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2017-12 27

[Student]Ballerina with Love in Deed

“Ballet is creating a sculpture that is visible only for a moment,” says Erol Ozan, writer of Talus. There is a ballerina and a choreographer who is creating such beauty of moments everyday- Lee Ji-hee (Dance, Doctoral program). As a winner of a triple crown of Chungbuk Dance Awards, Lee revealed her stories and passion towards ballet and choreography. Lee majored in dance for her bachelor's, master's, and doctoral degree at Hanyang University. On the way to become a senior granting love Lee won three trophies in the Chungbuk Dance Awards: Solo dance, choreography, and group dance awards. “It was truly a great opportunity for me to contribute to the growth in artistic recognition of Chungbuk where a very minimum of support for ballet takes place,” explained Lee. Despite the glory that shines behind her, the journey to stand on the top in her field was not as easy and beautiful as others might consider. “Both of my parents loved reading books and watching ballet, as my mother even majored in it. With my genetic ability for flexibility and my interests in creating stories through ballet, I never left this field since my elementary school years,” explained Lee. Majoring in dance at Hanyang University starting 2001, Lee is now looking forward to receive her doctorate in ballet. “Professor Kim Bok-hee and Son Kwan-jun from Hanyang University helped me out to become a better ballerina and treated me like their daughter. Working as a main dancer for their ballet companies, I grew my passion in choreography too,” said Lee. In her third year in college, Lee had to face bitter words regarding her ability. Professors and other dance instructors often told her that Lee’s techniques may be decent, but are lacking her own color. “To find my persona in dance, I decided to overcome my meticulousness. I began travelling around the world and even encountered dangerous situations in Rumania, dealing with gypsies,” laughed out Lee. By accumulating a broad spectrum of experiences, Lee was able to discover various emotions and sources for her dance. “My capability to choreograph and express emotions in my dance was all augmented thanks to my professors. I want to become a senior who can help my junior ballerinas just like my teachers did,” said Lee. Lee is a ballerina and a choreographer who has recently won a triple crown at Chungbuk Dance Awards. Artists: turning stress into beauty Living as a ballerina and a choreographer at the same time is arduous, and sometimes painful, says Lee. Because art is not an everyday subject that people are interested in, the financial status of numerous artists is in an inopportune condition. “Facing the reality as an artist is sometimes extremely stressful considering the unstable financial circumstances and artist’s block occurring in the process of artistic creation, like choreography,” explained Lee. Despite the stress the Lee copes with, she also talks about the pleasure of termination and passion. “Even though it is difficult to create an art work, the pleasure it brings with termination is beyond the description in words. I think these feelings are the sources and reasons for my passion and work,” smiled Lee. Lee always knew that without passion and perseverance, one can never become an artist, and thus, she spent 17 years of hard work at Hanyang University to accomplish her goals. Lee's journey is still far to go, and she hopes that her juniors will also run for their goals like she did in her past. Starting next year, Lee is planning to perform in America and Hong Kong. However, Lee’s dream has yet to be achieved. “I never chased a goal in presence but only the dream in the future. Viewing life in a wider spectrum is important, and passion is the key. I know it is hard, but I hope my juniors will never stop running!” Kim Ju-hyun kimster9421@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Lee Jin-Myeong

2017-12 04

[Student]Touchdown with Your Passion

The Hanyang Lions have recently grabbed the golden championship cup in their hands for the 2017 KAFA (Korea American Football Association) Challenge Ball. The KAFA Challenge Ball is a national American football competition held twice a year during spring and fall for all university teams. With the players’ passion towards American football, the Lions were able to win the cup and also the long, solid reputation of the club. News H met the captain of the Hanyang Lions, Yum Joon-suk (Applied Art, 2nd year) to hear more about the journey and spirit of Lions. Yum is a captain of the Hanyang Lions, the oldest American football club of Hanyang University. “Experience American football, and you will be seduced by its charm!” The KAFA Challenge Ball is divided into the regional and national competitions. Since the Hanyang Lions belong to the Seoul region, the Lions first had to make it into top four teams through the Seoul Regional Fall Challenge Ball. “During the quarterfinals of the Seoul Regional Fall Challenge Ball, we were losing by a score of 21:0 in the first half. However, we did not give up and turned the game around and miraculously won by 22:21 and were able to advance to the national competition,” said Yum with excitement. Since it was a victory for the Hanyang Lions after 2012, all team members and their seniors could not hide their smiles. At the final match, the Hanyang Lions were able to taste victory with overflowing tension. “The most exciting part of American football is that prediction never works. Even though we were winning in the beginning, we were caught up by the opposite team in the middle. So, we tried our best and never lost a grasp of tension until the final whistle was blown,” said Yum. American football is divided into two parts- offense and defense. There are four roles that offense players can play which are quarterback, running back, receiver, and offensive line. Also for defense players, the three roles are linebacker, defensive back, and defensive line, all of which are options they may choose. “The charm of American football is that despite your height, weight, and characteristics, you can take at least one position that perfectly suits you,” explained Yum. It was the first victory for the Hanyang Lions in the national league in five years. Hanyang Lions and glory The Hanyang Lions is an official American football club of Hanyang University first organized in 1962. With its long, solid history, all graduates and seniors make great efforts to support the club. “Our coach is also a senior who comes to teach and help us, even though he has his own job. Our seniors love the club and their financial supports along with cheerful words really encouraged us until the victory,” said Yum proudly. Yum is a team captain who organizes various events to build more powerful teamwork and to promote the Hanyang Lions to other students. “Organizing events, helping out freshmen members to adjust, and promoting our club is my main mission. The field captain of our club sets plans for actual games and manages practice sessions at least twice a week,” explained Yum. The Hanyang Lions is composed of students from various departments. "We always have a camp training during the summer and meet at least twice a week to practice or hang out together, except for the exam period. Teamwork is the key to success in our club,” highlighted Yum. "I hope more students will be enticed by the charm of American football!" Yum’s responsibility as a captain of the Hanyang Lions will end in December, and new leaders and people will gleam the club next year. "I hope more freshmen will join our club and learn the beauty of American football and teamwork along with it!” Kim Ju-hyun kimster9421@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Choi Min-ju

2017-11 20

[Alumni]Flower Blossomed Belatedly, but Firmly

On November 7 of 2017, the Ministry of Justice has announced the final 55 successful candidates of the last National Bar Exam of South Korea. Due to the alternation in the way of selecting judicial officials from the bar exam to law school, the 59th National Bar Exam will be the last bar exam in Korean history. One of the 55 successful applicants was Park Jong-hyun (Law, '96), the oldest of all. News H met Park to hear his passionate story of his 15 year journey in becoming a judicial officer. Park is the oldest of all successful candidates of the 59th National Bar Exam. “The bar exam was my youth” It was Park’s 15th year of studying for the bar exam. When he found out with his wife and family that one of the crowns for the last bar exam was his, he could not restrain his overflowing joy. “I do not know whom to thank, but I am happy that I was finally allowed to achieve my dream at the last possible chance,” said Park. When Park graduated from the Department of Law at Hanyang University, he joined the army. When he finished his two years of military service, he married his wife and began his journey of passing the bar exam. “After my discharge from military service, I pondered upon the importance of law in a civil society and concluded that law is the bridgehead of the country which made me challenge the exam,” revealed Park. For 15 years, Park has regarded goshichon (area around Shilim-dong where people preparing for national exams live and study) as his home. Park’s studying pattern for the bar exam was organized and incessant. Park woke up at six in the morning to study at both the academy and the private group studying session. In the midst of studying, Park never skipped working out for 30 minutes to an hour. “This pattern was my life for 15 years and I was sometimes scared that I will not be able to get off this routine forever. At these times, my wife always stood by me, and I tried to cope with my fear because I didn't wanted her to see my vulnerability,” reminisced Park. Patience with dignity sees the light Park’s life motto is “Even if the world does not give me a chance, that is still my life.” With this in mind, Park always tried to patiently study and wait for his glory to come. “I thought being professional at knowing the world is one of the most imperative criteria in becoming a judicial officer. Thus, I sometimes worked at part-time jobs, and this also prevented me from considering myself a pity,” said Park. With such bright energy and attitude, Park tried to relieve his family and also root for his mates at the academy. “I think my family and friends at the goshichon were the main reasons that kept me on track, even when I had failed the second-round of the bar exam for six times,” smiled Park. Park’s attitude as a judicial officer is a Hanyangian ideology- “love in deed.” “I will know what kind of officer I will become only after I graduate from the Judicial Research and Training Institute. But, this is one thing I know- that I should be assisting my service even for the smallest part of the society,” emphasized Park. Beginning next year, the National Bar Exam is being abolished, and the law school system is being adopted. “I feel extremely sorry for those who tried out for the last bar exam like me. I am sure that they will be able to gleam light on their life, with other paths too,” said Park. "It may take a short or maybe a long time to achieve your dream. But, do not hesitate to follow your passion, and please do not give up." Park is now going to enter the Judicial Researching and Training Institute to learn which kind of judicial part he is best suited for. “I hope that all my Hanyang juniors will never forget the spirit of love our prestigious school stresses, and if you are truly devoted to your role at Hanyang and the society, you will be able to bloom your distinguished flower,” said Park. “Keep fighting with your passion and with your youth. Please try to remind yourself that youth is not about time, but about your attitude and heart!” Kim Ju-hyun kimster9421@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Lee Jin-myung

2017-10 30

[Alumni]Discovery on the Beauty of Imperial Wallpapers

Changdeokgung Palace Complex is a landmark of Korea built in the Joseon Dynasty and is currently designated as a UNESCO (the United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization) World Heritage site. The world has been captivated by the beauty of the palace’s outlook and Confucian values inherent in the architecture. However, one thing that all architects omitted was the wallpaper and its values. Chang Soon-yong, (Architectural Engineering,'72) has displayed his past collection of imperial wallpapers at the “Act Facing Act” exhibition hosted by artist Yeon Ki-baek to underscore the importance of royal wallpapers that are rare and novel to the architectural history. Chang is an expert in papering architecture study of Korean royal palaces. Time to restore dignity Chang has spent his entire life devoting his passion to architecture, especially in the royal papering area. The interest stemmed from his 1973 field investigation on Unhyeongung Palace after graduation. “I have read in the Joseon Dynasty’s uigye (royal protocols) that there were more than 70 different kinds of wallpapers used for royal palaces. However, the restored version of palaces these days only utilized hanji (Korean traditional paper made of mulberry trees) with no distinctive characteristics, and I began to wonder what the past wallpapers were like,” explained Chang. At the site investigation, Chang fortunately received a sample of a royal wallpaper about to be discarded. “I macerated the sample inside the bathtub with warm water and discovered that there are more than 10 papers stacked and repapered to forge plywood like walls,” said Chang. Chang’s passion for royal wallpapers was augmented as he carried out more site explorations. He received samples from Changdeokgung Palace Complex maintenance work and and Deoksugung Palace and researched the roots, papering method, and patterns of the wallpapers that were about to be deserted. “The most impressive discovery I found in the piles of paper dumps was the Yongbongmun pattern (Korean traditional pattern of dragons and phoenix) that was mentioned in the uigye, but has never been spotted,” said Chang. Chang's data on imperial wallpapers is displayed at Amado Art Space. Chang has always hoped that the Korean architectural society and the government would be concerned with even the small part of architecture--papering. He has been working excessively hard in the field to promote the importance of royal wallpapers, but the governmental authority has denied his efforts. “I realized that papering may not be considered vital for official authorities. But, this is a shame in that World Heritage palaces have anachronously monotonous papering after all,” said Chang. This concern has led Chang to allow artist Yeon to utilize his past collection to display the importance of imperial papering. Attention for the indifference In order to restore the dignity of grand palaces built in the Joseon Dynasty, Chang collected samples out of dumps in every field investigation he went on. “I was shocked when the government official visited my office for advice to reconstruct Changdeokgung Palace five years ago. He told me that he is going to paper the walls with luxurious silk, and I was startled because the Joseon Dynasty’s Confucian places emphasized frugality,” explained Chang. The moment Chang realized that there is a deficient amount of data on royal papers, he decided to create his own data on them. However, Chang had to face a tragic moment when he favorably provided his data to an official in charge of reconstruction of Unhyeongung Palace. When the repair was finalized, the official lost all the data Chang had lent them. “Out of frustration, I wrote how I felt about that moment in my diary along with my decision to collect even more data on royal papering,” reminisced Chang. Currently, the diary is also displayed at Yeon’s exhibition along with his collection of imperial papers. Chang's diaries are displayed at the exhibition. The left was written on the day Chang found out about the loss of his data, and the right is on the papering method of Joseon Dynasty. Chang has an unusual family history in regards to architecture. His father was a professor at Hanyang University’s Department of Architecture while Chang’s son is also an architect. “I can guarantee that my family has devoted our life and passion to architecture. I hope our efforts will pay off with the public’s attention on royal papering and their preservation,” said Chang. Chang is rooting for the youth of Hanyang University to believe in their path. “Sometimes, all humans feel that the path they're walking on may be wrong. But, when your walk is not rooted from money but from passion, it will pay off one day,” advised Chang for the students of Hanyang University. Chang’s collection and diaries are displayed at artist Yeon Ki-baek’s exhibition at Amado Art Space. Kim Ju-hyun kimster9421@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Choi Min-ju

2017-10 25

[Faculty]Imperial Ambition through Bird’s Eye

Imagine that a bird is observing the world while flying over the sky. The holistic insight of a bird’s-eye view displayed at Hanyang University’s museum may overwhelm the audience. A bird’s-eye view designed and drawn by Hatsusaburo Yoshida during the Japanese colonization is evaluated as a creative and fresh masterpiece of the era. However, professor Han Dong-su and Seo Dong-chun of Far East Architectural History Lab have discovered that the vast coverage and amplification of specific geography behind the bird’s-eye view may imply the colonial ambition of Japan. The exhibition <Japan Draws the Ambition on Bird's-Eye View> is currently hosted at Hanyang University's museum. Ambitious bird flies over the world Bird’s-eye views drawn by Hatsusaburo Yoshida contains not only the geography of Japan, but also that of Korea, China, Europe, and further America. “It is hard to exactly beg the question that the intention behind this bird’s-eye view is for the colonial purpose due to the different stance between Korea and Japan. However, Korea’s assertion can be supported by several historical and architectural evidence,” said Seo. First point of focus is the view’s extensive, yet unnecessary coverage of geography. “Unlike the early views drawn in 1913, the 1922 view created during the peak of the Japanese Colonization era is peculiar in that the view resembles more of a world map conquered by Japan,” said Seo. The 1913 view has a narrow perspective of geography focusing only on Japan and the surrounding countries, while the 1922 view has an enormous spectrum of the world in Japan’s interest at the time. Bird's-eye view drawn by Yoshida pinpoints several colonial sites with extreme amplification. Another aspect to pay attention is from whom Yoshida received requests to draw more than 3,000 views. “We thought that if we discover who asked for these views, it can help explain the intention behind the map. The investigation was worth it because the client was the Japanese Railroad Administration, the key organization of colonization,” said Seo. In addition, Yoshida himself has arbitrarily served in the war in 1940, which supports the claim. “It is also eccentric that Yoshida magnified specific locations and buildings in the view, which were vital buildings to colonization, such as the Japanese Government General of Korea or shrines,” said Seo. Complementary history and architecture Far East Architectural History Lab has hosted several architectural history exhibitions including this year’s bird’s eye view. “Professor Han’s ultimate goal was to collect as much data on Korea’s architecture for his junior researchers that have been lost due to numerous wars and colonization.” Seo has been working with Han for 15 years to create the central historical axis of the three East Asian countires- Korea, Japan, and China. “Korea has lost a lot of historical reference on architecture despite the fact that our forefathers built great edifices. To restore all the data and develop future architecture in the sense of Korean traditional style, we must approach architecture in the perspective of the entire far east,” explained Seo. Three countries of the far east have been in close relationship since the early history. Through long-time interactions, cultures were exchanged including architecture, and the lab suggests that Koreans pay attention to Chinese and Japanese culture by analyzing the past interchanges. “Historical background of Korean architecture after the Japanese colonization is sometimes depressing in that we had to lose all the great work of our ancestors. However, it is now the time that we build a new beginning cheerfully,” said Seo. “Architecture is not just a building that we live in or see. It embodies the history, sorrow, happiness, and memories, and I wish all potential architects of Hanyang will polish up this holistic perspective.” Kim Ju-hyun kimster9421@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Kim Youn-soo

2017-10 16

[Student]Hanyangian Ballerina Blossoms Korean Dream on World Stage

There is an old saying that “ballet is like dreaming on your feet.” Kim Min-ah (Dance and Well-being, the ERICA campus, 4th year) has recently become the dream of South Korea, as she won the 2016 IDO World Ballet and Modern Jazz Championship. It was the first time in history that an Asian ballerina has taken the crown of the IDO (International Dance Organization). Currently, Kim received an Invitation to perform at the IDO World Gala (social occasion with special performances) in Poland. News H met Kim to hear her stories on the life-long desire for contemporary ballet and further hopes to achieve. Kim is last year's winner of the IDO World Ballet and Modern Jazz Championship. Destined dream of ballet It was in her third grade in elementary school that Kim first became intimate with dance. “All of my school friends were learning jazz dance at the moment. So I followed the trend and joined the club,” laughed Kim. After learning jazz dance for three years, Kim was informed about the beauty of ballet. “Even though I was learning and studying ballet, I felt like I was playing and dancing to the music with joy. That is when I thought ballet might be my destiny,” explained Kim. Kim was a gifted child with artistic talents. From music and dancing to art, Kim had tried out a variety of artistic subjects. However, the one that always interested Kim was ballet. “All the other subjects bored me out, except for one--ballet. Since ballet costs a lot for lessons, I decided that this would be my goal to dedicate all my passion into for good,” said Kim. Kim's performance at the IDO 2016 (Video courtesy of IDO) Kim is now majoring in contemporary ballet which is a genre that incorporates both classic ballet and modern dance. Expressing emotions that Kim felt in certain experiences or events often becomes the main theme of the performance. Usually, the choreographer sets specific dance movements to the music. However, the three minute long gala performance is choreographed by Kim herself. “The piece that I will perform at the gala is about the Syrian refuge crisis. The picture of a small child bleeding in the midst of war inspired me to perform the dance,” said Kim. Hopes to popularize ballet Despite her young age, Kim has numerous magnificent, grand titles such as ‘first in South Korea’ or ‘first Asian winner.’ However, with her family and friends rooting for her, Kim is not afraid of the pressure. “When I feel down, I try to walk around the city and empty my thoughts. After reminding myself of how important ballet is to me, and how everyone I cherish cheers for me, I can return to my original position and continue practicing,” said Kim. The biggest motivation of Kim to pour more ardor into ballet comes from the improvement of her dance. “When I see myself improving through video clips, I feel more energetic and passionate,” explained Kim. However, Kim is also worried that contemporary ballet is not popular among the public, and she feels the duty to convey the beauty of ballet to people. “I think it is also my responsibility to excel at all ballet contests so that I can let more Koreans to be aware of the beauty in it,” smiled Kim. "Improvement makes me more passionate, and passion leads to greater development." As a senior at Hanyang University (HYU), Kim is now preparing for a new path for her future. Her current dream is entering a dance company abroad to learn more on ballet in depth. “I was the fortunate girl to find my talents at a young age. I hope all of my fellow friends at HYU will also find the right path and feel the joy in it!” Kim Ju-hyun kimster9421@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Park Young-min

2017-09 04

[Alumni]White Rabbit Guiding You to the Musical Wonderland

“Oh dear! Oh dear! I shall be too late!” mutters the white rabbit in Lewis Carroll’s book Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland. The rabbit eventually leads Alice down into the rabbit hole where the wonderland begins. Cho Chung-hee of the Department of Korean Language and Literature, is currently a jazz vocalist of the Band “Rabbit of March,” and a professor at the Department of Applied Music. Let’s follow Cho to the wonderland of jazz music! Cho is a solo jazz vocalist and also a leader of band "Rabbit of March." Fearless 20’s and music “I had no fear for my dreams in my 20’s,” said Cho. After four years of studying Korean language and literature at college, Cho made a decision to follow her heart towards music. “I always knew that deep inside me, I wanted to become a musician,” reminisced Cho. Once Cho made up her mind, she wanted to be told that this path is right so she sang a song in front of her senior. “Although my senior told me to give up on music, my decision was still firmly set," laughed out Cho. Without any support from her parents who wished her to become Korean language teacher, Cho began to build up her music career and worked for part-time jobs for living. “My favorite music was not fixed at that time. I explored for various genres and songs, wandered from time to time, and then found out that jazz is the one that I was looking for when I became 30,” explained Cho. Cho then was absorbed into the attractiveness of jazz. “Whilst my practice, my acquaintance suggested me musicians who could amplify the music together. Harmony with Hwang Sung-yong and John Vasconcello through our band has always been one of the luckiest moments in my life,” smiled Cho. Cooperation of the trio produced popular jazz music that opened up for the public. Jazz through “Rabbit of March” was no more a ‘league of their own,’ but a music everyone can enjoy. Song of Wind is one of the most popular songs by "Rabbit of March." (Video courtesy of Darichaola1's Youtube) Your roles in the cyclical life Cho is also a professor at the Department of Applied Music at Hanyang University, ERICA. Bearing responsibilities rising from various roles may give lemons to Cho. However, she rather enjoys the large spectrum of her life. “The job called professor taught be to become a better person before teaching students. Teaching requires my ability to know and explain from the very fundamental knowledge, which I was always unaware of,” said Cho. Her another dream is to become a performance producer. “Jazz was a hard music for the public to access, which I disliked about. So I want to design jazz performances that can be popular among people’s everyday lives,” explained Cho. Until now, Cho followed her own hope to become a jazz musician. “Jazz has no restrictions. Within a given frame of music, I can do whatever I wish to by playing with the rhythm, melody, improvisation, and more. However, this general audience might find such elements difficult,” said Cho. Thus, Cho wishes to create a jazz performance that includes intricate explanation of music to the audience and conversation between the audience and musicians. Within this, Cho can become an emcee, producer, song writer, and a musician. Cho encourages Hanyangians to find out their own definition of happiness. Cho is now planning to make jazz a present. “I wish my music can become presents representing four seasons for the audience. For example, when its Christmas, listeners can open the winter CD. Also, I want to make jazz music based on lullabies. I have so many dreams!” Cho says that it’s never cliché to tell others to pursue what they want. “Things you can do and want to do are correlated and cyclical. Look at me! I majored in Korean literature and it helps my music. I hope students of Hanyang will try out everything their hearts desire!” Kim Ju-hyun kimster9421@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Kim Youn-soo

2017-08 15

[Alumni]Voice Out Your Voice!

In the beauty of women’s pregnancy and infant care, there’s the sorrow of mother’s impossibility to return to their career. In South Korea, the issue of career break has been a hot potato, which commonly refers to a period out of employment for women to raise their children. Despite the fact that South Korea’s gender inequality is slowly, but constantly being assuaged, there are still barriers to overcome. Lee Jae-eun (German Language and Literature, '02 and Ph.D. in Educational Technology) is a leader of Women’s Life School who suggests the novel ways to view and resolve the problems women face in Korea. Lee is currently a CEO of Women's Life School to counsel and help out women with low self-esteem. As a mother, CEO, writer, wife, and a woman Lee’s college years were full of joy and love with her friends and a lover. However, after her graduation, she had to face parting words from many relationships. “I realized that the main reason why I was hurt so much by the break ups is my tendency to rely on others, just because I was a woman. So, I decided to amend this problem,” reminisced Lee. The first door she knocked on after graduation was a feminist magazine company. As her major had no connection with feminism, she had to appeal her passion to be employed. “I began with becoming a fan of the magazine by commenting on every article posted with the nickname of Ho-Ho Girl,” laughed out Lee. After a few years of working as an official reporter, Lee decided to become a writer to connect scholar feminism to cultural feminism. Then, her first book Women’s Life Dictionary, which is divided into seven chapters to guide healthy mind and lifestyle for women, become one of the bestsellers in South Korea. Its profit was used to found her company- Women's Life School (Click). “I began to have interest in counseling women from university students to married women to have courage. This eventually led me to major in educational technology for my Ph.D. degrees,” said Lee. Women's Life School provides counselling services for women in various situations and ages. (Photo courtesy of wlifeschool) Now, Lee is a mother of one daughter, wife, and even a professor at a Korean university. “Having many roles is arduous, I realized that distribution of time to each role isn’t that much important. Understanding the core philosophy of each role while not losing my own philosophy is the most imperative factor,” said Lee. Lee can be benevolent as a mother and a wife, acute as a CEO, and considerate as a professor. However, she still does not forget that the most important entity to her is herself. Not a career break off, but a career changeover In Korea, there are two words that describe the occupation of mothers- working mom and a housewife. This means, when a working mom gets pregnant and has to quit work either by maternity leaves or resignation for longer infant care, the working mom becomes a housewife. However, Lee points out the flaw of this dichotomous view of portraying mothers. “Working moms and housewives aren’t two different occupations, but coexisting ones. Whenever working mom wants to become a housewife for kids or the housewife wishes to work again as their kids grows older, the career changeover in this aspect should be cyclical,” emphasized Lee. When Lee first set up Women’s Life School, the social reaction wasn’t exactly supporting her. The concept of a life school has not been popularized and feminism was a difficult subject. However, Lee did not gave up on the hope that feminism could become a popular idea and women with low self-respect in the society could gain their courage. “Even in the research, women have lower self-regard than men in Korea. Also, when we do the survey, numbers of young women pick strong, strict female leaders as their role model. But, we all should understand that feminine style can also be strong,” emphasized Lee. Women’s soft and delicate way of talking and caring could also impact the world, and Lee’s ultimate purpose is to bring out this quality to the world. Cover page of Lee's newly published book When You Miss Your Career Again has pictures of blooming flowers and flying butterflies to symbolize the new life of women. Based on her four years of memories at Hanyang University, Lee advised the female youth at the campus. “Many female students often give up on their friendship for their love and GPA. But learning how to balance friendship, economic ability, and love can be the true success of your life!” Kim Ju-hyun kimster9421@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Choi Min-ju

2017-07 31

[Student]Cross the World, Hanyangians!

The last day of finals end with the submission of the exam paper and the break begins. Students of Hanyang prepare for their break in all different ways, while there are a few who are packing their bags for travelling. News H met the travelers of Hanyang to share the joy of their journey. America, the land of dream “Travel is an opportunity to broaden my perspective.” “My school club members and I planned out our trip to America together,” said Jang. Her trip route was focused on the western states, especially on Grand Canyon. “I had great experience at America because it had a marvelous nature gifted but at the same time, developed its own culture and expressed it through modern places like Universal Studio,” said Jang. Jang's journey became better together with her friends from school club. (Photo courtesy of Jang) Jang picks her journey at the Grand Canyon as the best moment of the whole trip. “At the Horseshoebend, I felt like I could literally die walking under the burning sun, but when I reached the Antelope Canyon, I was captured by the magnificent beauty of America’s nature,” reminisced Jang. Jang strongly recommends other students to travel around the globe, because the four years at university could be the last moment people are young and free. “When we enter the world called society and start focusing on our careers, we might not be able to take a trip whenever we want to. So, let’s have fun while we can!” India, the holy world of Ganges “Travel is thirst. No matter how much I travel, I need more of it.” “I worked and saved money everyday for this trip. It was worth it,” said Kim. In the first week, Kim enjoyed the hot sunlight of India with her high school friends. In the vast continent, Kim had to utilize every possible transportation for her journey. “First, we took Indian cab, called Rickshaw, which is simply a bicycle. But the drivers deceived us with the price which made us fight against him and be thrown out in the middle of the street,” laughed out Kim. “Then we tried taking regional planes, sleeping buses, and night train, which tired us out completely,” said Kim. Kim was a superstar at India. “Indians were interested in a small Asian like me. Kids and families came up to me for a picture and a handshake. I have never been this popular!” chuckled Kim. This popularity helped Kim to bargain for price at markets. “When the seller asked for the price, I claimed for the 10% discount of the original price, and they usually accepted it. Please, don’t pay the full price when you visit India,” recommended Kim. Journey at India as a girl was the continuity of tension for Kim. “The day I arrived at India, there was a news on a foreign woman getting raped near the Ganges. This alerted us to rush to hotel right after sunset and always be careful of our security,” reminisced Kim. For Kim, travel is the source of energy. (Photo courtesy of Kim) Making new friends and contemplating on her life on the Ganges river became some of the most precious memories for Kim. She suggests to take a ride at Chulsoo’s Boat on the Ganges. Chulsoo is a Korean name which a travel writer Han Bi-ya of World Vision entitled for an Indian businessman on the Ganges. “Witnessing how the life and death coexists on the Ganges threw me some philosophical questions. I could see people taking bath, washing clothes, and floating dead bodies for funerals at the same time,” said Kim. “However, cows randomly swimming across the river while inquiring myself of philosophy was also a funny moment,” laughed out Kim. Kim suggests other students to make a bucket list for travelling and conquer each item off during the college years. “I think being a college student is standing on a thin boundary between a child and an adult. Perhaps, this is the only moment we can question about the future and ourselves deeply. These questions are often answered when we travel!” China, the endless wall of magnificence “Travel is arbitrary suffering. Because it is worth it.” “Simply saying, I was lucky to have a friend to accompany with, because he knew a lot about China,” said Lee. Lee’s friend has experience of living in Beijing, which helped them to plan their traveling routes easily. Lee’s trip was to go through at the Great Wall, the Forbidden City, Summer Palace, and the Temple of Heaven as quick as possible. “China had the pro-working class policy which stabilized and lowered the public price. So only with the money I saved from my allowance, I didn't had to move around in a tight budget,” reminisced Lee. "Feeling the history of thousands of years in China was quite of an experience!" (Photo courtesy of Lee) Even with the cheap drinks and street food, Lee said that he sometimes was deprived of Korean food. “The unique taste of Chinese food intrigued me at first, but sometimes I was in need of spicy Kimchi,” laughed out Lee. He was also overwhelmed by magnificent architecture of China. “China is close to Korea and is cheap to travel around. I suggest to take a visit. Besides, we are university students who can legally travel twice a year thanks to break!” Kota Kinabalu, where sunset differs everyday “Travel is impromptu. It is the privilege of a college student.” “In the song of 10cm, a famous South Korean band, the word Kota Kinabalu came up and that was the sole reason I left for travelling,” said Park. His original plan was to take a trip with two of his old friends and enjoy various activities and hot sunshine at the beach. “Studying everyday is a dull life. So I decided to visit Kota Kinabalu with relaxing routes of stopping by one beach per day,” reminisced Park. Stopping by a beach and feeling the nature overwhelmed Park everyday. (Photo courtesy of Park) As a college student, preparing for travelling expenses was one of the nuisances. However, Park says that is also the fun of a spontaneous trip. “Since I’m just a university student, I was able to get financial support from my parents for this journey which enabled me to enjoy various activities like paragliding and skin-scuba diving at the Tanjung Aru Beach,” smiled Park. His suggestions for the travelers of Hanyang were to make sure that the public security and transportation are safe and try out as many food as possible. “Please try out butter dipping shrimps and chili-crabs, when you visit Kota Kinabalu!” Europe, the world of dream and adventure “Travel is a dream. Before travelling, I dream about the trip. During travelling, it feels like I’m dreaming. After travelling, I reminisce the trip like a dream.” (Photo courtesy of Chea) “I thought that missing this golden time of life as a university student would let me regret for life. So, I just booked for the plane tickets,” said Chea. Travelling in Europe where the public price is high wasn’t an easy decision for her. Chea saved money under one purpose- trip to Europe. “I saved money for a year by tutoring kids at academies,” said Chea. The price paid off. Chea’s 40 days at Europe became the memory book that she can open up whenever she feels gloomy. “I went to Europe with my best friend and we say to each other every night that even the chitchat at the hotel with chips and beer would be missed when we go back,” laughed out Chea. "40 days in Europe passed by like 4 seconds!" (Photo courtesy of Chea) Journey with her best friend taught her to understand and to share same, but special memories with her friend. “We planned out our daily trip a day before at the hotel, which was thrilling. Eating street foods whenever we were hungry or walking to a destination endlessly to save money are something only the youth would do. This trip will be the greatest memories of my 20’s,” said Chea. Chea also suggests students to prepare international student ID for various discounts and use EU trains to save money. In addition, eating street food of that country will let one feel its culture through tongue, she says. “My friend got her phone stolen at Barcelona while eating hamburgers. It was absurd, but we call it a memory. Even a theft experience gleams in my mind as a special memory!” Kim Ju-hyun kimster9421@hanyang.ac.kr

2017-07 24 Important News

[Student]Pitching Star Rookie

A small white ball rolled upon a 10 year old boy. Although the boy barely knew what baseball is, he started to have an interest in baseball by joining the elementary school club as if he was destined to. This was the outset of Choi Chae-heung (Major in Sports in Life, ERICA, 4)’s baseball story. Chosen as the only university student of the 2018 Professional Baseball Rookie Players by KBO (Korea Baseball Association), Choi is beginning to embark on his professional baseball life. Choi has been nominated as a first-year rookie player for 2018 professional league. Until the glorious day of professional nomination On June 26 of 2017, Choi was nominated as the professional rookie player by Samsung Lions, one of the top 10 professional baseball leagues. The nomination symbolizes the road to success for rookies as the KBO only designates the best players and professional baseball clubs scouts new rookies based on the nomination. On the list, Choi was the one and only university student to be designated. “Although this fortunate news enlightened me, the feeling of gratitude advanced my joy. I immediately wanted to thank to all who supported and trusted me,” reminisced Choi. Although Choi is now the talk of the town as a captivating left-handed pitcher, it was nothing like he never had frustrating moments in his life. He originally was a pitcher in middle school league which he was utterly absorbed into. However, when he stepped into the high school league, his position suddenly changed into a batter and a first baseman due to his body fitness. Because the throwing speed of a pitcher needs to exceed 100 km/h, Choi, who was relatively smaller than now, was forced to give up the pitching position. “Even though my position changed into a batter, I couldn’t give up on my dreams of pitching. Since I became pretty tall as 185cm and I’m left-handed, I thought I could set forth these strengths as a pitcher later,” said Choi. Chasing his goals, he incessantly practiced on batting and pitching at the same time. When Choi came to Hanyang University, his coach Kim Han-geun fatefully suggested him to change his position to a pitcher. “I strongly asserted to my coach that I need to become a pitcher, and he trusted me. Kim is my life-saver and I thank him a lot,” said Choi. Endlessly training, Choi is now the best rookie pitcher throwing a ball up to the speed of 148 km/h. Choi is playing at his last University League with passion. (Photo courtesy of Choi) However, for Choi who enjoyed the honor of one of the best high school batters before, this swift change came to him as a new challenge. “I had no idea how to even professionally practice pitching so I asked my beloved friend Lee Soo-min who is a professional pitcher at Samsung Lions and my high school friend,” explained Choi. To wear a crown, endure the weight When Choi was 10 years old, he suddenly got interested in joining the baseball club in elementary school. However, for a boy who never knew what baseball was, it was a though challenge. “When I first began baseball, I wanted to run away from it due to its intense training. However, I came back to the club after a month of escape because I was captivated to baseball,” laughed Choi. Choi’s childhood wasn’t wealthy which made his parents concern about his career. “My mother opposed to my baseball career due to its expensive costs and uncertain future. However, my father who always taught me to pursue what I want, supported me,” recalled Choi. Even when Choi's performance was in its downside ,being ousted at his first-year player draft of KBO, his father was there to support him. “I persuaded my father that I want to keep my career and I will do better at university. He trusted me and I really was drafted as a rookie pitcher at KBO in my college,” smiled Choi. As a professional player, Choi is looking forward his bright future. "I plan everything ahead in a yearly basis and I am hoping to stay at the premier league and be awarded as the Rookie of the Year without any injuries,” said Choi. For the plan, he currently is working on weight training to reduce chances of small injuries. “Because of the hard training intensity that I continued since I was a boy, I had to give up on getting good GPAs at university. Still, I’m trying to cover it up with better baseball capacity,” said Choi. Choi's baseball life is about to begin. Choi’s final goal is becoming a member of the national baseball team. “Being a role model will be something I would ever ask for as a baseball player,” said Choi. In Korea, it is common for baseball players to immediately join the league after high school graduation. However, Choi’s experience at Hanyang University strengthened his capability. “I strongly suggest junior players to come to HYU because coach and friends fully support and believe in each other. With efforts of personal training and ardor, I think HYU will grow you into better players,” suggested Choi. Kim Ju-hyun kimster9421@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Kim Youn-soo