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2017-02 06

[Alumni]Singing Guardian of the Korean Gesang

Gesang, a German word meaning ‘a musical structure of a lyrical poem that acquired music’, can be created with any poems due to its unconstrained property of composition. A host of western gesangs are well known to a large spectrum of audiences, such as The Poet’s Love by Robert Schumann or Schwanegesang (Song of a Swan) by Franz Schubert. Despite the grand number and the beauty of many Korean poems, the Korean gesangs are neither well-known nor composed often. To spread the beauty of the Korean Gesangs, Jang Eun-hun (Department of Voice, '87), an alumnus of Hanyang University, took the lead for its betterment. Dynamic graph of life As a little boy living in an isolated countryside, Jang was unaccustomed to what made Jang today- music. All of a sudden, an opportunity came to Jang, when he began going to church, which was the only place with a piano in Jang’s village. “I enjoyed singing and playing piano at church when I was young. Because my village was mountainous, I strolled around a park every day, singing or mumbling poems that I knew,” recalled Jang. During his teenage years, he spent his days practicing and learning music in earnest at a mission school. When Jang applied to Hanyang University, he was selected as a scholarship student for the Department of Voice. “I never went to school festivals or parties, but I only practiced opera at school. Although I don’t regret it, I do reminisce the past and think that my youth should have been more reckless,” added Jang. However, his endless endeavors achieved results. After graduation, Jang was able to go to Italy to study music. ▲ Jang's passion for music began in his earlier years. Even after his four years at university, Jang thought that he still had an unnatural vocalization method. So, at the home of Vivaldi, Venice, Jang hammered harder with music. When he returned to Korea, his efforts paid off. Jang gained recognition in the field and worked as an established, eminent lecturer and a musician. “In my late 30s, I decided to change the route of my life. It was deep in my heart that the Korean gesang is a beauty, and that I had to disseminate this allure out for others to realize it, too." Because Korean history embodies emotions of sorrow, fury, bliss, and cherish, Jang posits that Korean poems written on Western manuscript would bewitch the audience, if popularized. Telling the world of the beauty in Korean Gesang To uplift the status of Korean gesang, there were two main checklists on Jang's agenda- improving the vocalization and composition of Korean gesang's structure, and building art halls to perform it. However, it was a long road for Jang to build two art halls without any financial sponsors. “My work is rare in our community, and I did not want to outstand from the beginning which may backfire." Jang started off by researching vocalization types that would suit the emotions and language of Korean poems. At last, he found that the Korean poems had stronger sense of emotions and soft pronunciation, which harmonize well with hymn-like melodies. Further, Jang also began to publish Korean gesang collections for children, so that gesangs can move out among all generations. Representative gesangs that Jang composed are Ouga (The Song of Five Friends) written by a poet called Yun Seon-do, and Nagunae (Traveler) by the poet Park Mok-wol. ▲ Jang composes melodies that suit the pronunciation of the Korean language, and strike a chord with the emotions of Korean poems. In building the art hall process, Jang, his wife, and two children became laborers and architects. For about 15 years, Jang and his family worked hard to design and build the halls and as a result, two Korean gesang art halls were created- Naeum Art Hall in Seoul and Korean Gesang Memorial Hall in Suncheon. “Both art halls offer stages performed by nationally famous musicians free of charge. The difference between the two halls is that one in Seoul was made for the convenience of musicians distance-wise, and the one in Suncheon was built to harmonize with nature,” said Jang. The Korean Gesang Memorial Hall in Suncheon, where Jang came from, is surrounded by mountains, Suncheonman Bay, and farms. “Surrounded by the beauty of nature, audiences can rest and immerse into Korean gesangs performed. I also decided to produce and host the International Korean Gesang Festival in the Suncheon Memorial Hall monthly, so that audiences may visit at any time they want for performances,” added Jang. ▲ Photo of Naeum Art Hall located in Seoul, Gangnam-gu. (Photo courtesy of Jang) ▲ Photo of Korean Gesang Memorial Hall located in Suncheon (Photo courtesy of Jang) The Naeum Art Hall has a special meaning behind its title. Naeum is an acronym for ‘love for nation, love for music’ in Korean (Nara sarang, Eumak sarang). In every step he is taking, there is a will of Jang to cherish Korean art. According to Jang, he is still on the move. ▲ Nagunae (composed by Jang Eun-hun, lyrics by Park Mok-wol) Kim Ju-hyun kimster9421@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Moon Ha-na

2017-01 24 Important News

[Student]Aspirations of a Prospective Technical Official

A civil servant is one of the most admired jobs in Korea. It is due to the fact that the job involves taking part in researching, making, and assessing national policies. In order to become a Korean civil servant, one has to pass the Civil Service Examination. The exam is notorious for its immense difficulty, with a very high competition rate. There are diverse fields and ranks in the job, and the one Jo took was the official deputy director's post. Of all the test takers hoping to work as a technical official, Jo Min-woong (Division of Mechanical Engineering, 4th year) not only passed the test but attained the highest scores among the examinees of 2016. Jo spoke about his study tactics and his thoughts about being a public official. For the happiness of the public Jo Min-woong (Photo courtesy of Jo) December 13th, 2016 was the day the names of applicants who passed the Civil Service Examination were announced. “I felt relief when I saw that I passed the exam. After that, I realized I was the top among all applicants. That had been my objective, but I couldn’t believe that it actually came true,” Jo remarked. “Even though I’m not perfect, it’s a great honor to receive such good results. Now, as a future civil servant, I want to try to contribute all I can for the development of Korea." Jo wished to become a public official because he wanted to contribute to increasing people’s happiness. “I did some volunteering- teaching high school students, repairing houses, and carrying coal briquettes for the needy,“ said Jo. One special experience of his was when he helped distribute free lunches to the poor on Christmas Day. Seeing 2,000 people waiting for their lunches on the cold roadside, Jo became determined to become a government official who could enlarge happiness for the public by developing policies that could greatly benefit them. Another reason why Jo wanted to become a technical civil servant was because of the dream that he could devote to Korea’s adjustment in the change related to the 4th Industrial Revolution, characterized by AI (Artificial Intelligence), Big Data, and IoT (Internet of Things). “Like Korea did in the 3rd Industrial Revolution, reaching 10th place in the world economy, I believe that contributing to Korea’s adaptation to this new paradigm is what I want to endeavor for in developing my nation." Effort not in vain There are three stages in the Civil Service Examination. The first stage of the examination is called PSAT (Public Service Aptitude Test), which assesses whether the test taker has the basic ability and refinement of carrying out government affairs. PSAT comprises of subjects called language and logic, data analysis, and situational judgment. The second stage tests how well one is equipped with knowledge of one's major. There are three compulsory subjects and one elective subject, depending on the field that one applied for. The test is held for five days, one subject each day, and applicants are to write their answers in essay format. The final stage is the interview. Held for two days, the test comprises of PT (Presentation), GD (Group Discussion) and an individual interview on public service values and job competence. “I began studying for the test since my sophomore year. I took a leave of absence to concentrate on studying in 2015, one year before the test.” The most difficult time Jo went through was when he failed the first stage of the examination in 2015. However, due to much encouragement from his family and friends, Jo could settle himself down to study once again. “I tried to use all my time to study, except the time taken to maintain elementary needs, such as eating and sleeping. The episode I remember most during the time I spent studying is last year’s seollal, or the Lunar New Year. Instead of going home to see my relatives, I had to stay in my empty dorm alone to study. Eating instant food from the microwave oven, I vowed to pass the exam in 2016 and have rice-cake soup with my family,” Jo reminisced. The folders of papers Jo organized while studying. (Photo courtesy of Jo) “I will receive training from May to December this year. Next year, I am to be placed in a department and start working. I don’t know where I’m going to work yet, but I want to work in the Ministry of Trade, Industry and Energy because it is the department where officials handle the real economy." When asked to give advice to fellow students who are preparing for big national tests, Jo said, “There is a saying that goes: ’Move forward step by step. There’s no greater method than this in order to accomplish something.' There were times when I felt anxious because I had a lot of studying to do in a limited space of time. In those moments, I tried to repeat this message over and over in my head. I hope this message helps fellow Hanyangians as it did for me in times of distress.” Jang Soo-hyun luxkari@hanyang.ac.kr

2017-01 23 Important News

[Student]Visualization of Movies in Written Critique

"Three films a day, three books a week and records of great music would be enough to make me happy to the day I die" is a famous quotation of a French director François Roland Truffaut. Jason Bechervaise (Department of Theater & Film, Ph.D. ‘17) is a man who fits in perfectly into this. With the passion and love for Korean movies, Bechervaise has traveled all over the world, and into an unknown territory in 2010. Who Bechervaise is Jason Bechervaise works as a movie critic at the Screen International. In addition, he writes columns for the Korea Times and the Seoul Magazine once a week. Bechervaise not only writes, but he also made appearances on the Arirang TV radio station, TBS eFM, and EBS radio, where he introduces Korean movies and a selection of Golden Globe Award-winning films. Although there is numerous work that he is currently working on, Jason says that there are special seasons when he is most busy. “The Cannes Film Festival, Bucheon International Fantastic Film Festival, Busan International Film Festival, Jeonju International Film Festival- these movie festival seasons are when I am the busiest. I not only write reviews about movies but also give critiques for some of them." Since Bechervaise started studying Korean cinema in England, he naturally considered about moving to Korea. “Although I could see movies in England, it was just not enough. I could meet people in the Korean film industry more freely as well,” he added. Bechervaise says that he used to hold movie subscriptions after having seen the “Memories of Murder”. Since then, Bechervaise started studying the Korean culture and history in order to understand Korean movies more deeply. His life changed accordingly. “I gained interest in those fields, started writing academic papers and essays on Korean films and studied more about Korea,” said Bechervaise. "One of the best things about Korean movies is the creativity." Life in motion Bechervaise says that there things that are chaotic in Korea which makes it a better place to live in. “I would put this country in three words: colorful, exciting, and energetic." In the UK, a kind of order exists that lasts a long period of time when getting something done, which makes things boring. In contrast, everything has to be fast in Korea. “There’s no country in the world that can be considered as being perfect. Korea's like my second hometown,” said Bechervaise. Although Bechervaise had a hard time and still finds it difficult to use Korean perfectly, his goal is to write his movie reviews in Korean as well as in English. Although Bechervaise prefers to watch Korean movies without subtitles for a better understanding of film techniques and storyline, historical dramas are still quite hard for Jason to understand without subtitles. “Most movie previews do not have subtitles, although there are some exceptions. I think I would get better at Korean as time goes." The biggest merits of Korean movies that Bechervaise pointed out were about how they convey social issues. “Not only the storytelling, but also the film techniques used by the Korean filmmakers are so creative." He explained that the mise-en-scene and the editing is portrayed in a beautiful way in Korean movies, which is something that can't be seen in other countries' films. “There are so many talented people that create movies in such a great way. It’s interesting to see how they portray social issues to the viewers so well,” praised Bechervaise. "I hope to write movie reviews in Korean someday." Bechervaise wishes to continue with his work in the Korean movie industry, and let more great films in the Korean language be known to the world. As they are exciting and always something to watch for Bechervaise, he watches about 250 films every year. With his adventures in Korea, and as a foreign Korean movie critic, film fanatics could do well to keep track of Bechervaise's movie reviews. Kim Seung-jun nzdave94@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Moon Hana

2017-01 16 Important News

[Alumni]Finding One’s Own Image

Personal color trend still continues in Korea. Personal color refers to the hues that would best match one’s natural colors of complexion, hair, and eyes. According to the color theory, finding one’s personal colors can help people discover their best-suited ways of tyling and makeup. While the concept of personal color originates from Europe, it is now very popular in Korea as well. There are an increasing number of people who would like to receive advice from professional image consultants as that can later make their shopping more cost-effective. This week, News H met with an image consultant from Hanyang University (HYU), Chon YeaSeul (Korean Literature, ’12). Life as an image consultant Chon was interviewed in a small yet very cozy and relaxing studio, ‘YEASEUL IMAGE’. “I started working as an image consultant since 2012 and opened up this studio in 2016,” said Chon. “There can be different services image consultants can provide to its customers. I focus on analyzing colors and the body proportion of a customer. Then, I would organize what I have found to tell what colors look best on them and what kind of styling of clothes and hair they should go for, which can greatly help them on special occasions,” said Chon. Chon is demonstrating how to find the best colors for a client. “My working days are from Wednesday to Sunday, which are the days when I meet with clients.” There are roughly four kinds of services Chon provide in her studio. It includes color consulting, color, face and body consulting, personal shopping, and makeup lessons. The first two consultations all start off from examining the best and worst color match for a customer. “I use about 50 to 120 color drapes to see what kind of color, different in its brightness, looks best to with a customer,” explained Chon. In a full consultation service, befitting to one’s body shape and ratio, Chon suggests specific shapes of glasses and eyebrows. Also, the styles of clothes and tips are given to customers. During non-working days, Chon focuses on market researching. “I wander around stores and test on new makeup products or clothes that I can suggest to my customers. I also visit different online communities to see what people like, and why they like it,” said Chon. From a crew member to a magazine assistant Before Chon started to work as an image consultant, she had some very unique and different careers. “I loved to be engaged in different out-of-school activities when I was attending HYU. I loved meeting new people and interacting with them and it led me to go on a trip as an exchange student to London. At London, I focused on learning English which allowed me to communicate with even more people and it was like the opening of new world to me,” said Chon. Such experience led her to spend a year prepare for a job in a Qatar airline. After a year of working as a crew member, Chon decided to move on and come back to Korea for a new challenge, being a magazine assistant she wished for since she was very young. “Unfortunately, I had to quit the job in the middle due to the internal affairs of the company. I was very depressed at the time what I should do in my life,” said Chon. Some of the failures at different magazine companies didn’t stop Chon from keep trying. She soon found out that a lot of the past crew members try out to become what is called a ‘CS lecturer’ in Korea, which refers to lecturers who give lectures at corporates with subjects like how to give proper service to its customers. “In one of the courses, there was a class called ‘image making’ which dealt about how to make oneself more attractive by combining proper colors and stylings. The class itself was very intriguing to me and I realized my past careers go along quite well to become an image consultant,” said Chon. Lessons at London Image Institute gave Chon the power to consult her clients with logic. (Photo courtesy of Chon) Continues to challenge New goal put her right into an action to become a qualified image consultant. To deepen her learning, she again went to London to take courses in London Image Institute. “I thought it was essential for me to go to the place where the concept of personal color is originated,” said Chon. For a month at London Image Institute, with famous Image consultant Lynne Marks, she focused more on learning colors. “At London, I kept practiced categorizing colors and styling different models. I was surprised to see that no two people have same image, everyone looks attractive when their charming points are most emphasized.” “I think all my different experience added up as a firm base to help me become a better image consultant. At the airline, I learned how to communicate well and treat people more kindly. As a magazine assistant, I learned how even the same products can give contrasting images with different settings, which are all needed qualifications for an image consultant,” said Chon. There is no settling for Chon, she is still dreaming and preparing for new challenges. “If given an opportunity, I want to participate in styling and image making for K-pop stars, as I always wanted to work for SM Entertainment,” said Chon. "I was more fearless because i had nothing to lose," said Chon. Yun Ji-hyun uni27@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Kim Youn-soo

2017-01 15

[Alumni]A Writer that Reads the World

“Do you know when you feel hunger the most? It’s not the moment right before you eat your food on the table. After having the first bite, that is when you feel hunger the most,” started Chun. Writer Chun, who graduated from Department of Journalism & Mass Communication recently opened up a Spanish restaurant called 'Table of Don Quixote' after having lived in Spain for her studies. Part 1. Being a writer Chun has started her writing in order to become a journalist and to let the world know about the stories that are yet to be unveiled. Due to her convictions in that writing for newspapers would do justice when it comes to unfair treatments that people get, she wanted to become a journalist. “I couldn’t keep up to the standards that have been set up to become a journalist and that is why I majored in literature again,” said Chun. After carrying out her studies in the field of literature, she naturally felt that it was just the work for her. “I would agree that writers actually write for a living, but I would say that it is more of reading the world and recreating it into one of the languages,” added Chun. She stresses that writing is about how she portrays the world that she sees through her eyes. “Back in the days when we were students, it was hard to even have a dream of our own. I have read probably all the books that I would read during my lifetime while I was studying literature,” said Chun. Since her dream was never set on being a writer, she says that she devoured the knowledge better and faster than others. “I had my hard times as well. I have always paid for my own tuition fees and worked in academies and publishing companies while writing my own novel,” she said. After 6 years of her studies in literature, she has started her literary career with the novel, 'Needle' which depicts about the characters that are actually around her. One of the most important things that Chun thinks when it comes to writing is being absorbed into the work itself and the characters until the she understands the person both on the mind and the body. Chun tells her stories about what it was like learning literature. Part 2. Being a cook “It was not only about being a cook but more of starting up a business. The whole process had to be chosen and I had to learn about all the interior designs to electric wiring to set up my own restaurant,” said Chun. She has always had her passion about cooking for other people and during a residence program at the University of Malaga, she obtained the chance to learn how to cook Spanish food. Although she started learning how to cook in order to be acquainted with the language itself, she later admits that she has got to understand the lives of Spanish people a little. “I learned how to cook in the morning and helped out as a teaching assistant for American tourist programs. At night, I did my writing once I got back to the dormitory,” recalls Chun. She says that she had one of the most comfortable and dreamy lives during her stay in Malaga. Her restaurant only opens up during the night time due to her fear of literature being further apart from her. “I used to open up full time but since I work on my own, I got exhausted during the weekends and didn’t have any time of my own,” says Chun. In addition to having an individual time, she says that it is the thing about the Spanish food that fits in well at night time. “There’s a lot of Spanish food that goes well with alcohol. ‘Serve little and more dishes’ is how you eat Spanish food which is why it should fit in better at night,” added Chun. Gazpachuelo is one of her favorite Spanish dish since it is a traditional Malaga regional food. It is hard to find anywhere else and Chun has promised her friends in Malaga that when they visit her restaurant, she would serve them the special dish of gazpachuelo. "Cooking is a part of the adventure itself." Chun wishes that she could write during her whole life time and stay awake. Enlightenment and adventure is what she seeks all the time and cooking is a part of the adventure itself. She also added that there was no better name other than 'Table of Don Quixote' in that it is the table and the menus that she is venturing on. As there are no guidelines as to where and how one should live their lives, Chun’s adventure is something that people could refer to. Kim Seung-jun nzdave94@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Moon Hana

2017-01 09

[Faculty]Developing Art Materials With 3D Printer

Of the 170 teams that participated in the 2016 Student Research Program, 17 were selected as outstanding teams that submitted remarkable reports. Teams from various schools partook in this program, each comprising of several students and one supervising professor. Among the 17 teams stands the group from Hanyang University: Jang Jin-ho (Department of Mechanical Engineering, 2nd year), Choi Ki-bong (Department of Computer Science and Engineering, 3rd year), Kim Jung-hyun (Department of Applied Art, 2nd year), Kim Hee-ryung (Department of Applied Art, 2nd year), Song Si-young (Department of Applied Art, 2nd year), and Yoon Yeo-jin (Department of Industrial Design, 3rd year) from Sungshin Women’s University. They were under supervision of Professor Hyun Eun-ryung of the Department of Applied Art. The six students and the professor shared their glorious moment with News H. From left to right: Hee-ryung, Si-young, Professor Hyun, Jin-ho, and Ki-bong. 3D printer and art material Children with visual impairment need special support and adjustment for educational content, materials, the environment, and teaching methods owing to visual disability. Art materials were created with a 3D printer, enablling children with total blindness or low vision to feel and get familiarized with space and shapes intimately and graphically. This is expected to aid their education and improve day-to-day life in applying the senses they acquired. As for children attending a school for the visually impaired, auditory-oriented teaching methods are implemented. The new teaching material made with 3D printers proved to be more effective, as students are asking questions that are deeper and more relevant to what they are learning. Students were notably engaged in the new equipment. Overall, the newly designed material attributed in promoting students’ better understanding of learning content. Image of Mona Lisa printed graphically for sensory comprehension. (Photo courtesy of the team's research report) Students sketching images by sensing 3D material. (Photo courtesy of the team's research report) Alliance of three majors The main objective of the team was to develop art appreciation teaching materials for visually impaired children by facilitating specialmodes of perception with a 3D printer. Specifically aiming to increase the sense of space by letting students touch 3D materials, the ultimate goal is set on providing the children with more choices for their lives—by building a connection between what they know and what they can do. Their background research included comprehending the current state of affairs regarding education for the visually impaired to navigate further research. This project could be interpreted as a significant confluence of engineering, art, and education, as students from these majors collaborated to carry out the mission. The successful result encourages further collaborative work of the three fields, as Hyun remarked, “Although we had a lot of difficulties adjusting schedules and gathering together, every task we carried as a team meant a lot, because we were all from different majors. The department of engineering and art are considerably distinct from one another, yet the convergence of the three brought a remarkable result. We learned that such fusion of dissimilar fields could produce valuable outcomes.” The team members are planning to participate in additional student research programs, extending their studies on the same topic at hand. As their background research indicated, they realized that education for the handicapped or impaired children is not well instituted, and is meagerly funded. Without funds from the government or corporates, the quality of education for the minority will remain low and primitive. Today's high-end technology enable people to do anything with intention. With this, Hyun and the students are planning to develop their project in order to upgrade education for visually impaired children. Hyun and the students are looking forward to participating in more student research programs. Jeon Chae-yun chaeyun111@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Moon Ha-na

2017-01 08

[Alumni]New Leader of the Korean Advertising & PR Practitioners’ Society

Many Korean students from middle to high school dream of becoming a righteous-minded advert maker after coming across public service advertisements. However, when they begin their academic career at university and face a grander society, their dreams tend to fade away and economic boon becomes the main goal of their life. In order to usher in students and prospective advertisement makers to the right places, the Korean Advertising and PR Practitioners’ Society (KCI) has been pursuing various projects and seminars for a period of 10 years. In the midst of those steps, Kim Bong-cheol (Department of Journalism & Mass Communication, ERICA Campus, '83), a professor at Chosun University, is determined to lead the Society on as its new leader. Values of society The Korean Advertising and PR Practitioners’ Society is differentiated from other advertisement-related seminars or societies. The Society distinguishes itself by learning and getting involved in the practical insight of advertisements, rather than studying and developing numbers of research papers that are sometimes full of logical fallacies and nonfactual theories. The KCI is composed of 500 PR (Public Relations) and advertisement experts from academia and business. “Mass communication and advertisements require not only educational knowledge, but also direct hands-on experiences, the Society maintains the balance of having educators and practitioners among its members,” said Kim. The Korean Advertising and PR Society hosts various contests and symposiums for the prosperity of the field. (Photo courtesy of Kim) The society hosts biannual symposiums and special seminars that cover new ideas and just, ethical methods of advertisements. “There are a host of projects designed and put into action. Two of these include academic journals published for the National Research Foundation of Korea and the Sarangbang sessions that call together university students in China to participate in the making of Korean tourism advertisements. They also include debates that discuss the future of advertisements,” explained Kim. Even though there is half a year left for Kim to become the de facto president of the society, he is preparing hard to lead the grand Society to the right path. Journey to the mass communication expert Kim emphasized the importance of both academic and practical experiences in advertisements. (Photo courtesy of Kim) When Kim was young, his dream was to become a consummate literary artist and to major in Korean language and literature. However, when Kim questioned himself of his gift as a writer, he realized that it wouldn’t bring much opportunity for him to succeed. So Kim decided to major in communication studies, even though he lacked professional knowledge or passion for the field. “I was a senior when I happened to apply for the Advertisement Research Paper Contest hosted by Jaeil Worldwide Incorporation- I received the grand prize. I felt proud and came to know my capabilities, which is why I decided to pursue a career in the advertisement field,” added Kim. After graduation, Kim worked for an advertising company in South Korea. However, adversity came when he decided to become a professor at Chosun University. “I got my doctoral degree in South Korea and I have never been educated abroad. In Korea, it is hard to be admitted as a qualified educator without any academic experience abroad. So, I thought that my effort will determine my future and I decided to write a host of qualified research papers and spread by work in many societies,” said Kim. His endeavor paid off when the fruit of his labor shined bright as a professor and the new president of the Korean Advertising and PR Practitioners’ Society. Kim is also the vice president of the Korean Advertising Society and a standing member of the Press Arbitration Committee. To the question of how he could stand so successful, Kim stressed academic knowledge that entails experience. “The field of advertisement and public relations can't be mastered with a ‘study hard’ attitude. It requires experience that expand the practical knowledge of binding academics with reality,” Kim professed. Although he feels burdened to become the president of a national society, Kim is ready to step up further. "Because the advertisement and PR are in close connection with social attitudes and trends, the economy needs to prosper in order for this branch to survive. Economically flourishing companies can support and utilize advertisements, so Kim hopes for a better economy for South Korea. “As an alumnus of Hanyang University, I was always proud of my school. Despite the harsh employment conditions that Korean university students currently face, I hope that they will always step forward with courage and anticipation. Enjoying what one does is the key to success,” concluded Kim. Kim Ju-hyun kimster9421@hanyang.ac.kr

2016-12 27 Important News

[Student]Flower Walls for Peaceful Demonstrations

The year 2016 has been a hard time for Koreans politically. Corruption related to President Park led Koreans to the streets to protest for her removal. In most sites where demonstrations were held, police were summoned to suppress the outburst. Violence inevitably occurs in protest sites, and there are cases where protesters aggressively collide with the police. On the other hand, in recent scenes of demonstrations, there was an idea to put flower stickers on the wall of police trucks as a symbol of peace instead of violent confrontation. The idea was thought up by an illustrator named Lee Gang-hun, and the project, named ‘Changing Car Walls to Flower Walls’ was backed up by a crowdfunding art company called 7Pictures. The company representative, Jeon Hee-jae (Financial Management, 4th year), was interested in the project, because he thought that it showed how art could influence society for the better. “By allowing people to participate in the creation of art, the project could really speak for protesters,“ he said. This week, News H met Jeon to hear about the works of his company and his viewpoint on art. Jeon is explaining about the 'Changing Car Walls to Flower Walls' project. Flowers for peaceful protests “The project started out from communicating with illustrator Lee through Facebook. We made contact and decided to carry out the plan,” Jeon explained. The fundraising was held in the way of crowdfunding, a method used by artists and social activists who need money to promote their works and projects, by asking the public for donation. More than one hundred artists cooperated in drawing and designing the stickers- through various means such as typography, illustrations, and messages. The result was successful. 30 thousand stickers were produced with the donated money. Soon after, the second project was held, this time making the stickers more detachable for the convenience of the police officers. Also, there were suggestions to use real flowers to decorate the walls of police cars, so the second donation included 90 thousand stickers with 700 flowers. Although the upgraded stickers were more expensive, the second fundraising also succeeded. People actively donated and voluntarily participated in decorating the car walls with the flower stickers during demonstrations. Jeon in front of the police truck decorated with flower stickers. (Photo courtesy of http://v.media.daum.net/v/20161212044252035) Art, an expression of life and the world 7Pictures is a company that aids artists through crowdfunding by introducing artists' projects or social activities on their homepage. Users can donate small sums of money, and can advertise a given product or project by sharing the information through SNS. “The 7Pictures website displays recent projects to fundraise for the flower stickers, including others like funding for a play about comfort women, who suffered as Japanese military sex slaves, and for the opportunity of allowing economically underprivileged children to visit an art exhibition,” Jeon said. Jeon became interested in art while actively working as a student director of TEDx, a conference for spreading novel ideas through lectures, held exclusively at Hanyang University. “Back then, I not only interviewed artists for TEDx events, but also met many people in the field of art out of pure interest and curiosity. Listening to their stories, I came to realize that artists needed money for holding gallery exhibits, and creating projects to products. That is why I decided to found my company, 7Pictures, to help them,” Jeon explained. The company’s prior mission was to introduce seven pictures a week, hence its name, 7Pictures. However, Jeon developed his idea into an internet fundraising platform for artists. 7Pictures won first prize in last year’s HYU startup competition. “Art is appealing because it freely expresses opinions from everyday life- money to political authority and so on. This is done in a beautiful and charming way, too. The way that art portrays life makes us think and change the way we view the world,” Jeon clarified. His dream is to encourage more people to become interested in art and help artists arrange much-needed funds. “Because money is donated and the art projects are advertised through SNS, it becomes easier for Korean and other Asian artists to make themselves well-known overseas,” Jeon mentioned. “Starting from small and attractive designer goods to catch customers’ eyes, I want to cover diverse fields, such as visual arts, music or even dance, in the immense world that is art.” Jeon believes that art expresses and changes viewpoints about life and the world. (Click on the link to visit the 7Pictures homepage. http://7pictures.co.kr/) Jang Soo-hyun luxkari@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Moon Ha-na

2016-12 26 Important News

[Faculty]New Leader of the Hanlim Academy

In the 21st century where science is becoming the touchstone of indicating the future, there are 38 National Academies of Engineering around the world, putting in their endeavors to vitalize scientific development. Out of the 38 academies, only 28 are officially authorized National Academies. Among them, the National Academy of Engineering of Korea (NAEK), also called the Hanlim Academy, is in the lead of scientific development. Professor Kwon O-kyung of the Department of Electronic Engineering has been newly appointed as the president of NAEK and is envisioning the bright future of science in South Korea. Professor Kwon is explaining about the significance of developing the engineering field. The Hanlim Academy and the promising future The NAEK, or the Hanlim Academy, is composed of 291 industrial CEOs and professors with authorities in the engineernig academia. Due to the popularity of engineering field and people's desire to enter the academy, there are 260 more candidate members other than 291 regular members. The official role of the Hanlim Academy is to map out the future of South Korea in regards to the engineering science field. Representative work of the NAEK is consulting and giving advice to the government about engineering and scientific policies. “The Hanlim Academy prepares the draft for policy plans every five years when the new government is ready to be established,” said Kwon. The main concerns of the Academy are increasing the possibility for job creation and augmenting the rate of economic growth from the current 4.5% to 9%. Kwon expects that the engineering field will contribute the most to augmentating the of economic growth of South Korea in the next few years. Also, the unification of the two Koreas is a major interest of the Academy, since ample resources and radical development in science will meet along with the unification in due course. Thus, the NAEK is currently researching North Korea's social overhead capital (SOC) in order to correctly identify how the two Koreas’ capitals are being established, and how the North Korean economy can be succored through engineering and scientific aid. “If South Korea is not knowledgeable enough about North Korea before the unification, it will incur disasters such as the spread of infectious diseases through North Korea’s peculiar living accommodations and ongoing chemical research. Thus researching about North Korea in advance with regards to unification is extremely vital,” emphasized Kwon. Key to a successful life Professor Kwon also accentuated the importance of living a well-regulated life and the willpower to achieve the goal of one’s life. Until this moment, of having become the president of the NAEK, Kwon has crossed many paths. Once he graduated from Hanyang University in electronic engineering, Kwon attended Stanford University for his Master's and Ph.D. degrees. He subsequently joined Texas Instruments, a semiconductor manufacturing company, at the process and design center. In 1992, many professors at Hanyang University solicited for Kwon's return for him to contribute as an educator and a scientist. However, when Kwon submitted his resignation, Texas Instrument turned it down every year. Even when Kwon came to Hanyang University to pursue his academic career as a professor, Texas Instrument did not accept his resignation for 10 years. Kwon has also successfully filled various posts in the engineering academia, including the president of Korean Information Display Society and the vice-president of the Engineering Department at Hanyang University. To the question of how he maintains such a successful life, Kwon answer was the "maintenance of a busy life and willpower". “When I decided to enroll in the doctoral program at Stanford University, I slept three hours a day and spent the rest of my time to study,” said Kwon. Even though this sort of commitment was hard to keep up, after about six months, he was able to maintain such a lifestyle for 40 years up until now. According to Kwon, a steady lifestyle is the key to success, and the will to study and learn more about the field is the most critical attribute to securing a rewarding life. ▲Kwon attends the NAEK forum (third from the right). (Photo courtesy of NAEK) Kwon's ultimate goal is to make Korea a country that is full of chances and competence. “I have always pondered about the Korean education system since I was a university student. South Korea tries to inject too many subjects into students' heads, and this will only result in lining them into a ragged line of test scores. Korea needs to become a nation where everyone can be the leader of each specific field, meaning that everyone deserves to discover what they are intelligent in, instead of studying a lot of uninterested subjects at once,” said Kwon. He is currently looking to achieving this objective at the National Academy of Engineering of Korea by reforming the education system in the field of science. Kim Ju-hyun kimster9421@hanyang.ac.kr Photo by Choi Min-ju

2016-12 19 Important News

[Student]Winners of 2016 Korea Interior Architecture Competition

On September 19th, the 28th Korea Interior Design Competition was held by the KCC architecture corporation and the Korean Society of Interior Architects/Designers (KOSID). It was an open competition for anyone interested in the field of interior design, but those who were handing in their work were required to be residents in Korea. Kim Hye-won and Jo Eun-byeol (both Department of Surface & Interior Design, ERICA Campus, 3rd year) won the grand prize in this year's competition along with Kim Ju-seok from the same department, who was unable to attend the interview. Q1: Congratulations on winning the grand prize! How do you feel? Kim: “Our team focused on communicating a lot with one another, and this was probably the reason why we were able to receive such a big award. We are still overwhelmed by the fact that we have won and we thank everyone who has helped us and supported us.” Jo: “This is one of the biggest competitions in the field of interior design, so we are very honored. We can never get used to being congratulated by people. We did go through very hard work and it couldn’t have been achieved had it not been for the professor and the seniors.” Q2: What was the concept of this competition? Jo: “There was nothing set in particular and it was supposed to be a free topic of each teams creating an interior design concept and making a model on the basis of that.” The Grand Prize-winning model made by Kim and Jo. (Photo courtesy of KOSID) Q3: Could you explain to us about your work? Kim: “We decided on the National Geographic brand, because they are known for lively, unique pictures, yet have a photo exhibition that is dull. We wanted to create a gallery for this brand and make it like no other. From the ritteri anemone, we got the idea of liquidity and brought it to our surface design. Because anemones tend to stick to rocks or other animals, these two different characteristics were to be harmonized together in our work. We wanted to make this National Geographic gallery set up by the Han River so that it serves as a place to rest and gaze at the photos at the same time.” Q4: How did the three of you become involved in the same team? Kim: “When we were in the second semester of our second year, we took the same course called Visual Merchandizing. Us three were brought together as a team and we had to do our project together for the semester. Jo suggested that we try out for this competition and we decided to submit our own project for it.” Kim (left) and Jo (right) explain the concept of their design model. Q5: What do you learn in the Department of Surface & Interior Design? Kim: “It is a combination of surface interior design, interior design and textiles. We learn how to deal with the fabrics along with designing. With this combination, we are educated to have diverse choices when it comes to choosing our career. Some of the things that we learn are the design trends, surface pattern drawing, textile expressions, furniture designs, including most of what is necessary when it comes to designing the insides of a building.” Q6: How long did you prepare for the competition? Jo: “About six months.” Kim: “Yes, since we developed almost all of our project during a semester last year, we had a rough draft of what it would look like. The night before we submitted our work, our professor visited us and encouraged us. We were able to carry on due to the support.” Q7: What were some of the things that were good and bad? Jo: “We were able to fill up the qualities that we each didn’t have. We were able to learn from one another through communication, too. We were kind of scared of our professor’s feedback on our work but we have learned a lot from it.” Kim: “I personally didn’t have any interaction with the seniors before, but through this competition, I was able to become acquainted with them. We had to do some unexpected presentations for people from time to time and we felt our skills improving every time.” Above is a 3D mass study of the model. (Photo courtesy of KOSID) Q8: How will you use the six million won? Kim: “We divided up the prize money evenly. Since we used about one and a half million won for creating our model for the competition, we had four and a half million won left. I've decided to use the money to travel to Japan, and use the rest for my graduation work.” Jo: “I gave the money to my parents.” Q9: Could you give a final piece of advice for those preparing for competitions? Kim: “Do not think that investing your money on a competition is a waste of money. We believe that it is all a part of experience. Since we invested a lot, the quality of our work was considerably better.” Jo: “If you believe that what you are doing is right and work hard on it, good results will eventually follow. I would also stress the importance of communication between teammates since that will reduce the uncertainties.” According to Kim and Jo, communication is a very important part of teamwork. Kim Seung-jun nzdave94@hanyang.ac.kr Photo by Kim Youn-soo