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2017-07 10

[Alumni]Until Ballet Can Capture the Heart of Everyone

Three ballerinos were dancing with the utmost concentration. The leader displayed mild charisma, never taking his eyes off the other two dancers who were showing graceful and understated motions. Kim Kil-yong (Department of Dance, ‘92), is the head of Wiseballet Theater who creates and directs ballet performances that the general public can enjoy. Intriguing ballet performances for the public Wiseballet Theater is famous for its unique ballet shows combining b-boy dance, tap dance, tango, and hip-hop, cooperating with other dance crews, such the famous Korean b-boy crew, Last For One. “Each ballet troupe prepares their own version of The Nutcracker during Christmas season. Our performance was complimented for its engrossing and compact organization of choreography that mix-matched ballet with other genres of dances,” Kim said with a proud grin. Kim is the leader who takes responsibility of Wiseballet Theater. (Photo courtesy of Wiseballet Theater) Since Wiseballet Theater focuses on the popularization of ballet, the diverse performances it covers range from creative and contemporary to classic ones with explanations. One of the most inspiring showcases that the troupe presented was Once Upon a Time in Ballet. Kim called the performance, a ‘ballet-cal’, meaning that it combined ballet and musical, with diverse other dance genres as well. In addition, the troupe presented street ballet performances in Hongdae, Hyehwa, and Suwon. “Some dancers were hesitant about the idea that they had to dance on the sidewalk in front of passing bystanders. However, seeing how the people loved the show, they became enthusiastic to participate in the next shows, ” Kim chuckled. A dance competition between two rivaling families is the main plot of Once Upon a Time in Ballet. In this scene, Cheolsu and Yeonghee is dancing together, expressing their secret love. (Photo courtesy of Wiseballet Theater) From a ballet starter, growing to become a professional performer At first Kim did not have an interest in ballet or even dance. After going to technical high school, Kim realized he did not quite fit in so he searched for another path in his future. Since Kim had a taste for art, and his mother once learned ballet, he decided to study ballet. “I can’t say I fell in love with ballet as soon as I first started practicing, especially due to my masculine personality. But as I got to know ballet more and more, I found out ballet was actually very stylish, then I gradually became enthralled in its charm,” Kim reminisced. Possessing both capacity and effort, he eventually became the member of the renowned Korean National Ballet. “But somehow, as I spent four years as the dancer of Korean National Ballet, I felt like there was an empty space in my heart. I was given the best outfit, the most impressive stages, and the admiration of others, but at the same time I felt there was something missing, ” Kim said. The fruitful result of following his heart With such concern, he talked to his professor Cho Seung-mi at HYU about his problem. “Professor Cho is my mentor of my lifetime. After hearing all my troubles she asked me to join her in creating the Cho Seung-mi ballet corporation, ” Kim revealed. “The time I joined in the troupe as a choreographer and performer was one the happiest moments of my life, ” Kim faintly smiled. According to Kim, he learned Cho’s creativity and mindset about giving art performances. “One time I remember is that she made an extra show for people with physical difficulty. At first, because I was the lead dancer I felt too exhausted and tired, but when I saw the audience trying to clap with difficulty with their eyes filled with admiration, I burst into tears, ” Kim reminisced. Kim created Wiseballet Theater with his friend Hong Seong-wook after leaving the Cho Seung-mi ballet corporation. (Photo courtesy of Wiseballet Theater) Unfortunately, Cho faced an early death due to cancer. After her death, He left the troupe and created his first ballet show about the stories of living as a ballerino in Korea, ‘Some things that can happen to you’, with his three friends. The show was a huge success, which made Kim to think of making his own ballet troupe. Consequently, he and his friend, Hong Seong-wook, the art director, initiated Wiseballet Theater in 2005, which continues to this day. Wiseballet Theater gives a great number of inspiring performances even comparing to huge ballet companies. The reason for this is Kim's belief that the troupe is there for the purpose of the enjoyment of its audience. Along with those shows, Kim is currently directing Swans ballet troupe, the first amateur ballet troupe in Korea, to give opportunity to ordinary citizens to perform ballet on stage. To the students dreaming of becoming ballerinas and ballerinos, Kim advised, “Ballet is not an easy road to take in life. I once strived to become the best in ballet, but I now believe that the important thing is to enjoy oneself and find happiness when dancing.” Kim at the inauguration ceremony of Swans ballet troupe in January. According to Kim, the passion of the members of Swans ballet are so great that they give energy to Wiseballet Theater. (Photo courtesy of Wiseballet Theater) Jang Soo-hyun

2017-07 10

[Student]Thinking Outside the Circle

Creative ideas can originate from literally everything, depending on the creator’s attitude. When making an advertisement, inspiration can come from other advertisements, one’s experience or thoughts, or other people. For Kim Dong-hoon (Department of Educational Technology, 4th year), the winner of New York Festivals 2017, however, it comes from his dissatisfaction about the society. New York Festivals is one of the most well-known international award competitions for the world’s best works. Winning two Third Prizes in the New York Festivals 2017, Kim has taken a step closer to his dream. Different perspective, different approach Kim’s works by the name of ‘Cover by Artist’ and ‘Missing Models’ each received a Third Prize in the competition. ‘Cover by Artist’ is an advertisement idea proposed to the most popular digital music service in the United States Spotify, which puts the stage performance video of an artist on the space on the screen where there originally lies the cover album of the music to further promote the artist’s work. “If you use a music streaming service, the cover album takes up most of the space of your screen. I personally enjoy listening to live concert music and I suddenly thought if I could turn the idle space into a room for performance videos, this could be a means of advertising while making the service more enjoyable.” Spotify - Cover By Artists from Donghoon Lee on Vimeo. His other work ‘Missing Models’ is an idea derived from the hopes of helping to find missing children. In a poster, there are hundreds of faces of missing children clustered together. That makes it hard for people to take a close look at each one, which got Kim thinking. Kim thought about instances where people take a close look at the figure and came up with home shopping. He applied the concept to WooCommerce, a customizable e-commerce platform for building online business and inserted the missing children’s face as the models’ face in the home shopping sites. In this way, the faces of the children could be better recognized. Woocommerce - Missing Models from Donghoon Lee on Vimeo. Spotify, Woocommerce, missing children, and home shopping are all something that everyone is familiar with. Yet, no one has ever came up with these ideas so far. Kim’s way of thinking and approaching certain situations led him to devise such ideas. “I take a lot of notes in my daily life. It could be under any circumstances, really. Those little notes help me to create helpful ideas later on.” From problem to idea “When I look at advertisements, there are a lot of things that I don’t like about. In general, I see a lot of factors in this society that could be improved. What I do in that situation is that I take note of them and try to solve them in my own way, through making creative advertisements.” This is how his two award winning advertisement ideas came into being. Kim sees every problem as a potential idea for his work and use them as a source of ideas. “I don’t have a particular source of inspiration every time I make an advertisement. My daily life and every aspect of it could be my inspiration that gives me ideas.” Kim wants to make advertisements that could help solve social problems. Kim first got interested in making advertisements after watching one in one of his classes. “It was a chocolate advertisement and it was the first time in my life that I felt like I wanted chocolate just by watching an advertisement. I was amazed by how a short advertisement could convince people to change their minds.” As an Educational Technology major, Kim knows how to think from a learner’s perspective. This helped him to consider what the audience would want from an advertisement, enabling him to produce a more effective result. After making ads, being aware that random moments could inspire him, Kim became more attentive to little details of his life. "My next goal is to win next year's Cannes Lions, which is another prestigious international competition." Jeon Chae-yun Photos by Kim Youn-soo

2017-07 03

[Alumni]A Shining Star in Operas and Musicals

A Verdi opera ‘Rigoletto’ came to an end on the 30th of June with loud applause from the audience. A renowned vocalist, Kim Soon-yeong (Department of Vocal Music, ’06), famous for both musicals and operas, caught the attention through the character named ‘Gilda’. She acted out the pure and innocent girl through her voice, leading the opera to a great hit. A soprano, stepping into a musical Opera vocal performers would frequently think that they would not be able to perform again in operas once they expand thier activities to musicals. However, Kim completely broke the stereotype through the character ‘Christine’ in the musical ‘Phantom’, which was premiered in 2015. She was casted by EMK music company through the music video ‘First Love’, composed by Kim Hyo-geun (Click to listen). “A lot of acquaintances tried to persuade me not to do it since they thought I wouldn’t be able to perform again in operas. But I didn’t want to miss an opportunity of new experiences," said Kim. Kim explaining her opportunity of starting musicals Of course, Kim was not a perfect actress from the beginning. She faced extreme hardships as she had to step into an entirely different area. The tempo of the musical was much faster than that of operas along with the increased number of acting scenes. “I wasn’t able to keep up with the other actors at first. The choir even ridiculed me during the practices. However, as I got better through persistent practice, the pure, passionate character of Christine became soundly mine and I gained more confidence.” Kim reminisced. She also mentioned that she was able to understand the character more deeply because of the fact that Christine came from the countryside, just like Kim who moved from Daejeon to Seoul to achieve her dream. As a result, Kim attained absolute success and became the only actress who took the role of Christine again in the second presentation of ‘Phantom’ this year. She remarked that she was able to act in a much more relaxed manner throughout the second presentation as she was extremely tensed up in the first one. Kim praised the features of musicals through her own experience. “I was never bored of acting even though I played the role of Christine numerous times. It felt new everytime with different actors of ‘Phantom’. They allowed me to feel different emotions each time I act on stage.” Kim performed as Christine 98 times in total, but she is confident that she enjoyed each and every performance. A scene of the musical 'Phantom'. The phantom of the opera 'Eric' is teaching songs to 'Christine' in the picture. (Photo courtesy of Kim) Kim’s significance of operas and musicals “I would never be able to choose between operas and musicals. They both have their own charming points.” said Kim. Formally, even when both performances practice for the same amount of time, operas usually have only 2 or 3 plays while musicals have much more plays; 50 for each presentation in the case of ‘Phantom’. Therefore, Kim pointed out that she can fully absorb the character of musicals throughout the acts but only feels like rehearsals with operas. Kim also pointed out the different focuses of each plays. Operas focus more deeply into music, while musicals put their priorities on acting. Therefore, Kim puts every ounce of her energy into her songs in operas. She explained that she can reach a state of catharsis through the concentration of her voice in the music. On the other hand, as musicals focus more in actions, Kim felt that they tend to be more energetic, diverse and colorful. Kim praised both areas for their own unique traits. "No one told me to sing. I just loved singing so much I searched for chances to sing." Kim anticipated that she would continue performing in both areas of operas and musicals. Her aspiration is later to be referred an all-rounder. “I’m not the best in any area. However, I think that’s the very reason I was able to try both of them, and make satisfying results.” Kim wished that she could inspire more of her junior colleagues to broaden their views and to challenge themselves in various areas. “Performances nowadays show a collaboration of various areas. Fitting to the trend, I wish opera vocal performers can also show active performances in areas other than just from their own.” Kim concluded. On Jung-yun Photos by Moon Ha-na

2017-07 01

[Student]Winners of 2017 Robofest Vision Centric Challenge

Robofest is a renowned robot competition that has started from 2000. Hosted by Lawrence Technological University in the United States, over 20,000 people have competed from 14 different countries in the last 17 years. Bae Jong-hak and Yoo Ho-yeon (Robot Engineering, 3rd year) have worked together as a team in 2017 Robofest that was held from June 1st to 3rd in Florida, and won the Vision Centric Challenge. Back to back winners Team Linker, consisted of Bae and Yoo have won the 2016 Robofest last year as well. It is the same competition with different rules. “They host the competition in the U.S. in June, while in Korea, it is held in October,” explained Bae. This time, Bae had the full support from the Department of Robot Engineering. “Our department has generously provided us with the opportunity to travel to the U.S. for free and also helped us out with the materials needed to create the robots as well. Special thanks to professor Han Jae-kwon for helping us out with the robots,” added Bae. Yoo (with the robot), Han (middle), and Bae (with the trophy) are smiling in front of the camera. Team Linker has received such a good feedback thanks to the internal software of their robot. The objective of the competition was the robot to perceive the numbers and equations through the camera and eventually reach a certain result out of it. “We put a lot of effort on the software so that when the robot gets stuck with the equations, it could move back a little instead of standing there still,” said Bae. He explained that Team Linker has prepared for the competition for 3 months and it took about one month to create the robot. “ Software of the robot took longer for us because it was more important than the hardware.” "It has been a privilege for us to participate in the competition." I – Robot After studying one more year to retake the college entrance examination, Bae found his interests in creating robots. “One of my childhood dream was to create a robot on my own,” recalled Bae. He explained that Department of Robot Engineering would be a perfect fit for those not interested in particular field of study. Since robotics requires knowledge from diverse fields, students are able to acquire engineering skills that could be applied in any type of studies. “We learn about diverse types of integrated studies and then move on focus on a certain field that catches your attention. For me, it was image recognition. I gained more interest after studying it during the competition,” said Bae. Bae wishes to create robots similar to Jarvis. In the future, Bae wishes to study more about the robots and image recognition in graduate school. “I see a lot of possibilities from the robots in that we could have a better future with them,” commented Bae. He wishes to create a home robot that would be able to handle useful tasks like Jarvis from Iron man. Bright future seems to lie in front of the winners of Robofest Vision Centric Challenge. Kim Seung-jun Photos by Kim Youn-soo

2017-06 27

[Student]Graduation Postponement and Employment Rate (1)

The employment rate in South Korea is marking its lowest every year. The young generation is going through the so called 'Giving Up Syndrome', meaning that in order to lead an employed, sustainable life, one has to give up several factors- love, marriage, children, one's own house, relationships, and more. To find out more about job opportunities, college students are postponing their graduation. However, graduation postponement incurs shortage of faulty members per student and a lower school appraisal in accordance with student employment rate. To ascertain the correlation between graduation postponement and the employment rate, Ph.D. students of the Department of Education at Hanyang University's Graduate School, Lee Jeon-e, Yu Ji-hyeon, and Kang Young-min, have researched and grabbed their award at the symposium held by KEIS (Korea Employment Information System). News H met Yu and Kang for an analytical insight into their research. Changes in perception Graduation postponement is a term that differs from a leave of absence, meaning delaying the date of graduation after fulfilling all the graduation requirements. In the beginning of this policy’s application, a number of universities disfavored those in need of graduation postponement. “Students who need to graduate and get a job are in deep trouble nowadays due to the low employment rate and limited job openings. Since they don’t want to be idle and unemployed for years, they delay their graduation and search for jobs while retaining the sense of belonging to the school,” said Yu. However, considering these students’ circumstances, the government decided to advise universities to provide better services for students in need of postponement. Kang (left) and Yu (right) explain how graduation postponement affects the employment rate positively, using the GOMS data. Using the GOMS (Graduates Occupational Mobility Survey), graduation postponement is positively affecting the employment rate of university students. However, doing nothing during the delay would mean nothing. “It is imperative for these students to get involved in work experience like internships and professional consultations. Also, universities should run a career development center and its diversified services efficiently,” advised Kang. Both Yu and Kang referred to the case of Hanyang University as an exemplary case, considering its efforts and financial support for the Career Development Center. (To see more, click here.) Yu and Kang both suggest all colleges to run programs that can help students be employed while granting them credits. “We do worry that the concept of the university is changing- from the academic hub to an employment preparation center. However, the status quo of South Korea is extremely unstable that without such occupational preparations, the young generation can’t properly get a job,” emphasized Yu. Hopes for the Korean education system The selection of the thesis topic contributed to the winning of the KEIS Symposium. “Graduation postponement became a momentous issue for the young generation and the GOMS data have been established in 2014 separately from the leave of absence. This shows the facet of Korea’s reality,” said Kang. Being aware of the seriousness in the Korean education system and its effects on the employment rate, Yu and Kang both expressed their willingness to change the education system. The KEIS Symposium is held every year to prosper the research within the utilization of their employment data. (Photo courtesy of KEIS) Although they are walking down a similar lane, Yu and Kang have chosen different paths. In the case of Kang, she had always been interested in education itself and graduated from the Department of Educational Engineering and went to the graduate school of the same major. “As my perspective of viewing education broadened from micro to macro, my desire to research more on education was augmented,” said Kang. Now, she is working at the National Institute of Lifelong Education, working specifically on adult education. Yu, however, graduated from the Department of English Education and worked for a textbook production company. Inquiring the reasons behind the low quality of South Korean textbooks that students no longer utilize, she decided to enter graduate school at a late age. “Even though Kang and I have had different experiences, we cooperated to produce an intricate paper on a career-developing education in the hope of becoming helpful education researchers,” said Yu. Kang and Yu both dream of becoming researchers that can influence the Korean education system. Collecting preceding research papers and distinguishing the results in intricate ways to verify the correlation between graduation delay and employment was hard work. But with the help of their professor Park Ju-ho and his amendments, they were able to successfully end the journey. “We are not recommending students to delay their graduation just because our research proves a positive correlation. Making use of career development programs and multi-major policies of universities would be the most beneficial direction that we can suggest,” said Yu and Kang. Kim Ju-hyun Photos by Moon Ha-na

2017-06 26

[Student]Run, Train, and Box!

With loud cheers from the audience, support from friends and family, nervous excitement throughout the body, and the tense atmosphere on the ring, the match was heated to its maximum and both players were growling with fierce spirit. An avid boxer, Kim Dong-woo (Department of Applied Physics, ERICA Campus, 4th year) has won his way up the tournament of 2017 Rookie Championship match hosted by Korea Boxing Federation and grabbed the champion’s trophy at last. Clenching his teeth and enduring extreme daily training, Kim shared his story as a newly rising champion. Spotlight on the ring “I remember the fatal blow that knocked my opponent down. I might have lost the match had it not been for that K.O.” reminisced Kim. It was at the last moment of his semi-final match that he struck a weighty blow and reeled his opponent backwards, after which Kim forcefully gave a succession of blows that finally knocked him down. “That was my favorite part of the match,” commented Kim. "My strength is throwing heavy punches." For the championship, Kim had a total of three matches at intervals within a couple of weeks. His quarter-final match was an unearned win, his semi-final a memorable win, and his final match the victorious one. After his semi-final, Kim had an injury on his left-hand ligament, which could have posed him a disadvantage. Fortunately, however, there was a one week delay for the final match and Kim gained an extra week until he healed. When Kim first steps on the ring, he naturally feels extreme nervousness sweeping over him. However, he manages to stay calm and hide that uneasiness by lightly running on the edges of the ring. “I need to show my opponent that I’m not nervous and that I’m confident. That’s the key to overcoming your nervousness.” Dramatically, Kim's opponent for the final match was his close friend who trained and prepared for this championship together. “I expected to see him at last, assuming that I would make it to the final match. We both trained really hard, so if we didn’t meet at the last match, it would mean one of us has been defeated, which is enervating,” remarked Kim. To both players, the final match was made more meaningful because they both made it to that round. "I can't stop training, because I can't get rid of the thought that my enemies are training harder." How it all began Kim first started boxing as a hobby as an attempt to lose weight after gaining a lot during exam weeks. As an uninterested starter, he never imagined becoming a boxing champion of Korea one day. After one year of training, Kim acquired his pro-boxer license and found himself completely befallen for boxing. Currently, as a senior at university, Kim is also concerned about his academics. He is facing the dilemma of either dedicating his life to boxing or going to a graduate school of physical education, only to pursue a career related to boxing. As for now, Kim's passion is directed toward boxing and he is doing what he enjoys at the moment. “I know I should care more and focus on my career at this point but I love boxing so much that I can’t stop training for it.” After his victory at the championship, he felt rewarded for all his hard work and was determined that his road to becoming the champion of Korea was further paved. Despite his family’s concerns and disapprovals, he has only reaped positive outcomes and is driven further by his growing passion for boxing. "I will not fail anyone who support me." "My ultimate goal is to become the champion of Korea." Jeon Chae-yun Photos by Kim Sang-yeon

2017-06 20

[Student]Pianist and Songwriter, Bamhaneul

One might have felt the wanting to listen to something calm and soothing, but also desired for a much modern type of music. Kim Ha-neul (Department of Piano, 2nd yr), stage name ‘Bamhaneul (night sky in Korean)’, is a rising star piano player and songwriter of indi music duo group Mozaroot. Recently on May 24th, Kim released his first single, ‘Seounhae (sad and hurt)’ with his singer partner Hanseul. Mozaroot and their fresh acoustic music The group name Mozaroot is the combination of the words Moja (hat in Korean) and Root, sounding similar to the famous performer and composer Mozart. “It means our music is unpredictable, just like the magic hat from which anything can come out. Basically, our team focuses on the reinterpretation of acoustics led only by piano and vocals,” Kim explained. Kim's stage name, Bamhaneul was created by merging his name and his first written song about his first love, 'After ten nights' sleep', when he was 19. "We have made a moderate success, and even though this is my first single album I feel that I have completed a team project," Kim added. “The song, ‘Seounhae’ was written when I was 20-year-old. At first I thought I would get to sing the song myself, but since I worked with my partner singer Hanseul, I changed the keys to a much higher version," Kim revealed. He additionally altered the melody that suited her more and also changed the lyrics to become more feminine. Kim explaining the meaning of his group name Mozaroot. "I first met Hanseul when I was recommended to became the part of Juice Media, an entertainment management company. Her voice had a taste of a fairy tale, because she is interested in musicals, and my music had a classical feel. That's how we got together as a team, because our music fitted nicely." Kim became the member of Juice Media when he took his leave of absence and taught piano lessons for students in need. “I met the head of Juice Media there who was working as a composing instructor, and that is how I was suggested to work there.” Kim said. A multiplayer of music Since Kim is the piano player and the songwriter of the group, he spends most of his day in front of the piano. "I first start with the title of the song when I compose it, and select the lyrics that I really want to put in the song. Then I move on step by step to build up the melody of the beginning and the middle of the song, the verse, and the chorus, " Kim explained. Kim with his music sheets. The sheets contain melody and lyrics for 'Seounhae'. When writing a song, Kim sets the beat according to his intended connotation, chooses appropriate chords of major or minor, such as C major and D major, and then adds on notes and rhythms. The ups and downs of his song depend on the mood and emotions, for example, high notes for tense mood and low notes for calm mood. When the lyrics contain negative words, he prefers major chords, and for positive ones, major chords. According to Kim, the songwriter's personality is reflected in his or her songs. "Because I like playing around with my friends, there are some puns, sarcastic and black humor in my songs. The name of one of those songs is ‘니 얼굴 실화냐 (I can't believe the state of your face)', " Kim chuckled. "I also like to make my songs difficult to translate in English. I believe Korean is the language which has the power to express something well," he added. Meaningful dreams of a promising music artist Kim not only works as a member of Mozaroot, but is a popular facebook page owner posting his songs, covers, and rearrangement of original pieces. He has 20 unreleased songs and wishes to compete in the Yoo Jae-ha Music Concours, a song writing and performance competition for discovering new and talented artists, in his near future. Kim singing and playing piano at his concert. (Photo courtesy of Kim) Recently, Kim donated all of the profits earned in his personal recital and his extra money for victims enforced to work as comfort women by the Japanese military during WW2. “I think music is for expressing some things that are difficult to say in words. Due to my belief that the incident that the victims had to handle was one of the saddest events in Korean history that words cannot express, I decided to donate the earnings and planning to donate more to help people in the future.” Kim said. “I want to make a masterpiece of a song, even though I don't exactly get what it is yet. I don't want to make my song to be heard like one gulps down an 'instant food', but create it so that it can give the listener different feelings each time it is heard. Say, my idea of a successful career as a songwriter would be if my song is played in my funeral, and every person there recognize it. However most of all, I belive continuous effort is the road to success.” Kim grinned. Kim aspires to become a songwriter and compose music that recurs again and again in people's memory. Click here to visit Mozaroot's facebook page. Jang Soo-hyun Photos by Moon Ha-na

2017-06 20

[Alumni]Impassioned teacher of love

As third graders in high school, students often bear precarious agitation in their minds when choosing career, picking majors, or entering universities. Heartfully understanding this distress and sincerely wanting to lessen the load of unease, Kim Kyung-hoon (Department of education, ‘01), a teacher at Haneul Academy, has composed a song with meaningful lyrics for his apprehensive students. Bringing students to tears and causing a touching sensation in their hearts, the song sure seems to last in the students’ mind for their entire life and be a valuable memento of their high school times. As a teacher and a musician As a teenager, Kim always dreamed of becoming a teacher, as much as he aspired to become a musician. Not being able to pick one of the two, he concluded that he would be both at the same time: a teacher who composes music. “I was motivated by my high school teacher who also wrote and published several books. His main job was teaching and his side job was writing. That was the exact lifestyle that I pursued.” He began to compose songs when he was a teenager and nurtured the other dream concurrently. "High school students today bear much more stress than we did in the past in our school days." With his first music album released in 2008, by the name of Acoustic Project as a solo artist, Kim intermittently composed songs dedicated to other people. The name Acoustic Project, does not only mean unplugged music, but also means to include all acoustic matters, all sounds of music. The digital single album he released last month, titled ‘To the Sky’(Click to listen) is a song dedicated to his third-year students at his school, with the music video featuring his students. Witnessing what his student are going through and understanding how tough it is, Kim was determined that he would write a song for them. As a teacher, Kim always tries to teach students how to live happily, not stressfully. Though it may seem as if entering a good university is the greatest hardship and the most important step of achieving success, it is only a stepping stone which last only temporarily. “I tell students to look beyond and find what will bring them happiness in the long run. Life is not an equation that needs perfect calculation answers and,” remarked Kim. Kim is working on his song in the workroom. (Photo courtesy of Kim) Kim recording his song with his own voice. (Photo courtesy of Kim) Be brave and not timid, To the Sky The title ‘To the Sky’ epitomizes the lyrics of the song, coinciding with the name of the school—Hanuel in Korean is sky. Students who do not know about their potentials consider themselves as the ugly duckling and remain close to the ground but I wanted to make them aware that they will one day soar to the sky like a beautiful swan. “When I sit my students individually for counseling, the first thing they do is crying. It shows how frustrated and anxious they are. I wanted to reflect their mood and portray it in a song with a hopeful message in hopes of encouraging them.” The lyrics are largely divided into two parts: the first half of the song from the perspective of the students, and the remaining half of the teacher’s. The intention of doing so was to reach the students’ heart more directly and to sound as if the song was reading their minds. In that way, bigger wave of sympathy and emotion could be aroused in students’ hearts. Each line of the lyrics is meant to resonate with the mood of the students in the first half of the song, when it is describing their feelings from their very perspective. In the second half, cheerful messages from the perspective of a teacher, from Kim’s perspective, is delivered, heartening each students who is struggling amidst her angst. "To the sky, my dear students!" Jeon Chae-yun Photos by Moon Ha-na

2017-06 12

[Alumni]Groundbreaking English Tutoring

'English nausea' is a buzzword in South Korea, which refers to the fear of English communication and education. In 2016, a mobile application called Tutoring was launched by co-CEOs Choi Kyung-hee (Division of Journalism and Mass Communication, ‘04) and Kim Mi-hee (Division of Advertising and Public Relations, ‘06). After its release, Tutoring began to engage attention from numbers of users with English nausea, attaining 55,000 charged clients in June 2017. News H met CEO Choi Kyung-hee to analyze the success and future of Tutoring. Novel platform of English education Choi’s original occupation was developing teaching materials at the Chosun Ilbo Corporation. Choi's ultimate dream was contributing to the educational revolution in South Korea. While Choi was travelling around the globe for diverse experiences to achieve her goal, Kim reached her with a business idea. “Kim was an engineer at Samsung and I was an educator, which made me contemplate over the business. However, with these two contrary dispositions, we reached an agreement that this could work out,” reminisced Choi. "Our ultimate goal is to create a sensation like 'Uber' in the educational mobile application field," said Choi. In the mobile application market where success and failure are borderless, the two CEOs presented decisive strategy- ‘lower the cost, increase the pay’. Since the business model is online operation system, Tutoring can offer low costs for the users and high pay for the contracted instructors by reducing human labor costs and offline management costs. “Attractive cost allows the clients to be involved into our application easily. However, the constant updates of English contents are also what draw attention from the users,” said Choi. Tutoring offers more than 80 different themes and various teachers that clients can choose and based on that, they practice English communication through phone calls. The philosophy behind Tutoring is that education should not be carried out in the perspective of a teacher, but in the eyes of a student. Thus, conversational contents are steadily developing and increasing based on current trends. Also, the imperative criteria for choosing the on-demand instructors are their witness and active voice. “Since English education is based on phone call conversation, active voicing and charming communication skills are extremely significant along with the educational contents,” emphasized Choi. Tutoring has more than 55,000 charged users, and is consistently augmenting its popularity. (Photo courtesy of Tutoring) Becoming a future-oriented analyst Since the on-demand mobile learning platform is fast-changing, intricate analyses of the market, competitors, and its products are momentous. “All businesses nowadays involve artificial intelligence to comprehend its market. Since it wouldn't be odd if a business in this market suddenly collapses or succeeds tomorrow, strategies like growth hacking is vital,” said Choi. Growth hacking is a process of rapid experimentation across marketing channels and product development to identify the most efficient ways to grow a business. By using AI, workers at Tutoring consistently confirm their growth and weakness. “When we think of marketing, people usually associate with PowerPoint presentations and SWOT (Strength, Weakness, Opportunity, and Threat of a firm) analyses. However, those days are over with the advent of AI. All we, the marketers, need is sensible adaptation to numbers that AI provides and making correct decisions stemming from that process,” explained Choi. Choi emphasizes the value of experiences in order to stand fearless before failure. When Choi was at Hanyang University, she was an unconstrained student who found the meaning of her life in travelling and experiencing things. However, through those invaluable experiences, she is able to confront the fear the word ‘failure’ gives off. “I want to advise the Hanyangian students that starting a business will automatically bring failure and pain. However, it’s important to know that an accumulation of experiences will take over the fear.” Kim Ju-hyun Photos by Kim Youn-soo

2017-06 12

[Student]A Woman Who Ran in Desert for Charity

‘Charity run or donation through sports’ is one of the emerging trends to financially support people who are in need of help. In Korea as well, there are increasing number of people choose to express their passion as a way to raise money for donation. One of the best examples was found among Hanyang University (HYU) students, Kim Chae-wool (Industrial Information Studies, 2nd year). From last April 30th to May 6th, Kim participated in Sahara Desert Marathon and succeeded in fundraising over 7 million won (approximately 7 thousand dollars) which was donated to Korea’s first and only children rehabilitation hospital. Message of Hope Witnessed in The Ironman Triathlon Sahara Desert Marathon is known as one of the four toughest marathon on earth. (Other three include the Gobi March in China/Mongolia, the Atacama Crossing in Chile and The Last Desert in Antarctica. This year due to the IS, it was held in the Namib Desert.) Participants, or runners have to run total 250km for six nights and seven days without any external support except for water and sleeping bag at nighttime. Other essential equipment have to be carried in personal bag packs which usually weigh up to 11 to 12kg. A lot of people surrounding Kim, her parents and friends worried of her application for this extremely challenging marathon. However, Kim simply had to do as she planned because she had a goal in her mind. The biggest motivation for Kim's challenge was from the sign of strong love and hope she saw in the Ironman Triathlon. One of the main events that motivated her to participate in this marathon traces its date back to 2015 when she volunteered as a staff in a Korean Ironman triathlon. In a sports competition where a participant has to swim, ride a bicycle, and run a marathon without a break, Kim witnessed a father on the race with his son suffering of a rare disease. “I felt like a hammer just smashed right in my head,” reminisced Kim. What Kim witnessed was a lively scene of a man running with his son in a sports competition which is even hard for a runner on his or her own could complete. “Even after the race, I wasn’t able to forget what I saw, and decided I would also be the one who can give hope to such disabled young children through my own challenge,” said Kim. Her first grand step was to participate in an Ironman triathlon herself. In the same competition where she witnessed the father and the son, she ran with the goal to donate all the participation fee for disabled children. After preparing for about a year, she could finish the cousrse and make her first donation. “But then, I thought, why stop here? there must be better ways to help more children who needs support,” said Kim. Kim posing in front of the fininshing line of the marathon. (Photo courtesy of Kim) Even on a Tight Schedule as a Working Student That idea was the start of the whole plan to run the marathon. In the following year, she encountered desert marathon via Youtube and thought it was the perfect one for fundraising. “Even if it’s little, I wanted my fundraising plan and challenge could raise more awareness of lack of child rehabilitation hospital in Korea,” explained Kim. Kim was the youngest participant out of all 110 runners from all over the world. (Photo courtesy of Kim) Of course, preparing for a desert marathon required more training for Kim and she started to work out day and night even on her tight schedule as a working student. “Before going to work, I went to swimming centers in the early mornings and during lunch breaks at work, I often skipped my meal and went for a run in a park in front of my office. It was actually really tough because I had to go to school after getting off from the work as well,” remembered Kim. Even without a personal trainer or any other professional help, she continued to push herself to a harder training. For a fundraising, Kim utilized her personal blog which she used to post her workout journeys. On her blog, she explained in a detail why she planned this donation project from the beginning to what contest she is participating. Rewards included hand-written letters on a back of a picture she took herself in the desert. As a result, more than 160 people, including Kim’s acquaintances supported the crowdfunding which amounted up to 7 million won in total. On the middle of the Hot Namib Desert Kim walking in the middle of the Namib Desert. As a nickname of the desert marathon can easily tell, Kim did encountered hardships during her seven days race. On the last course of the race, which is called a ‘long day’, participants had to run about last 80km out of the whole 250km. “The last day was the hardest, not only because of the length of the course, but also because of the pain in my knees,” said Kim. Even before coming to Namib, her knees were in a severe condition due to some hard core trainings. “I really wanted to give up because of the extreme pain but I could not give up because of all the supports I have received,” said Kim. After taking proper medication, with strongly clenched fists, she started to run back on track and was able to successfully finish the course on time. Kim’s first desert marathon race was over, but she is now preparing for her bigger plans, to run rest of the three marathons before she graduates. “I really hope better perception of donation could be spread in Korea. It is not a hard or difficult thing to do, only what people need is courage. Also, through sports donation, people can be healthy while helping people so I wish more people would give it a try,” said Kim. A bigger vision of Kim is now to run rest of the three desert marathons. (Photo courtesy of Kim.) Yun Ji-hyun Photos by Choi Min-ju