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2018-02 26

[Alumni]For Africa, In Africa

What are some of the most common preconceived notions of Africa? You might likely think of it as a place of less development, fatal diseases, and torrid weather. However, people with analytic insight will say that it is a place full of potentially infinite development. Jin Seung-soo (Division of Mechanical Engineering, ’09), dedicating his passion in making Africa a better country, is a member of the African Development Bank (AfDB). Jin shared his story of working in Africa this week. Collaboration is the key AfDB is an intercontinental development finance institution whose objective is to alleviate poverty and improve living conditions in Africa, with aims to develop its social and economic status at large. Currently consisting of 80 member countries, 54 of which are African countries and the rest, non-African countries, the organization is staying faithful to its mission through supporting projects and programs that foster the economic and social development of the country. Counseling and financing for development, the AfDB provides grants, concessional loans, and non-concessional loans which are mainly used to build large-scale infrastructure and for economic policy reformation or empowerment. "In an international finance institute like AfDB, there are people from diverse fields of study." (Photo courtesy of Jin) Upon entering the AfDB in 2013, Jin is currently in the Republic of Cote d’Ivoire where the headquarters is located and is taking charge of developing energy projects for Eastern Africa. He is an energy finance expert, mainly responsible for leading the energy project financing. In other cases, he is a financial specialist who analyzes the profitability and economic validity of the finance project. When the African government or a private sector requests finances for energy projects, the AfDB’s sector expert supports them as a task manager and forms an appraisal team with specialists like Jin in addition to other specialists such as environmental and social specialists, legal specialists, and credit risk specialists. The team would then make decisions regarding the financing for the project. Taking a glimpse into Jin’s career in Africa, there seems to be little connection between his major Mechanical Engineering and his financing work. Jin accounted for this seemingly divergent career path: “since I was an university student, I was interested in other fields outside of the Engineering Department such as management and finance. I once took a course and studied plants, which triggered my interest in project financing. Being a part of the strategy for the planning team of Samsung C&T Corporation and Samsung LED, I added financial knowledge on top of my engineering knowledge. Then, I grew ambitious and wanted to use my competency to do something big.” Afterwards, Jin quit working in Samsung and got his M.A. degree in Business Administration from the Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST). Having studied both engineering and finance, Jin was eager to find the merging point between the two fields. He finally came to the conclusion that he would finance projects, which led Jin to challenge himself in Africa in a sequence. A project for providing clean water (Photo courtesy of AfDB) The potential to create greater impact With its growth rate exceeding that of the world’s rate, Africa is being spotlighted for development investments, displaying an infinitude of possibilities for development around just about every corner of the country. Working for and living in Africa for several years now, Jin has been witnessing the growth of the country while at the same time being involved in its development. “Currently, Africa isn’t a very stable country, which is why many countries are deterred from investing in it. In the case of Korea, it is maintaining its speculative stance toward Africa since it classifies the country as a risk. However, Africa has a very high growth rate and a strikingly low development level, which brings the effect of development to its climax,” commented Jin. As aforementioned, Jin’s job is to analyze the economic validity of a project as a financial analyst. He feels the highest sense of achievement when the project he financed develops into a beneficial one, both financially and economically. He recalled one of his most rewarding performances while financing South Africa’s Concentrate solar power plant project, where earning the approval from the bank was very difficult due to a profitability-related matter. Despite the fact that Jin was a newly recruited member, he was a big help in that situation. “It is always a very good thing to see people’s lifestyle changing due to the changes of development. Providing electricity to the region where there is no electricity, for example, would completely change people’s lives. Furthermore, the electricity could be used to further develop the area. Thinking about all the awaiting developments, it feels very gratifying and valuable. As an energy finance expert, Jin’s goal in the long run is to promote as much investment as possible and contribute in its energy development. Furthermore, he envisions promoting investments to Africa from Korea and building a bridge between the two countries and allowing Korean corporations to enter Africa. “For all the students who dream of working for the promotion of global welfare, there are three things to keep in mind: First, fluency in a second or even a third language and expertise in your field are indispensable. Second, experience is crucial. It is never easy to enter an international organization, which means that in order to increase your competency, having related experience could lift you up and serve as an essential background. Last, suitability and perseverance are required. A large institute is not a place you can get into right after graduating from school. You need a definite goal and supporting plans to eventually achieve your dream. Failure is not to be feared!” "Africa has infinite potential for development." (Photo courtesy of Dong A) Jeon Chae-yun chaeyun111@hanyang.ac.kr

2018-02 12

[Alumni]A Proud and Blissful Architect

“At the age of 85, looking back at my life, I am very happy and thankful,” began Yu. Yu Hi-jun (Department of Architecture, ’58) is a Hanyang alumnus and an emeritus professor who taught at Hanyang for 34 years. Having experienced, learned, and achieved a lot in his long journey of life as an architect, Yu has a shining story to share. An architect and an artist Almost every day, Yu goes to a coffee shop nearby his house alone and enjoys a cup of coffee for a good two hours. “I like to look back at my life to recall my deeds and ponder whether I’ve led a good life or not.” It all started with Yu’s hobby of drawing a continuous pattern on paper every weekend, which gladly and willingly imprisoned Yu in his room. Since he was in middle school, Yu unconsciously showed his talent in art. “One time, when I was a first grader in middle school, my teacher told us to draw a sketch of the school building. Afterwards, he would put every piece of work on the front board and let it be evaluated openly by all of his classmates. When he saw mine, he said it wasn’t just a mere sketch,” remembered Yu. From this and several other incidents, Yu began to discover his talent in art and architecture. There had been many ups and downs in Yu’s life before entering Hanyang’s Department of Architecture, such as being captured by the military troop, the Korean War on the 25th of June in 1950, and following months of starvation. Due to the war, Yu was not able to make it to highschool graduation. However, this did not stop him from going to university. During his years in Hanyang, his talent in drawing and architecture became more prevalent and outstanding that it attracted popularity and attention from in and out of the school. Eventually, during the days when going abroad to study was as rare as being nearly impossible, Yu went to America to extend his studies in architecture for graduate school in Iowa. He attempted to earn his tuition fee by getting a job in a design office. “When I was walking in Hanyang campus one day, I was determined to make Hanyang University a better school with my own hands," commented Yu. One thing that triggered Yu’s desire for studying further was the frustration he received when his professor frequently remarked, ‘there’s something great about this work.’ Yu was more than desperate to find out what that “something” was, which he quenchingly found the answer to after his research and studies in America and during his long years of teaching in Hanyang. The answer was brought to Yu by his accumulation of knowledge and skills as an artist and an architect. Building up on his talent, his hunger for studying and ambition for the future enabled Yu to overcome his past hardships, and that drove him forward. Having studied abroad, Yoo's fluency in English is not surprising. Built in the past, stands through the future “My philosophy in architecture is creativity. Regardless of the type of art, once seen, it should ring a pounding beat to one’s heart at the first sight. I was once requested to design a cathedral. After completing it, I imagined the situation where I had to put rows of mattresses because I was afraid people who saw it for the first time would scream and fall back,” said Yu, half jokingly. He revealed that his source of inspiration is his knowledge and all the theories he has studied. Yu takes a shower before starting his work to freshen up his body and mind. “The theories and concepts I’ve studied have become a great stimulus, and that’s where my inspiration comes from.” Being the receiver of the 21st Catholic Art Special Prize this week, Yu’s notable list of achievements goes on and on. Starting with the former president Park Jung-hee’s office, Yu turned out to be the one who designed the architecture of the Blue House’s (the Korean Presidential Residence) Reception Hall. In addition, after president Park’s wife had become deceased, Yu was requested to remodel her bedroom. He was even requested to design the office of the Minister of Foreign Affairs by the president. It was evident that Yu’s sense of architecture was at the level of wide recognition and appreciation, even by the president, so much so, that he was almost single-handedly responsible for such tasks. From designing several cathedrals to numerous buildings and from writing a number of books, there have been countless achievements Yu has accomplished in his life. Yu remembers the day when he was in a bookstore in Canada looking for books related to architecture and feeling inexplicably happy. He was so happy that he was able to study and learn and be who he was. His passion for studying and architecture has never seemed to dwindle. From December of 2015 to December of 2016, Yu’s private exhibition by the name of ‘Passion’ was held, expressing his happiness and thankfulness of his life. His passion and devotion to art and architecture will remain enthusiastic in his works. The Reception Hall of Cheongwadae, the Korean Presidential Residence (Photo courtesy of enacademic.com) Three of the paintings from Yu's 'Passion' (Photo courtesy of galleryro.net) "You need to discover your own path. Otherwise, it won't open." Jeon Chae-yun chaeyun111@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Kang Cho-hyun

2018-01 21

[Student]Melody of Sincerity

"How will you financially be successful in that path?" was the question Park got most frequently after becoming determined that he would become a harmonicist. Since he was a young boy, Park Jong-seong (Department of String and Wind Instruments majoring in Orchestra Conducting, Master’s program) had many opportunities to encounter music and learn various instruments thanks to his pianist mother. The one that enchanted Park the most was not the piano, the violin, or the flute, but the harmonica. Having studied harmonica and composition since high school, Park became a talented harmonicist player and song-writer who is dreaming of becoming a conductor in the future. The thrill of impressive touchingness Park first encountered the harmonica when he was in elementary school. He only considered the instrument as a good hobby and something he could have fun with, until his harmonica teacher suggested him to participate in a harmonica contest held in Japan. Park agreed to the suggestion and ended up receiving the grand prize, which brought his teacher to tears of happiness. “The teacher is someone who is so precious and valuable to me. He is a great person of wonderful personality who was so loving and dedicating. After receiving the grand prize and seeing him crying, I felt like I repaid for all the love I’ve received from him with music. This is when I decided that I would become a harmonicist.” Moreover, lucky for Park, the contest was also a concert for professional harmonica players, the performance which further inspired him to become a harmonicist. Park saw an old Japanese harmonicist who stepped onto the stage with a walking aid due to his weak legs, his harsh breaths clearly audible during his performance. “The sound that man produced was simply mesmerizing. It was so touching that it even made me feel jealous of his professionality. At that moment, my dream became solidified,” reminisced Park. The thrill that vibrated Park’s heart that day was the pivotal event that set his path toward becoming a harmonicist. "For my song composition, the inspiration comes from my daily life." Nonetheless, his decision was not always unchanging. While in high school, he studied music composition because he thought going to a university and majoring in composition would be the most helpful stepping stone for his dream since there is no school in Korea that has harmonica as a major,. Park realized that the history of harmonica is relatively very short and there are not many songs written for harmonica. Such bitterness urged him to become a composer for harmonica music. Park almost majored in composition in one school had it not been for another school which announced that they accept any applicants of string and wind instruments. Even though majoring in the harmonica was unheard of and unprecedented, his skill allowed Park to become the first one. Park proved his skill by collecting about 10 prizes from various contests. The most memorable one of all was the pivotal contest in Japan and some others include the Asian Pacific Harmonica Contest held in China, in which Park got the first prize in three different sections and the world’s harmonica contest in Germany. Park likes to perform his own songs in the contest because he wants to express himself through the song he composed, which he believes could best convey his color and feeling. The song he feels the strongest attachment is called ‘Run Again,’ which Park composed after his mother passed away. Park was going through a great emotional slump and could not prepare for the contest. However, he suddenly encouraged himself and brushed off the dust. This song won him a grand prize! A clip of Park's performance For myself, and for the harmonica “If I have to choose one thing to do for the rest of my life, I thought it would be the harmonica because it’s what makes me happy.” The instrument is charming to Park in its smoothness in playing. “Just with the breaths I’m taking right now, the harmonica can be played. Unlike other instruments where you have to use energy or some power, the harmonica can be played very naturally.” This is what enables Park to express and convey his emotions through his songs, as the sound comes from his natural breaths. “There is one thing I want to change about the instrument. It is the fixed idea people normally have with the harmonica. Unless they see me performing, people tend to underestimate the sound the instrument can produce. I want to change such a simple understanding about the harmonica by becoming a better player who can produce greater music.” Just as Park wanted to study music composition to compose songs for the harmonica, he wanted to study orchestra because he wants to become a better harmonica player. He was seeking further studies above composition that would guide him to enhance his skills as a player and came across the idea of studying orchestra conducting. After studying conducting at Hanyang with his professor, Park became more ambitious to carry on his studying and move on to the Doctor’s degree. He not only thinks his studying will ultimately help him to become a better player but also found another goal for himself. “I wish to be an orchestra conductor who can also participate in the performance,” envisioned Park. "I will always have fun playing the harmonica and be happy with my performance." Jeon Chae-yun chaeyun111@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Lee Jin-myung

2018-01 14

[Student]Monopolizing the First Place

With the slogan ‘The Engine of Korea,’ Hanyang University (HYU) has been one of the main forces in Korea for technology and engineering domains. Having high recognition of its engineering department and other fields of technology, Hanyang has been cultivating numerous outstanding students who have the potential of becoming the future leader of the fields. In this year’s Technique Examination where five out of about 250 people are selected, four Hanyangians proudly returned with the glorious news of occupying four of the five winners’ places. News H introduces two of the four Hanyangians this week: Jeon Ui-geon (Architectural Engineering, ’12) and Cho Won-dam (Chemical Engineering, 4th year). Hard work pays off, eventually Five out of 250 sure is a fierce competition with a ruthless passing ratio. Jeon prepared for the test for almost four years and Cho for an year, the rough time of which surely paid off. When asked what is the secret of winning the competition, Jeon and Cho both gave humble yet determined answers. “I think it’s all about setting the right direction. I always tried to have the best mindset of a diligent student. No matter what I was doing or where I was, I always had my mind on the materials I was studying. By wholly fixating your mind to studying, you can draw the most out of this simple method. I even dreamed of studying in my sleep. Additionally, I relieved my stress by swimming, which helps you to clear your body and mind,” said Jeon. “For me, the reason I was able to pass the test despite the lack of time in the middle of my school semester was because I put focus on the sample questions when I was studying. By analytically studying the sample questions and figuring out the main scope of the test questions, I think I was able to efficiently prepare for the test and obtain the best result,” revealed Cho. Both Jeon and Cho were in Examination Class in Hayang, where they were funded with dormitory, studying facilities and meals. They both joined study groups to find people whom they can study with and to exchange help. They took mock tests together as a group and shared their knowledge, which turned out to be a great studying method. Both of them showed great appreciation to the group members as they were in the similar situation, which means their circumstances and emotions were highly relatable to each other. The examination is largely divided into four stages, which are carried out over five days. This year’s was Jeon’s fourth and the last test, for which he exceptionally did not have a good feeling for. “To be honest, I thought I’d pass the test every year because I had a good feeling. But this year, I had several ominous happenings such as a cockroach climbing onto my toe or breaking my glasses on the first test day, which never happened in three years. However, to overcome the bad feelings, I screamed ‘a crisis is an opportunity!’ on my scooter,” chuckled Jeon. The day before the final test, in Jeon’s dream, countless shooting stars poured onto his head, which gave him hope. In Cho’s case, once again, it depended on her perspective. “I doubted myself at first because I was so anxious. However, I regarded the test as just another test from my school, which I believe helped me to do better unconsciously. Jeon (left) and Cho (right) are two proud Hanyangians who added honor to the school. 99 percent effort, 1 percent luck Interestingly, both Jeon and Cho said that passing the examination was unexpected, not to mention receiving the top scores. They were more than glad and thankful for the result, and they confessed that they felt a little lucky. The outcome of their efforts is deeply meaningful, as their reasons for taking the test was definite. For Jeon, when he was researching for his career when he was 20 years old, he first came across the Technique Examination. Since he wanted to have a job that would greatly contribute to the interest of the public, he was convinced that he would prepare for the test in the future. On the very day he was discharged from the ROTC (Reserve Officers' Training Corps), he went straight into the Examination Class and started studying. Similarly, Cho took the test because she was inspired by his father who is a dedicated public officer who works devotedly for the country. She realized taking the test would lead her to the most desired path that accorded with her values. There were hard times, as their journey was not an easy task. Jeon felt considerable burden as he doubted himself after failing from his first try. He confessed that overcoming that fear was the hardest thing as nothing was guaranteed for sure. For Cho, who had to attend her first semester’s courses, balancing and managing her studying for both her classes and the Technique Examination was not easy. Due to their relatedness in the contents, she was able to handle both of them at the same time. Now that they have passed the first door toward their dream, their goals have been laid ahead. Jeon wants to be a green architecturer who is well-recognized by his peers. He wants to contribute to Korea’s well-being at large, which is why he decided to take the Technique Examination at the first place. On the other hand, Cho wants to contribute to Korea’s energy field. Since Korea does not produce natural resources, she wants to contribute to stabilization of the country by excluding any turbulence caused by energy shortage. "Don't feel too disappointed and never give up!" Jeon Chae-yun chaeyun111@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Choi Min-ju

2017-12 18

[Student]Strong Inside and Out

A possessor of a doctor’s degree in Mechanical Engineering, a violinist, and an air force pilot officer are three titles that seem distantly irrelevant, as they do not overlap in their boundaries, and, perhaps, due to the awareness that each title takes a strenuously long time to achieve. Surprisingly, as it turns out, they could all belong to a single person who has passion and definite goals for the future. Youn Sung-hee (Mechanical Engineering Integrated Masters/Doctoral program, ’17) is a recently commissioned pilot officer from the Republic of Korea Air Force who obtained her Integrated Masters/Doctoral degree from Hanyang University. Youn shared her compelling story with News H this week. These pictures allow a brief glimpse into Youn's achievement. (Photo courtesy of Youn) Pivotal encounter Up until when she was a first grader in high school, Youn specialized in violin. She has numerous experience performing with a music band and also in solo performance, originally having planned to enter the school of music. When asked what has suddenly inspired her to get interested in mechanical engineering in the middle of majoring in violin, Youn answered in a convincing voice: “I was in the class room one day and heard a loud noise from a helicopter that was distractingly loud. I was triggered to think of ways to reduce the noise pollution coming from the helicopters, then I decided that I would study mechanical engineering to get expert knowledge to better address the problem.” This turning point in her youth resulted in who she is today. She started to catch up with science and math in high school in preparation to study mechanics later. She received her bachelor’s degree in three years, majoring in Physics. Afterwards, she entered the Hanyang Graduate School of Mechanical Engineering and obtained her masters/doctoral degree, further nourishing her dream of becoming a researcher of weapon systems. “As a female, I never even thought of becoming a military officer. I was hoping to become a researcher in the Agency for Defense Development or the Hanwha Corporation of Explosives, as I dreamed of contributing to the advancement of Korea’s National Army and its weapons.” It seems that the most powerful fuel that motivated her to devote her time and effort in studying the field of mechanical engineering and to become a military officer is her patriotism. While Youn was studying in Hanyang, she was involved in a project with the Agency for Defense Development. Meanwhile, she encountered another turning point. She came to realize that it is a soldier, not a civilian researcher who holds the key to diagnosing what the military truly needs. This led Youn to conclude that she must touch and observe the weapons herself in order to find out what and how to improve the current system. Finally, and most importantly, Youn visited The Korea Institute of Military Science and Technology, where she met an air force lieutenant-colonel active in duty by chance. He offered to enlist her in the army and conduct her research after hearing Youn’s plans full of passion and patriotism. After a ponderous deliberation, Youn was convinced that she would do so. “I am very satisfied with how things are going in my life, and I am ready for what awaits me.” Youn has gone through 12 weeks of military training. (Photo courtesy of Youn) Youn playing the violin: Youn is still an active violinist as she is the Head of the Orchestra at Chung-ang University and the Amateur Orchestra Union and occasionally performs solo. (Photo courtesy of Youn) Spreading the wings of a dream Of the 310 officers that were commissioned alongside Youn, 16 were female, and Youn was one of them. She confessed that the 12 weeks of training were dreadful, as the training requires not only strong physical stamina but also mental volition. “It is true that the training was hard to endure as a female,” chuckled Youn, “however, I endured the hardship with a strong mindset. Plus, my stamina wasn’t that bad to begin with.” Believing in the famous phrase that a ‘citizen’s strength is national strength,’ she always exercised in her spare time when she was in graduate school. Although no strength is ever enough to endure the harsh training in the army, Youn’s relentless passion and dedication seem to have paved the way for her. “Of course, there are a lot of fun episodes to talk about. Secretly munching on the snacks hidden by the soldiers of the previous regime and getting caught looking at a playful companion painting the camouflage cream silly and more is one such. There are many little stories that make me smile.” When Youn was studying in graduate school, she published a number of excellent papers. Two of them have been registered in the Science Citation Index, and one of which owns a patent for an optical system, which is related to protecting an aircraft from an enemy’s laser attack. Her research primarily dealt with the analysis of damage from a large output of laser. In other words, by analyzing how the damage is done to an air craft from a laser attack, the technology to prevent serious damage and protect the air craft can be invented. Youn is planning to continue her study because she values not only hands-on experience but also the academic background. “I am going to go on with my research studies to not lose touch with them!” In this upcoming January, after the rest from basic education and training, Youn is entering the Air Force Logistics Command Aviation Technology Research Institute and getting down to her research. “Energizing Korea’s dignity is my life goal. I believe if Korea becomes stronger through solid infrastructure in terms of national defence, the country’s respectability could rise after which diplomacy and the tension from foreign relations could ease and our people could feel relieved. I am determined that it is my duty and responsibility to protect the people and the country. I am willing to devote my life into what I will be given with,” remarked Youn, heartfully. As an aviation technology researcher, an air force officer, and a violinist, Youn will always follow her heart. (Photo courtesy of Youn) Jeon Chae-yun chaeyun111@hanyang.ac.kr

2017-11 19

[Alumni]A Civilian-Friendly Band of Police

There are many pairs of words that make sense as an oxymoron such as a silent scream, only choice, military intelligence, and so on. How about police and music? The police is an established body that enforces the law, limits civil disorder, and protects property, whereas music is a form of art and cultural activity that gives people joy and satisfaction. In the Police Academy Band, the officers select, arrange, and practice music to perform in a variety of occasions, adjusting to their duty. Park Nam-yong (String and Wind Instruments, Majored in Trumpet, ‘02) is a sergeant of Seoul Metropolitan Police Agency and the leader of Golden Crown Ensemble of the Police Academy Band who connects the police and the civilians through music. Beauty but a beast Park wanted to major in physical education until he became a high school student. The turning point of his life that sent him to the College of Music of HYU was when he entered the Wind Orchestra, which had no string instruments and consisted mainly of wind and percussion instruments. Among the others, the trumpet stood out as the main melody, which called Park’s attention. “Trumpet can leave a strong and masculine impression to the audience but at the same time, it contains warm and soft melody in its sound. Its appearance looks robust and tough but it produces sound that suggests otherwise,” described Park. Learning the instrument led Park to gear his career path towards music, not physical education. Wanting to find a promising occupation as a musician, Park decided to become a member of the Police Academy Band. Golden Crown Ensemble is principally a quintet, consisting of two trumpets, a horn, a trombone, and a tuba. However, due to the frequent need of a drum, the band more often performs as a sextet. “A quintet without a drum has a limited range of performable music. For instance, when we played The Pirates of the Caribbean, it was essential to include the drum. Sometimes, more than five instruments are a requisite.” In other words, Golden Crown Ensemble’s number of its members could range from 5 to 12, making it a brass ensemble instead of a quintet. “Since we’ve performed in countless places and times, it’s hard to recall every episode. But the most memorable performance I’d had was the World Police Band Concert, which was held in October in Japan. We played Frontier by Yang Bang-ean and Arirang and other pieces by arranging them into one.” In every performance, Golden Crown Ensemble considers the audience and their age, selecting the most adequate songs. If the audience is elderly, the band would choose the music from decades ago and if the performance is held in a middle school, music like pop songs would be the choice. The band occasionally performs as a bigger group than a quintet. (Photo courtesy of Park) The band's performance has been putting focus on domestic and school violence. (Photo courtesy of Park) Civilian-friendly? civilian-oriented! The band, as it is not an ordinary music band but a police-officer music band, has to fulfill its duty by performing in congruity with the national policy. Up to quite recently, the band has been performing with the theme of wiping out the four wickednesses of the society for the safety of citizens: rape, domestic violence, bullying, and junk food. Besides, public performances such as that near the Korean presidential residence had been held every Thursday for seven years. Through these approachable performances, Golden Crown Ensemble tries to give the citizens the impression that they are always close and attentive, providing cultural entertainment at the same time. One cordial fact about the band is that they tour around and visit every corner of the country. Their schedule is determined by calls or by their voluntary visits. “If we are called, we go without hesitation. But more importantly, we open concerts for anyone and everyone, including the socially neglected or disadvantaged. We even opened a small music concert in a park of homeless people.” The band gets calls from outside organizations, government, schools, and most meaningfully, from the citizens. Wherever there is a need, the band goes! "We will always be citizen-friendly!" Jeon Chae-yun chaeyun111@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Kang Cho-hyun

2017-11 05

[Alumni]Sound of the Regional Idiosyncrasies

Pansori is a genre of Korean musical storytelling performed in a duet by a vocalist and a drummer. The vocalist or the singer is called the sorikkun, and the drummer is called the gosu. The term pansori is a derivation of two words pan and sori, meaning a place where many people gather and sound, respectively. Kim Ji-hee (Department of Traditional Korean Music, ‘96) is a sorikkun who never hesitates to go to a pan where she can hear new sori. Having moved to the countryside to explore the undisclosed sori of the elderly, Kim has been accumulating unrecognized sori of the people from the Gangwon-do Province and has performed on a stage on the first day of November. New place, new sound The title of the concert was “Walking on a Path”, which connotes multiple aspects of Kim’s life and the paths that she has been walking on. The concert, consisting of 10 songs Kim composed from the sori she gathered while staying close to the people of Gangwon-do Province, speaks for Kim’s life as a sorikkun. After graduating from Hanyang, Kim spent busy days engaging herself in various musical dramas, traditional Korean outdoor performances (madangnori), and musicals. A pivotal point in her busy life that diverted her path was at the age of 30 when Kim moved down to Gangwon-do Province and married her farmer husband, after which she experienced and discovered the true charm of rural sounds carried by the elderly. As she spent her life in this new place, Kim had plenty of opportunity to approach rural area sounds, from the elderly Kim worked side by side with on the farm. Picking up the lines of work songs that the locals sang and collecting the idiosyncratic facets of the music, Kim acquainted herself with the true sori of the rural area and decided that she would dedicate her life as a sorikkun to preserve and propagate the endangered, beautiful sound of the people. “It’s truly pitiful how this unique style of sound is disappearing, as more and more elderly pass away without leaving a record of them. As a sorrikun, I believe my role is to get myself familiar with their sori and produce music so that people can recognize them,” remarked Kim. "I found myself pursuing happiness that was driven by giving the elderly enjoyment." The path of one’s life The title of the concert, “Walking on a Path” has a special meaning to it, which is associated with Kim’s life. The path refers to her life path, which has been varying in its direction. “I sometimes look back and wonder if I’m walking on the right path. But I think believing that you are on the right road and continue moving forward is the goal of life. On this path of my life so far, I’ve met many different people and their sori, all of which I have wanted to compile in my songs.” Everyone has their own path in life, and Kim wanted to convey the message that pursuing a dream from one's heart is the essence of life. Kim felt a different kind of happiness when she saw the smiles on the faces of the elderly after performing in front of them, which was different from the round of applause she had received after performing in a big theater. The candy that an old lady gave and a can of Sprite the other offered meant a lot to her. “I’ve felt the uniqueness of this happiness through my life in Gangwon-do Province. There are too many sorikkun who can flawlessly perform Chunhyangga and Shimchungga, the representative pansori songs. I believe doing the sori is the best path for my life.” "Doing what I can is the right direction for my life path." (Photo courtesy of Kim) Jeon Chae-yun chaeyun111@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Kim Youn-soo

2017-10 15

[Student]Winners of 2017 International Robot Contest

Held annually in the Korea International Exhibition and Convention Center (KINTEX), the International Robot Contest (IRC) is the largest robotic event in Korea. In October of 2017, IRC once again welcomed contestants from various countries such as Japan, Singapore, and Malaysia. Of several categories of the contest, the gold prize winner of the TurtleBot Auto Race area is the team Real Bapdodook (rice thief), consisting of four students from the Department of Robotics: Jung Hyun-cheol (3rd year), Lee Do-gyu (2nd year), Cho Min-soo (3rd year) and Jung Min-jae (3rd year). Real Bapdodook's gold prize (on the left) and their finished product Ganjang-gae-jang (on the right) (Photo courtesy of Real Bapdodook) Intense concentration as when eating “The Department of Robotics was established in 2013, and we are the first group of students to be admitted into the department. The contest let four of us to come together.” TurtleBot is a robot with open-source software, which is the main item used for the event. All four students were highly interested in it, which became a main motive for them to team up together. The name of the team seems quite unique to be a robotic contest entry. Rice thief, Bapdodook in Korean, is a term referring to food so delicious that it arouses an appetite to the point where one finishes a bowl of rice instantly. The members decided to name their team Real Bapdodook because when people are eating “rice thieves,” they concentrate on eating so much that they become silent. Similarly, the team wanted to focus their TurtleBot to the extent where they become wordless. Fittingly, the name of their robot is Ganjang-gaejang (soy sauce marinated crab), because the finished look of their work resembles the shape of a crab—soy sauce marinated crab is one type of Korean food considered to be a bapdodook. “We decided to participate in the contest because even though it had been three years since we entered the department, we had not really had any opportunity to actually make robots or create an algorithm that goes along with it. With the desire to utilize what we have learned, we searched for robotic contests and came across the IRC TurtleBot Auto Race." Besides, they wanted to put robot operating system (ROS) into use and get a real-life lesson from experience. From left to right: Jung Min-jae, Jung Hyun-cheol, Cho Min-soo, and Lee Do-gyu. (Photo courtesy of Real Bapdodook) The gold mine of efforts “By the time we finished preparing for the contest, we wished to have some extra days of breaks, but the new semester greeted us.” Preparing for the contest throughout their entire summer break, there were largely three impasses the team had to jump over. First and the most difficult barrier was studying ROS (coding system of communication among sensors of the robot). Since TurtleBot was an ROS-based device, not knowing it will make it impossible to start the project. The team had no helping hand to tutor them with the equipment, so they started from scratch by studying with online materials. Another barrier was assembling different parts. No matter how supreme a single part is, it is of no use if it does not fit into the robot. From finding out how an equipment works to figuring out how to harmonize the whole system, there were piles of problems to solve. Lastly, “tuning” the robot to the course of the contest field was a big issue. In order to make the robot run perfectly on its own, this step was essential. This step took the longest because there was simply no other way than to test with trial and error. The track of TurtleBot Auto Race. (Photo courtesy of Real Bapdodook) “Hard work pays off” is what the team said after going through long, exhausting periods of preparation and finally tasting victory. Ganjang-gaejang was outstanding in its speed and stability, but it was especially praised for staying close to the basic, provided materials. While other teams dismantled the TurtleBot and added additional parts that costed much, Real Bapdodook focused on maximizing the efficiency with what was given, proving that winning requires no fancy accessories. The contest offered no cash prize but an upgrade of the TurtleBot, which the team is willing to use for the department’s ROS education. Ganjang-gaejang was excellent in line-tracing as well, which was a crucial factor in making it the winner. From discerning lights, signs, and barricade to safely passing tunnels, the team’s robot successfully completed the given missions. Finishing the track with impressive line-tracing at a speed faster than other teams, the team Real Bapdodook proved its competency. Looking forward to participating in more robotic contests in the future, the members are proudly holding the gold prize in their hands. (Photo courtesy of Real Bapdodook) Jeon Chae-yun chaeyun111@hanyang.ac.kr

2017-10 02

[Student]A Donor and a Champion

“A lot of people say I am already successful, and they congratulate me for my achievements. However, I only think this is the beginning,” remarked Won Doo-jae (Sports and Well-being, 2nd year). Won is the key player of Hanyang’s soccer team and one of the members of the national team, U-18 and U-19. In the summer of 2017, he has also joined the J2 League’s Avispa Fukuoka team, proving his competence. On top of his achievements, Won has made headlines because he has donated one hundred million won to Hanyang University (HYU), claiming that Hanyang is the place of his growth. Ups and downs As everything starts small and trivial, Won’s interest in soccer first sprouted when he was in elementary school. First regarding soccer as his hobby and the subject of his special activity club at school, he stepped into what later became his career path, unknowingly. Entering middle school is when he was determined that he wanted to be engaged in soccer professionally, deeply consulting his parents about his decision for the first time. This led him to enter a middle school that had a soccer team and that provided him the opportunity to receive lessons and training. This continued throughout his high school days. By the end of his high school years, Won was put on the brink of going through a surgery due to his sports hernia (a symptom in the pubis are common to sports players). It was the time he was about to join the national representative’s team, so Won was put in a serious dilemma. His desire to join the team, in the end, overpowered his necessity to go through the surgery. Enduring both pain and fear of his symptom, he says, “was the most difficult time for me so far.” He postponed his surgery to a future time by which his symptom was not only on the right side of his pubis but also on his left. Won's back number in the team Avispa Fukuoka is 6. (Photo courtesy of Sportal Korea) Climbing the long way and overcoming hardship, Won became who he is today. He recalled, “I would say my professional debut game was the most memorable game of all. The game was held in July of 2017 against Yamagata, the home team of the league. I was more excited than nervous because I went through so much harsh training.” Won is currently taking a year off due to his tight schedule of matches and training. He had the urge to become an official soccer player so enthusiastically that it became his priority over academics. “I guess soccer was a louder call,” chuckled Won. He is playing in the league in Japan now! Before matches, Won says he watches a lot of videos of soccer matches and listens to energizing music. Right before going to the match, he makes sounds with his hands to prevent himself from being too nervous. The secret to maintaining his stamina, according to Won, is running in the games, since soccer is a sport that involves a large field and the players incessantly run. “Participating in many games and going through training as a team beforehand helps to keep up my stamina.” During the game, however, he does not have the conscience to think about anything else but to focus on the game. "Untill I reach my full potential!" (second to the right on top) (Photo courtesy of Korea Football Association) Shoot goal to the next stage! “What I find attractive about soccer is its usage of the feet, perhaps the most difficult part of the body to handle, to maneuver the ball so freely,” remarked Won. Soccer is his passion, career, and life. He expressed his gratitude to all his coaches and especially to HYU. “Hanyang is the place of my growth” is what Won said when donating a hundred million won to the school. To elaborate, he described Hanyang as the place he grew up through activities and lessons. Just like he did in middle and high school, he met a great coach and received constructive advice and training that led him to become who he is. His times of acquiring skills and accumulating experience has surely seemed to pay off. “My achievements so far are the beginning of my life. I believe there is a long path lying in front of me, and I can do better, infinitely. To reach my full potential, I’m never stopping or giving up!” cheered Won. His goal is to become a better soccer player than he is today, nourishing his potential with his passion. He believes there is no stop to improving, which explains all his hard work and relentless effort to pave the path that lies ahead of him. "Hanyang is where I grew up." Jeon Chae-yun chaeyun111@hanyang.ac.kr

2017-09 03

[Student]Writing as a Comprehensive Skill

What makes up a good song? Some would say good melody while others say good lyrics. Then, where do good melody or lyrics come from? Kang says, at least for the lyrics, it comes from everyday life. Kang Min-gu (Korean Language and Literature, Doctoral Program), a musician and a poet, unearthed his talent in writing when he was a young boy and developed that talent into his career. His discovery and strength in writing led him to become who he is today, an indie singer-songwriter and a poet by the name of Kang Baek-soo. A friend and the band Kang was schooled in all-boys middle school and high school in Korea, which completely eliminated any possible chance of school romance. When his friend presented a tempting idea, to make a band and perform at a all-girls high school, Kang could not help but accept the suggestion. This seemingly petty reason was the turning point of Kang’s life—this is how Kang began music. “I tried to have different hobbies such as sports and photography but they all didn't last long. Music is the only hobby that captivated my interest.” Entering Hanyang University and belonging to the College of Humanities, Kang naturally joined the band of the department, Dasalnolae. His ability of handling different instruments led him to be the main member of the band, especially in the times when only a few people joined the band. On one insignificant day, Kang saw his fellow member writing a song and making music. “At that moment, it looked easy and I thought, ‘why don’t I try writing a song myself?’” This is how he began writing songs. The lyrics of Kang’s songs come from his daily life as well. Just as he gets inspired by the little happenings in his life, his songs reflect the ordinary parts of his life and arouse a wave of empathy from the people who listens to his music. “I drink with my friends pretty often and every time, on my way back home at nights, I think about the memorable conversations I had because they could give me ideas for the lyrics.” One of his song, titled Wangsimni (click to listen), is a song based on his bitter feeling when he visited Wangsimni after graduating. The lyrics of his songs are easily relatable to those who have similar experience because they are not extraordinary. As an indie musician, Kang performs in music festivals, cafes, and other concerts he is called for. His nearest concert, The Wander Concert, will be held in few weeks on the shore of a cafe located in Incheon. Currently having seven music albums, hundreds of poems written, and four essays in books, Kang is actively engaged in his writing life. (Photo courtesy of Kang) A fine artist As a poet, on a different note, Kang insists on something of his own. When composing a song, he tends to take other people’s opinions into consideration because he aspires to produce music that people can feel attachment to. However, when it comes to poems, his own thoughts are all that matters. “To me, poems are like my identity. I take no other opinions and evaluate and judge my own poems on my own. No other peoples’ opinions are to be incorporated,” stated Kang, sternly. While his songs are for the public, his poems are for himself exclusively. Though he started his band and music by a coincidental chance, he firmly believes that his life path would still have navigated toward writing anyway. As a Korean Language and Literature major with his specialty in modern poetry, he regards his main job as a poet. Kang is preparing to publish his first collection of poems. He has written hundreds of poems so far and he is currently in the process of selecting the best ones of all. “I want to maintain my creative stamina and consistently produce my works.” He wants to be someone who maintains his job and be proud of the stacks of works he produces as time goes by. Reflecting his relatable and interesting songs and their lyrics, his collection of poems sure sounds unique and exciting to see. “Writing is my job. If I write on a manuscript paper, then it’s a poem. If on a music paper, it’s a song.” (Photo courtesy of Kang) Jeon Chae-yun chaeyun111@hanyang.ac.kr