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2017-06 20

[Student]Pianist and Songwriter, Bamhaneul

One might have felt the wanting to listen to something calm and soothing, but also desired for a much modern type of music. Kim Ha-neul (Department of Piano, 2nd yr), stage name ‘Bamhaneul (night sky in Korean)’, is a rising star piano player and songwriter of indi music duo group Mozaroot. Recently on May 24th, Kim released his first single, ‘Seounhae (sad and hurt)’ with his singer partner Hanseul. Mozaroot and their fresh acoustic music The group name Mozaroot is the combination of the words Moja (hat in Korean) and Root, sounding similar to the famous performer and composer Mozart. “It means our music is unpredictable, just like the magic hat from which anything can come out. Basically, our team focuses on the reinterpretation of acoustics led only by piano and vocals,” Kim explained. Kim's stage name, Bamhaneul was created by merging his name and his first written song about his first love, 'After ten nights' sleep', when he was 19. "We have made a moderate success, and even though this is my first single album I feel that I have completed a team project," Kim added. “The song, ‘Seounhae’ was written when I was 20-year-old. At first I thought I would get to sing the song myself, but since I worked with my partner singer Hanseul, I changed the keys to a much higher version," Kim revealed. He additionally altered the melody that suited her more and also changed the lyrics to become more feminine. Kim explaining the meaning of his group name Mozaroot. "I first met Hanseul when I was recommended to became the part of Juice Media, an entertainment management company. Her voice had a taste of a fairy tale, because she is interested in musicals, and my music had a classical feel. That's how we got together as a team, because our music fitted nicely." Kim became the member of Juice Media when he took his leave of absence and taught piano lessons for students in need. “I met the head of Juice Media there who was working as a composing instructor, and that is how I was suggested to work there.” Kim said. A multiplayer of music Since Kim is the piano player and the songwriter of the group, he spends most of his day in front of the piano. "I first start with the title of the song when I compose it, and select the lyrics that I really want to put in the song. Then I move on step by step to build up the melody of the beginning and the middle of the song, the verse, and the chorus, " Kim explained. Kim with his music sheets. The sheets contain melody and lyrics for 'Seounhae'. When writing a song, Kim sets the beat according to his intended connotation, chooses appropriate chords of major or minor, such as C major and D major, and then adds on notes and rhythms. The ups and downs of his song depend on the mood and emotions, for example, high notes for tense mood and low notes for calm mood. When the lyrics contain negative words, he prefers major chords, and for positive ones, major chords. According to Kim, the songwriter's personality is reflected in his or her songs. "Because I like playing around with my friends, there are some puns, sarcastic and black humor in my songs. The name of one of those songs is ‘니 얼굴 실화냐 (I can't believe the state of your face)', " Kim chuckled. "I also like to make my songs difficult to translate in English. I believe Korean is the language which has the power to express something well," he added. Meaningful dreams of a promising music artist Kim not only works as a member of Mozaroot, but is a popular facebook page owner posting his songs, covers, and rearrangement of original pieces. He has 20 unreleased songs and wishes to compete in the Yoo Jae-ha Music Concours, a song writing and performance competition for discovering new and talented artists, in his near future. Kim singing and playing piano at his concert. (Photo courtesy of Kim) Recently, Kim donated all of the profits earned in his personal recital and his extra money for victims enforced to work as comfort women by the Japanese military during WW2. “I think music is for expressing some things that are difficult to say in words. Due to my belief that the incident that the victims had to handle was one of the saddest events in Korean history that words cannot express, I decided to donate the earnings and planning to donate more to help people in the future.” Kim said. “I want to make a masterpiece of a song, even though I don't exactly get what it is yet. I don't want to make my song to be heard like one gulps down an 'instant food', but create it so that it can give the listener different feelings each time it is heard. Say, my idea of a successful career as a songwriter would be if my song is played in my funeral, and every person there recognize it. However most of all, I belive continuous effort is the road to success.” Kim grinned. Kim aspires to become a songwriter and compose music that recurs again and again in people's memory. Click here to visit Mozaroot's facebook page. Jang Soo-hyun luxkari@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Moon Ha-na

2017-06 20

[Alumni]Impassioned teacher of love

As third graders in high school, students often bear precarious agitation in their minds when choosing career, picking majors, or entering universities. Heartfully understanding this distress and sincerely wanting to lessen the load of unease, Kim Kyung-hoon (Department of education, ‘01), a teacher at Haneul Academy, has composed a song with meaningful lyrics for his apprehensive students. Bringing students to tears and causing a touching sensation in their hearts, the song sure seems to last in the students’ mind for their entire life and be a valuable memento of their high school times. As a teacher and a musician As a teenager, Kim always dreamed of becoming a teacher, as much as he aspired to become a musician. Not being able to pick one of the two, he concluded that he would be both at the same time: a teacher who composes music. “I was motivated by my high school teacher who also wrote and published several books. His main job was teaching and his side job was writing. That was the exact lifestyle that I pursued.” He began to compose songs when he was a teenager and nurtured the other dream concurrently. "High school students today bear much more stress than we did in the past in our school days." With his first music album released in 2008, by the name of Acoustic Project as a solo artist, Kim intermittently composed songs dedicated to other people. The name Acoustic Project, does not only mean unplugged music, but also means to include all acoustic matters, all sounds of music. The digital single album he released last month, titled ‘To the Sky’(Click to listen) is a song dedicated to his third-year students at his school, with the music video featuring his students. Witnessing what his student are going through and understanding how tough it is, Kim was determined that he would write a song for them. As a teacher, Kim always tries to teach students how to live happily, not stressfully. Though it may seem as if entering a good university is the greatest hardship and the most important step of achieving success, it is only a stepping stone which last only temporarily. “I tell students to look beyond and find what will bring them happiness in the long run. Life is not an equation that needs perfect calculation answers and,” remarked Kim. Kim is working on his song in the workroom. (Photo courtesy of Kim) Kim recording his song with his own voice. (Photo courtesy of Kim) Be brave and not timid, To the Sky The title ‘To the Sky’ epitomizes the lyrics of the song, coinciding with the name of the school—Hanuel in Korean is sky. Students who do not know about their potentials consider themselves as the ugly duckling and remain close to the ground but I wanted to make them aware that they will one day soar to the sky like a beautiful swan. “When I sit my students individually for counseling, the first thing they do is crying. It shows how frustrated and anxious they are. I wanted to reflect their mood and portray it in a song with a hopeful message in hopes of encouraging them.” The lyrics are largely divided into two parts: the first half of the song from the perspective of the students, and the remaining half of the teacher’s. The intention of doing so was to reach the students’ heart more directly and to sound as if the song was reading their minds. In that way, bigger wave of sympathy and emotion could be aroused in students’ hearts. Each line of the lyrics is meant to resonate with the mood of the students in the first half of the song, when it is describing their feelings from their very perspective. In the second half, cheerful messages from the perspective of a teacher, from Kim’s perspective, is delivered, heartening each students who is struggling amidst her angst. "To the sky, my dear students!" Jeon Chae-yun chaeyun111@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Moon Ha-na

2017-06 12

[Alumni]Groundbreaking English Tutoring

'English nausea' is a buzzword in South Korea, which refers to the fear of English communication and education. In 2016, a mobile application called Tutoring was launched by co-CEOs Choi Kyung-hee (Division of Journalism and Mass Communication, ‘04) and Kim Mi-hee (Division of Advertising and Public Relations, ‘06). After its release, Tutoring began to engage attention from numbers of users with English nausea, attaining 55,000 charged clients in June 2017. News H met CEO Choi Kyung-hee to analyze the success and future of Tutoring. Novel platform of English education Choi’s original occupation was developing teaching materials at the Chosun Ilbo Corporation. Choi's ultimate dream was contributing to the educational revolution in South Korea. While Choi was travelling around the globe for diverse experiences to achieve her goal, Kim reached her with a business idea. “Kim was an engineer at Samsung and I was an educator, which made me contemplate over the business. However, with these two contrary dispositions, we reached an agreement that this could work out,” reminisced Choi. "Our ultimate goal is to create a sensation like 'Uber' in the educational mobile application field," said Choi. In the mobile application market where success and failure are borderless, the two CEOs presented decisive strategy- ‘lower the cost, increase the pay’. Since the business model is online operation system, Tutoring can offer low costs for the users and high pay for the contracted instructors by reducing human labor costs and offline management costs. “Attractive cost allows the clients to be involved into our application easily. However, the constant updates of English contents are also what draw attention from the users,” said Choi. Tutoring offers more than 80 different themes and various teachers that clients can choose and based on that, they practice English communication through phone calls. The philosophy behind Tutoring is that education should not be carried out in the perspective of a teacher, but in the eyes of a student. Thus, conversational contents are steadily developing and increasing based on current trends. Also, the imperative criteria for choosing the on-demand instructors are their witness and active voice. “Since English education is based on phone call conversation, active voicing and charming communication skills are extremely significant along with the educational contents,” emphasized Choi. Tutoring has more than 55,000 charged users, and is consistently augmenting its popularity. (Photo courtesy of Tutoring) Becoming a future-oriented analyst Since the on-demand mobile learning platform is fast-changing, intricate analyses of the market, competitors, and its products are momentous. “All businesses nowadays involve artificial intelligence to comprehend its market. Since it wouldn't be odd if a business in this market suddenly collapses or succeeds tomorrow, strategies like growth hacking is vital,” said Choi. Growth hacking is a process of rapid experimentation across marketing channels and product development to identify the most efficient ways to grow a business. By using AI, workers at Tutoring consistently confirm their growth and weakness. “When we think of marketing, people usually associate with PowerPoint presentations and SWOT (Strength, Weakness, Opportunity, and Threat of a firm) analyses. However, those days are over with the advent of AI. All we, the marketers, need is sensible adaptation to numbers that AI provides and making correct decisions stemming from that process,” explained Choi. Choi emphasizes the value of experiences in order to stand fearless before failure. When Choi was at Hanyang University, she was an unconstrained student who found the meaning of her life in travelling and experiencing things. However, through those invaluable experiences, she is able to confront the fear the word ‘failure’ gives off. “I want to advise the Hanyangian students that starting a business will automatically bring failure and pain. However, it’s important to know that an accumulation of experiences will take over the fear.” Kim Ju-hyun kimster9421@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Kim Youn-soo

2017-06 12

[Student]A Woman Who Ran in Desert for Charity

‘Charity run or donation through sports’ is one of the emerging trends to financially support people who are in need of help. In Korea as well, there are increasing number of people choose to express their passion as a way to raise money for donation. One of the best examples was found among Hanyang University (HYU) students, Kim Chae-wool (Industrial Information Studies, 2nd year). From last April 30th to May 6th, Kim participated in Sahara Desert Marathon and succeeded in fundraising over 7 million won (approximately 7 thousand dollars) which was donated to Korea’s first and only children rehabilitation hospital. Message of Hope Witnessed in The Ironman Triathlon Sahara Desert Marathon is known as one of the four toughest marathon on earth. (Other three include the Gobi March in China/Mongolia, the Atacama Crossing in Chile and The Last Desert in Antarctica. This year due to the IS, it was held in the Namib Desert.) Participants, or runners have to run total 250km for six nights and seven days without any external support except for water and sleeping bag at nighttime. Other essential equipment have to be carried in personal bag packs which usually weigh up to 11 to 12kg. A lot of people surrounding Kim, her parents and friends worried of her application for this extremely challenging marathon. However, Kim simply had to do as she planned because she had a goal in her mind. The biggest motivation for Kim's challenge was from the sign of strong love and hope she saw in the Ironman Triathlon. One of the main events that motivated her to participate in this marathon traces its date back to 2015 when she volunteered as a staff in a Korean Ironman triathlon. In a sports competition where a participant has to swim, ride a bicycle, and run a marathon without a break, Kim witnessed a father on the race with his son suffering of a rare disease. “I felt like a hammer just smashed right in my head,” reminisced Kim. What Kim witnessed was a lively scene of a man running with his son in a sports competition which is even hard for a runner on his or her own could complete. “Even after the race, I wasn’t able to forget what I saw, and decided I would also be the one who can give hope to such disabled young children through my own challenge,” said Kim. Her first grand step was to participate in an Ironman triathlon herself. In the same competition where she witnessed the father and the son, she ran with the goal to donate all the participation fee for disabled children. After preparing for about a year, she could finish the cousrse and make her first donation. “But then, I thought, why stop here? there must be better ways to help more children who needs support,” said Kim. Kim posing in front of the fininshing line of the marathon. (Photo courtesy of Kim) Even on a Tight Schedule as a Working Student That idea was the start of the whole plan to run the marathon. In the following year, she encountered desert marathon via Youtube and thought it was the perfect one for fundraising. “Even if it’s little, I wanted my fundraising plan and challenge could raise more awareness of lack of child rehabilitation hospital in Korea,” explained Kim. Kim was the youngest participant out of all 110 runners from all over the world. (Photo courtesy of Kim) Of course, preparing for a desert marathon required more training for Kim and she started to work out day and night even on her tight schedule as a working student. “Before going to work, I went to swimming centers in the early mornings and during lunch breaks at work, I often skipped my meal and went for a run in a park in front of my office. It was actually really tough because I had to go to school after getting off from the work as well,” remembered Kim. Even without a personal trainer or any other professional help, she continued to push herself to a harder training. For a fundraising, Kim utilized her personal blog which she used to post her workout journeys. On her blog, she explained in a detail why she planned this donation project from the beginning to what contest she is participating. Rewards included hand-written letters on a back of a picture she took herself in the desert. As a result, more than 160 people, including Kim’s acquaintances supported the crowdfunding which amounted up to 7 million won in total. On the middle of the Hot Namib Desert Kim walking in the middle of the Namib Desert. As a nickname of the desert marathon can easily tell, Kim did encountered hardships during her seven days race. On the last course of the race, which is called a ‘long day’, participants had to run about last 80km out of the whole 250km. “The last day was the hardest, not only because of the length of the course, but also because of the pain in my knees,” said Kim. Even before coming to Namib, her knees were in a severe condition due to some hard core trainings. “I really wanted to give up because of the extreme pain but I could not give up because of all the supports I have received,” said Kim. After taking proper medication, with strongly clenched fists, she started to run back on track and was able to successfully finish the course on time. Kim’s first desert marathon race was over, but she is now preparing for her bigger plans, to run rest of the three marathons before she graduates. “I really hope better perception of donation could be spread in Korea. It is not a hard or difficult thing to do, only what people need is courage. Also, through sports donation, people can be healthy while helping people so I wish more people would give it a try,” said Kim. A bigger vision of Kim is now to run rest of the three desert marathons. (Photo courtesy of Kim.) Yun Ji-hyun uni27@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Choi Min-ju

2017-05 22

[Faculty]Winner of the Paiknam Scholar Award

During his 12 years at Hanyang University, Professor Kang Yong-soo of the Department of Energy Engineering has demonstrating the virtues of an educator and a researcher. For his endeavor, Kang was awarded the Paiknam Scholar Award on the 78th school anniversary. Expecting to retire in 2018, Kang reminisces his life as scientist and professor. Life as a scholar Kang began his teaching career at the Department of Chemical Engineering in 2005. While at HYU, Kang pioneered and led a new discipline from the basics to the application of the "facilitated transport phenomena in the solid state" and obtained excellent results by applying it to membranes and solar cells. As a result, about 185 papers were published in SCI international journals from 2005 to 2017 and Kang was able to win several awards, including the Paiknam Scholar Award. “The Paiknam Award was a great honor for me, and it leads me to think of myself as a lucky person. I should attribute all the credit to my lab students, who followed and supported me,” said Kang. One of Kang’s best research is on the facilitated transport phenomena in the solid state and their various applications. The beginning of his research dates back to when Kang was working at KIST (Korea Institute of Science and Technology). “The first project assigned to me at KIST was separating oxygen and nitrogen from air. Each element can be utilized pragmatically in practical life, and the usage of the separation membrane was the key,” emphasized Kang. After great research findings, Kang was recognized as the greatest scholar at Hanyang University this year. Since then, Kang's interest has changed to the separation of olefin such as ethylene or propylene because it is one of the most difficult tasks to solve. “I was sponsored one billion won for this Creative Research Program by the NRF (National Research Foundation of Korea) to develop this fuekd for 10 years, which was a tremendous opportunity for me,” reminisced Kang. After 10 years at KIST, Kang realized that his specialization lies in the basic understanding of principles, not practical applications. As a result, he left KIST to become an educator at HYU. Multi-player in research and education In addition to personal academic achievement, Kang’s BK21 Project and the ERC (Energy Research Center) of the Leading Research Center Support Project also ushered science at Hanyang to advance. Kang also undertook the role as chairman and editor-in-chief of various academic societies at home and abroad, contributing to the development of the school as well as the broader society. When Kang came to Hanyang University, he realized that he could not bring the research funds provided by KIST to his school lab. In need of research funds to satisfy the scientific desires of his and his students, Kang made a difficult decision. “I just called an executive director of Samsung Institute of Science, Dr. Kim Jong-min, to ask for research funding. He would have been very confused, because we have only met a few times before, but Kim decided to support me for the development of science,” said Kang. After such vicissitudes in life, Kang was able to investigate how to overcome low ionic conductivity in polymer electrolyte for dye-sensitized solar cell and improving the separation performance of membranes. These are each utilized on strengthening solar cells and curtailing petrochemistry’s high energy consumption, enormous cost and inefficient use of space. Kang sends gratitudes to his fellow students at the school and at his lab. The Best Teacher Award is Kang’s most favorite prize as professor. “This award is given by students that I teach. I wish my students will have pride in themselves when learning about science and life,” said Kang. According to him, calmly waiting for opportunities while preparing one's own unique characteristics will help students realize their dreams. Kim Ju-hyun kimster9421@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Kim Sang-yeon

2017-05 22

[Student]Writing Songs of Memory

“Under the deep ocean, hundreds of unbloomed flowers…” starts the song Flower of Truth, composed by Park Soo-jung (Department of Applied Music, 2nd year, ERICA Campus). Believing in the necessity of remembering the MV Sewol tragedy, Park, as a young composer, has been writing songs about Sewol in hopes of reminding people about the incident. Collaborating with the youth musicians supporting organization Sing About Chu, Park recently presented her new tribute song Flower of Truth. She expresses her deep sorrow and regret over the disastrous event through the song. Flower of Truth Commemorating the 3rd anniversary of the MV Sewol incident, Park wrote and dedicated this song to the students and their families, as an attempt to represent the consolation and condolences of the public. The overall mood of the song is dismal and depressing as it tries to reflect the reality surrounding the incident. The underlying message she tried to convey was criticism toward society’s changing perspective of the event which grows more and more nonchalant and negligent. She pointed out the nonsensical attitude of some people, and wrote this song in compensation of those negativities. Flower of Truth criticizes the inappropriate attitute toward Sewol and its victims. “I sometimes see ridiculous remarks by people online such as ‘enough with Sewol,’ ‘I’m tired of hearing about this issue already,’ ‘It's had enough attention’ and so on. It makes me angry to see how cruel and indifferent people are.” By including the line “someone’s pain is someone’s mockery,” Park intended to reproach those who spoke improperly of the Sewol incident. Repeated in the song is the lyrics “make it bloom, make it full bloom,” by which she meant the bloom of flowers in people’s minds, the flower of truth, and never forget what happened. “I was taking a nap on the day of Sewol’s third anniversary, and I had a strange dream. In it, I was drowning in the ocean, which gave me enough fear and pain to wake up terrorized. I will never be able to imagine or understand the students’ awful horrors that they went through that day,” expressed Park. Such vividness solidifed in her mind that the pain and terror of the students, not to mention the scars left on their families, should never be overlooked and nor be forgotten. Park and Composition When composing a song, Park gets inspiration from anywhere and everywhere. The little thoughts and ideas that pass by her mind or the objects she sees develop into lyrics and melodies. For Flower of Truth, she found the melody after a shower. As a music major, she has written many songs, the most representative one being The World, dedicated to people who have low self-confidence and many insecurities, to boost their confidence and to shift their minds towards a more positive view of themselves. “I chose to major in composing music because as a high school student, the only joy and hobby I had was playing the guitar and singing along. I was emotionally going through hard times, but I was able to find comfort in music.” As a young composer, Park’s dream is to one day become a composer whose name is synonymous with great music and the music in which people find energy and strength. "I want to compose music that lifts people up." Click to watch Park's Flower of Truth Jeon Chae-yun chaeyun111@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Kim Hye-im

2017-05 14

[Alumni]Professional Math Teacher for All

Educational Broadcasting System (EBS) is Korea’s public broadcasting network that provides various educational materials like animations for children and lectures for students and adults alike. On EBSi, one of the internet sites of EBS, TV lectures are saved online for high school students nationwide, who are preparing for their upcoming suneung (Korean SAT). The instructors who are selected to lecture on EBSi are equipped with skills, filled with passion and fully prepared to teach the public. Nam Chi-yeol (Department of Mathematics, '05) is one of those qualified EBSi lecturers and a schoolteacher who tutors math and mathematical essay writing. Aimless student to responsible teacher Nam was a so-called math whiz when he was young, studying high level math problems until three to four in the morning, dreaming of becoming a math teacher. But there came a time when he lost his interest in studying. After getting a score of 0.38 in his GPA and having part-time jobs for a while, Nam became deeply concerned about his life. Worried, he thought about the time when he enjoyed math and productively navigated his life. Coming to the conclusion that he should become a math teacher, Nam studied to reach the top in his department and realized his dream after preparing for the national teaching qualification exam. Nam enjoyed teaching and getting along with students when he was first assigned to a middle school, his various experiences in life during his wandering helping to understand his students more. Nam another life as a mathematics expert began when he started working at a high school after five years of teaching. He tried various teaching methods with his students, including a math educational volunteering club. In addition, Nam opened an Internet Math Café and posted handmade math materials to assist his students’ studies. Nam explains his teaching philosophy. Then, there was an event that induced Nam to spend a year fiercely studying and thinking how he will teach mathematical essays in addition to his original subject, searching through most of math textbooks and workbooks in Korea. “Mathematical essay is typically taught through visits by instructors outside of school. I thought it was a pity that they could not take care of the students to the very end. It was because of the limitation of teaching only for a few classes,” Nam said. What Nam wanted was to take responsibility of students until they graduated and succeeded in university admissions, so he decided to teach the subject by himself. His students proved Nam’s efforts by attaining good results in their university entrance examinations. During the process, Nam felt that he wanted to teach math at EBS. “The school I am working at is not exactly educationally developed. I wanted to help students in similar situations, or even worse, such as those who are living on islands or in farming and fishing communities,” Nam said. Nam, preparing his math lecture in an EBS studio. (Photo courtesy of EBS, 'heemang suhak' Naver post homepage) The teacher who works harder than his students After successfully passing through three highly competitive stages of becoming an EBS instructor (resume, teaching rehearsal test, and interview), he experienced difficulties working both at school and at EBS. “Each day, two hours were spent on the road, because the location of the school and EBS company building was far away. Additionally, I had to teach both math and mathematical essay lecture series, and film three or four lectures at one time,” Nam revealed. Nam was thankful of the opportunity to teach and help more students, even though he returned home at around midnight, exhausted. Nam spends about five hours preparing his lectures by solving mathematical problems several times, researching and extracting lecture materials from various math workbooks. He has currently worked on nine lecture series and has written a workbook on mathematical essay and suneung math. In order to allow students to find true enjoyment in math, Nam believes in understanding the core principles instead of simply memorizing formulas. Consequently, he focuses on students’ ability to logically infer and deduct, honing the capability to communicate mathematically. Nam thinks it is important to put himself in the students’ shoes, and tries to continuously research better ways to teach, like watching other teachers’ lectures and putting teaching aids into use to spark students’ interests in math, regardless of their math comprehension skills. “Before I become old, I want to exert myself to mathematical education. After I retire, I want to volunteer math teaching to needy students,” Nam said. Firm in his conviction to teach students like his own sons and daughters, Nam's efforts live on to become Korea’s best math teacher. Nam aspires to be the best math teacher in Korea. Jang Soo-hyun luxkari@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Moon Ha-na

2017-05 01 Important News

[Student]Hanyangian Brothers on the Soccer Field

When players flutter their sweat and passion in the air on a soccer field, the fans watch the direction a ball is heading to with bated breath. The fierce competition, earnest desire for victory, and both psychological and physical pressure are what soccer players must bear on the ground. In Hanyang University, there are two brothers who chose to walk this path- Lee Dong-hee of the Division of Sports and Well-Being and Lee Gun-hee of the Department of Sports Industry. Life of Hanyang soccer players Even though they were brothers grown at same home, their beginnings of soccer life were different. Dong-hee: I began playing soccer in my first year at elementary school. My father, who had a dream of becoming an athlete in his early age, suggested me to do so. From then, I lived with my coaches or my teammates, only to practice soccer. Gun-hee: My start was a bit different, because I had no interests in sports. When I was in my sixth grade at elementary school, I just became a goalkeeper for no reason. When I found out that I was a fast runner, I became an offense, and I began to grow my dream as a soccer player. Dong-hee: I went to a high school located in the rural area, so it was hard to be recognized by the coaches in Seoul. I had lucky opportunities to play against Hanyang University during my high school years for three times. This way, I could be scouted by my coach and come to HYU. I hope more opportunities will come to players at rural areas, because many of them have skills and efforts that deserve chances. Gun-hee: Unlike my older brother, I went to a high school in Seoul, and got accepted to Hanyang University. I thought that HYU would be a great home for me, because my brother is there and, also because of its environment. The coaches are nice and the facilities are considerate of players. I am blissful about my soccer life at HYU, except for my brother’s high temper. (laugh) Dong-hee: Just like Gun-hee said, the coach always tries to solicitude us, considering our conditions, schedules, and needs. As a sub-captain of a team, I have burdens that I have to encourage and criticize teammates at the same time. Also, managing soccer schedules and school education is another nuisance for us. Lee Dong-hee (left) and Lee Gun-hee (right) are talking about their soccer life. One year is a long run for Hanyangian soccer players. From February, Hanyang team participates in the Spring Soccer League, and the U-League (University League), until September. Also, between June and August, players compete against 16 other teams at the National Sports Festival. When most of the leagues are over, Hanyang soccer team leaves for the off-season training during the winter to constantly fit in shape. The Lee brothers on the field Both brothers take great responsibilities on the soccer field. The older brother Dong-hee is a midfielder and Gun-hee is a front-line offense. Despite the great pressure they must bear, Dong-hee is now a sub-captain and Gun-hee has already scored multi-goals at the U-league. Q. What are some aspects of each other that you want to take after? Dong-hee: My brother Gun-hee is sincere on the field. Before playing games, be manages his mental conditions and is able to calmly score at games. Gun-hee: Dong-hee embodies great fundamental skills and fitness. Even though I try to be calm when faced with the goalpost, it is still hard for me to take care of my health conditions. I am affected by the time when I play soccer, but Dong-hee is consistently good during the game, whether it is morning or evening. Q. What are your ultimate goals? Dong-hee: I want to enter a K-League (Korean League) team in South Korea. Also, I wish to wear a Tae-guk mark (South Korean Flag) on my uniform and represent my country with my brother. Fame is not what I desire, but long-lasting soccer life. Thus, I will always confront soccer earnestly, also to satisfy my grateful coach who trusts me. Gun-hee: I want to become a memorable player in the end. My favorite soccer player is Lewandowski of FC Bayern. Just like him, I want to be the best offense who results in constant scores. The two passionate brothers stand as the bright future of HYU. Parents of the Lee brothers are very proud of their sons, but try not to root for them intensely. They lower their sons’ conceit, if they have to. Under such wise parents, the Lee brothers are always immersed into soccer and practicing. “When I visited Germany from HYU, I realized that general environments such as facilities, coaches, and self-pride are different from Korea. I wish our country will someday provide such comforts and considerations for all our players,” said Lee. Kim Ju-hyun kimster9421@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Moon Ha-na

2017-04 25

[Alumni]CEO of Design Egg

Among fierce competition in the entertainment and design industry, there came a glittering 'star' company: Design Egg. With the launch of the program “Tap Tap Como” on the Seoul Broadcasting System, the CEO of Design Egg, Jung Je-won (Department of Entertainment Design, ERICA Campus, '07), is working on his creative design tasks more ardently. News H met him to hear the path he has taken, and the future he is paving for. Jung is explaining the path he has taken to found Design Egg. When others break an egg, it is fried egg, but when you break it, it is a chick Company Design Egg has been founded on 2007 and its task force is divided into two spheres: commercial and contents. The commercial part concentrates on the tasks handed over by other subcontracting companies, while the contents part focuses on its creative self-development. “With the financial surplus earned from the commercial sector, we invest all our ability to develop new animations, designs, and contents within our creativity. Thus, the contents part is what we value the most,” said Jung. The name 'Design Egg' was founded 10 years ago, when Jung and three of his fellow colleagues gathered round. “There’s a saying that when an egg is broken by others, it becomes fried egg, but when it is broken by itself, it becomes a chick. We tried to embed this meaning in our company- blooming prosperity and creativeness,” emphasized Jung. Design Egg's booth at a character fair is boomed by children. (Photo courtesy of Jung) Due to Jung’s experience at the Designing industry, he cherished the hope to ameliorate the poor environment. “After the graduation, I worked at the designing company to build wider personal connections and experiences. But, the low income and harsh welfare made me grasp the magnitude of this industry,” said Jung. In the attempt the set the better example and path to his juniors, he decided to found a company of just environment with his colleagues. When you’re lonely and tired, Como will tap-tap you Animation created by Design Egg “Tap Tap Como” brought Jung and his crew a significant amount of opportunity and fortune. However, the production process was a continuous adversity. The target was children and the animation itself was six to seven minutes long, which was immensely longer than what Design Egg has been producing for their commercial goods. Even so, they made steady progress. “To define children’s tastes, we aired an incomplete piece in kindergartens and tried to communicate often with moms around us,” noted Jung. As a result, the heart of the animation was born: the Tap-Tap dance of Como. <Tap-Tap Dance of Como, Video courtesy of Design Egg> Como in the animation is the main character and a baby chick. Como’s friends are Toto, who came from the urban area, Wormy, a worm whom Como did not eat but became friends with, and Uba, who is a warm-hearted baby duck. Together, they learn the goodness in life, solicitude, and love. “Babies are the kindest beings. I have a faith that this purity in animation will remind adults of the innocence and naivety they once had.” Jung strives for the betterment of the entertainment design industry for his juniors. Jung’s ultimate goal is not limited- it adds up as he seeks betterment. “It is the most blissful moment when my babbling baby giggles when Como is being played.” Developing Design Egg into a sustainable and welfare-based company like Disney or Zebra is now propelling Jung onwards. Kim Ju-hyun kimster9421@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Kim Youn-soo

2017-04 17

[Alumni]A Pro in Both Fields; Pansori and Gayageum

Just as a guitar player may also sing beautifully, Choi Min-hyouk is a professional player and singer of gayageum, or Korean zither, and pansori, a type of Korean traditional music. His field of music is called Gayageum sanjo mit byeongchang in Korean. Hi diligence and passion enabled him to master gayageum and pansori to complete the course of Intangible Cultural Property .23 designated by the South Korean government. Recently, Choi was awarded the prestigious Ureuk Grand Prize at the 26th National Ureuk Gayageum Contest, a nationwide competition for gayageum players and pansori singers, held on March 31st to April 1st. Also working as a chief member of Daejeon Yeonjung Korean Music Center, an organization whose mission is to preserve Korean traditional music, or Gukak, he endeavors to deliver the excellence of Gukak to Korea and the world’s general public. For the first time, a male contestant, Choi won the grand prize at the 26th National Ureuk Gayageum Contest. (Photo courtesy of Choi) The 26th Grand Prize Winner of the National Ureuk Gayageum Contest The largest number of contestants consisting of of 214 teams participated in this year's contest. Choi was the first male competitor to win the Grand Prize. “Despite my skills that need more refining, it was luck that awarded me this fruitful outcome. I’ll use this opportunity to work harder and devote myself more deeply.” he modestly revealed. The songs Choi sang and played with his gayageum are 'Hwaryongdo' from Jeokbyeokga in the preliminary round and ‘On the way to the castle’ from Simcheongga in the finals. Jeokbyokga, a Chinese war story, and Simcheongga, a tale which a devoted daughter helps to recover eyesight of her blind father and subsequently becoming a queen in her homeland, are famous pansori songs from the Joseon Dynasty. ‘“Hwaryongdo' depicts scenes of fierce war and ‘On the way to the castle’ vividly describes the blind father well. The two songs made it easier for me to showcase the charm of a male pansori singeri, ” he explained. Choi singing pansori and playing his gayageum. (Photo courtesy of Choi) Efforts To Preserve and Maintain Traditional Music Currently a chief member of Daejeon Yeonjung Korean Music Center, Choi takes part in various music performances in and out of the country and teaches gayageum and pansori. “Today, pansori is perceived as something old and boring by the general audience. As a gukak performer, I believe prejudice is the problem we have to overcome. I am working hard to teach gukak easily and make it more approachable to the general public,” he said. In addition to practicing his music, Choi also focuses on communication and harmony between other members of the group. Choi began practicing pansori when he was ten-years-old, at the suggestion of his father. Choosing pansori as his major, he started studying gayageum after taking classes as his minor. From his classes, he first met his teacher Gang Jeong-suk, who had much knowledge and skills for Intangible Cultural Property No.23 Gayageum sanjo mit byeongchang. Becoming a disciple of Gang, and after four years of training, he was selected as the gukak musician to complete the necessary course as a receiver of Intangible Cultural Property No.23. “My motto is ilchaeyushimjo(一切唯心造), which is a term from Buddhism that means everything depends on how you think. Positive thinking and incessant exertion reap good results for certain,” Choi claimed. Choi also believes that the performer of music needs to be a good person first in order to play good music. Therefore, his prime objective is to become a good person who plays good music. “Nowadays, all gugak majors learn both purely traditional and crossover music. However, I believe that only when the root of the tradition is firmly established can there be room for creative crossover music, ” he advised. Choi believes that the performer of music needs to be a good person first in order to play good music. (Photo courtesy of Choi) Jang Soo-hyun luxkari@hanyang.ac.kr