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2017-09 26

[Alumni]True Educator of Korean Arts

Always dreaming of becoming the best pansori performer, Wang has always pictured himself being on the stage, under bright spotlights highlighting his every movement ever since he was a student. Although he now performs on the stage, Wang dreams of something different. “We not only try to raise the students as artists, but as a person with righteous manners before being glamorous artists,” said Wang. From student to being a teacher Wang was the first student in Hanyang University (HYU) to have majored in Korean traditional song, pansori. Since it was the first year that HYU started the curriculum for Korean traditional music majors, there was much chaos. Wang recalls, “There was no pansori performer who could teach me in my freshman year. The curriculum just wasn’t ready at the time. Still, we did have some great professors from my second year.” Since Wang’s family was not affluent at the time, he could have stopped his career from his second year. “My teacher, Park Gui-hee took me to the Korean Culture and Arts Foundation and asked the dean for a scholarship herself,” commented Wang. "Overcoming diverse obstacles in life will lead to growth somehow." As Park was the mentor for Wang and a former founder of the National Middle & High School of Traditional Korean Arts, Wang was able to work as a part time teacher during his fourth year at HYU. “I didn’t have many classes to take in my last year at school and I had to do something to earn money,” added Wang. Right after his graduation from HYU, Wang was offered to teach at the School of Traditional Korean Arts as a proper teacher since he completed a course in teaching. “I couldn’t let her down. After all the things she had done for me,” commented Wang. Although he wanted to enter The National Changguk Company of Korea and perform as a pansori performer, the dream had to wait for a while. From performer to being a principal After 13 years of teaching at the National Middle & High School of Traditional Korean Arts, Wang finally got the chance to enter the National Changguk Company of Korea in 1999. “I always had that craving for performance inside me. Even when I was the teacher at the school, I would take my students to see the performances or go to watch it on my own,” chuckled Wang. Due to his talents, Wang has starred in diverse traditional Korean operas as the main actor and produced a lot of his own as well. After 15 years of performances, Wang returned to the school to as a principal. “I think I took my tests to prove that I was worthy of becoming the principal of this school. That is why I am so proud to be here,” commented Wang. Although he could have asked for better treatment of being a professor or to not agree to take the tests for becoming the principal, Wang accepted the terms suggested from the school to be proud of himself. Moreover, it was the school that Wang had spent his early career which made it more emotionally attaching for him. “I felt the necessity to return to this school to lead my students into the world of Korean arts. I would love to be the role model for them,” added Wang. “Since I have diverse experiences from the past to the present, I wish to be the type of principal that students can always lean on.” "I wish to be the type of principal that students can always lean on.” Kim Seung Jun nzdave94@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Choi Minju

2017-09 17

[Alumni]Peru’s Finest Dessert

Just as the conquistadors have set their foot on South America in search of gold bars, Pyo Ji-do (Business, ’16) has opened up his own dessert café in Peru and named it Mister Bingsu (ice flakes with syrup). Peru is known to be very warm all around the year that even in the winter, temperatures would only fall to 17 to 19 degrees. After experiencing Peru during an exchange student program, Pyo has immediately fallen in love with the country. Ice flakes where no snow falls In 2014, Pyo had the opportunity to live in Peru for a year during his exchange student program. With his mind focused on starting his own business, Pyo started looking for items that would catch the eyes of Peruvians. “They love ice cream due to the warm weather, but there were not a lot of choices to choose from,” recalled Pyo. Ice flakes with syrup along with diverse types of fresh fruits were what Pyo came up with immediately. “At the moment, we only have five types of bingsu; strawberry, mango, chocolate, cheese, and melon. We are planning to expand our menu choices later on,” added Pyo. Kim (left) and Pyo (right) taking pictures with customers. (Courtesy of Pyo) After returning to Korea, Pyo contacted his high school friend and started preparing to open Mister Bingsu. “We were planning to open up our business in December 2016 but due to the delay in paperwork, we were able to start in April 2017,” commented Pyo. As Pyo has experienced, South American culture always maintains its leisurely manner which was one of the hardships that Pyo has faced. “Sometimes, I faced problems with translating formal paperwork, but I was able to achieve all this thanks to my homestay family.” Success in Peru “Peruvians loved experiencing bingsu for the first time in their lives. We were able to become successful through TV programs,” chuckled Pyo. Right after 2 weeks of starting Mister Bingsu, Peru’s biggest national broadcasting team have filmed Pyo’s store. In addition, a lot of Peruvians have advertised Mister Bingsu through social network services as well. “I think we were quite lucky to have such great opportunities,” mentioned Pyo. Before starting up the business in Peru, Pyo studied about diverse bingsu while working in Sulbing, one of the biggest bingsu franchise stores in Korea. “A lot of the recipes, famous in Korea, could not be used due to the high cost. Instead, we decided to localize our menus.” Peruvians line up to experience Mister Bingsu. (Courtesy of Pyo) Pyo is preparing to expand his business all around South America. “We are receiving diverse love calls from other regions in Peru and even neighboring countries,” explained Pyo. Yet there are some obstacles that Pyo has to overcome. “Our sales dropped during the winter which is why we are preparing to diversify our menus,” added Pyo. As Pyo enjoys cooking from time to time, he has further wishes of opening Korean restaurants as well. “We are far from a success yet. We will work harder to spread our Korean culture and food.” Kim Seung Jun nzdave94@hanyang.ac.kr

2017-09 10

[Student]Being the Eye For the Blind

Staring deep into the horizon, a man was sitting by the sea watching the waves splashing against the thirty-foot cliff. Although this is not a sentence with diverse adjectives, people who have been to the sea at least once in their lives and have seen it with their very own eyes would be able to picture the scene quite visually in their own ways. “Because blind people are lacking one of their senses, they seem to be missing out on a lot of fun in the world, which is why we have decided to become the eye for them,” commented Shin Jung-ah (Information System, 3rd year). Team Hues, consisting of Shin, Sung Young-jae (Business, 4th year) and two developers from different colleges have created “Miris: Memorable Iris”, which is a device that enables blind people to hear the texts being read out into speech. Sung and Shin discuss the developments necessary for the Miris. Team Hues, light and hope for All Team Hues have already won grand prizes in several contests with their brilliant technological idea for its high degree of completion and marketability. Over 90 percent of blind people are illiterate in Korea, meaning that only 10 percent of blind people in Korea are able to read braille. Yet there are not so many devices that enable blind people to be able to read or study. Most of the devices are targeted towards the 10 percent of the literate blind since it is much cheaper to develop and is easier to do so through braille. What team Hues have targeted were those in the 90 percent majority of blind people who cannot read braille, although they could speak Korean. “It is very obvious that knowledge inequality comes from not the disability itself, but rather from the lack of developers trying to help blind people eager to learn more,” pointed out Shin. Miris is a small camera device that people can wear like glasses and connects with the earphones to let them hear the texts being read out. Through the text to speech (TTS) technology, the camera would analyze the fonts which would let the people “hear” the books they wish to read. What is more interesting is that Miris would have a bookmark system which would let blind people find the book they were reading, plus mark the pages that they have read. Through the RFID and NFC chips, the Miris sensors would scan the microchips and would react to the sensor. Since there are so many cutting-edge technologies involved in this one machine, such as image processing technology, OCR, the text to speech, and so on, Miris has yet to be commercialized as the miniaturization process has yet to be developed. As the team name represents, team Hues will continue to suggest new pathways of enlightenment for the blind. They believe true knowledge comes from books, even with the development of the Internet--and Hues is determined to bring a new dimension to the educational sector for the blind. "We would love to be the eye for the blind and help them read books." Kim Seung Jun nzdave94@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Choi Minju

2017-08 20

[Student]Being Suit-able for All

Under the motto of “better design, better fit”, Ahn Ji-soo and Shin Yo-sup (Chinese Language & Literature) have set up their designer brand, “SUITABLE”. After setting up the brand in 2015, it has expanded its range of clothes from tailor-made suits to ready-made clothes and this year, women’s wear is ready to be launched. Since co-CEO Shin was on vacation, News H have met Ahn to hear about Suitable. Passion for Fashion Ahn was a natural born fashion star who loved to stand out in front of others. “I had the most shocking look out of all the freshmen when I first entered Hanyang University (HYU),” chuckled Ahn. With his Afro-hair bleached white, Ahn was always wearing the trendiest fashion on campus. “I didn’t really join a lot of clubs but I did work with ‘Campus style icon’ finding the fashion icon of different schools,” said Ahn. Being such a fashion star on campus, Ahn was always the one to reach for advice before going shopping. “I remember being so proud when my friend turned up so cool with a nice outfit after consulting with me,” recalled Ahn. After graduation, Ahn and Shin were both accepted to companies that they have always wanted. “I was good at my job but somehow, there was this empty feeling after returning home everyday,” said Ahn. It was the passion for fashion that was missing in Ahn’s life which he eventually realized after two years of work. “Shin first suggested about starting this business and I felt my heart beating so fast,” recalled Ahn. Shin takes care of most of the promotion and planning of the business while Ahn is responsible for designing clothes. “I always contemplate deeply about one issue and it works the same for designing as well,” explained Ahn. Trying to create clothes that he wants to wear everyday, Ahn says that he is proud to be a designer. Ahn tries to provide styling tips for their customers from head to toe. Philosophy in business “We use the best quality fabric that we can find,” explained Ahn. Comparing fabric from all over the world, Ahn and Shin tries to use the best that they could find and it has led to better quality in their finalized products. With high repurchase rate, Suitable is the type of brand that everyone loves after experiencing the product and its services. “We not only try to sell just our products, but we also try to give the best styling tips and advices that would suit our customers the best,” said Ahn. Providing the pride and hope everyday through their clothes is what Ahn wants to achieve. “There are days when we are filled with pride when we wake up in the morning and feel like we can do anything. I want all my customers to feel that way when wearing our product in the morning,” said Ahn. Suitable also exercises a lot of corporate social responsibility in real life through making tailor-made clothes for the disabled as well. “It takes a lot of time and effort to design a different type of shirt from the scratch,” explained Ahn. One time, Ahn had to design and create the shirt all over for a disabled customer and it took over two weeks to make the final product that fits perfectly. “He later visited our office wearing what I made for him and it looked perfect on him. Filled with pride, that customer thanked us which was very heartwarming,” recalled Ahn. Having big dreams of expanding Suitable into a global brand, Ahn and Shin wishes to enter a bigger market. With their philosophy and work ethics, it would be quite sure to please the customers as they have until now. “I hope everyone feels the pride when wearing our brand Suitable,” concluded Ahn. “I hope everyone feels the pride when wearing our brand Suitable.” Kim Seung-jun nzdave94@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Choi Min-ju

2017-08 13

[Alumni]To the Next Victoria's Secret of Asia

“80 % of women don’t know their right bra size and face difficulty wearing it,” explained Kim. Sara’s Fit is a custom-made underwear brand that has been established about one and a half year ago and is gaining great support from a lot of women due to its comfortable and modern design. With its 24 different types of categorization method and one-on-one consulting with every customer that takes from half an hour to an hour, Sara’s Fit tries to deliver the right type of underwear for women. Challenges to find a career Although Kim’s initial dream was to become a professor, her dream has changed completely after experiencing exchange student programs in her junior year. “I started to realize that my dream of becoming a professor was to show off to other people that I have been diligent all my life,” said Kim. After the exchange student program, Kim was attracted to other programs that gave her more chance to interact with foreign countries. Still, even upon her graduation, she could not find what she really wanted to become. After graduation, Kim was studying MBA program at the United States, when she realized that there was a lot of start-up booms in the country. “People were not afraid of starting their own business. In Korea, start-ups were yet to be popular then,” explained Kim. Kim is explaining about the difficulties of finding her dreams. Through Kim’s memories of openness of people regarding underwear in the United States, she started to think that accumulating data of customers would become a huge industry in Korea. Since Kim did not major in fashion design, there were a lot to learn from the beginning. “Underwear design is a very secretive field with high entry barriers. It takes years to learn the critical knowledge since there are only a few designers that could make the right designs,” explained Kim. After recruiting one of the best underwear designers in Korea, Kim and her partner have established Sara’s Fit. “Sara seemed to be a very friendly name in Asia which we decided to name for our clients and the consultants at the same time.” Being the Boss Kim has experienced diverse types of careers from MBA, Samsung SDS to KOTRA after graduation. “There was little that an employee could do in terms of making decisions although there were some good things about belonging in such a huge corporation,” recalled Kim. Since Kim has to take care of the funding to expenditure, there is a lot at stake which gives her the motivation and responsibility at the same time. Algorithms that match customers to their perfect-fit underwear is on its way to put to action. Investments are also on its way. Kim has the dream of making Sara’s Fit into the next custom-made Victoria’s Secret of Asia. “Europe and America has a huge market of custom-made underwear. Asia, however, is on its way of developing at the moment,” added Kim. Expanding to overseas market would be the next step for Sara’s Fit. “It’s all planned out at the moment and we are on our way to open up different line-ups for customers of diverse age groups as well,” said Kim. Heartwarming moments exist when Kim’s customers with different body shapes return to the shop and thank her. “It’s not just what you wear. It’s how you wear it that’s also important and a lot of people don’t know it yet so we will try our best to provide the best for the customers.” Guidelines to how to use Sara's Fit (Courtesy of sarasfit.com) "We want Sara's Fit to be the Victoria's Secret of Asia." (Courtesy of Kim) Kim Seung-jun nzdave94@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Kim Youn-soo

2017-07 17

[Student]Future Leader of Environmental Studies

Some people are lucky enough to find what they would like to do in the near future during their studies at university. Kim Tae-hong (Earth Resources and Environmental Engineering, Doctoral Program) is one of the lucky ones to be able to set his career plans and continue to be successful in his field, environmental engineering. As one of the co-author of the book “Integrative Understanding of Shale Gas Reservoirs” along with professor Lee Kun-sang (Department of Earth Resources and Environmental Engineering), Kim is already being recognized as one of the future leaders in the field. How it all started After Kim has finished writing his second research paper on methods to extract shale gas, Springer publisher, one of the biggest publishers worldwide, has offered Kim and professor Lee to write a book about shale gas. “In the United States, studies about shale gas was starting to catch fire and I was lucky to flow with the wave,” said Kim. Encountering such a huge opportunity was unexpected. “It’s such a new type of study and something uncommon in Korea. The field itself was full of uncertainty,” recalled Kim. The book itself is not only being sold in hard copies but E-book versions as well and about 2,300 copies have been sold so far. It could be viewed as an extended version of the research paper since it is where it all stemmed from. “There are not many specialists in this field of area and especially in Korea, it was all so new for us. We had to strive to find any information possible,” explained Kim. Kim has been studying this field of expertise for about ten years with the help of professor Lee. Although it has been hard work for them, Kim recalls the process of learning being filled with excitement in being the future specialist in the field. Kim recalls being filled with joy when he was offered to publish the book. There has been a lot of support for Kim from diverse research foundations which greatly helped him to continue his research. “I was able to study in the United States with the help of financial support that we were able to get. We sent many proposals and we were lucky enough to be the chosen a lot of the times,” said Kim. His latest research paper written with professor Lee in Applied Energy journal is being rated at 5.7 on the scale of impact factor, which means that in every research paper he writes, it is being quoted in 5.7 research papers by others. “Nature is about 30 to 40 and although it depends on the field of study, my paper is being quite highly quoted in our studies,” explained Kim. Current status and Future goals Kim and Lee’s research focuses on injecting CO2 into the shale reservoir, which is a very tight sedimentary rock. To simply put it, CO2 increases the pressure into the methane gas while CO2 resides in the shale also known as the carbon capture and storage (CCS) method. It is economically and environmentally beneficial in that CO2 is reduced from the air and is used to extract shale gas more than the old method. Kim and Lee are still working on the shale gas and developing the CCS method into a more accurate model. “A new project has been given from the national institute to study deeper about the CCS method to make it more economically beneficial which is what I am focusing on the most nowadays,” explained Kim. Kim wishes to study further about this field of study in the future at research centers. Since there are not much environmental factors that Korea could rely on as a stable type of fuel, shale gas is something that Korea should put more focus on.“Korea has a bad outlook regarding resource development and it seems right to me that there should be more research and development in this field to prepare for the future,” suggested Kim. As for the future researchers of Hanyang University, Kim advises them to have high hopes about what they enjoy learning about. “Someday, the lucky chance would come towards us and I prepared hard to own this moment which has resulted in this output I guess,” concluded Kim. Bright future lies ahead of Kim as a researcher. Kim Seung-jun nzdave94@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Kim Youn-soo

2017-07 01

[Student]Winners of 2017 Robofest Vision Centric Challenge

Robofest is a renowned robot competition that has started from 2000. Hosted by Lawrence Technological University in the United States, over 20,000 people have competed from 14 different countries in the last 17 years. Bae Jong-hak and Yoo Ho-yeon (Robot Engineering, 3rd year) have worked together as a team in 2017 Robofest that was held from June 1st to 3rd in Florida, and won the Vision Centric Challenge. Back to back winners Team Linker, consisted of Bae and Yoo have won the 2016 Robofest last year as well. It is the same competition with different rules. “They host the competition in the U.S. in June, while in Korea, it is held in October,” explained Bae. This time, Bae had the full support from the Department of Robot Engineering. “Our department has generously provided us with the opportunity to travel to the U.S. for free and also helped us out with the materials needed to create the robots as well. Special thanks to professor Han Jae-kwon for helping us out with the robots,” added Bae. Yoo (with the robot), Han (middle), and Bae (with the trophy) are smiling in front of the camera. Team Linker has received such a good feedback thanks to the internal software of their robot. The objective of the competition was the robot to perceive the numbers and equations through the camera and eventually reach a certain result out of it. “We put a lot of effort on the software so that when the robot gets stuck with the equations, it could move back a little instead of standing there still,” said Bae. He explained that Team Linker has prepared for the competition for 3 months and it took about one month to create the robot. “ Software of the robot took longer for us because it was more important than the hardware.” "It has been a privilege for us to participate in the competition." I – Robot After studying one more year to retake the college entrance examination, Bae found his interests in creating robots. “One of my childhood dream was to create a robot on my own,” recalled Bae. He explained that Department of Robot Engineering would be a perfect fit for those not interested in particular field of study. Since robotics requires knowledge from diverse fields, students are able to acquire engineering skills that could be applied in any type of studies. “We learn about diverse types of integrated studies and then move on focus on a certain field that catches your attention. For me, it was image recognition. I gained more interest after studying it during the competition,” said Bae. Bae wishes to create robots similar to Jarvis. In the future, Bae wishes to study more about the robots and image recognition in graduate school. “I see a lot of possibilities from the robots in that we could have a better future with them,” commented Bae. He wishes to create a home robot that would be able to handle useful tasks like Jarvis from Iron man. Bright future seems to lie in front of the winners of Robofest Vision Centric Challenge. Kim Seung-jun nzdave94@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Kim Youn-soo

2017-04 10

[Student]Marathon, Veni, Vidi, Vici!

“At least I ran all the way” is a famous quote by Murakami Haruki, a famous novelist who gets motivated to write through running. Moon Sam-sung (Department of Sports Industry, 4th year) is also a runner who doesn't believe in quitting. Although he injured his fibula (a bone parallel to tibia) 5 weeks before the Seoul Marathon, held on March 19th, Moon decided to run all the way, and he won the Master’s division. Career as a runner Moon started his career as a runner at the age of 10. Moon was Jung Jin-hyuk's training partner for about 7 years. Jung is currently a marathon runner at KEPCO. Living ust a few meters away from each other in the same neighborhood, Moon was able to run alongside Jung, while holding to his dream of becoming the best runner in Korea. “My partner Jung has been the greatest gift that I could ever hope for. Thanks to him, I was able to win the biggest tournament in my middle school years twice in a row,” recalled Moon. The concept of a running partner is of great importance since partners motivate each other to reach their fullest potential and achieve the best in a shorter period of time compared to training alone. Moon remembers his childhood years as a runner. One tip that Moon gave when dealing with injuries was to never stop exercising. Even if you are injured, according to Moon, workout routines must be kept although not to your fullest capacity. “Your running ability will eventually return once you are able to train again. There is no need to be pressured mentally even though others may be training harder than you are,” said Moon. He claims that marathons all come down to mental strength after the 35km mark. “Anyone can train to run up to 35km. It’s after the 35km mark that people fail,” said Moon. He likens that stage as “not being able to eat anything for one week, being out of breath, and hammers being thrown on the legs with every step." Hard work pays off The 2017 Seoul Marathon was the first tournament where Elites (Korea Athletics Federation Runners) and Masters (Non-professional runners) started the race at the same time. Moon won the Masters division this year. Right after entering Hanyang University in 2011 on a full-scholarship, Moon quit his career as a professional runner due to a knee injury. After five years of inactivity, Moon started preparing for marathon running again last year. “Although people warned me not to run in this race, I wanted to try my best due to the hard work that I had put in my training sessions.” Moon, running in the 2017 Seoul Marathon. During his period of inactivity, Moon worked as personal trainer and recently started working as a coach at 'Bang Sun-hee Academy'. After completing military service, he tried saving up money for university by working as a personal trainer. “As I worked, I realized that I should eventually attend university and get a degree,” said Moon. He started running half marathons last year, and, in order to be ready for the full marathon, he had to lose about 10kg. “I prepared for the Seoul Marathon for about 100 days, and I was proud to win the race and prove my skills as a coach,” said Moon. In the first month, Moon trained on sprints, the second month on endurance, and the last month on both speed and endurance. Moon wishes to participate in the 2020 Tokyo Olympics. Although it has been a hard race so far, life itself is a marathon, and Moon plans on preparing for the realization of a bigger dream. “I want to participate in the Tokyo Olympics in 2020 along with my former partner Jung,” said Moon. With such vivid dreams, we have yet to await Moon’s next step as a professional runner. Kim Seung-jun nzdave94@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Moon Hana

2017-02 27

[Alumni]Collecting Coins as Investment

People have their own appetite for broadening their personal fields of interest. Kim Hee-sung (Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, '08) has been collecting money for over 10 years. A wide array of commemorative coins, gold coins, silver coins, and bills are all part of Kim’s interests and his collection business called Power Coin. Reporters of News H interviewed Kim to get a closer insight into how his money market operates. Gaining interest It all started off when Kim was in his first year of college. Having had the opportunity to live in the US for about a year, Kim had the chance to participate in various coin shows. These exhibitions were held quite often in most big counties, and at the time, it was challenging to afford collecting coins. “I was just a student then, and for a student, it's very hard to buy gold coins for leisure.” Kim explains about the market prices of coins. After graduating from college, Kim looked up on some of the coins that he had seen in the coin fairs, and discovered that the price had soared higher than when he first saw it. “This was when I realized that coin collection could be a real investment, and started collecting coins one by one,” said Kim. Through the civil engineer certification academy that he opened up in Busan, Kim was able to collect most of the coins that he had wanted. Kim and his wife could not stand the long distance, which is why he started his business in Korea. Fostering insight When going abroad or buying coins through eBay, Kim was sometimes tricked into buying fake ones. After accumulating experiences and learning the know-hows through books, Kim has now developed his own outlook on which are real, and are of more value. “Most people in this field don’t explain the reasons behind why a certain monetary product is an imitation. It’s probably their own know-how that they’re trying to guard,” he added. Kim claims that money auctions tell a lot about reading the market price. Attending money exhibitions that are held in China and Hong Kong also helps to realize the trend for him, as well. Various shapes and sizes of commemorative coins exist. Not all commemorative coins rise in value. Factors that determine the rise and fall of prices are popularity, quantity and quality. For instance, the 1988 Seoul Olympics coin was issued at about 85,000 won, but now it is being traded at around 70,000 won even after almost 30 years has passed. This is because it has been issued in such large quantities that it only holds material value. As for bills, the quality matters a lot. Even if a tiny part of an edge is worn out, the price would drop 10 to 20%. Kim also says that buying gold or silver coins is better investment compared to buying actual gold or silver bars. “Coins are a bit like limited edition items. The price of the materials themselves, plus the scarcity, creates the price. Gold or silver bars can be made in limitless quantities but not the coins,” said Kim. Studying coins are not only good for investment but also monetary insight. Kim claims that pursuing an interest not only in college studies but something beyond it, is more important. As Kim's interest in coins made it possible for him to become the CEO of Power Coin, Kim wishes that more people could expand on the area they like. Kim Seung-jun nzdave94@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Choi Min-ju

2017-02 13

[Staff]Foreign Student Ambassador to HYU

Living in a foreign country requires a lot more than being just curious. As Punt put it, “you must get ready to get out of your comfort zone”. From being a student to an employee at Hanyang University (HYU), Rick Punt (Business, Master's Program, '17) has accumulated numerous experiences here, having been an exchange student at HYU and now working for the school in taking care of the exchange students himself. Career at Hanyang Rick Punt first came to HYU in 2011 as an exchange student from the Netherlands. He discovered the Hanyang International Summer School (HISS) before the regular semester started. All Punt knew about Korea before he came to the country was North Korea, their nuclear weapons and other negative preconceptions. “I thought South Korea would be no different than third-world countries. I was shocked to see that it wasn’t.” Before he came to Korea, Punt read and analyzed the reports that other students had written on Asian countries. “I wanted to feel the Eastern Asian society for myself, and Seoul seemed to be the best,” he said. As his exchange student period ended, Punt grabbed the chance to work as an intern at HYU's Office of International Affairs. Punt wishes to help more international students adapt to Korea. After his internship was over, Punt went back to the Netherlands to graduate. He came back to Korea in 2013 and wrote papers on Hanyang University international promotion strategy. He is now in charge of HISS, the largest school program in Korea. Last year, 1,700 international students have participated and Punt currently promotes the program to universities overseas. Punt also deals with the winter school as well which goes on for one month. Having finished his MBA course and graduating this month, he is now a full-time employee at HYU. A multitude of experiences From an exchange student to an alumnus of HYU, and furthermore being a member of International Affairs office, Punt acquired diverse experiences during his stay in Korea. There have been special cases during his MBA program being the only foreigner. “I was always the center of attention and since the classes were in Korean, I didn’t have confidence presenting. Chinese letters were the most difficult part,” added Punt. During his exchange student years, he says that there were only positive memories of his friends from different countries, who have all been cordial. Through a lot of club activities, Punt was able to get along with people and learn Korean at the same time. Some of the work culture that Punt has experienced in Korea is quite different from the Netherlands. Other than the office hours, he says that there are times when his whole team works overtime. “If it was just me working alone, I wouldn’t have done it. The whole team gathering and eating food, talking- that’s the motivation that keeps me going,” added Punt. He says that the merits in working at HYU is that there are a lot more opportunities compared to other universities. “HYU provides a lot more events that shows the Korean culture. Some of my other friends that used to study in other countries later moved to HYU,” said Punt. "You must get ready to get out of your comfort zone." Having experienced the hardship of being an international exchange student firsthand at HYU, he knows the best about those students. Punt even takes care of practical things such as applying for insurance, getting a phone and doing online-shopping for international students who haven't quite adjusted to the Korean life. Punt wishes to open up all-in-one services that could make the lives of international students easier in Korea. There are no concrete future plans for him just yet, but Punt lives in the moment. "The work is good, the people are amiable, and I'm having a great time here- I don't know how long I'm to stay, but right now I'm enjoying myself enough." Kim Seung-jun nzdave94@hanyang.ac.kr Photo by Moon Hana