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2017-01 09

[Faculty]Developing Art Materials With 3D Printer

Of the 170 teams that participated in the 2016 Student Research Program, 17 were selected as outstanding teams that submitted remarkable reports. Teams from various schools partook in this program, each comprising of several students and one supervising professor. Among the 17 teams stands the group from Hanyang University: Jang Jin-ho (Department of Mechanical Engineering, 2nd year), Choi Ki-bong (Department of Computer Science and Engineering, 3rd year), Kim Jung-hyun (Department of Applied Art, 2nd year), Kim Hee-ryung (Department of Applied Art, 2nd year), Song Si-young (Department of Applied Art, 2nd year), and Yoon Yeo-jin (Department of Industrial Design, 3rd year) from Sungshin Women’s University. They were under supervision of Professor Hyun Eun-ryung of the Department of Applied Art. The six students and the professor shared their glorious moment with News H. From left to right: Hee-ryung, Si-young, Professor Hyun, Jin-ho, and Ki-bong. 3D printer and art material Children with visual impairment need special support and adjustment for educational content, materials, the environment, and teaching methods owing to visual disability. Art materials were created with a 3D printer, enablling children with total blindness or low vision to feel and get familiarized with space and shapes intimately and graphically. This is expected to aid their education and improve day-to-day life in applying the senses they acquired. As for children attending a school for the visually impaired, auditory-oriented teaching methods are implemented. The new teaching material made with 3D printers proved to be more effective, as students are asking questions that are deeper and more relevant to what they are learning. Students were notably engaged in the new equipment. Overall, the newly designed material attributed in promoting students’ better understanding of learning content. Image of Mona Lisa printed graphically for sensory comprehension. (Photo courtesy of the team's research report) Students sketching images by sensing 3D material. (Photo courtesy of the team's research report) Alliance of three majors The main objective of the team was to develop art appreciation teaching materials for visually impaired children by facilitating specialmodes of perception with a 3D printer. Specifically aiming to increase the sense of space by letting students touch 3D materials, the ultimate goal is set on providing the children with more choices for their lives—by building a connection between what they know and what they can do. Their background research included comprehending the current state of affairs regarding education for the visually impaired to navigate further research. This project could be interpreted as a significant confluence of engineering, art, and education, as students from these majors collaborated to carry out the mission. The successful result encourages further collaborative work of the three fields, as Hyun remarked, “Although we had a lot of difficulties adjusting schedules and gathering together, every task we carried as a team meant a lot, because we were all from different majors. The department of engineering and art are considerably distinct from one another, yet the convergence of the three brought a remarkable result. We learned that such fusion of dissimilar fields could produce valuable outcomes.” The team members are planning to participate in additional student research programs, extending their studies on the same topic at hand. As their background research indicated, they realized that education for the handicapped or impaired children is not well instituted, and is meagerly funded. Without funds from the government or corporates, the quality of education for the minority will remain low and primitive. Today's high-end technology enable people to do anything with intention. With this, Hyun and the students are planning to develop their project in order to upgrade education for visually impaired children. Hyun and the students are looking forward to participating in more student research programs. Jeon Chae-yun chaeyun111@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Moon Ha-na

2017-01 08

[Alumni]New Leader of the Korean Advertising & PR Practitioners’ Society (1)

Many Korean students from middle to high school dream of becoming a righteous-minded advert maker after coming across public service advertisements. However, when they begin their academic career at university and face a grander society, their dreams tend to fade away and economic boon becomes the main goal of their life. In order to usher in students and prospective advertisement makers to the right places, the Korean Advertising and PR Practitioners’ Society (KCI) has been pursuing various projects and seminars for a period of 10 years. In the midst of those steps, Kim Bong-cheol (Department of Journalism & Mass Communication, ERICA Campus, '83), a professor at Chosun University, is determined to lead the Society on as its new leader. Values of society The Korean Advertising and PR Practitioners’ Society is differentiated from other advertisement-related seminars or societies. The Society distinguishes itself by learning and getting involved in the practical insight of advertisements, rather than studying and developing numbers of research papers that are sometimes full of logical fallacies and nonfactual theories. The KCI is composed of 500 PR (Public Relations) and advertisement experts from academia and business. “Mass communication and advertisements require not only educational knowledge, but also direct hands-on experiences, the Society maintains the balance of having educators and practitioners among its members,” said Kim. The Korean Advertising and PR Society hosts various contests and symposiums for the prosperity of the field. (Photo courtesy of Kim) The society hosts biannual symposiums and special seminars that cover new ideas and just, ethical methods of advertisements. “There are a host of projects designed and put into action. Two of these include academic journals published for the National Research Foundation of Korea and the Sarangbang sessions that call together university students in China to participate in the making of Korean tourism advertisements. They also include debates that discuss the future of advertisements,” explained Kim. Even though there is half a year left for Kim to become the de facto president of the society, he is preparing hard to lead the grand Society to the right path. Journey to the mass communication expert Kim emphasized the importance of both academic and practical experiences in advertisements. (Photo courtesy of Kim) When Kim was young, his dream was to become a consummate literary artist and to major in Korean language and literature. However, when Kim questioned himself of his gift as a writer, he realized that it wouldn’t bring much opportunity for him to succeed. So Kim decided to major in communication studies, even though he lacked professional knowledge or passion for the field. “I was a senior when I happened to apply for the Advertisement Research Paper Contest hosted by Jaeil Worldwide Incorporation- I received the grand prize. I felt proud and came to know my capabilities, which is why I decided to pursue a career in the advertisement field,” added Kim. After graduation, Kim worked for an advertising company in South Korea. However, adversity came when he decided to become a professor at Chosun University. “I got my doctoral degree in South Korea and I have never been educated abroad. In Korea, it is hard to be admitted as a qualified educator without any academic experience abroad. So, I thought that my effort will determine my future and I decided to write a host of qualified research papers and spread by work in many societies,” said Kim. His endeavor paid off when the fruit of his labor shined bright as a professor and the new president of the Korean Advertising and PR Practitioners’ Society. Kim is also the vice president of the Korean Advertising Society and a standing member of the Press Arbitration Committee. To the question of how he could stand so successful, Kim stressed academic knowledge that entails experience. “The field of advertisement and public relations can't be mastered with a ‘study hard’ attitude. It requires experience that expand the practical knowledge of binding academics with reality,” Kim professed. Although he feels burdened to become the president of a national society, Kim is ready to step up further. "Because the advertisement and PR are in close connection with social attitudes and trends, the economy needs to prosper in order for this branch to survive. Economically flourishing companies can support and utilize advertisements, so Kim hopes for a better economy for South Korea. “As an alumnus of Hanyang University, I was always proud of my school. Despite the harsh employment conditions that Korean university students currently face, I hope that they will always step forward with courage and anticipation. Enjoying what one does is the key to success,” concluded Kim. Kim Ju-hyun kimster9421@hanyang.ac.kr

2016-12 27 Important News

[Student]Flower Walls for Peaceful Demonstrations

The year 2016 has been a hard time for Koreans politically. Corruption related to President Park led Koreans to the streets to protest for her removal. In most sites where demonstrations were held, police were summoned to suppress the outburst. Violence inevitably occurs in protest sites, and there are cases where protesters aggressively collide with the police. On the other hand, in recent scenes of demonstrations, there was an idea to put flower stickers on the wall of police trucks as a symbol of peace instead of violent confrontation. The idea was thought up by an illustrator named Lee Gang-hun, and the project, named ‘Changing Car Walls to Flower Walls’ was backed up by a crowdfunding art company called 7Pictures. The company representative, Jeon Hee-jae (Financial Management, 4th year), was interested in the project, because he thought that it showed how art could influence society for the better. “By allowing people to participate in the creation of art, the project could really speak for protesters,“ he said. This week, News H met Jeon to hear about the works of his company and his viewpoint on art. Jeon is explaining about the 'Changing Car Walls to Flower Walls' project. Flowers for peaceful protests “The project started out from communicating with illustrator Lee through Facebook. We made contact and decided to carry out the plan,” Jeon explained. The fundraising was held in the way of crowdfunding, a method used by artists and social activists who need money to promote their works and projects, by asking the public for donation. More than one hundred artists cooperated in drawing and designing the stickers- through various means such as typography, illustrations, and messages. The result was successful. 30 thousand stickers were produced with the donated money. Soon after, the second project was held, this time making the stickers more detachable for the convenience of the police officers. Also, there were suggestions to use real flowers to decorate the walls of police cars, so the second donation included 90 thousand stickers with 700 flowers. Although the upgraded stickers were more expensive, the second fundraising also succeeded. People actively donated and voluntarily participated in decorating the car walls with the flower stickers during demonstrations. Jeon in front of the police truck decorated with flower stickers. (Photo courtesy of http://v.media.daum.net/v/20161212044252035) Art, an expression of life and the world 7Pictures is a company that aids artists through crowdfunding by introducing artists' projects or social activities on their homepage. Users can donate small sums of money, and can advertise a given product or project by sharing the information through SNS. “The 7Pictures website displays recent projects to fundraise for the flower stickers, including others like funding for a play about comfort women, who suffered as Japanese military sex slaves, and for the opportunity of allowing economically underprivileged children to visit an art exhibition,” Jeon said. Jeon became interested in art while actively working as a student director of TEDx, a conference for spreading novel ideas through lectures, held exclusively at Hanyang University. “Back then, I not only interviewed artists for TEDx events, but also met many people in the field of art out of pure interest and curiosity. Listening to their stories, I came to realize that artists needed money for holding gallery exhibits, and creating projects to products. That is why I decided to found my company, 7Pictures, to help them,” Jeon explained. The company’s prior mission was to introduce seven pictures a week, hence its name, 7Pictures. However, Jeon developed his idea into an internet fundraising platform for artists. 7Pictures won first prize in last year’s HYU startup competition. “Art is appealing because it freely expresses opinions from everyday life- money to political authority and so on. This is done in a beautiful and charming way, too. The way that art portrays life makes us think and change the way we view the world,” Jeon clarified. His dream is to encourage more people to become interested in art and help artists arrange much-needed funds. “Because money is donated and the art projects are advertised through SNS, it becomes easier for Korean and other Asian artists to make themselves well-known overseas,” Jeon mentioned. “Starting from small and attractive designer goods to catch customers’ eyes, I want to cover diverse fields, such as visual arts, music or even dance, in the immense world that is art.” Jeon believes that art expresses and changes viewpoints about life and the world. (Click on the link to visit the 7Pictures homepage. http://7pictures.co.kr/) Jang Soo-hyun luxkari@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Moon Ha-na

2016-12 26 Important News

[Faculty]New Leader of the Hanlim Academy

In the 21st century where science is becoming the touchstone of indicating the future, there are 38 National Academies of Engineering around the world, putting in their endeavors to vitalize scientific development. Out of the 38 academies, only 28 are officially authorized National Academies. Among them, the National Academy of Engineering of Korea (NAEK), also called the Hanlim Academy, is in the lead of scientific development. Professor Kwon O-kyung of the Department of Electronic Engineering has been newly appointed as the president of NAEK and is envisioning the bright future of science in South Korea. Professor Kwon is explaining about the significance of developing the engineering field. The Hanlim Academy and the promising future The NAEK, or the Hanlim Academy, is composed of 291 industrial CEOs and professors with authorities in the engineernig academia. Due to the popularity of engineering field and people's desire to enter the academy, there are 260 more candidate members other than 291 regular members. The official role of the Hanlim Academy is to map out the future of South Korea in regards to the engineering science field. Representative work of the NAEK is consulting and giving advice to the government about engineering and scientific policies. “The Hanlim Academy prepares the draft for policy plans every five years when the new government is ready to be established,” said Kwon. The main concerns of the Academy are increasing the possibility for job creation and augmenting the rate of economic growth from the current 4.5% to 9%. Kwon expects that the engineering field will contribute the most to augmentating the of economic growth of South Korea in the next few years. Also, the unification of the two Koreas is a major interest of the Academy, since ample resources and radical development in science will meet along with the unification in due course. Thus, the NAEK is currently researching North Korea's social overhead capital (SOC) in order to correctly identify how the two Koreas’ capitals are being established, and how the North Korean economy can be succored through engineering and scientific aid. “If South Korea is not knowledgeable enough about North Korea before the unification, it will incur disasters such as the spread of infectious diseases through North Korea’s peculiar living accommodations and ongoing chemical research. Thus researching about North Korea in advance with regards to unification is extremely vital,” emphasized Kwon. Key to a successful life Professor Kwon also accentuated the importance of living a well-regulated life and the willpower to achieve the goal of one’s life. Until this moment, of having become the president of the NAEK, Kwon has crossed many paths. Once he graduated from Hanyang University in electronic engineering, Kwon attended Stanford University for his Master's and Ph.D. degrees. He subsequently joined Texas Instruments, a semiconductor manufacturing company, at the process and design center. In 1992, many professors at Hanyang University solicited for Kwon's return for him to contribute as an educator and a scientist. However, when Kwon submitted his resignation, Texas Instrument turned it down every year. Even when Kwon came to Hanyang University to pursue his academic career as a professor, Texas Instrument did not accept his resignation for 10 years. Kwon has also successfully filled various posts in the engineering academia, including the president of Korean Information Display Society and the vice-president of the Engineering Department at Hanyang University. To the question of how he maintains such a successful life, Kwon answer was the "maintenance of a busy life and willpower". “When I decided to enroll in the doctoral program at Stanford University, I slept three hours a day and spent the rest of my time to study,” said Kwon. Even though this sort of commitment was hard to keep up, after about six months, he was able to maintain such a lifestyle for 40 years up until now. According to Kwon, a steady lifestyle is the key to success, and the will to study and learn more about the field is the most critical attribute to securing a rewarding life. ▲Kwon attends the NAEK forum (third from the right). (Photo courtesy of NAEK) Kwon's ultimate goal is to make Korea a country that is full of chances and competence. “I have always pondered about the Korean education system since I was a university student. South Korea tries to inject too many subjects into students' heads, and this will only result in lining them into a ragged line of test scores. Korea needs to become a nation where everyone can be the leader of each specific field, meaning that everyone deserves to discover what they are intelligent in, instead of studying a lot of uninterested subjects at once,” said Kwon. He is currently looking to achieving this objective at the National Academy of Engineering of Korea by reforming the education system in the field of science. Kim Ju-hyun kimster9421@hanyang.ac.kr Photo by Choi Min-ju

2016-12 19 Important News

[Student]Winners of 2016 Korea Interior Architecture Competition

On September 19th, the 28th Korea Interior Design Competition was held by the KCC architecture corporation and the Korean Society of Interior Architects/Designers (KOSID). It was an open competition for anyone interested in the field of interior design, but those who were handing in their work were required to be residents in Korea. Kim Hye-won and Jo Eun-byeol (both Department of Surface & Interior Design, ERICA Campus, 3rd year) won the grand prize in this year's competition along with Kim Ju-seok from the same department, who was unable to attend the interview. Q1: Congratulations on winning the grand prize! How do you feel? Kim: “Our team focused on communicating a lot with one another, and this was probably the reason why we were able to receive such a big award. We are still overwhelmed by the fact that we have won and we thank everyone who has helped us and supported us.” Jo: “This is one of the biggest competitions in the field of interior design, so we are very honored. We can never get used to being congratulated by people. We did go through very hard work and it couldn’t have been achieved had it not been for the professor and the seniors.” Q2: What was the concept of this competition? Jo: “There was nothing set in particular and it was supposed to be a free topic of each teams creating an interior design concept and making a model on the basis of that.” The Grand Prize-winning model made by Kim and Jo. (Photo courtesy of KOSID) Q3: Could you explain to us about your work? Kim: “We decided on the National Geographic brand, because they are known for lively, unique pictures, yet have a photo exhibition that is dull. We wanted to create a gallery for this brand and make it like no other. From the ritteri anemone, we got the idea of liquidity and brought it to our surface design. Because anemones tend to stick to rocks or other animals, these two different characteristics were to be harmonized together in our work. We wanted to make this National Geographic gallery set up by the Han River so that it serves as a place to rest and gaze at the photos at the same time.” Q4: How did the three of you become involved in the same team? Kim: “When we were in the second semester of our second year, we took the same course called Visual Merchandizing. Us three were brought together as a team and we had to do our project together for the semester. Jo suggested that we try out for this competition and we decided to submit our own project for it.” Kim (left) and Jo (right) explain the concept of their design model. Q5: What do you learn in the Department of Surface & Interior Design? Kim: “It is a combination of surface interior design, interior design and textiles. We learn how to deal with the fabrics along with designing. With this combination, we are educated to have diverse choices when it comes to choosing our career. Some of the things that we learn are the design trends, surface pattern drawing, textile expressions, furniture designs, including most of what is necessary when it comes to designing the insides of a building.” Q6: How long did you prepare for the competition? Jo: “About six months.” Kim: “Yes, since we developed almost all of our project during a semester last year, we had a rough draft of what it would look like. The night before we submitted our work, our professor visited us and encouraged us. We were able to carry on due to the support.” Q7: What were some of the things that were good and bad? Jo: “We were able to fill up the qualities that we each didn’t have. We were able to learn from one another through communication, too. We were kind of scared of our professor’s feedback on our work but we have learned a lot from it.” Kim: “I personally didn’t have any interaction with the seniors before, but through this competition, I was able to become acquainted with them. We had to do some unexpected presentations for people from time to time and we felt our skills improving every time.” Above is a 3D mass study of the model. (Photo courtesy of KOSID) Q8: How will you use the six million won? Kim: “We divided up the prize money evenly. Since we used about one and a half million won for creating our model for the competition, we had four and a half million won left. I've decided to use the money to travel to Japan, and use the rest for my graduation work.” Jo: “I gave the money to my parents.” Q9: Could you give a final piece of advice for those preparing for competitions? Kim: “Do not think that investing your money on a competition is a waste of money. We believe that it is all a part of experience. Since we invested a lot, the quality of our work was considerably better.” Jo: “If you believe that what you are doing is right and work hard on it, good results will eventually follow. I would also stress the importance of communication between teammates since that will reduce the uncertainties.” According to Kim and Jo, communication is a very important part of teamwork. Kim Seung-jun nzdave94@hanyang.ac.kr Photo by Kim Youn-soo

2016-12 18

[Student]Winners of 2016 Hanyang Newspaper Literary Contest

Writing is one of the most creative activities that humans can engage in. Authors portray their inner thoughts and the world around them through writing, which touches upon the hearts of many. On December 5th, the winners of the 2016 Hanyang Newspaper Literary Contest were chosen from numerous competitors both from Hanyang University (HYU)'s Seoul and ERICA Campuses. This week, News H met the winners of Korean poetry and written criticism fields, Lee Dong-won (Department of Economics, ERICA Campus, 3rd yr) and Kim Jun-sung (Departmnet of Korean Language and Literature, Seoul Campus, 4th yearr) respectively. The shimmering reasons of victory The Hanyang News Literary contest has a 49-year history that selects excellent student writers of Korean poetry, prose, and written criticism on culture, literature, academics or film. The two victors expressed their delight in winning and said that the contest gave them an opportunity to become more passionate about writing and think more about it. Lee commented, “I participated in the contest due to my interest in writing poems. I am grateful for the good results, and I plan to participate in more literary contests. As for my work, I got the idea for it when I was watching a documentary about the life of a man who produces salt in a salt field, and so the title is ‘The Old Saltmaker.’” Kim's writing, named ‘Psychoanalysis and Women’, is about how women are viewed in the academic domain of psychoanalysis. "This is also my final report for Women, History, and Media class. I am thankful for my professor, and fellow students who gave me feedback,” said Kim. He entered the contest because he was curious about how his work would be appraised, and the experience became a chance for Kim to write better. The winners of the 2016 Hanyang Newspaper Literary Contest, Kim (left) and Lee (right). Among all the contestants, Lee and Kim‘s work stood out due to their deep contemplations about their chosen fields, and their work that reflected their considerations. “I tend to lead people to think for themselves through my writing, rather than imposing my own thoughts unto the readers. I think that is the reason why my work was selected,” said Lee. ‘The Old Saltmaker’ depicts a day of an old man making salt. Described in a detailed manner, it gives the reader comfort and leaves lasting impressions. “When writing a piece of written criticism, choosing a theme and organizing the content in a consistent way is very important. Because I studied and applied a lot of theories to my work from academics such as Sigmund Freud and Jacques Lacan, I could write with less difficulty,“ explained Kim. According to him, there are some discriminating viewpoints toward women in the field of psychoanalysis. So in his writing, Kim tried to point out those points and tried to find the elements that still remain discriminatory. The meaning of writing Lee and Kim were interested in writing since they were in high school. Lee, praised by his teachers of his writing capacity, developed his abilities by entering various literary contests in those days. Kim had many worries when he was a freshman in high school. He contemplated about how to express his complex feelings, and started writing novels. As Kim studied diverse literary domains in his major, including criticism, he became interested in that genre as well. “I decided to go for the written criticism field in the contest because I gained interest in it during my classes. Through it, I can logically express and organize my thoughts,” said Kim. Lee and Kim’s hobby of writing continues on to the present. Their passion keeps them writing consistently in their daily lives. “I usually write diaries about two or three times a week, as well as short memos whenever I get inspired by something. I read them a few times to see whether those thoughts can develop into interesting pieces of writing,” revealed Lee. “I come up with ideas from books and everyday life. Since I like to write stories as well as criticisms, I find novels helpful,” said Kim. Lee studies vocabulary from dictionaries to improve his expressions in poetry. He also enjoys reading collections of poems, such as Mun Tae-jun’s Kajaemi (halibut). Kim believes in and tries to fulfill the need to read, write, and think a lot in order to write well. Kim and Lee are to continue writing in the future. Lee is to keep on writing poems in the future, and he wants to develop his own world of poetry. “I want to broaden and deepen the ideas in my poems. I also want to contemplate the problems of modern society through poetry,” Lee explained. Kim is to study psychoanalysis in depth, from Jacques Lacan to Slavoj Zizek in graduate school, and continue on writing. After that, Kim is planning to find a job at a publishing company because of his love of reading books. To Kim, writing is like searching for an answer to life’s complicated questions. For every authors and readers, writing is like a window that reveals the inner feelings, ideas, and thoughts of the writer to the world. As future writers, Lee and Kim are trying to open that window to confront life and the world we live in. Jang Soo-hyun luxkari@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Choi Min-ju

2016-12 11 Important News

[Student]Winner of the 2016 Campus Patent Strategy Universiade

University students can choose from a variety of off-campus activities to widen their perspectives or gain more experience in relation to their majors. One of them involves participating in various contests, which can push oneself to realize one’s potentials and abilities. Cho Soo-bin (Department of Materials Science, ERICA Campus, 4th year), who won the Minister of Trade, Industry and Energy prize from the 2016 Campus Strategy Universiade, shared her story regarding the contest and her dream. An idea that shone amidst the other 3500 According to its official website, Campus Patent Strategy Universiade is a contest that aims to foster a professional workforce with practical patent knowledge for various corporates. Being the 9th Universiade running, it was co-hosted by the Korean Intellectual Property Office, and the National Academy of Engineering of Korea. It was also sponsored by major corporations including Samsung Electronics, Hyundai Motors, and Posco. Participants are undergraduates and graduates, but the ratio of graduate participants is normally higher, as the contest requires a deep level of knowledge related to patents. Cho is posing for a picture with the President of HYU, Lee Young-moo, at the special awards ceremony at ERICA Campus. The contest roughly consists of paper examinations and presentations. There are largely two parts to the contest- prior art research and patent strategy. Both sections require students to submit their answers on paper. The due date was early June and late August respectively. Cho had participated in the contest for the third time this year. Last year, she won a prize of 6 million won with two other team members for the patent strategy section. Having accumulated more knowledge, this year, she applied to both sections and won 500,000 won and 10 million for prior art research and patent strategy sections respectively. This year, Cho prepared all the answers on her own. “As the required amount of research was larger than last year, I had to form stricter plans to prepare for the answers needed,” said Cho. Investing more than 10 hours a day The part to which Cho won the Minister of Trade Industry and Energy prize required her to choose one subject among those suggested by the Universiade, and to analyze existing domestic and foreign patents regarding the field. Then, a detailed report has to be written about promising research subjects, as well as the ways to obtain a new propitious patent. “I chose the question on display technology, which I was both interested and confident about doing. It was the subject I chose last year as well,” said Cho. Cho prioritized strategic planning the most in the preparation process. Display technology is one of the greatest fields of interest among corporations nowadays, as the rising trend of smart, self-driving cars’ main technology is the display. “I focused more on the software display than the hardware. I thought it would be more convenient for drivers to have their information displayed on their car window, so I suggested the specific technology and the way to obtain a patent for it,” said Cho. The progress of writing the answers for the questions was very challenging from its start. The implicative language of patents made the question itself complex to understand. After analyzing the questions, Cho pondered about the intent behind the questions. Cho thought it was necessary to refer to the examiners (sponsoring corporates) to satisfy them. As a result she studied more than 300 corporate-related articles and 5000 skills enrolled in patenting. The arduous process allowed Cho to successfully set the direction of the idea report she submitted as her answer. “Among a total of 167 pages of answers, I had to do all the research preparation by myself. It took me a lot of time to make powerpoints, which I am less proficient at. I had no option but to spend more than 10 hours a day for the contest,” said Cho. A step closer to her dream The contest rewards its winners well. One of the noticeable privileges is that winners are called to the sponsored corporates’ job interviews. In addition, winners can get involved in a community called Young Intellectual Property Leader (YIPL), which is composed of winners of past contests. “YIPL let its members have a quality time meeting up with CEOs and experts from corporates. I think such experiences are valuable as they cannot easily be done within school,” said Cho. One of the biggest reasons Cho chose this contest is because it is highly relevant to her dream- becoming a patent attorney. “I wanted to check for myself whether I am right for the job. Even though the work was hard and difficult, I enjoyed the progress of analyzing patents and writing reports about it. It made me feel that I am a step closer to my dream,” said Cho. Cho is currently on a leave of absence as she is studying for the patent attorney state examination. It was tough juggling the contest and the exam studies simultaneously. From now on, she will be focusing more on preparing for the exam to secure her future. Cho advised HYU students to try out more activities that can be done outside of school. Yun Ji-hyun uni27@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Moon Ha-na

2016-12 11

[Faculty]Expert in Public Administration Law

Diverse fields of specialization in law exist, ranging from administration law, civil law, penal law, commercial law to constitutional law. Professor Lee Ho-yong of the Department of Public Administration at Hanyang University (HYU) is an expert in the field. Lee had attended HYU as a student, receiving his Ph.D. in Law in 2001. Although he does have experiences teaching different types of laws such as police law or social security acts, he has found public administration the most fascinating. Lee has been a member of the examination board for diverse national examinations such as the bar exam. Q1. Why did you choose Public Administration despite having majored in law? Lee: “Public administration law deals with the intentions of a country. It regulates a country so that it isn't perceptible to unlawful acts. Administration itself is the action taken by a country while public administration law is what enforces administration in the way that law functions. I believe that public administration law meaningful in that it propells the country in the right direction. Through it, people can be compensated for what they have been wrongfully dealt with. For instance, let’s say that my driver’s license was revoked due to an insignificant reason, not under the appropriate grounds for such a revocation. Then I can claim for a restoration through this law.” Lee explains about his experiences of being a national examiner. Q2. You seem to have a lot of experience in being a bar examiner. Tell us more about it. Lee: “I became an examiner through the recommendations of other professors in 2002. There are diverse types of tests ranging from the bar exam, to civil service examinations. I have probably been an examiner in more than hundreds of tests counting the small tests as well. We used to have a system where examiners are grouped and stay together for seven to ten days with no connections with the outside world. We would hand in our cell phones and communication would be limited. Out of the question banks, we pick out a few question cards and make sure that the questions have no ambiguity. This takes as long as making questions ourselves. Then we would compare certain questions with other professors to make sure that the questions and answers are correct.” Q3. Do the examiners become acquainted with each other as well? Lee: “Out of the professors that do not belong in the same majors, we do hold meetings from time to time. Since professors from the same majors often meet frequently in conferences and societies, the meetings don't really mean much to us but as for examiners with different occupations, such as a judge, we sometimes get to meet and talk.” Q4. Can you tell us about the law school preparation class? What could be the pros and cons for the elimination of national bar exams and turning it into a law school system? Lee: “Around 100 to 130 students from HYU usually enter law schools, and their achievements are starting to gain more light. A lot of students go to better law schools compared to when I first started this law school preparation class. As for the bar exams, it's quite a sensitive issue. As of next year, bar exam would be out of use and law schools would completely replace the exams. "As for entering law school, there are three things to prepare for: LEET, GPA and English. Personally, it seems unfair to only have a law school system since a lot more people could have seized the chance to become a lawyer, prosecutor, or judge, but now there is only one way to become a national judicial officer- by getting into and graduating from law schools. The biggest problem is that this imposes a huge limit to those who obtained low GPAs during their university years. LEET or English proficiency tests could improve through a lot of practice, but as for GPA, students cannot recover from it unless they return to school for retakes. Although the intention of the law school is for the good of many, it seems to me that other alternative options should be left open as well.” "I have always dreamed of becoming a professor, and it took a lot of effort to bring myself to this place." Q5. Was it your dream to become a professor? What motivates you to lecture students? Lee: “Yes, I have always dreamed of becoming a professor and it took me a lot of effort to bring me to this place. I worked hard anywhere I went, since I wanted to be recognized as a hard-working person so that universities would ask me to teach at their place. Once you set your dream too late, it just makes you fall behind. Some students come to me after watching a few of my lectures on YouTube. They either send e-mails thanking me for the lecture or come and visit my office for advice as well. Close acquaintances with my students is what makes me feel proud. I talk to the students a lot and they come asking for help quite often. This is what keeps reminding me to be a good professor.” Q6. Any last comments for the readers? Lee: “You should never be afraid to reach for your dreams. Put your mind to it, as well as a lot of effort, into the things that you would like to do- not what others tell you to. People get to reach a certain status socially, but what determines your status is how much you have worked for it, not where you have started off from. Dream for what you would like to do and pour the passion and effort into it. That's what I think success is.” Kim Seung-jun nzdave94@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Choi Min-ju

2016-12 05 Important News

[Alumni]Exclusive Values of Interpretation

September 27th, 2016 was the first day of the televised presidential debate between Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump. Their dispute was broadcast and interpreted in different languages all around the world. Choi Hyun-jin (English Language and Culture, ERICA Campus, ‘05) is the interpreter who interpreted the debate for Korean viewers. Choi has not only interpreted all three debates of the US presidential candidates, but also aided famous VIPs, including prime ministers of Australia, Canada, Finland, ASEAN's Security General L. Minh, and various Korean ministers. News H met Choi to hear about the life of an interpreter, and the value of their work. Choi is a veteran interpreter who has worked in the field for seven years. The interpreter who translated Presidential Debates The US presidential debates were sources of great interest for viewers but they were intense battles for Choi, who was the one and only interpreter for every round of debates. “There was no time for preparation in the first round, so I focused on the main points and tried not to misinterpret,” she explained. Unlike normal occasions, there was no booth for the interpreters, nor soundproof walls or microphones available. Even so, Choi succeeded in this nearly impossible setting with utmost concentration, and was praised for her performance. Choi also participated in the lasting rounds of the debate. This time she could do even better because she had some time to prepare. She searched for pledges of the candidates, every world issue and news related with America and its politics, from economy, business, to climate change and Korea-related issues. After she was finished she herself felt great pride and honor as an interpreter, and she became known for her work to other translators as well. Climbing up to the summit of her dreams Though Choi is a professional interpreter, strenuous efforts were needed to become one. She first learned that there was an actual job of interpreting in her freshman year. ”I learned the concept of interpreting language in the teenage years I spent in Canada, because I had to aid in communication between my parents and my Canadian teachers. However, I never knew that I could be educated and thus be qualified to interpret in events such as international conferences, ” Choi said. Her professor and mentor, Lee Tae-young, introduced her about how she could enter graduate schools that teach translation and consequently become an interpreter. Since then, she decided on her career path as that. Choi immersed in interpretation work in her booth. (Photo courtesy of Choi) Although Choi was determined to become an interpreter, studying to be qualified for the job was very difficult indeed. “I studied two years at a specialized graduate school for interpreting. The work was so tough that I moved to a house near the school, and even studied during meals, ” Choi reminisced. Her endeavors surely paid off, because she passed the graduation exam and earned a Master's degree in interpretation which is necessary to become a professional interpreter. Now, her daily life consists of attending and preparing for big scale conferences and events from Monday to Friday. Before every occasion, she receives a thick packet of papers, containing information about the event that she has to learn beforehand in order to interpret well. “Language is like a baseline for being able to interpret. One should be equipped with the knowledge of what he or she would interpret, as well as being proficient in the native language, so that the content is delivered to the audience in the best way,” explained Choi. Choi (middle) translating during an ASEAN conference. (Photo courtesy of Choi) An aura of sophistication “Interpreting is not a job that stands out and shines. The work is more like a glow- I’m not the heroine, but more like a light that shines, or an aura behind heroes that always exists to do the job of brightening them,” Choi elaborated. She promised herself in the past to use her talents and skills to volunteer and help people when she becomes an interpreter. “Working as a translator is not easy, but if you like to meet global leaders and create a huge values for yourself and others, it is the job for you. The work really makes you want to improve yourself and pushes you to keep on trying. The work we interpreters do is simply a one-of-a-kind, ” Choi emphasized. Choi’s first dream was to become an interpreter, and the second is to teach students how to change one language from another. Thanks to the dean of her department she graduated from at HYU, she could procure the opportunity to lecture about consecutive interpretation (CI). CI differs from simultaneous interpretation in that the interpreter speaks after the actual speaker has finished speaking a segment. “I want to approach the field of language interpretation academically, such as obtaining a Ph.D. But also, as a lover of HYU, I would be in much delight to teach more of what I know if possible.” Choi's motto is 'an aura of sophistication', meaning that she wants to become a skilled interpretor who emanates a beneficent glow. Jang Soo-hyun luxkari@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Kim Youn-soo

2016-12 05

[Alumni]Dance as a Protest Medium

Professor Jang Soon-hyang is committed to combining dancing and protesting to build a proper relationship between society and manifestations of art. She received a doctorate degree from the Department of Dance and is currently a professor at the Social Education Center at Hanyang University. Often referred to as the “dancer of life, peace, and unification who always agonizes with the social roles of dancing”, Jang has been participating in numerous demonstrations and protests in attempts to bring societal reform. Dancing and the society When asked to interpret the societal role of dancing in terms of her experiences, Jang’s answer was equivocal. “I’m still looking for the significance and the specific role of dancing as a form of art in our society. One thing I can say is, if the dancing conveys a message that the audience could sympathize with, it will naturally attract more audiences. As for me, dancers do not always need to gain spotlight on a fancy stage, but rather, where their dancing is really needed is their appropriate stage,” remarked Jang. She added that as long as the dancer can express the connotations of their movements, the minimal objective is fulfilled. In 2005, Jang received an invitation from the Geumgangsan opera troupe, North Korea’s one and only performance group that travels abroad to perform, to learn South Korea’s traditional dance. Gladly accepting the request, Jang made contacts with the group and was surprised to find out that some of the members of the performance group were originally from South Korea. If dancing, along with other forms of art, could be the methods to communicate with people from different places, then the societal role of art would be to connect the subjects of social issues and the society. Jang noted that active participation in the society through artwork such as dancing could prevent them from being isolated and alienated from the national community, reiterating her point on the relationship between art and the society. Jang thinks dancers should be more concerned about social issues. Jang's past protest, objecting to the placement of THAAD in South Korea. (Photo courtesy of Jang) A socially conscious dancer Jang has been playing a vital role in resolving social issues in Korea, giving performances that implicate problematic aspects. One of the most recent activities she took part in was the 'Remember the 4.16 Sewol Shipwreck campaign', in which citizens infuriated with the Sewol ferry accident gathered at Gwanghwamun Gate to manifest their rage. Jang joined the group by expressing the people's fury by dancing on their behalf. In addition, she appeared at Gwanghwamun Gate again for the fierce demonstration for current president’s resignation. Since this affair continues to overwhelm the country these days, more people came to join the protest and appreciated Jang's efforts. “After my performance, one of the protesters gave me encouraging hug, expressing her melancholy about the situation of Korea. It was a very worthy moment, because from this, I was able to unite people with my dancing and they showed compassion in return,” recalled Jang. Jang protests for President Park's resignation at Gwanghwamun. (Photo courtesy of Ohmynews) Jang’s ultimate goal is to play a role in achieving the unification of North and South Korea. She hopes to see artworks, including dancing, acting as the constructive force that helps to build an interactive relationship between the two Koreas by reaching out and communicating bilaterally. “I want future dancers to be aware of social issues and try to think about what their role is as dancers within the society. Dancing is not only about being famous for one's beauty and elegance but also about carrying out necessary societal functions as a message conveyer,” expressed Jang. Jeon Chae-yun chaeyun111@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Kim Youn-soo