountant(CPA) after acquiring a private accountant license in China. She decided her career in HYU to better specialize in this area. Han not only concentrated in her studies, but tried out various part-time jobs and interns. “I taught undergraduate students on basic accounting theories. I also had a part-time job in a cosmetic trading firm as a translator, and worked in Korean cosmetic shops to improve the Korean nuance,” reminisced Han. After her various experiences, she realized financial accounting was what she truly wished to do. In order to be a Chief Financial Officer(CFO), she decided to look for a job in Korea. She is now working in the Accounting department of SK innovation affiliation SK General Chemical, writing settlement of accounts and annual reports. “It’s only my fifth month, and still have a lot more to learn. The actual task itself isn’t as new as the culture of companies. I had more hardships with speaking honorific words according to the position,” explained Han. She showed her aspiration to improve her abilities to be able to work in any country she happens to face. Han is achieving her dream step by step to become a CFO. (Photo courtesy of Han) On Jung-yun jessica0818@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Kang Cho-hyun

2018-01 08

[Student]Winners of I·SEOUL·U Storytelling Competition

Two proud Hanyang University (HYU) students won first place in the I·SEOUL·U storytelling competition. It is hosted by the Seoul Metropolitan Government with its total prize money mounting up to 20 million won. Choi Hyun-jun (Entertainment Design, 3rd year), and Nam Jung-yeon (Communication Design, 3rd year), a close friend within the College of Design, teamed up for their first competition ever and were honored with the crown. From the left, Choi Hyun-jun (Entertainment Design, 3rd year), and Nam Jung-yeon (Communication Design, 3rd year). They were both interested in design from a young age. For the first time in forever The I·SEOUL·U storytelling competition is a part of Seoul's effort to promote its brand name: I·SEOUL·U. Its participants can depict their very own unique story about Seoul through a video, article, or poster. Nam and Choi chose video as it is Choi's major in school. There were a total of 625 pieces submitted, with one first place award, three second place awards, and six third place awards. Although lots of design college students participated in such competitions, it was the first time for both Nam and Choi to participate in one. “To be honest, I was afraid before. I was not sure of my own abilities,” mentioned Choi. Beginner’s luck or not, Choi and Nam showed perfect teamwork throughout November when they prepared for the competition. “People always ask us if we ever had conflicts, but we never had one,” smiled Choi. As a pair of close friends, they both mentioned that having someone to watch over and support one another was the key to completing their video. Choi, majoring in entertainment design, did most of the editing work. “Although putting 3D into videos is not part of my curriculum, I was able to self teach myself through a video society ‘Intro’ in our school,” said Choi. Nam, on the other hand, brainstormed with Choi and edited pictures and graphics in the video. Take a look at Choi and Nam's ingenious story. (Video courtesy of Choi and Nam) The hardest part of the production was the filming. Because the team had to rent a 4K camera, they had to fit all of their filming schedule into one day. Considering that the sites were dispersed all around Seoul, they had to begin in the early morning, use time in its utmost efficiency and wrap up before sunset. The time lapse sunset in the video was taken by the team in the peak of Inwang mountain for four hours. When asked about the source of their brilliant ideas, Nam answered, ‘lots of brainstorming and our imagination.’ For instance, Nam always used to think, ‘what if there is another reason for people walking in the street?’ and they came up with an idea of magnets pulling people around in the streets. “The whole point of the video was to visualize the extraordinary reasons behind ordinary activities in our imagination,” said Nam. Creativity to gravity The inspiring ideas of the team was the crucial reason for attracting the minds of people. The winner of the I·SEOUL·U storytelling competition is first decided on the professionals’ evaluation on creativity, art, aptness to the topic, and utility. Then, the remaining 40% is up to the people’s choice. We do not know exactly how many votes the team received, but assuming from the results, Choi and Nam must have caught people’s eyes with their original ideas. "There was no secret recipe for overcoming hardships. We just bore with it. Pulling all-nighters is a usual thing for design students anyways," said Choi. When asked about the usage of their prize money of 5 million won, both plan to spend the money on purchasing devices related to their major. Nam would like to purchase a tablet so that she can enhance her productivity during the semester, and Choi plans to buy a camera, supposedly a choice based on the difficulty they had filming videos the past month. Choi and Nam would like to challenge once again in a competition, as they find each other a perfect teammate. Right now, however, they have their hands busy on their internship. “I am learning a lot, managing a project from A to Z. Making a video for my school project and for a client are two very different jobs, but I enjoy it,” mentioned Choi, with a smile on his face. Both plan to proceed in their profession according to their major. With the passion and ability they have now, they have a bright future ahead. Kim So-yun dash070@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Choi Min-ju

2018-01 02

[Alumni]A Doctor at an Art Museum

What does the field of medicine and art have in common? To that question, doctor Park Kwang-hyuk (Department of Medicine, ’00) answers that they both revolve around the life and death of humans. While the field of medicine works strenuously to lengthen human lives by finding the cause and remedies for diseases, art strives to capture the essence from various moments in a person’s life. Having found this intriguing factor, Park has devoted his life equally to each of these fields. He works as a physician before noon, and gives art lectures in the afternoon. The audience of his lectures are somewhat varied, from corporations to public offices and schools. One lecture that he gives on a regular basis is through his weekly art gathering, the Mona Lisa Smile. The Mona Lisa Smile The name 'Mona Lisa Smile', suggested by one of the members, has a dual meaning. The first is quite literal, referring to the mysterious smile of Mona Lisa, one of the most symbolic works of art in the Louvre Museum. The second meaning is derived from the movie, The Mona Lisa Smile. In the film, the protagonist is an art instructor who attempts new approaches to art lectures. Park expressed satisfaction with the name, as it well captures the values that his gathering strives for: the love for art and the desire for new things. The Mona Lisa Smile is a social gathering that welcomes anyone who shares a love for art. (Photo courtesy of Park) When asked how the Mona Lisa Smile came to being, Park replied that he originally began with docent lectures, which is a type of lecture that handles art facts and history when some of his audiences approached him with a suggestion to begin a regular lecture. Intrigued by his lecture contents, they formed a regular social gathering for art lovers, where Park could give regular lectures. For Park, it was a great opportunity as he liked nothing more than to study art under various themes and prepare lectures to share his findings. Some of his most popular themes were “The plague in classical art”, “Gambling in classic art”, “Jealousy in classic art” and so on. The classes are held every Friday, from 7pm to 9pm, in Yeoksam-dong. About 30 to 40 people from a total of 70 members attend, where classical art is approached in a variety of perspectives, such as medicine, humanities, and so on. Not only are there lectures but also group museum tours from time to time on weekends. Although most of the members are artists and doctors, Park mentioned that he was surprised to find out the diverse professions of his audience, such as lawyers, pharmacists, accountants, and public servants. A Doctor at an Art Museum Park also published a book titled, “A Doctor at an Art Museum.” It is part of a series in which different fields are applied as windows to perceive classical art. There are books such as “A Chemist at an Art Museum,” “A Lawyer at an Art Museum,” and such. Park explained that the book was actually a collection of his lecture notes from the Mona Lisa Smile. Some of his members asked for a review note of his lectures to organize their contents, so he began sharing his analysis on internet communities. The notes had so great a reaction that people nudged him to organize them into a book. Park also wrote columns for art magazines from time to time, and some of them were also used for the book. Although his lectures revolve around a large number of themes, he was asked specifically to extract contents related to the field of medicine to emphasize his characteristic as a doctor. Park answered that he was surprised to find out that "A Doctor at the Art Museum" had a decent sales number. (Photo courtesy of Park) The story of Park Park recalls that he had been mesmerized by Greek Mythology as a child. As an introverted kid, he often turned to mythology books during his free time. However, his ideas and concept of various gods and myths were only in his imagination. It was when he encountered his first classical art piece that the ideas in his head were portrayed in real life. He realized that a picture really did speak a thousand words, and that there were details that he had never thought of before. It was in that moment when he realized his love for art. Later in his high school years, he witnessed the death of a protestor during a demonstration in Shinchon. Such a close encounter to death was a traumatic event for him, and he recalled that he was even physically ill for a few days. He had spent the rest of his life trying to forget the memory of what he had seen on that day. Then, during his second year in medical school, he went on a trip to Europe. He visited the Louvre Museum in Paris, where he was mysteriously drawn to the Liberty leading the People, drawn by Eugene Delacroix. He stood in front of the piece and shed tears for a long time. “I saw myself in that drawing. Among the protesters leading the rally, there was a frightened looking child, whom I found myself in.” He felt as if his old trauma was fading away and realized that there is a power in art which can heal people. Throughout the interview, Park was excited about his next lecture regarding the piece, The Girl with the Pearl Earrings Now Park is living a happy life pursuing his interests and his profession. He jokingly added that many people think that he must make a lot of profit from his activities, but as a father of five daughters, he has to work very hard to maintain his life balance of both fields. He plans to lead this lifestyle for as long as he can, and when asked about any of his long term goals, Park answered that he hopes to publish another book in the future. In his last comments, Park wanted to tell the readers that there are many domestic artists who are extremely talented but have a hard time maintaining their professions. Just like the late artist Vincent Van Gogh, artists cannot keep up with their living expenses and only draw. He expressed deep sympathy, as domestic art museums such as Hangaram Museum, Somang Museum, and many small galleries in Insa-dong carry a number of art works from talented artists who haven’t had a chance to get any spotlight. Although he himself holds small auctions to raise support funds for unknown artists, he hopes to see many more opportunities and events to promote talented, yet unknown Korean artists. Lee Chang-hyun pizz1125@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Kang Cho-hyun

2018-01 01

[Student]Creating a New Package

Another year has passed, and people are starting the year with a new determination. In the midst of these determinations, a student is firmly walking his way towards his goal. Choi Gi-jun (Communication Design, 4th year), focused on package design during his time as a university student and is reaching towards his own star, as a succesful designer. Designing his talent The area of ‘package design’ is not a very familiar field with most people. “Package design includes everything that covers a product of any kind,” began Choi. Package design is a field within design, that includes the practical package of anything; not only the design itself, but also the shape and the materials of the package. The final output can give totally different impressions according to the materials one uses. Package design is a complex task since the design is not the only implementation the designer must consider. They have to firmly consider the practicality as sturdiness is required in consonance with the fragileness of a product, and the ambience of the material also needs to be taken care of depending on the traits of a product. Choi is explaining about the field of package design in a cafe near ERICA campus. With this skill, Choi participated in the Korea Design Exhibition with his novel idea. He designed a travel kit when Zika virus was a hot issue in Korea. “Various international viruses flow into Korea as tourists are increasing day by day. However, simple hygiene kits can actually protect against most of these viruses, and, therefore, I created an idea suited for students like myself,” explained Choi. He designed a hygiene kit which is very affordable, which targets students like him. Through this idea and design, he was able to win the special prize in the student field exhibition. He also participated in the Design Sharing Project, which was a type of talent donation. This project led to a win-win game, linking students with small businesses and city-run organizations. Students are able to learn more about the actual field of their studies, and the organizations can receive help from the students they wouldn’t have been able to receive otherwise. Through this project, Choi redesigned the sesame oil created by the Ansan Senior Club, ‘Premium (Myeong-pum) Oil’. His work resulted in a 204 percentage increase in sales. However, it wasn’t only the organization who took benefit. Choi reminisced, “The design inevitably has to change according to the target of the product. I was able to learn the details of the methods required through this program, leading towards the development of my own skills at the same time.” The design Choi created in the Korean Design Exhibition and the Design Sharing Project (Photo courtesy of Korean Design Exhibition and Ansan Senior Club) Packaging his life beautifully A designing career was not certain until he stepped into university. “I was initially interested in stage design as a high school student. That was the only area I actually experienced, and that was the very reason I wished to major in it,” explained Choi. He first encountered the field of package design through the recommendation of his teacher. He was captivated by the fact that he was able to make a three-dimensional design instead of a two-dimensional design as he had continuously done. However, after his entrance, he had his ups and downs. “I hit a slump as the years passed in university. As we continuously experience and observe various works, the level of our expectations gets higher. However, there is a certain point that my hands cannot satisfy my eyes.” He worked even harder during his slump. He believed the only method to get out of a slump is to practice as much as he can. He showed his works to others to receive feedback and repeated modifications until he was able to materialize his works through his intention. Choi will continue his design career with his enthusiasm. Now his goal is to become a respected designer in the area. He is already in the midst of preparing his portfolio and has his firm interests in mind. “I want to make packages related to food. There are certain organizations I’m interested in. When you see their designs, you can tell if they showed concern in design or not.” He also added that he wishes the treatment for designers could improve as well. “The social recognition for designers is still low in Korea due to the lack of workplaces for designers. I wish this problem could be solved in the near future,” wished Choi. On Jung-yun jessica0818@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Lee Jin-myeong

2017-12 27

[Student]Ballerina with Love in Deed

“Ballet is creating a sculpture that is visible only for a moment,” says Erol Ozan, writer of Talus. There is a ballerina and a choreographer who is creating such beauty of moments everyday- Lee Ji-hee (Dance, Doctoral program). As a winner of a triple crown of Chungbuk Dance Awards, Lee revealed her stories and passion towards ballet and choreography. Lee majored in dance for her bachelor's, master's, and doctoral degree at Hanyang University. On the way to become a senior granting love Lee won three trophies in the Chungbuk Dance Awards: Solo dance, choreography, and group dance awards. “It was truly a great opportunity for me to contribute to the growth in artistic recognition of Chungbuk where a very minimum of support for ballet takes place,” explained Lee. Despite the glory that shines behind her, the journey to stand on the top in her field was not as easy and beautiful as others might consider. “Both of my parents loved reading books and watching ballet, as my mother even majored in it. With my genetic ability for flexibility and my interests in creating stories through ballet, I never left this field since my elementary school years,” explained Lee. Majoring in dance at Hanyang University starting 2001, Lee is now looking forward to receive her doctorate in ballet. “Professor Kim Bok-hee and Son Kwan-jun from Hanyang University helped me out to become a better ballerina and treated me like their daughter. Working as a main dancer for their ballet companies, I grew my passion in choreography too,” said Lee. In her third year in college, Lee had to face bitter words regarding her ability. Professors and other dance instructors often told her that Lee’s techniques may be decent, but are lacking her own color. “To find my persona in dance, I decided to overcome my meticulousness. I began travelling around the world and even encountered dangerous situations in Rumania, dealing with gypsies,” laughed out Lee. By accumulating a broad spectrum of experiences, Lee was able to discover various emotions and sources for her dance. “My capability to choreograph and express emotions in my dance was all augmented thanks to my professors. I want to become a senior who can help my junior ballerinas just like my teachers did,” said Lee. Lee is a ballerina and a choreographer who has recently won a triple crown at Chungbuk Dance Awards. Artists: turning stress into beauty Living as a ballerina and a choreographer at the same time is arduous, and sometimes painful, says Lee. Because art is not an everyday subject that people are interested in, the financial status of numerous artists is in an inopportune condition. “Facing the reality as an artist is sometimes extremely stressful considering the unstable financial circumstances and artist’s block occurring in the process of artistic creation, like choreography,” explained Lee. Despite the stress the Lee copes with, she also talks about the pleasure of termination and passion. “Even though it is difficult to create an art work, the pleasure it brings with termination is beyond the description in words. I think these feelings are the sources and reasons for my passion and work,” smiled Lee. Lee always knew that without passion and perseverance, one can never become an artist, and thus, she spent 17 years of hard work at Hanyang University to accomplish her goals. Lee's journey is still far to go, and she hopes that her juniors will also run for their goals like she did in her past. Starting next year, Lee is planning to perform in America and Hong Kong. However, Lee’s dream has yet to be achieved. “I never chased a goal in presence but only the dream in the future. Viewing life in a wider spectrum is important, and passion is the key. I know it is hard, but I hope my juniors will never stop running!” Kim Ju-hyun kimster9421@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Lee Jin-Myeong

2017-12 26

[Student]Let the Class of 85 Be a Step Forward to Your Dreams

‘Tell me what you want to do, and the 85s will help!’ is the slogan of the second 85 Dream Scholarship, which is funded by the graduates of Hanyang University who were admitted in 1985. Their donation first started last year with the late night meal during exams for the class of 15, who are 30 years junior to the class of 85. Then, with much success with the last year’s Dream Scholarship, the class of 85 alumni came back this year with much more financial assistance. News H met three of the eight lucky teams to hear more about their stories. "I am constantly learning to improve the contents in Si-garette, and also regarding the copyright issue. The fact that I have enjoyed every step enabled me to come this far. Take a piece of literature instead of a cigarette Song Yu-su (Advertising & public relations, 4th year) and his team ‘Si-garette’ are looking forward to making their ideas come true in the real-world thanks to the support of the Dream Scholarship. The team name ‘Si-garette’ is also the name of their product, a combination of Si (which means poetry in Korean) and cigarette. Twenty short pieces of literature, poetry, or fun facts are rolled into a box that opens like a cigarette box. “I found that people smoke because the world never says ‘si(yes)’. I wish Si-garette can help people bear the world better,” said Song. The Si-garette contains 20 short stories and contents in a rolled paper like cigarette. Contents can be previewed in Si-garette's instagram account: @sigarette_pocketpoem Si-garette team plans to utilize the grant on an automated machine. When Song first thought of the idea three years ago, he neglected that rolling the papers and putting it into a box could cause a hassle in mass production. Before this June, Song focused on recruiting writers to provide their works to be published through Si-garette. “But in reality, the machine cost too much as we have to make a special one to serve our purpose. Other business competitions would not fund the project because I did not aim to profit from this,” reflected Song. But thanks to the Dream Scholarship, the long aspiration of Song is at the brink of realization. The first copies will be handed out for free to increase the recognition among people, and with the reputation, Song hopes for a paid sponsorship from private companies. Then, the profit will be used to publish the books of underground writers. “I love writing, but I know that I am not good enough to be a full-time writer. That is why I chose to help other writers through such projects,” said Song, with a humble smile. "My story brought a sense of empathy, and I think that was the key to my winning the scholarship." Blowing the dust off from the paper The next beneficiary we met is a soon-to-be comic artist, Lee Jin-hyun (Advertising & Public Relations, 2nd year). Lee has been drawing cartoons from a young age, but the pressure of college admission made her put the papers aside. She recently had a chance to take the dust off from the rusty dream, ironically when she got sick and had to withdraw from school temporarily. “I had time to think about my old dream and decided to pursue it,” Lee said. Lee desires to draw and write a story about an Indian child selling tea on street. It is a combination of Lee’s interest in tea and India. When asked: ‘what do you think was the key to your winning?’, Lee answered, “a feeling of sympathy.” “I suppose the seniors agreed to my story and wanted me to learn more with the scholarship they granted.” Lee plans to register for art academy as she has never formally learned drawing. Lee added that the seniors wish her to persist on one story and upload them to amateur platforms such as ‘Naver challenge for the best’. “I would like to say thank you for the class of 85 seniors, and I dream to help my juniors in thirty years,” said Lee. Mentor for the mentors Being a mentor to someone requires excellent interpersonal skills, especially if the mentee is a sensitive child during puberty. Team ‘Mentos’ is going to publish a guidebook for all the college mentors out there, guiding children. “There practically is no education nor training for the mentors, although there are so many programs and institutions initiating mentor programs,” lamented Sim Young-woo (Philosophy, 3rd year). That is why the three friends gathered up to become a mentor for the mentors. From the left, Ryoo Chang-hee (Philosophy, 3rd year), Sim Young-woo (Philosophy, 3rd year) and Lim Se-hoon (Philosophy, 3rd year). All three team members: Sim Young-woo (Philosophy, 3rd year), Lim Se-hoon (Philosophy, 3rd year) and Ryoo Chang-hee (Philosophy, 3rd year) have at least two years of experience as a mentor. Based on their unique experiences, Sim is in charge of the ‘academics’ part, Ryu in ‘life’, and Lim in the ‘experience’ part of the book. As diverse as their experiences, the motivation to become a mentor is all vastly different. Ryu, for instance, dreamt of becoming an instructor at private academies. However, he constantly felt like the students stop their interaction and relationship with the tutor when their time of struggle for college admission comes to an end. As he aspired to set up his own institute where students and teachers can remain in a good, long-lasting relationship, he applied for several mentoring programs to learn the secret. “Initially I thought I would quit after a promised year like most of the work I do, but witnessing my small help becoming a big one for the kids was so rewarding for me to keep doing the mentoring job up until now,” smiled Ryu. "All three of us once dreamt of becoming educators, but not now. The reason we are doing this project is to leave our footsteps behind so that our fellow university students can have something to refer to when they feel lost, which we ourselves wished for." Their book, consisted of aforementioned three parts, aims to provide a well-rounded guide for beginning mentors from ‘how to start a conversation’ to ‘how to say farewell without hurting the mentee’. They started writing the book this April, with the help of the Hanyang Academic Town that supports students’ noble ideas for research. But the aid was not enough for them to print as many copies they had intended to. “So we actually planned to use our own money,” said Sim. “That is why we are going to use all of the scholarship into printing,” added Lim. The ‘Mentors’ team finished their first draft before the final exam. “Now it is the real beginning. We have to design the book, edit the contents, and actually publish it. It is going to be one very busy vacation,” said Ryu with much delight in his voice. The three philosophers’ faces were filled with joy and passion throughout the interview. We look forward to reading their book in the Center for Social Innovation. Kim So-yun dash070@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Choi Jin-myung, Kang Cho-hyun

2017-12 18

[Student]Strong Inside and Out

A possessor of a doctor’s degree in Mechanical Engineering, a violinist, and an air force pilot officer are three titles that seem distantly irrelevant, as they do not overlap in their boundaries, and, perhaps, due to the awareness that each title takes a strenuously long time to achieve. Surprisingly, as it turns out, they could all belong to a single person who has passion and definite goals for the future. Youn Sung-hee (Mechanical Engineering Integrated Masters/Doctoral program, ’17) is a recently commissioned pilot officer from the Republic of Korea Air Force who obtained her Integrated Masters/Doctoral degree from Hanyang University. Youn shared her compelling story with News H this week. These pictures allow a brief glimpse into Youn's achievement. (Photo courtesy of Youn) Pivotal encounter Up until when she was a first grader in high school, Youn specialized in violin. She has numerous experience performing with a music band and also in solo performance, originally having planned to enter the school of music. When asked what has suddenly inspired her to get interested in mechanical engineering in the middle of majoring in violin, Youn answered in a convincing voice: “I was in the class room one day and heard a loud noise from a helicopter that was distractingly loud. I was triggered to think of ways to reduce the noise pollution coming from the helicopters, then I decided that I would study mechanical engineering to get expert knowledge to better address the problem.” This turning point in her youth resulted in who she is today. She started to catch up with science and math in high school in preparation to study mechanics later. She received her bachelor’s degree in three years, majoring in Physics. Afterwards, she entered the Hanyang Graduate School of Mechanical Engineering and obtained her masters/doctoral degree, further nourishing her dream of becoming a researcher of weapon systems. “As a female, I never even thought of becoming a military officer. I was hoping to become a researcher in the Agency for Defense Development or the Hanwha Corporation of Explosives, as I dreamed of contributing to the advancement of Korea’s National Army and its weapons.” It seems that the most powerful fuel that motivated her to devote her time and effort in studying the field of mechanical engineering and to become a military officer is her patriotism. While Youn was studying in Hanyang, she was involved in a project with the Agency for Defense Development. Meanwhile, she encountered another turning point. She came to realize that it is a soldier, not a civilian researcher who holds the key to diagnosing what the military truly needs. This led Youn to conclude that she must touch and observe the weapons herself in order to find out what and how to improve the current system. Finally, and most importantly, Youn visited The Korea Institute of Military Science and Technology, where she met an air force lieutenant-colonel active in duty by chance. He offered to enlist her in the army and conduct her research after hearing Youn’s plans full of passion and patriotism. After a ponderous deliberation, Youn was convinced that she would do so. “I am very satisfied with how things are going in my life, and I am ready for what awaits me.” Youn has gone through 12 weeks of military training. (Photo courtesy of Youn) Youn playing the violin: Youn is still an active violinist as she is the Head of the Orchestra at Chung-ang University and the Amateur Orchestra Union and occasionally performs solo. (Photo courtesy of Youn) Spreading the wings of a dream Of the 310 officers that were commissioned alongside Youn, 16 were female, and Youn was one of them. She confessed that the 12 weeks of training were dreadful, as the training requires not only strong physical stamina but also mental volition. “It is true that the training was hard to endure as a female,” chuckled Youn, “however, I endured the hardship with a strong mindset. Plus, my stamina wasn’t that bad to begin with.” Believing in the famous phrase that a ‘citizen’s strength is national strength,’ she always exercised in her spare time when she was in graduate school. Although no strength is ever enough to endure the harsh training in the army, Youn’s relentless passion and dedication seem to have paved the way for her. “Of course, there are a lot of fun episodes to talk about. Secretly munching on the snacks hidden by the soldiers of the previous regime and getting caught looking at a playful companion painting the camouflage cream silly and more is one such. There are many little stories that make me smile.” When Youn was studying in graduate school, she published a number of excellent papers. Two of them have been registered in the Science Citation Index, and one of which owns a patent for an optical system, which is related to protecting an aircraft from an enemy’s laser attack. Her research primarily dealt with the analysis of damage from a large output of laser. In other words, by analyzing how the damage is done to an air craft from a laser attack, the technology to prevent serious damage and protect the air craft can be invented. Youn is planning to continue her study because she values not only hands-on experience but also the academic background. “I am going to go on with my research studies to not lose touch with them!” In this upcoming January, after the rest from basic education and training, Youn is entering the Air Force Logistics Command Aviation Technology Research Institute and getting down to her research. “Energizing Korea’s dignity is my life goal. I believe if Korea becomes stronger through solid infrastructure in terms of national defence, the country’s respectability could rise after which diplomacy and the tension from foreign relations could ease and our people could feel relieved. I am determined that it is my duty and responsibility to protect the people and the country. I am willing to devote my life into what I will be given with,” remarked Youn, heartfully. As an aviation technology researcher, an air force officer, and a violinist, Youn will always follow her heart. (Photo courtesy of Youn) Jeon Chae-yun chaeyun111@hanyang.ac.kr

2017-12 04

[Faculty]A Professor and a CEO

The two nouns, professor and CEO often do not go along too well. It is because the two jobs require two distinct traits, such as a rigorous academic interest for a professor and innovation for a CEO. There are few who manage to bear the two titles, but Park Jai-koo (Professor, Natural Resources and Environmental Engineering) is one of them. In one of the busy Saturday afternoons of Park, News H visited his office to take a closer look at his recent accomplishment. Park is holding a sample of his insulatio, explaining with pride. "Technology is what led to the invesment," smiled Park. Hang in there, that is what makes difference in the end ‘Congratulations’ was the word that started the interview. Park and his company, Micropore was able to draw a huge 3 billion won investment to mass produce his original insulation. The type of insulation Park has developed is specifically used in the process of assembling displays, which is one of the most important industries in the modern world. Park’s insulation is different from the Japanese and German products mainly in two ways. First, it creates less dust. The invention is made of Silicon dioxide, commonly known as Silica. It is one of the most commonly found minerals that originates from underground. “Most insulations are made of Silica, but the root technology of processing it creates vastly different results,” said Park. The second specialty is that it protects from heat very well. The statement may sound awkward as all insulates should prevent heat. Nevertheless, Park mentioned that the imported materials are not specifically made to be used as semi-conductor display insulates. Therefore, Park’s invention with countless pores inside serves the purpose much better. To the question, ‘what was the core factor for Micropore to receive such investment?’ Park answered ‘technology’ without a second of hesitation. Park told us that his past 20 years of working as a professor and a CEO was burdensome as it sounds. Despite the Act on Special Measures for the Promotion of Venture Businesses in 1997 that gave birth to dozens of ‘professor-start-ups’, Micropore is one of the longest living ventures of its kind. “Right earlier this week, I took off from the metro to visit my factory and realized that my shoes were worn out so much. That is how much effort and energy was required to keep up the work,” smiled Park. When asked what is the key behind all this, Park replied, "You just hang in there. There is no special skills or knowledge required. What you do is to pour your everything and hang in there. In the end, the one who endured the longest will make difference.” "A social atmosphere encouraging college students to explore and make companies should be created." Manufacturing industry as the engine of Korea As an engineer professor, Park laments at the reality where not many companies own domestic factories. “Manufacturing industry should revive. That is the way for Korea to grow its competency,” said Park, filled with certainty. The root of such industry is mineral. In order to be utilized, a mineral requires to be located, mined, and processed. Park focuses in processing but also in Urban Mining. “There is more gold in your phone than in a 1 ton of mineral,” mentioned Park. Urban mining retrieves disposed cell phones or PCB (Printed Circuit Boards, found in all electronic devices) and selectively processes them in order to retrieve rare metals such as Au, Ag and Pt. Park now looks forward to acquiring another title, an author. With his abundant experience in both business and engineering, he would like to give advice to fellow professors who are starting his or her own business or planning to have one. “They all need to hold up until the company actually makes progress and profit. I wish Hanyang, as one of the leading engineering schools in the nation, should have a signature company that has our name on it,” wished Park. For the short-term goal, Park plans to list Micropore on KOSDAQ. With the recent investment, may the wind blow to his path. Kim So-yun dash070@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Lee Jin-myung