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2018-09 10

[Student]Artificial Intelligence Novel Competition Award Winners

Only a few fear that artificial intelligence (AI) will annihilate mankind, but many do worry that it will replace their jobs. Some repetitive and analytical jobs such as writing sports or stock news have in fact been mostly replaced by algorithms. In this era, a team of Hanyang University undergraduate students have developed an AI that can write fiction. From left, Ko Hyung-kwon (Mathematics, 4th year), Lee Kyu-won, Jung Jae-eun, and Yoon Cheol-ju (all three Industrial Engineering, 4th year), the members of the Long Short-term Memory team, on August 17th (Photo Courtesy of Ko) Led by Ko Hyung-kwon (Mathematics, 4thyear), the team named Long Short-term Memory (LSTM), a type of network the team used to enable deep learning, won the silver medal from the KT Artificial Intelligence Novel Contest on August 17, 2018 with their novel titled, ‘The Rebel.’ LSTM was the only team to be composed of undergraduate engineering students among all other competitors. Ko and three other team members, Lee Kyu-won (Industrial Engineering, 4th year), Jung Jae-eun (Industrial Engineering, 4th year), and Yoon Cheol-ju (Industrial Engineering, 4th year) met and formed their team in the IE Capstone Design class, where students must conduct group research on any topic. Ko originally recruited the team with the research focus on AI's writing poems but quickly changed the route to novels when they learned about the competition. Working for about four months on the project beginning in March, the team had spent a lot of time studying what an AI is. “There are a lot of open source algorithms that can create stuff, but as we had no prior knowledge of AI, we had to start from scratch by studying,” reminisced Lee. The hardest part of studying was that there were not many available materials in Korean. Ko remarked, “as a team leader, I had to know more than my team members, so I took online courses from prestigious U.S. universities despite my poor English.” Team members are explaining how they prepared for the competiton. Yoon Yoon Cheol-ju (Industrial Engineering, 4th year) mentioned that good teamwork led to good results. On top of the industriously-acquired knowledge, the team built their algorithm in a quite innovative way. Realizing the inevitability of human intervention, the team tried to minimize it by coding the AI to recommend five possible sentences that follow the previous one. “To make the computer understand the characteristics of sentences, whether it is part of a dialogue or a descriptive sentence, we had to tag all the sentences in the input database,” Ko said. Therefore, ‘The Rebel,' a high school romance fiction, was created. “We had to utilize online fiction for copyright issues, and the vast majority of the available source for the sentences were romantic novels,” mentioned Jung. To the question, ‘Is AI really life-threatening?’ All the team members crossed their heads. Yoon added, “I thought it would be, so I planned to take my career down that road. But as I learned more and struggled myself, I was able to feel the barrier still existing in many ways, especially in the creative work.” The team has now disbanded, and the members are expecting to graduate soon. They all have different plans, but the intense experience has influenced their career path to research or work in a related field. Click to read 'The Rebel' Kim So-yun dash070@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Park Geun-hyung

2018-09 04

[Student]Hanyang Lions Spreading Wings to the World

For those who aspire to take their life out to the world, studying or working overseas can be a great option. However, not everyone actually gets to live abroad because of so many elements to consider such as language, being apart from friends and family, and the lack of information. This week, News H met two proud Hanyang students, Heo Byeong-geun (Department of Political Science and International Studies, '18) and Cho Kyung-min (Mechanical Engineering, 4th year) to listen to their stories of how they tackled all the barriers. From left, Cho Kyung-min (Mechanical Engineering, 4th year) and Heo Byeong-geun (Department of Political Science and International Studies, '18) Off to New York to become a researcher Heo was accepted to New York University for a PhD in politics with a full scholarship this year. A scholarship package is given to all students in the doctorate program. He remarked that during his days in the military, he realized that he wanted pursue his career in Political Science. After being discharged from the military, Heo actively started to prepare for graduate school. “Along the way, I learned that I can go directly for a doctorate degree without a masters,” smiled Heo. Post graduate institutions require a Curriculum Vitae (CV), a form of resume, to assess one’s academic career. Nonetheless, Heo had little to write about, with him being an undergraduate student. “I had to knock on some doors,” mentioned Heo. He eventually got to join some projects with his professors. Although he started his preparation right before his senior year, he recommends others to start as soon as possible. “The sooner the better.” Japanese company to start a career Cho Kyung-min also made up his mind to work in Japan when he as a soldier. “A year of working holiday in Japan gave me some sense of what it would be like to work in Japan, and I loved it,” mentioned Cho. The key part in the preparation for him was ‘self-assessment.’ Cho wrote down ten of the most important events in his life and analyzed his characteristics into fifty words based on them. Cho emphasized the importance of this practice: “knowing oneself thoroughly from an objective point of view enables one to find the right job and to answer interview questions with stories and sound reason.” Both Heo and Cho emphasized that one need to go out and knock on doors and ask around for information, rather than relying too much on the internet or private matching organizations. “Simply wanting to escape the situation does not help. You need to prepare thoroughly and with confidence in the path you are choosing,” said Cho. Cho is starting his work with the Sumimoto Group, one of the four largest electronics companies in Japan as a researcher. Kim So-yun dash070@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Park Geun-hyung

2018-08 30 Important News

[Alumni]Hanyang Alumni in WFUNA

From a young age, many students dream of working for an international organization such as the United Nations (UN) . Lee Young-jin (International Studies, ’12) has been actively engaging in spreading the goals of the UN and educating civil society as part of the World Federation of United Nations Associations (WFUNA) since 2016, as a Training and Education Associate. He shared his experience and tips to his fellow dreamers at Hanyang this week. News H interviewed Lee Young-jin (International Studies, '12) at the World Federation of United Nations Associations office, a sister organization of the United Nations. Is WFUNA part of the UN? “Many people get confused about whether WFUNA is part of the United Nations, but it’s more like a sister organization,” smiled Lee. While the UN works with countries and facilitates relationships and cooperation among its member nations, WFUNA is more focused on the relationship between people and the UN. The organization also functions as the head of more than a hundred United Nation Associations all over the world. Lee is working in the Seoul branch, which is one of three secretariats of WFUNA: New York, Geneva, and Seoul. As the only secretariat in Asia, the Seoul office works to spread their Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), especially focusing on the young. Lee, as a Training and Education Associate, is in charge of educational programs that promote and strengthen the UN's values and educate the participants to help them become global citizens in the form of the Model United Nations (MUN). He came back just last week from New York, with the Youth Program at the UN: Korea. Lee Young-jin (top right, International Studies, '12) with his students from the Youth Program at the UN: Korea. (Photo courtesy of Lee) Focusing on specialty When asked what made him work for a global nonprofit organization, Lee mentioned his long experience with the MUN. Lee has been participating in numerous MUN programs since the first year of high school, and he once even hosted Hanyang's MUN when he was the vice president of the Division of International Studies. He also worked as part of the United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) in Korea to organize Model UNESCO in his junior year. “One has to have his or her own specialty in order to work with international organizations,” Lee emphasized. With his abundant experience with MUNs, he was offered a position as a trainer in the WFUNA Youth Camp, which he is now in charge of. That was the beginning of his career in the field. His fluency in Korean, English, and French is also a strength when it comes to working in such an organization. “Working in WFUNA Seoul requires excellence in both English and Korean, and if one wishes to work in Geneva, French would be important too,” mentioned Lee. He pointed out that good scores and so-called "specifics" required to work in major corporations in Korea is not valued as much in the field. Rather, Lee encouraged students to focus on their work experience and specialty. Kim So-yun dash070@hanyang.ac.kr

2018-07 17

[Faculty]Old Poetry Gathered into a Book

People say that being a parent is a whole new experience that brings so many unexperienced emotions and thoughts into one's life. Professor Pak Dong-uk (Korean Language & Literature) felt the same as any other father. With his son being born at a relatively late age for him, he was mesmerized by the feelings the little one gave him. He did not stop there but put his overflowing feelings into poem and searched more vigorously through old Korean poems written about family and being a father. Pak recently published his third book on the subject, No Flower Better that You. The title of this collection of poems sounds as if it is a love story or a love letter and indeed, it is. It all started with a question: Did fathers from the Joseon dynasty really disregard their daughters as portrayed in the dramas? It is widely known that Joseon – a country that later became the Republic of Korea – believed strongly in Confucianism. One commonly held belief was that women deserved fewer rights and respect than they do in contemporary Korean society. Wives who were forced back to work the day after giving birth to a daughter instead of a precious son are commonly portrayed in films and dramas that take place on the pages of our history. But as a father, Pak wondered if that would be true. News H interviewed Pak Dong-uk (Korean Language & Literature) in the Engineering BuildingⅡ. Pak's No Flower Better than You was published on May 18th. Using his early morning time before going to his 9 a.m. classes, Pak was able to find dozens of old poems written by fathers to their daughters, filled with nothing but love. “I figured fathers loved their daughters throughout history,” smiled Pak. His work does not necessarily say that all daughters during the Joseon Dynasty were loved as much as the daughters of the contemporary world, but it does point out that ladies in affluent families (enough for their father to be literate) were loved by their fathers, unlike the common misconception. It has been seven years since my daughter has been born, I can’t let her go out the doors now. A crow reminds you playing with ink, And a bracken reminds of your small hands picking up chestnuts. You wouldn’t have gotten used to getting ready in the morning with your mother. Who would comfort you when you cry for dad at night? Just wait child, for I will hug you the first thing I get back home, Even before I get my coats off. <Thinking of my daughter>, Jo Wee-han Pak himself defines a father as "a person who does not fall." He remarked that he feels so much more responsibility to his family and that having a child has widened his perspective of the world. “I now treat my students differently, because I keep thinking how precious they must be to their own parents.” Two more books on the topic of married couples will be published later this year. Pak still has endless topics he would love to write, collect and introduce old poems about. He gave readers of News H a special sneak peek into his upcoming book that will be published later this year. He said “It's about a truely genius poet named Lee Un-jin, who died at the age of 27. He wrote a series of poems with 170 poems in it, and that's all I can reveal now,” smiled Pak. The professor was humorous for the entire interview, yet he had much seriousness in his face. Kim So-yun dash070@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Kang Cho-hyun

2018-06 25

[Faculty]Childhood Inspiration Shared With Pupils

Some people have ‘that moment’ when they decide what career path to pursue. For Kim Eung-soo (Department of String and Wind Instruments), it was when he first listened to Mozart’s Violin Concertos when he was in elementary school. After about 30 years, Kim organized a concert with his students to play his childhood inspiration at Paiknam Art hall, on April 30th. Not a lot of concert play the entire concertos (comprised of five songs) in one occassion, as the pieces are long and very difficult to play. It is most likely that Kim’s performance was the first one in Korean musical history to play the whole set of songs at once. To perfect the songs, Kim and ensemble SOL practiced for two months for the concert. Kim Hyung-eun (String & Wind Instruments,4th year) mentioned “after this concert, preparing other songs and concerts felt whole lot easier.” Unlike other concerts, where there are separate team to organize the event, the performers had to do everything from advertising, contacting journalists and putting up posters on the wall. Kim Eung-soo (Department of String and Wind Instruments) is explaining about the meaning of ensemble SOL at Paiknam Art hall, on April 30th. The ensemble members all students of Kim, with 15 violin players. It is not common for a professor and students to play in a same concert, as there are unignorable gaps between the performers. What Kim wanted to make through the event is to make a “fence” for his students to keep in touch and to cooperate with eath other even after the graduation. Kim, the student, also agreed on the point commenting “through overcoming the hardships together, the performers became really close.” She also thanked her professor for making the concert possible. Kim graduated all three universities; University of Music and Performing arts Vienna, University of Music and Performing arts Gratz and Hannover Universty of Music, Drama and Media summa kum laude (first of class, meaning ‘with highest honor’ in English). However, despite of his awards and career, I could tell he is a very humble person through his remarks such as “I personally don’t think I am good enough to teach anyone,” “I am honored to participate in one of the most great things humanly possible, education.” Kim also emphasized that Hanyang University students have the necessary skills to become top musicians, so that they need to have more pride in our school and be more self-content. Kim and some of his students, namely Kim Hyung-eun, is participating in Korean Chamber Music Concert on coming 27th and 29th of June, at Seoul Arts Center. He also plans to make more events where he can harmonize with his students sometime next month. With the love and passion for both violin and his students, his plans seem bright. "Have more confidence" was the encouragement message Kim wants to give to his students. Kim so-yun dash070@naver.com Photos by Kang Cho-hyun

2018-06 22

[Student]Singer, Student, and Star

Many of us have tuned in for Mnet’s Super Star K for several years now. One competitor on Super Star K 4 (2012) who made it to the top 12 chose to attend Hanyang University and is now preparing to graduate. News H met Lee Ji Hye (Applied Music, 4th year) on a sunny summer afternoon at an aesthetic café in front of ERICA campus. Lee, on June 20th. She was just like any other Hanyang student, happy for her semester to finally be over. Lee was 17 when she auditioned for Super Star K, and this was her first audition ever. Lee loved music, especially playing musical instruments such as classical piano and Cello. She also loved singing from a young age, but the dream of becoming a singer did not seem like an option for her due to her parents’ disapproval. Nevertheless, Lee stepped up and participated in the audition program, wanting to see how good she was. Lee definitely made a positive impression on the public with her singing. However, there were rumors and hateful comments as well - a harsh thing for a 17-year-old student to handle. “I have still never watched a single episode of the show. But I was able to get through the hard times with my mother’s support and her positivity. We used to laugh at the comments because while they were all very mean, they also praised my singing,” smiled Lee. Through the experience, she believes she has gotten stronger and more careful about talking about celebrities or even friends on the topic of unidentified rumors. Despite the harsh criticism she has received, Lee is thankful for the experience she had, especially the Super Star K Concert in Olympic Park, which was attended by an audience of several thousand people. The high school student grew up to become a mature artist and student at Hanyang who writes her own lyrics. Lee is now officially listed as a songwriter after her recent digital single, "No Spring After All" (2017). The emotional, sorrowful lyrics are partly based on her experiences during college, especially the lessons she learned through break-ups, she had through break-ups. Lee mentioned that “the hardest part while writing a song was to confine my thoughts into a fixed melody. I didn’t want to write lyrics like all the other love songs out there; I wanted to put my feelings and thoughts into it, but it felt like it would be hard for the public to really understand it if I only told it with my own words. Finding the right balance between the two was difficult.” Lee performing on stage. She emphasizes the importance of lyrics and the delivery of emotion through them. (Photo courtesy of Lee) Like the song "No Spring After All" (2017), most of Lee’s songs are ballads. Lee commented that her voice and tone fit with emotional lines, but she has recently started listening to rock music and happy songs as part of an effort to ‘"not be too sad." Lee strives to grow as an artist. She tries especially hard to deliver emotion and sensations through her songs. Now preparing for the upcoming graduation show this October, she is looking forward to being able to impact more and more audiences in the future. Kim So-yun dash070@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Lee Jin-myung

2018-06 04

[Alumni]Dance What Words Cannot Describe

One of the two modern dance companies in Korea, Daegu Contemporary Dance Company, is greeting its seventh art director Kim Sung-yong (Dance, '00). News H interviewed Kim at a café near Suseo station on Saturday, June 2nd. Kim Sung-yong (Dance, ’00) in his recent repertoire Taking. Kim defined creation as "taking something that already exists and putting a meaning to it' in this particular choreography. (Photo courtesy of Kim) Kim started his career in an arts high school, through a teacher’s recommendation from middle school. As a young performer, Kim dreamed of one day being the director of Daegu Contemporary Dance Company. “I couldn’t believe it,” said Kim, reminiscing the moment he got the final offer from the company. He was as excellent a dancer as he is as a choreographer. With "Chaconne in G Minor" by Tomaso Antonio Vitali, Kim won 1st prize at the Dong-A Dance Competition at the age of 20. Winning in 1997, he is still the youngest winner in the history of the competition. After graduation, Kim became a semi-finalist in the third Japan International Ballet and Modern Dance Competition. That led to endless job offers from Japan, and later from Europe and North America. When asked what the hardest part of such a long and ongoing career of dancing was, Kim replied "personal relations." He explained, “Dancing itself was never too hard or exhausting. I never thought of quitting dancing in my life,” smiled Kim. The foremost value of dancing for Kim is to express what words cannot. He described dancing as metaphoric and intangible but stronger than physical objects or words. Through such visual expression, Kim wishes people, including the audience, dancers, and himself to discover feelings that they did not know existed before. That was the idea at the core of the more than 130 routines he coreographed. For instance, in his most recent and the first piece as the director of Daegu Contemporary Dance Company, Goon-joong (The Crowd), he tried to convey his contemplation on the idea of violence. Why are some people violent? Are all offenders simply offenders, or are they also victims? In the end, he came to the conclusion that the bystanders doing nothing about the violence are the worst people. Kim’s term ends in two years, and it seems like his schedule is fully booked for the coming years. He and his team have various festivals and performances to participate in both in Korea and abroad. Despite the busy schedule and the hectic life he is leading, Kim’s eyes shined with passion and interest throughout the interview. Kim So-yun dash070@hanyang.ac.kr

2018-05 06

[Alumni]Reinterpreting Korean Culture Through Fashion

“I love my design style because it is so direct,” smiled Jang Yoon-kyung (Jewelry & Fashion Design, ERICA, '18). News H met Jang, who is the designer for SET SET SET, on a chilly spring day. She was recognizeable even before she entered the café because of her unique earrings of her own creation and their catchy look. It was as if she was silently screaming, "I’m a fashion designer!" "The brand name means three things; the three members (three in Korean, pronounced 'set'), the set clothes as we often design, and Sse-sse-sse (a Korean traditional hand-clapping game)," explained Jang Yoon-kyung, in a café near her office on Sunday, May 6th. A Vancouver Fashion Week participating designer When asked how she felt about receiving the invitation to Vancouver Fashion Week in 2017, Jang replied “I thought it was a scam at first,” with a playful smile. Jang and her brand SET SET SET were invited to the Vancouver Fashion Show for two seasons in a row - 2018 Spring/Summer season and 2018 Fall/Winter season. SET SET SET is a designer brand that launched on July 28th, 2016. As the founder and the only designer for the brand, Jang places the emphasis of Korean culture as their core identity. “We use cultural aspects of Korea in making the textiles of our clothes. For example, our theme for last season was the new year’s blessing (bok) culture in Korea,” mentioned Jang. After receiving the dreamlike invitation to the international stage, Jang and her crew worked day and night for two months to complete the collection of 46 pieces. SET SET SET definitely made an impression on the fashion world, receiving love calls from Tokyo and Seoul after their debut. Nonetheless, it has not all been such an easy road for Jang. SET SET SET started out as a start-up club on ERICA campus with two other friends. Hanyang University provided a lot of help and supplies before they launched the brand, but after the business registration, it was all up to Jang. “The biggest issue was money, of course.” Despite of the precarious situation, Jang did not want to make clothes that would just "sell well." She emphasized that SET SET SET was and still is a brand that pursues her design spiri: kitsch and direct. “The invitation to Vancouver arrived when I was devastated and had almost given up,” reminisced Jang. Pursuing her identity through the brand, telling the story of Korean culture through clothes, Jang was able to seize this big opportunity. Left: Jang's personal favorite from the recent 2018 F/W collection. Right: A skirt and a t-shirt from the 2018 S/S collection. The theme was Samul-nori, a Korean traditional instrument, so the pattern of the skirt (enlarged in the bottom right corner) has traditional musical instruments such as Jang-gu or Book. (Photo courtesy of Jang) Do it to know it “I was only able to discover my aptitude for business after I actually started,” smiled Jang. She recommends people "go out and do something" to experience for themselves what they like - and even more importantly - what they don't like. Jang herself was able to realize that she fancies designing more than actually making the clothes after joining the ELAB (Erica Lab) club that required her to intensely make clothes. Her thought on this matter became even clearer when she took a yearlong break from school after her first year and studied fashion design skills in depth. The same applied to her entrepreneurship. Jang mentioned that she was only able to venture into the fashion business because she was so young and naïve. Her friends and seniors advised against her launching the brand without experiencing the industry as part of a company, but she thinks that a loss of innocent brought about by experience in the industry would have kept her from actually starting her own business. Is it for her experience-based career? Jang seemed like a person with ambition. She did not hide her passion and trust in her design style throughout the interview. “I want SET SET SET to be the first thing that comes into people’s minds when they think of Korean culture...I believe that my brand will grow big sometime in the future.” While striving to provide a unique and new standpoint in recreating Korean culture, Jang aims to debut in Tokyo, London, and New York in two years. News H also wishes Jang and SET SET SET success to thrive on a bigger stage. Kim So-yun dash070@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Kang Cho-hyun

2018-04 30

[Alumni]Don't Set Your Limits, You Can Become Anything

Have you ever wondered what kind of people work at Google and YouTube? For the amount of workload and the complexity of the technology involved, the workers must be geniuses, right? This week, News H had an opportunity to meet one of the geniuses, a proud alumnus of Hanyang, Jeon Joon-hee (Mathematics, ’95). News H had an opportunity to briefly interview Jeon Joon-hee on the 24th of April, right before his lecture for Hanyang students who are planning to start their own businesses. Although it was a short interview, Jeon passionately and energetically answered some questions. Work, work and more work! Jeon’s life so far has been a full-time, ceaseless factory. Starting his career with his college friends by developing software called 21st Century Word Processor, they founded a company named ESTsoft in 1991. At that time, there were no programs usng iKorean text that enabled people to open multiple documents at once or change the size of the fonts. To make matters worse, the length of a document was limited. “With the invention of the word processor, people started to switch from writing bothersome work such as papers for a class by hand to typing them,” mentioned Jeon. With the increasing demand for technology and the unexplored trait of the industry, Jeon detected a possibility. However, the barrier for the latecomer was higher than expected. “After pouring our lives into the poject for about a year and a half, we came up with version 1.8, right around the time when Hangul 2.0 was released,” reminisced Jeon with a bitter smile. Hangul emerged in the word processor market five years earlier than Jeon’s 21st Century Word Processor, and was also developed by college students. Jeon was not let down by the market barrier. He and his friend worked harder to encompass as many features as Hangul had and to develop original ideas as well. Also, they targeted a specific customer of computer academies who could not afford the expensive license of Hangul. ESTsoft Corporation still persists in the market with their leading product of ALZip, and Jeon still consults for the company with affection. To the unknown land of America Jeon is now working as an Engineering Director for YouTube TV, in charge of the whole project team. Surprisingly enough, he was not fluent in English nor had he planned to get a job in the states from the beginning. Jeon left Seoul to expand his online game business that he started with his friend after his second job at Hanmeoft Corp, with a million-pound investment from a Korean-British official. With the hope of succeeding in the birthplace of online gaming, Jeon found out that the investor had passed away due to a heart attack. “I called my wife and she told me not to come back,” he chuckled. Getting a job in a foreign land where you do not speak their language well was challenging. It was especially difficult for Jeon who had never written a resume nor gone to a job interview. “After some trial and error, I was able to understand and forecast the interview questions. I put down all the possible questions, memorized them to the bones, and then the interviews suddenly felt so easy,” smiled Jeon. The first job he had in the U.S. unfortunately was acquired by a larger company soon, with the economic recession led by the bursting of the dot com bubble. The second job was interesting but the task was somewhat repetitive. That is when he was offered a position at Google. “I wanted to do something fun and innovative,” said Jeon. Jeon is enthusiastically giving a lecture to Hanyang sudents on the 24th of April, as part of the Hanyang Global Startup Mentor Session, "Start Your Business Like Google." Setting the bar high When asked what enabled him to race so hard and so far, Jeon smiled and replied, “I don’t set my limits. I believe I can do or become anything.” Listening to his stories, Jeon’s life has had its ups and downs. He encountered a huge barrier with his first project, was devastated by the death of his investor, and had his company subjected to a hostile acquisition, but after all these setbacks he was able to dust off, stand up, and start running again because he had faith in what he could become. “I believe that who you are now is the collection of thoughts you had in the past,” said Jeon, with a bright, warm smile. Kim So-yun dash070@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Kang Cho-hyun

2018-04 16

[Student]A Lion in the Sky

As of February 2018, there are more than 30 countries worldwide depending on nuclear power, with about 510 reactors and 160 currently in development. Moreover, there are five remaining Nuclear Weapon States (NWS) in the world. Despite the huge amount of electricity that nuclear reactors generate, the world is heading towards nonproliferation and inhibition of further development due to various security and health issues that could potentially affect everyone on the planet. The Korea Advanced Institute of Science & Technology's (KAIST's) Nuclear Nonproliferation Education and Research Center (NEREC) offers a scholarship to a limited number of excellent students in Korea, and Jung Yu-jin (Political Science and International Studies, Master’s program) was the first Hanyangian to be nominated in its three-year history. News H met Jung on a lovely spring afternoon. Nuclear nonproliferation One of the main agendas in the quest for international security is nuclear proliferation, due to the terrorizing destructiveness of the weapon. Although it is left in the hands of international relations professionals, many social science students face a psychological barrier when dealing with the technical aspect of the nuclear energy. Understanding the highly complicated process of nuclear division and the fundamentals of weaponizing it or using it as a power source is somewhat critical, setting a limit for social science students. The same applies for nuclear engineering students too. KAIST, one of the leading science institutes, along with Hanyang University, in Korea, founded the NEREC fellowship program aiming to co-research with social science majors in their master's or doctoral program on the issue of nuclear nonproliferation. Counting its third year in 2018, the research fellows have come from various prestigious schools, while Jung is the first Hanyangian member of the group. Jung submitted a research plan with the focus on international nuclear nonproliferation policies in relation to hegemony (leadership or dominance by one country). “The details of the paper will constantly change in the process,” mentioned Jung. The research fellows will conduct their own research until October, having monthly meetings with their academic advisors. A screen capture of Jung's personal webpage. Her biography and past experiences are well organized. (https://sites.google.com/view/yujinjuliajung/) (Photo courtesy of Jung) International politics as a life career Jung first found her interest in the field when she volunteered at the 2012 Nuclear Security Summit. “I was a third year Policy Studies student, who only knew that this summit was internationally significant but nothing else,” smiled Jung. By having the chance to closely observe the decision making and conference process, her academic interest in nuclear policies grew. This led her to join the Work English Study Travel (WEST) program to work in big organizations that are based in Washington D.C. “When I was working for the Voice of America, I was able to interview and march with the people who support affirmative action. The experience helped me a lot when studying American politics later on,” mentioned Jung. As such, she persued her interest in international politics and nuclear policies trying to experience as much as she could. “I decided to study further after such experiences, especially at Hanyang where the faculty is great and I feel comfortable,” emphasized Jung. She also mentioned that watching theories being applied to real life helped her to cultivate her academic imagination and still inspires her so much. Because studying and experiencing international politics is so exciting for Jung, she plans to apply to begin studying for her doctorate degree this year. “I should focus on the research project in NEREC and my graduation paper; then I look forward to working in research facilities in Korea before I set off to the U.S. for my doctorate degree,” planned Jung with sparkling eyes. Kim So-yun dash070@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Choi Min-ju