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2018-02 05

[Faculty]Founding the First Korean Dance Troupes Association

There is an old saying on unity, ‘united we stand, divided we fall’. It is important for people to cooperate and organize to raise their voice on issues and deliver their will more effectively. Professor Moon Young-chul, from the Department of Dance, has been a professional ballet dancer for over forty years and has always had the urge to bring dance troupes in Korea together for common goals. Thanks to his hard work, more than fifty organizations from three different fields of dance from – Korean dance, modern dance, and ballet – were able to cut the ribbons on July 13, 2017. Although it was a Saturday, Moon came to school for practice. Voicing out issues One of the many issues that Moon and the Korean Dance Troupes Association (tentative title) are interested in is the military issue of Korean male dancers. As dancing requires daily practice in a specific condition, male dancers in the nation are having a difficult time continuing their career while having to serve in the military for almost two years. There are very limited opportunities for exemption compared to other fields of art such as music. While there are more than 240 awards which are subject for the exemption annually, male dancers must win first prize from one of the four events to be exempt from military duty, which are the Dong-A Dance Competition, Seoul Dance Festival, Korea Dance Festival, and the Korea Newbie Dancer Competition. “Korean dancers are good, but the condition is harsh up to the point where foreign dance companies ‘import’ our dancers” lamented Moon. Moon plans to discuss such issues with the head of other dance troupes and bring them up to the table as much as he can. The association also aims to provide foundations for the member organizations to brand themselves, promoting Korea to the world. Moon’s MoonYoungChul Ballet Pomea contributes a lot in that sense. As well as the media work and teaching, Moon works hard to live up to another title of his, 'a ballet dancer'. (Video courtesy of Moon) Leading creative ballet in Korea MoonYoungChul Ballet Poema was founded in 2003 by Moon when he started teaching in HYU. He brought Hanyang graduates and students together to perform creative ballet, scripts inspired from literature. ‘Poema’ means poet in Spanish. Moon named his organization as such because he believes ballet dancing is like a poet, literary and delicate. The organization performs once a year with original pieces. Moon organized his ballet group aiming to make the creative ballet group that represents the whole nation. In a sense, he has already achieved that goal. The MoonYoungChul Ballet Poema has won dozens of awards in Korea and has been invited to perform in Saint Petersburg, Russia for four years in a row. The most recent performance was titled <The Blue Bird>, from Maurice Maeterlinck’s script <The Blue Bird (1908)>. A video clip from last year, The MoonYoungChul Ballet Poema performing <The Blue Bird> (Video courtesy of Moon) Moon himself occasionally performed in the play although he does not plan to take the stage this year. When asked what motivated him so much from a young age to continue in ballet and constantly strive to dance, produce, and engage in backstage jobs, Moon replied that “ballet is like a drug to me. I just can’t live without it.” With the passion he has inside, he aspires to provide more stage for his students now. “Students need motivation to keep them practicing every day. I feel like it is my duty now to find and give as much opportunity to them,” smiled Moon. Recently appointed as the 17th president of the Dance Research Journal of Korea, Moon will be busier than ever. “Dance and procrastination never go along. The one who keeps working and keeping themselves busy will survive,” emphasized Moon. He wishes his students to participate more in the academic realm of ballet, as its importance is growing day by day. Kim So-yun dash070@naver.com Photos by Choi Min-ju

2018-01 15

[Alumni]The New Head Coach of the School Basketball Team Expresses Confidence

Once upon a time, there was a shooting guard on the Hanyang University’s (HYU) basketball team who led the team to win the competition. Twenty-three years later, the player returned to his home team to teach his pupils. This week, News H met the new head coach of HYU's basketball team, Chung Jae-hun (Business, ’96). "I am deeply honored to come back home for teaching." About the coach himself A shooting guard is one of the five positions in a basketball game. He or she is the one who mainly attempts long range shots such as Stephen Curry in the modern NBA. Chung used to play as a shooting guard when he was in college. One of the moments that he remembers playing was his turn around shot against the Korea University team. 1995 was the year when HYU shared the top spot with Korea and Chungang University. After graduation, Chung became the founding member of Daegu Orion Orions, which is now called Goyang Orion Orions. The newly appointed head coach further explained his long passion towards leadership. “The frustration became bigger for me to lose a game as a coach, than to lose as a player,” said Chung. That is why he decided to retire from the court in 2002 after winning the 2001 season with the Orions. Now coming back to his home school as a head coach, Chung is inspired to grow the players as big as the alumnus already on the court. “I feel greatly honored and pressured at the same time,” smiled Chung. Hanyang's proud basketball team from last season. We ended up in 8th place last year. (Photo courtesy of HY-Ball) Prospects for the team Chung sees that the biggest strength of the team is speed. However he also recognizes its weakness which is the lack of height and defense. “We have many offensive options on the team but we lack defensive strategies.” Therefore he is planning to focus on improving the defense by emphasizing the centers to get more involved in boxing out, overcome the physical attributes by engaging in zone defense strategies and attempting to trap the opposition in the corners. Boxing out refers to blocking the opposition players from getting involved in rebounds, which is when the ball bounces back from the rim. Zone defense is when players mark the players according to their own respective areas. “Practice makes perfect,” said the head coach, looking determined. The only way to make up such shortcomings is to practice day and night. In the morning, the team is scheduled for weight lifting, defensive strategies in the afternoon, and personal skill training during the night. As Chung remembers his team back in the days in HYU, most players were able to do shoots, passes, dribbles and drives. Nevertheless, he feels like the students nowadays are less impressive, in terms of their abilities. “Still, by working to improve ourselves little by little, we will be able to have competitiveness through the use of various strategies,” mentioned Chung, with hope in his eyes. "Instead of fancy plays that catch the attention of the crowd, I will defend and rebound more to improve the team," said Bae Kyung-sik (Sports Industry, 4th year), the captain of the team. When asked what his goal is for next season, Chung replied with humbleness: “We aim to make it to the play-offs." A playoff is a competition played after the regular season by the top competitors to determine the league champion or a similar accolade. Once our team makes it to the playoffs, Chung believes that the team can possibly reach the final four. “Me and the whole team shares the goal of reaching the final four. Although people might think that we are not a strong team, we aim high,” Chung aspires. The new season starts from March. Let us keep our eyes on the upcoming games and the progress Chung will bring to the team. Kim So-yun dash070@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Choi Geun-baik

2018-01 08

[Student]Winners of I·SEOUL·U Storytelling Competition

Two proud Hanyang University (HYU) students won first place in the I·SEOUL·U storytelling competition. It is hosted by the Seoul Metropolitan Government with its total prize money mounting up to 20 million won. Choi Hyun-jun (Entertainment Design, 3rd year), and Nam Jung-yeon (Communication Design, 3rd year), a close friend within the College of Design, teamed up for their first competition ever and were honored with the crown. From the left, Choi Hyun-jun (Entertainment Design, 3rd year), and Nam Jung-yeon (Communication Design, 3rd year). They were both interested in design from a young age. For the first time in forever The I·SEOUL·U storytelling competition is a part of Seoul's effort to promote its brand name: I·SEOUL·U. Its participants can depict their very own unique story about Seoul through a video, article, or poster. Nam and Choi chose video as it is Choi's major in school. There were a total of 625 pieces submitted, with one first place award, three second place awards, and six third place awards. Although lots of design college students participated in such competitions, it was the first time for both Nam and Choi to participate in one. “To be honest, I was afraid before. I was not sure of my own abilities,” mentioned Choi. Beginner’s luck or not, Choi and Nam showed perfect teamwork throughout November when they prepared for the competition. “People always ask us if we ever had conflicts, but we never had one,” smiled Choi. As a pair of close friends, they both mentioned that having someone to watch over and support one another was the key to completing their video. Choi, majoring in entertainment design, did most of the editing work. “Although putting 3D into videos is not part of my curriculum, I was able to self teach myself through a video society ‘Intro’ in our school,” said Choi. Nam, on the other hand, brainstormed with Choi and edited pictures and graphics in the video. Take a look at Choi and Nam's ingenious story. (Video courtesy of Choi and Nam) The hardest part of the production was the filming. Because the team had to rent a 4K camera, they had to fit all of their filming schedule into one day. Considering that the sites were dispersed all around Seoul, they had to begin in the early morning, use time in its utmost efficiency and wrap up before sunset. The time lapse sunset in the video was taken by the team in the peak of Inwang mountain for four hours. When asked about the source of their brilliant ideas, Nam answered, ‘lots of brainstorming and our imagination.’ For instance, Nam always used to think, ‘what if there is another reason for people walking in the street?’ and they came up with an idea of magnets pulling people around in the streets. “The whole point of the video was to visualize the extraordinary reasons behind ordinary activities in our imagination,” said Nam. Creativity to gravity The inspiring ideas of the team was the crucial reason for attracting the minds of people. The winner of the I·SEOUL·U storytelling competition is first decided on the professionals’ evaluation on creativity, art, aptness to the topic, and utility. Then, the remaining 40% is up to the people’s choice. We do not know exactly how many votes the team received, but assuming from the results, Choi and Nam must have caught people’s eyes with their original ideas. "There was no secret recipe for overcoming hardships. We just bore with it. Pulling all-nighters is a usual thing for design students anyways," said Choi. When asked about the usage of their prize money of 5 million won, both plan to spend the money on purchasing devices related to their major. Nam would like to purchase a tablet so that she can enhance her productivity during the semester, and Choi plans to buy a camera, supposedly a choice based on the difficulty they had filming videos the past month. Choi and Nam would like to challenge once again in a competition, as they find each other a perfect teammate. Right now, however, they have their hands busy on their internship. “I am learning a lot, managing a project from A to Z. Making a video for my school project and for a client are two very different jobs, but I enjoy it,” mentioned Choi, with a smile on his face. Both plan to proceed in their profession according to their major. With the passion and ability they have now, they have a bright future ahead. Kim So-yun dash070@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Choi Min-ju

2017-12 26

[Student]Let the Class of 85 Be a Step Forward to Your Dreams

‘Tell me what you want to do, and the 85s will help!’ is the slogan of the second 85 Dream Scholarship, which is funded by the graduates of Hanyang University who were admitted in 1985. Their donation first started last year with the late night meal during exams for the class of 15, who are 30 years junior to the class of 85. Then, with much success with the last year’s Dream Scholarship, the class of 85 alumni came back this year with much more financial assistance. News H met three of the eight lucky teams to hear more about their stories. "I am constantly learning to improve the contents in Si-garette, and also regarding the copyright issue. The fact that I have enjoyed every step enabled me to come this far. Take a piece of literature instead of a cigarette Song Yu-su (Advertising & public relations, 4th year) and his team ‘Si-garette’ are looking forward to making their ideas come true in the real-world thanks to the support of the Dream Scholarship. The team name ‘Si-garette’ is also the name of their product, a combination of Si (which means poetry in Korean) and cigarette. Twenty short pieces of literature, poetry, or fun facts are rolled into a box that opens like a cigarette box. “I found that people smoke because the world never says ‘si(yes)’. I wish Si-garette can help people bear the world better,” said Song. The Si-garette contains 20 short stories and contents in a rolled paper like cigarette. Contents can be previewed in Si-garette's instagram account: @sigarette_pocketpoem Si-garette team plans to utilize the grant on an automated machine. When Song first thought of the idea three years ago, he neglected that rolling the papers and putting it into a box could cause a hassle in mass production. Before this June, Song focused on recruiting writers to provide their works to be published through Si-garette. “But in reality, the machine cost too much as we have to make a special one to serve our purpose. Other business competitions would not fund the project because I did not aim to profit from this,” reflected Song. But thanks to the Dream Scholarship, the long aspiration of Song is at the brink of realization. The first copies will be handed out for free to increase the recognition among people, and with the reputation, Song hopes for a paid sponsorship from private companies. Then, the profit will be used to publish the books of underground writers. “I love writing, but I know that I am not good enough to be a full-time writer. That is why I chose to help other writers through such projects,” said Song, with a humble smile. "My story brought a sense of empathy, and I think that was the key to my winning the scholarship." Blowing the dust off from the paper The next beneficiary we met is a soon-to-be comic artist, Lee Jin-hyun (Advertising & Public Relations, 2nd year). Lee has been drawing cartoons from a young age, but the pressure of college admission made her put the papers aside. She recently had a chance to take the dust off from the rusty dream, ironically when she got sick and had to withdraw from school temporarily. “I had time to think about my old dream and decided to pursue it,” Lee said. Lee desires to draw and write a story about an Indian child selling tea on street. It is a combination of Lee’s interest in tea and India. When asked: ‘what do you think was the key to your winning?’, Lee answered, “a feeling of sympathy.” “I suppose the seniors agreed to my story and wanted me to learn more with the scholarship they granted.” Lee plans to register for art academy as she has never formally learned drawing. Lee added that the seniors wish her to persist on one story and upload them to amateur platforms such as ‘Naver challenge for the best’. “I would like to say thank you for the class of 85 seniors, and I dream to help my juniors in thirty years,” said Lee. Mentor for the mentors Being a mentor to someone requires excellent interpersonal skills, especially if the mentee is a sensitive child during puberty. Team ‘Mentos’ is going to publish a guidebook for all the college mentors out there, guiding children. “There practically is no education nor training for the mentors, although there are so many programs and institutions initiating mentor programs,” lamented Sim Young-woo (Philosophy, 3rd year). That is why the three friends gathered up to become a mentor for the mentors. From the left, Ryoo Chang-hee (Philosophy, 3rd year), Sim Young-woo (Philosophy, 3rd year) and Lim Se-hoon (Philosophy, 3rd year). All three team members: Sim Young-woo (Philosophy, 3rd year), Lim Se-hoon (Philosophy, 3rd year) and Ryoo Chang-hee (Philosophy, 3rd year) have at least two years of experience as a mentor. Based on their unique experiences, Sim is in charge of the ‘academics’ part, Ryu in ‘life’, and Lim in the ‘experience’ part of the book. As diverse as their experiences, the motivation to become a mentor is all vastly different. Ryu, for instance, dreamt of becoming an instructor at private academies. However, he constantly felt like the students stop their interaction and relationship with the tutor when their time of struggle for college admission comes to an end. As he aspired to set up his own institute where students and teachers can remain in a good, long-lasting relationship, he applied for several mentoring programs to learn the secret. “Initially I thought I would quit after a promised year like most of the work I do, but witnessing my small help becoming a big one for the kids was so rewarding for me to keep doing the mentoring job up until now,” smiled Ryu. "All three of us once dreamt of becoming educators, but not now. The reason we are doing this project is to leave our footsteps behind so that our fellow university students can have something to refer to when they feel lost, which we ourselves wished for." Their book, consisted of aforementioned three parts, aims to provide a well-rounded guide for beginning mentors from ‘how to start a conversation’ to ‘how to say farewell without hurting the mentee’. They started writing the book this April, with the help of the Hanyang Academic Town that supports students’ noble ideas for research. But the aid was not enough for them to print as many copies they had intended to. “So we actually planned to use our own money,” said Sim. “That is why we are going to use all of the scholarship into printing,” added Lim. The ‘Mentors’ team finished their first draft before the final exam. “Now it is the real beginning. We have to design the book, edit the contents, and actually publish it. It is going to be one very busy vacation,” said Ryu with much delight in his voice. The three philosophers’ faces were filled with joy and passion throughout the interview. We look forward to reading their book in the Center for Social Innovation. Kim So-yun dash070@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Choi Jin-myung, Kang Cho-hyun

2017-12 04

[Faculty]A Professor and a CEO

The two nouns, professor and CEO often do not go along too well. It is because the two jobs require two distinct traits, such as a rigorous academic interest for a professor and innovation for a CEO. There are few who manage to bear the two titles, but Park Jai-koo (Professor, Natural Resources and Environmental Engineering) is one of them. In one of the busy Saturday afternoons of Park, News H visited his office to take a closer look at his recent accomplishment. Park is holding a sample of his insulatio, explaining with pride. "Technology is what led to the invesment," smiled Park. Hang in there, that is what makes difference in the end ‘Congratulations’ was the word that started the interview. Park and his company, Micropore was able to draw a huge 3 billion won investment to mass produce his original insulation. The type of insulation Park has developed is specifically used in the process of assembling displays, which is one of the most important industries in the modern world. Park’s insulation is different from the Japanese and German products mainly in two ways. First, it creates less dust. The invention is made of Silicon dioxide, commonly known as Silica. It is one of the most commonly found minerals that originates from underground. “Most insulations are made of Silica, but the root technology of processing it creates vastly different results,” said Park. The second specialty is that it protects from heat very well. The statement may sound awkward as all insulates should prevent heat. Nevertheless, Park mentioned that the imported materials are not specifically made to be used as semi-conductor display insulates. Therefore, Park’s invention with countless pores inside serves the purpose much better. To the question, ‘what was the core factor for Micropore to receive such investment?’ Park answered ‘technology’ without a second of hesitation. Park told us that his past 20 years of working as a professor and a CEO was burdensome as it sounds. Despite the Act on Special Measures for the Promotion of Venture Businesses in 1997 that gave birth to dozens of ‘professor-start-ups’, Micropore is one of the longest living ventures of its kind. “Right earlier this week, I took off from the metro to visit my factory and realized that my shoes were worn out so much. That is how much effort and energy was required to keep up the work,” smiled Park. When asked what is the key behind all this, Park replied, "You just hang in there. There is no special skills or knowledge required. What you do is to pour your everything and hang in there. In the end, the one who endured the longest will make difference.” "A social atmosphere encouraging college students to explore and make companies should be created." Manufacturing industry as the engine of Korea As an engineer professor, Park laments at the reality where not many companies own domestic factories. “Manufacturing industry should revive. That is the way for Korea to grow its competency,” said Park, filled with certainty. The root of such industry is mineral. In order to be utilized, a mineral requires to be located, mined, and processed. Park focuses in processing but also in Urban Mining. “There is more gold in your phone than in a 1 ton of mineral,” mentioned Park. Urban mining retrieves disposed cell phones or PCB (Printed Circuit Boards, found in all electronic devices) and selectively processes them in order to retrieve rare metals such as Au, Ag and Pt. Park now looks forward to acquiring another title, an author. With his abundant experience in both business and engineering, he would like to give advice to fellow professors who are starting his or her own business or planning to have one. “They all need to hold up until the company actually makes progress and profit. I wish Hanyang, as one of the leading engineering schools in the nation, should have a signature company that has our name on it,” wished Park. For the short-term goal, Park plans to list Micropore on KOSDAQ. With the recent investment, may the wind blow to his path. Kim So-yun dash070@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Lee Jin-myung

2017-11 13

[Alumni]88 Ways of Speaking: To Keep Myself

“Tigers die and leave their skins: People die and leave their names.” This is a famous proverb that points a great master’s name that lives on. Son Hwa-shin (Korean Language & Literature, ’09) as a high school student thought she also wanted to pass her name down, especially through her writing. “The idea that you eventually die, but your work lives for eternity is so fascinating,” said Son, with her eyes glowing with enthusiasm. News H met Son, a beginning essayist who just published her first book through Daum Kakao’s amateur writing platform, ‘brunch beta’. "I wish to write an essay that can be called a masterpiece." “He was a person who knew exactly what he wanted.” Son always had a passion for writing, and that led her to major in Korean language and literature. Nevertheless, she did not realize that writing can also be a breadwinning career. While having a minor identity crisis, Son went to an exhibition to clear her head during the summer of 2015. That is when she read the quote: “He was a person who knew exactly what he wanted.” “I was genuinely stunned by the words,” said Son. That was the moment when she realized that the root of her crisis starts from ignorance of her own wills. Son said what comes between ‘I am just a’ and a period truly represents oneself. Son thought ‘writer’ fills her blank. "I am just a _____ ." What fills your blank? Luckily enough, she encountered the notice for ‘brunch project’ online which promised its first-place winner with an opportunity to publish his or her book through Kakao. “This is it,” thought Son. She wanted the blue ribbon so bad to quit her job and focus on writing. “It would be a lie if I say I was never worried, but I had faith. The blue ribbon felt like mine, and I wanted to turn my life around with this award,” mentioned Son. However, life gave her a lemon. She did not make it to the first place but to second. Son, however, turned it into a lemonade instead. Second-place, unlike the first, is awarded with some funds to support the writer to publish a book on one's own. The process of writing a book proposal, sending them to several dozens of publishers, and having meetings taught her a lot. “Come to think of it, I feel lucky to win the second-place instead of first,” reminisced Son. The book 88 Ways of Speaking: To Keep Myself (2016). Click the image to purchase the book. (Photo courtesy of Sam and Parkers) Writing as a way to love oneself Son’s book ’88 Ways of Speaking: To Keep Myself (2016)’ contains 88 brunch posts that tell everyone to ‘talk like oneself’. “I felt like in this fast-changing world, people keep losing and forgetting who they are. In that context, I perceive life as battle to keep who you are.” Son strongly asserted that in order to talk like yourself, you first have to know yourself, which can be accomplished through writing. For most of the people who are afraid of writing due to various reasons, Son recommends them to write about what you like. It might lighten your burden by writing on an external subject, but in the end, all writings encompass the thoughts and logic of the writer. Once you get used to writing, Son emphasizes having one’s own style is also important. Left is Amedeo Modiglian's 'Portrait of Jeanne Hebuterne in a large hat (1918)', and the right piece is Edvard Munch's 'The Scream(1893)'. Both paintings uncover the essence through distortion. (Photo courtesy of Wikipedia) Wanting to have excellence in writing, Son also studiously develops her own writing style. She aims at highly connotative, contextual writings through writing less. “I often think of art when I write,” said Son. Amedeo Modigliani or Edvard Munch reveals the essence of a subject not through depicting it in a realistic and specific way, but rather through simplifying and distorting it. Son also enjoys adding her literary touch to her news articles. “If you think of an article, it feels cold and simply informative. But an article can ironically provide a better understanding through literary approaches,” mentioned Son. This technique is called ‘not tell but show’. For instance, Son could simply write ‘the reporter met actor Hong at a café in Samchung-dong’, but by adding ‘a café with a beautiful chandelier’, readers can instantly picture the place where the interview took place. Son is a young dreamer with an affection and enthusiam for writing. Son definitely plans to publish more essays in the future. “I’ve never really thought of myself as an essayist, but by being called as one, I am even more motivated to write more essays,” said Son with excitement. Throughout the interview, Son turned into a young dreamer whenever she talked about her writing. With such passion and diligence, News H is looking forward to reading more of her works. To catch up what has already been uploaded, click HERE. Kim So-yun dash070@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Choi Min-ju

2017-11 06

[Alumni]Blocks of Opinions Making the Hall of Fame, Glowpick

The cosmetic market in Korea has been booming for a long time, releasing numerous new brands and products. Unlike in the past, where ‘road shop products’ and ‘department store products’ had a clear division in their quality and price, many consumers are now lost in the wide array of choices available. CEO of GLOWDAYZ, Kong Jun-sik (Journalism & Mass Communication, ’11) proposed a solution in this confusing era. Kong wanted to make Glowpick as a medium of wise cosmetics shopping for consumers. Honest reviews as road signs “Glowpick is a mobile application that provides information to consumers in the form of a ranking, 100 percent based on their reviews,” said Kong. Realizing the fact that people are lost in the sea of information, Kong decided to collect reviews from ordinary people, the actual consumers of makeup. “Making a choice must have been difficult, especially when many beauty shows or blogs have accepted paid advertisements in order to flourish, without providing straightforward suggestions” lamented Kong. Therefore, unlike many review applications, Glowpick does not sensor customer reviews, even if they may seem extreme or contain swear words. Kong mentioned that he wants to create a comfortable environment as if the users are talking to their friends offline. The standard of a ‘good cosmetic product’ may differ for every person and every beauty application. Some value the components, and others value the professional’s opinion. In Glowpick’s case, Kong believes the product that has been recommended the most by the largest number of people is the best product. That is why Kong had striven to collect more than 2 million frank opinions from the past. Through such effort, Kong was able to bring the attention of major brands and marketing operators on the importance of consumer reports. “Now we can process and provide the information to cosmetic companies so that they can consider the public opinion in developing new products,” said Kong, proudly. A screen capture of the Glowpick (Photo courtesy of Glowpick) Now more than just a ranking application When the two reporters from News H had congratulated him on making Glowpick’s first offline store in Shinsegae Gangnam, Kong waved his hands with modesty. Now GLOWDAYZ has made its first step in the offline distribution channel, but Kong has bigger dreams. “It’s only part of the plan,” said Kong. The ultimate goal of the company, he mentioned, is to equip its own distribution channel. He aims to develop Glowpick to provide accurate information that fits with individual skin type, and the consumers can conveniently purchase the product without having to leave the application. Behind all the glowing success, Kong has experienced two times the bitter failures. Kong first grew his interest in IT business in his first job at a media company. Media trend at that time was changing from traditional newspapers to mobile news, so Kong created new media contents in the company. Then, after graduation, Kong started his own venture both in Korea and in the States. “Both didn’t really work out too well for various reasons. But thinking back, those experiences became stepping stones for me,” recalled Kong. He also asserted that Korean society has to be more open to failures. "That way, more people, including the younger generation, should feel safer to bring their ideas into the world, which they should. I myself wouidn't be able to overcome the obstacles I faced," said Kong with a warm smile. The offline store of Glowpick in Shinsegae Gangnam (Photo courtesy of Glowpick) Kim So-yun dash070@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Kim Youn-soo

2017-10 02

[Alumni]Don’t be Afraid to Follow Your Values

The third top box office hit in the history of Korean documentary films, Our President (2017) is directed by a Hanyang alumni, Lee Chang-jae (Policy Studies, ’94). He studied engineering before coming to Hanyang, and studied law in our school. After graduation, he worked in the field of journalism, then media. Now he is a documentary movie director, a writer, and a professor. News H visited Lee this week to have a closer look into his past and recent work. Lee is enthusiastically explaining how leading one's life by oneself is important. What seems like a winding path “If I look back, it was not all so meaningless after all,” said Lee, thinking back to his past. Lee studied law because of his parent’s will. He originally wanted to study history, but his parents told him he would never get a job majoring in history. During his college years, he wanted to discover and prove what he liked and was good at. He figured writing was his path, and applied for numerous competitions, all of which he did not win. Dramatically, he won first place in the Hanyang Literature Competition. “Thinking ‘I wanted to walk this path’ in my mind only seemed like it would fly away so easily. I had to prove myself before really going into the other direction.” After being discharged from the military, Lee felt that he must climb the tree to eat the fruit. Hoping to study journalism, he desperately felt the need for more information. There were not a lot of graduates, nor peers to help him. Therefore, he knocked on the doors of the Executive Vice President and Head of the Office of Planning. He demanded a preparation group for the press exam, which is now the preparation course for the press examination. In his first and second job, he felt he lost the dominance over his life once again. Leading a hectic life and being promoted fast, time flew, and he had sipped his bridle away. Hence, he went to Chicago to learn film. Poster of Lee's latest movie, Our President (2017) One step forward at the edge of a cliff There is a saying in Buddhism, ‘百尺竿頭進一步’. It means to take a step forward at the edge of a hundred ‘chuck’ (a traditional measure length of a hand, 33.3cm.) cliff. Going to Chicago and coming back to Korea was a big step for Lee. Making a movie took about three years, and with him having nothing left in Korea made him feel heavy. That’s when he was offered a position with the school. Lee makes movies on the topics he is interested in. The movie, On the Road (2013) was based on the reflection he had 20 years ago, seriously considering entering the Buddhist priesthood. The latest movie, Our President (2017) started on Lee’s hope to remind Korean citizens that we once had a time when people chose their own presidential candidates and the president. “Just like superheroes go and save the world when they are told of their super-power, I wanted to give our citizens a reminder that they own their country.” Lee mentioned that because another documentary movie on the late Roh’s life was released just a few months before Lee’s movie, he had to look for the clips that were not used in the other movie. Looking through the 60 hour long material, the last moment when Roh says, “I am Roh Moo-hyun” and turns his back caught Lee’s eyes. “It felt like the clip was left unused for me.” That’s when he decided the ending moment of the entire film. “Out of 9000 minutes of the interview, only 40 minutes are used in the documentary. That’s why I need to look back at the materials and take some time for myself to contemplate.” Lee always notices himself being changed after a film. “I have to be completely immersed into one’s life in order to make a documentary film. Change in my perspective is almost inevitable,” said Lee. He pointed that introspection and learning has to be balanced to form a truly dimensional self. That is why he always writes a book after a film. Lee plans to start on another project around the upcoming December. “Whenever I make a new movie, external success is not my goal. Only my inner values that I pursue truly fulfills me,” said Lee with a peaceful smile on his face. Kim So-yun dash070@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Kim Youn-soo

2017-09 26

[Student]Two Brave Hanyangians Saving Lives

Stepping into emergency situations requires a great deal of courage and training. This week, News H met two of the brave lions of Hanyang, Lee Mok-wang (Division of Sport Science, 3rd year) and Lee Beum-hee (Chinese Language & Literature, 1st year). Both students saved a man’s life by operating cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Lee Mok-wang is explaining the situation. Q1. Could you explain the situation when you found the patient? Beom-hee: I was on patrol in the Dongdaemun area with a police lieutenant as usual when a couple walking in front of us reported the patient. The man was laying on the ground and his body was stiff, breath being short. His eyes were flipped, so I immediately felt something was wrong with him. Mok-wang: An evening before Memorial Day, I went to Korea Integrated Freight Terminal for a one day part time job. While I was working, a man about five meters away from me collapsed while grabbing a bar. Nobody knew he was having cardiac arrest. We all just thought he was taking a break. I had my eyes on him because I felt something was going on. Then I realized his breath was abnormally rapid and deep. Q2. Why were you around the area? Beom-hee: I am serving as a tourist police, and a tourist policeperson patrols tourist attractions such as Dongdaemun, Myung-dong, and Hongdae in rotation. I have never seen a person passed out on the ground on my past patrols, though. Mok-wang: I was working in the terminal as a daily part timer. I was planning to donate the daily wage to the Ansan Shalom Welfare Center because I always wanted to share with people in need. I find it very lucky for someone who can perform CPR to be there at the moment to save a man’s life. Q3. What was the first thought that came into your mind? Beom-hee: To be honest, I was scared at first. I am a policeperson but I have never seen anyone like that. But the uniform gave me a big sense of responsibility. Q4. What were the people around you doing at the time? Beom-hee: The police lieutenant that I was accompanied with told me that we have to tilt the patient’s head to open the airway. That’s when we realized his head was bleeding. As there were no more people than us and the initial reporters, I asked them to call for the ambulance. But they were already calling. The couple explained the situation to the paramedic on the phone and told me what he said. Mok-wang: They were in a state of panic, not knowing what to do. I asked a person to call the ambulance while performing CPR. It took about 10 to 15 minutes for the ambulance to come. Lee Beum-hee is holding an award from the Seoul Metropolitan Police Agency. (Photo courtesy of Lee) Q5. How long did you operate CPR? What thoughts did you have during the operation? Beom-hee: It took about four to five minutes, but I wasn't so sure. Performing CPR was harder than I thought because I had to put all my weight to my arms. During the operation, the patient’s wife and young daughter came and were crying. Looking at his family being so worried, I couldn’t stop. Mok-wang: I performed for about 10 to 15 minutes, and it was tiring. But, because I major in sports, I work our regularly, and I think it helped a lot. Q6. When did you know that the patient would be okay? Beon-hee: As I was performing CPR, right before the ambulance arrived, the patient’s eyes came back to a normal position, and he was able to breathe on his own. I could feel he was coming back. I was so relieved. Because for the past four minutes of operation, he did not move or react at all. I was also frantic at that time, but I still remembered hearing an old gentleman saying, ‘oh, he’s alive now.’ Q7. When did you learn how to perform CPR? Beom-hee: I learned CPR in the army recruits’ training center. I couldn’t remember everything I learned at the moment, but I did everything that I remembered. Mok-wang: I learned it for the first time when I entered the military in the army recruits’ training center. After I was discharged from the military, I had an opportunity to learn once again in school. (Left) Lee Mok-wang is delivering his daily wage to the Ansan Shalom Welfare Center. (Right) Lee recieved an achievement award from the Dean of College of Sports and Arts. Q8. Did you get in contact with the patient after they got better? Beom-hee: Unfortunately I didn't. About two weeks after the incident, I heard that he was a professor in Macau through a news article, so I tried to find his contact on the university homepage. However, I could not find him. I did ask for his contact in the hospital when I saw him for the last time, but his wife told me they don’t have any contact in Korea. Mok-wang: I did not personally get in touch with him, but I heard that he is living in a tough environment. I am not expecting any thanks because I did what I had to do. I just wish he gets well soon. Q9. Is there a thing you would like to mention to others? Beom-hee: I would like to say something to the people who will learn CPR in the future. You might wonder if you will ever perform CPR in your life, but unexpected things happen in life in unexpected moments. I recommend you teach CPR to your family members, as anyone can have cardiac arrest, even at home. Mok-wang: Please pay attention during the CPR education. Many people disregard the precious education and let it pass by. However, if you learn the operation properly, someday you will be able to handle emergency situations well. We need to be conscious that cardiac arrest can happen to your family and friends. "I was able to realize the weight of a uniform through this incident. I hope I can manage future emergency situations better and more calmly." Kim So-yun dash070@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Kim Youn-soo and Park Young-min

2017-09 19

[Faculty]Robotics is for Everyone

“I will be riding a huge robot like in the cartoons in 100 years, and I’ll live forever,” smiled Professor Han Jea-kweon (Department of Interdisciplinary Robit Engineering ). Han in his office in the late afternoon gave two vastly contrasting impressions of a pure child and an agile scholar. News H met with Han to hear more stories about his recent developments and insight in robotics. Han is explaining how much experience is valuable. Get out of the library “It’s really sad that most students ask me the question because it implies how much the young generation of our society is suffering from uncertainty, especially on their future.” When asked, ‘What made you become a robot engineer?’, Han answered both sarcastically and empathetically. He did have a special reason on becoming the person who he is now, but he wanted to make sure that the readers do not fall into the frame of thought that a person needs ‘the moment’ or ‘the reason’ to decide what to do in the future. Han went on to explain that a person passes by hundreds and thousands of opportunities in his or her lifetime, but it is what gives them fun and joy that they are truly attracted to. And ‘the thing’ is not found in books but in experiences. Han himself has also accumulated abundant experiences as a foundation of being one of the leading scholar in the field. Han has always wanted to make robots, but due to the lack of opportunities in Korea at that time, he proceeded with his study in graduate school in automobiles. Then, he got a job in a major company as mainstream society had told him to. “But there was always this unfulfilled thirst inside telling me, ‘this is not your life! You are not born to do this, go on and do what you really want to do,” recalled Han. So, he chose to study in the States to overcome such lack of opportunity. “At that time, I did not foresee my salary to be cut in half,” laughed Han. Geek in the lab Han expressed the most enthusiasm and seriousness when he talked about his work. “I really was a geek before. Watching robot animation is still one of the most important parts of my day,” said Han. The first robot he ever made was a ‘Humvee’, a transformer-like robot. The Humvee was made over the course of one week, during my summer vacation back in 2007, when the movie Transformers (2007) was first released. Han and his wife rebuilt an RC car ‘hummer’ and gave it arms and legs. The Humvee video ‘Real Transformer NO C.G. Upgrade Version -Humvee Bioloid-‘ uploaded on Youtube hit more than 342,000 views to this date. Han’s passion for robots only grew over time while he studied in the United States for his doctoral degree. After coming back to Korea, Han participated in DARPA (Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency) Robotics Challenge that lasted for three years from 2012 to 2015. Coming back from the States, Han was bitterly surprised at the situation of the Korean robotics field. The biggest challenge he felt was the lack of intelligence. “The people we had, one by one, were brighter than the ones I’ve seen in the States, but the absolute number was too small.” Han compared the situation with the professional baseball league, where other countries such as Japan or the US have lots of back up players to change in every match, but we do not. That is the moment when he decided to get involved in education. EDIE, one of Han's robots. EDIE is a type of Human Robot interaction robot, intricately structured to communicate and bond with humans. Robots WILL create jobs “Humanity has been worried about robots and machines taking their jobs since the 1760s,” smiled Han. He advised that we need to search for what we can do ‘with’ the robots instead of being worried about what they will take from us. Traditional elites good at calculation and memorizing will lose jobs. But people with intuition, sense and creativity will flourish in unlimited possibilities. That is because robotics requires people from all fields with the aforementioned qualities. For instance, it took a designer, psychologists, and screen play experts in creating a Human Robot Interaction (HRI) robot EDIE. “Robot is a tool needed in our daily lives. Students now need to contemplate on how to progress one step ahead with robots and create social values.” Han plans to focus on three main topics in robotics; humanoid robots, HRI and disaster inspection robots for the short term. Kim So-yun dash070@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Park Yong-min