Total 19Articles
News list
Content Forum List
2018-06 04

[Alumni]Dance What Words Cannot Describe

One of the two modern dance companies in Korea, Daegu Contemporary Dance Company, is greeting its seventh art director Kim Sung-yong (Dance, '00). News H interviewed Kim at a café near Suseo station on Saturday, June 2nd. Kim Sung-yong (Dance, ’00) in his recent repertoire Taking. Kim defined creation as "taking something that already exists and putting a meaning to it' in this particular choreography. (Photo courtesy of Kim) Kim started his career in an arts high school, through a teacher’s recommendation from middle school. As a young performer, Kim dreamed of one day being the director of Daegu Contemporary Dance Company. “I couldn’t believe it,” said Kim, reminiscing the moment he got the final offer from the company. He was as excellent a dancer as he is as a choreographer. With "Chaconne in G Minor" by Tomaso Antonio Vitali, Kim won 1st prize at the Dong-A Dance Competition at the age of 20. Winning in 1997, he is still the youngest winner in the history of the competition. After graduation, Kim became a semi-finalist in the third Japan International Ballet and Modern Dance Competition. That led to endless job offers from Japan, and later from Europe and North America. When asked what the hardest part of such a long and ongoing career of dancing was, Kim replied "personal relations." He explained, “Dancing itself was never too hard or exhausting. I never thought of quitting dancing in my life,” smiled Kim. The foremost value of dancing for Kim is to express what words cannot. He described dancing as metaphoric and intangible but stronger than physical objects or words. Through such visual expression, Kim wishes people, including the audience, dancers, and himself to discover feelings that they did not know existed before. That was the idea at the core of the more than 130 routines he coreographed. For instance, in his most recent and the first piece as the director of Daegu Contemporary Dance Company, Goon-joong (The Crowd), he tried to convey his contemplation on the idea of violence. Why are some people violent? Are all offenders simply offenders, or are they also victims? In the end, he came to the conclusion that the bystanders doing nothing about the violence are the worst people. Kim’s term ends in two years, and it seems like his schedule is fully booked for the coming years. He and his team have various festivals and performances to participate in both in Korea and abroad. Despite the busy schedule and the hectic life he is leading, Kim’s eyes shined with passion and interest throughout the interview. Kim So-yun dash070@hanyang.ac.kr

2018-05 06

[Alumni]Reinterpreting Korean Culture Through Fashion

“I love my design style because it is so direct,” smiled Jang Yoon-kyung (Jewelry & Fashion Design, ERICA, '18). News H met Jang, who is the designer for SET SET SET, on a chilly spring day. She was recognizeable even before she entered the café because of her unique earrings of her own creation and their catchy look. It was as if she was silently screaming, "I’m a fashion designer!" "The brand name means three things; the three members (three in Korean, pronounced 'set'), the set clothes as we often design, and Sse-sse-sse (a Korean traditional hand-clapping game)," explained Jang Yoon-kyung, in a café near her office on Sunday, May 6th. A Vancouver Fashion Week participating designer When asked how she felt about receiving the invitation to Vancouver Fashion Week in 2017, Jang replied “I thought it was a scam at first,” with a playful smile. Jang and her brand SET SET SET were invited to the Vancouver Fashion Show for two seasons in a row - 2018 Spring/Summer season and 2018 Fall/Winter season. SET SET SET is a designer brand that launched on July 28th, 2016. As the founder and the only designer for the brand, Jang places the emphasis of Korean culture as their core identity. “We use cultural aspects of Korea in making the textiles of our clothes. For example, our theme for last season was the new year’s blessing (bok) culture in Korea,” mentioned Jang. After receiving the dreamlike invitation to the international stage, Jang and her crew worked day and night for two months to complete the collection of 46 pieces. SET SET SET definitely made an impression on the fashion world, receiving love calls from Tokyo and Seoul after their debut. Nonetheless, it has not all been such an easy road for Jang. SET SET SET started out as a start-up club on ERICA campus with two other friends. Hanyang University provided a lot of help and supplies before they launched the brand, but after the business registration, it was all up to Jang. “The biggest issue was money, of course.” Despite of the precarious situation, Jang did not want to make clothes that would just "sell well." She emphasized that SET SET SET was and still is a brand that pursues her design spiri: kitsch and direct. “The invitation to Vancouver arrived when I was devastated and had almost given up,” reminisced Jang. Pursuing her identity through the brand, telling the story of Korean culture through clothes, Jang was able to seize this big opportunity. Left: Jang's personal favorite from the recent 2018 F/W collection. Right: A skirt and a t-shirt from the 2018 S/S collection. The theme was Samul-nori, a Korean traditional instrument, so the pattern of the skirt (enlarged in the bottom right corner) has traditional musical instruments such as Jang-gu or Book. (Photo courtesy of Jang) Do it to know it “I was only able to discover my aptitude for business after I actually started,” smiled Jang. She recommends people "go out and do something" to experience for themselves what they like - and even more importantly - what they don't like. Jang herself was able to realize that she fancies designing more than actually making the clothes after joining the ELAB (Erica Lab) club that required her to intensely make clothes. Her thought on this matter became even clearer when she took a yearlong break from school after her first year and studied fashion design skills in depth. The same applied to her entrepreneurship. Jang mentioned that she was only able to venture into the fashion business because she was so young and naïve. Her friends and seniors advised against her launching the brand without experiencing the industry as part of a company, but she thinks that a loss of innocent brought about by experience in the industry would have kept her from actually starting her own business. Is it for her experience-based career? Jang seemed like a person with ambition. She did not hide her passion and trust in her design style throughout the interview. “I want SET SET SET to be the first thing that comes into people’s minds when they think of Korean culture...I believe that my brand will grow big sometime in the future.” While striving to provide a unique and new standpoint in recreating Korean culture, Jang aims to debut in Tokyo, London, and New York in two years. News H also wishes Jang and SET SET SET success to thrive on a bigger stage. Kim So-yun dash070@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Kang Cho-hyun

2018-04 30

[Alumni]Don't Set Your Limits, You Can Become Anything

Have you ever wondered what kind of people work at Google and YouTube? For the amount of workload and the complexity of the technology involved, the workers must be geniuses, right? This week, News H had an opportunity to meet one of the geniuses, a proud alumnus of Hanyang, Jeon Joon-hee (Mathematics, ’95). News H had an opportunity to briefly interview Jeon Joon-hee on the 24th of April, right before his lecture for Hanyang students who are planning to start their own businesses. Although it was a short interview, Jeon passionately and energetically answered some questions. Work, work and more work! Jeon’s life so far has been a full-time, ceaseless factory. Starting his career with his college friends by developing software called 21st Century Word Processor, they founded a company named ESTsoft in 1991. At that time, there were no programs usng iKorean text that enabled people to open multiple documents at once or change the size of the fonts. To make matters worse, the length of a document was limited. “With the invention of the word processor, people started to switch from writing bothersome work such as papers for a class by hand to typing them,” mentioned Jeon. With the increasing demand for technology and the unexplored trait of the industry, Jeon detected a possibility. However, the barrier for the latecomer was higher than expected. “After pouring our lives into the poject for about a year and a half, we came up with version 1.8, right around the time when Hangul 2.0 was released,” reminisced Jeon with a bitter smile. Hangul emerged in the word processor market five years earlier than Jeon’s 21st Century Word Processor, and was also developed by college students. Jeon was not let down by the market barrier. He and his friend worked harder to encompass as many features as Hangul had and to develop original ideas as well. Also, they targeted a specific customer of computer academies who could not afford the expensive license of Hangul. ESTsoft Corporation still persists in the market with their leading product of ALZip, and Jeon still consults for the company with affection. To the unknown land of America Jeon is now working as an Engineering Director for YouTube TV, in charge of the whole project team. Surprisingly enough, he was not fluent in English nor had he planned to get a job in the states from the beginning. Jeon left Seoul to expand his online game business that he started with his friend after his second job at Hanmeoft Corp, with a million-pound investment from a Korean-British official. With the hope of succeeding in the birthplace of online gaming, Jeon found out that the investor had passed away due to a heart attack. “I called my wife and she told me not to come back,” he chuckled. Getting a job in a foreign land where you do not speak their language well was challenging. It was especially difficult for Jeon who had never written a resume nor gone to a job interview. “After some trial and error, I was able to understand and forecast the interview questions. I put down all the possible questions, memorized them to the bones, and then the interviews suddenly felt so easy,” smiled Jeon. The first job he had in the U.S. unfortunately was acquired by a larger company soon, with the economic recession led by the bursting of the dot com bubble. The second job was interesting but the task was somewhat repetitive. That is when he was offered a position at Google. “I wanted to do something fun and innovative,” said Jeon. Jeon is enthusiastically giving a lecture to Hanyang sudents on the 24th of April, as part of the Hanyang Global Startup Mentor Session, "Start Your Business Like Google." Setting the bar high When asked what enabled him to race so hard and so far, Jeon smiled and replied, “I don’t set my limits. I believe I can do or become anything.” Listening to his stories, Jeon’s life has had its ups and downs. He encountered a huge barrier with his first project, was devastated by the death of his investor, and had his company subjected to a hostile acquisition, but after all these setbacks he was able to dust off, stand up, and start running again because he had faith in what he could become. “I believe that who you are now is the collection of thoughts you had in the past,” said Jeon, with a bright, warm smile. Kim So-yun dash070@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Kang Cho-hyun

2018-04 16

[Student]A Lion in the Sky

As of February 2018, there are more than 30 countries worldwide depending on nuclear power, with about 510 reactors and 160 currently in development. Moreover, there are five remaining Nuclear Weapon States (NWS) in the world. Despite the huge amount of electricity that nuclear reactors generate, the world is heading towards nonproliferation and inhibition of further development due to various security and health issues that could potentially affect everyone on the planet. The Korea Advanced Institute of Science & Technology's (KAIST's) Nuclear Nonproliferation Education and Research Center (NEREC) offers a scholarship to a limited number of excellent students in Korea, and Jung Yu-jin (Political Science and International Studies, Master’s program) was the first Hanyangian to be nominated in its three-year history. News H met Jung on a lovely spring afternoon. Nuclear nonproliferation One of the main agendas in the quest for international security is nuclear proliferation, due to the terrorizing destructiveness of the weapon. Although it is left in the hands of international relations professionals, many social science students face a psychological barrier when dealing with the technical aspect of the nuclear energy. Understanding the highly complicated process of nuclear division and the fundamentals of weaponizing it or using it as a power source is somewhat critical, setting a limit for social science students. The same applies for nuclear engineering students too. KAIST, one of the leading science institutes, along with Hanyang University, in Korea, founded the NEREC fellowship program aiming to co-research with social science majors in their master's or doctoral program on the issue of nuclear nonproliferation. Counting its third year in 2018, the research fellows have come from various prestigious schools, while Jung is the first Hanyangian member of the group. Jung submitted a research plan with the focus on international nuclear nonproliferation policies in relation to hegemony (leadership or dominance by one country). “The details of the paper will constantly change in the process,” mentioned Jung. The research fellows will conduct their own research until October, having monthly meetings with their academic advisors. A screen capture of Jung's personal webpage. Her biography and past experiences are well organized. (https://sites.google.com/view/yujinjuliajung/) (Photo courtesy of Jung) International politics as a life career Jung first found her interest in the field when she volunteered at the 2012 Nuclear Security Summit. “I was a third year Policy Studies student, who only knew that this summit was internationally significant but nothing else,” smiled Jung. By having the chance to closely observe the decision making and conference process, her academic interest in nuclear policies grew. This led her to join the Work English Study Travel (WEST) program to work in big organizations that are based in Washington D.C. “When I was working for the Voice of America, I was able to interview and march with the people who support affirmative action. The experience helped me a lot when studying American politics later on,” mentioned Jung. As such, she persued her interest in international politics and nuclear policies trying to experience as much as she could. “I decided to study further after such experiences, especially at Hanyang where the faculty is great and I feel comfortable,” emphasized Jung. She also mentioned that watching theories being applied to real life helped her to cultivate her academic imagination and still inspires her so much. Because studying and experiencing international politics is so exciting for Jung, she plans to apply to begin studying for her doctorate degree this year. “I should focus on the research project in NEREC and my graduation paper; then I look forward to working in research facilities in Korea before I set off to the U.S. for my doctorate degree,” planned Jung with sparkling eyes. Kim So-yun dash070@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Choi Min-ju

2018-03 19

[Alumni]Where Brands and I Meet: Brandi

Shopping online is no longer magical for most people. E-commerce has bloomed and blossomed in our computers and mobile phones, too. Now there are thousands of personal sellers through their Instagram and blogs. Seo Jung-min (Business, ’07) pondered two questions: Why do all markets have to be scattered all around the internet? Why not make a platform for all markets? Brandi, a marketplace for no-brand apparel Brandi is a mobile application and platform launched in July 2016, which provides a gateway between individual merchandizers and consumers in the female clothing market, especially the ones without a brand. The application enables consumers to easily purchase clothes without logging in or making accounts on individual websites, which saves a lot of hassle for the buyers. The reply from the consumers was great, recording over 20 million accumulated downloads and 12 million users so far. Brandi, designed for a mobile environment that emphasizes a simple and catchy user interface, allows consumers to look through what is new and trending as if shopping is their hobby. Screen captures of the Brandi application. Filters enable customers to find products in the desired price range and popularity rating. The last picture shows that you can view the rankings of individual stores. (Photo courtesy of Brandi) More than 3000 sellers from blogs and Instagram markets are listed in Brandi, and that has led to over 400 milllion won in transactions to be made just last year. The reason behind such progress seems like Seo’s emphasis on the quality of service. All sellers are subject to internal standards that give penalty points whenever a delivery is late or there is no regular update on the market. Also, Seo strived to create unique characteristics of Brandi that differentiate it from other competitors. First, the application has a clear focus on women’s clothing. “If an application covers too many categories, a user would have to scroll through several pages to find exactly what she or he is interested in. If that experience is repeated, the user will not click the app again,” mentioned Seo. That is the reason why the company recently launched another application called HIVER for branded clothes. Moreover, Brandi simplified its purchasing process, which connects all the markets on the application seamlessly. Yet, through its diversity of sellers, the application still provides a wide variety of options for customers to choose from. "The first three years of venture was extremely hard, because I basically knew nothing. But after three years, I think I understood what I had gotten myself into," laughed Seo. A Young Entrepreneur Seo’s first adventure in the venture world started right after his military discharge, while he was still a third grade college student. “My immaturity gave me some hard times, but I was able to throw myself into the world as there was not much for me to lose,” smiled Seo. The business he started at that time was also in the fashion industry, where customers could select their own design of t-shirts. The business was operated by Seo himself for seven years and was then acquired by a big corporation. After two years working in the company, Seo decided to take off on his second journey, Brandi. “I always knew I was meant to be a businessperson,” said Seo, determined. Behind all the success and progress he made, there was hard work. Seo worked as an apprentice in Hanyang Venture Alumni since his third year of college, when at that time there were only people in their mid-30s or 40s in the alumni group. He participated in the Hanyang Start-up Competition in 2007, too. “I was always an enthusiastic student back in the days. Eager to learn and challenge myself,” mentioned Seo. When asked if planning to put men's apparel in Brandi, Seo shook his head, determined. Seo considers simplicity and focus the key of a mobile appication. Because Seo himself is a start-up businessperson, he tries to create a company culture where “founders like me would also want to stay and work.” He said, “Young people these days, including myself, cannot stand the rules and stiff conditions, especially when they seem unnecessary.” Therefore, Brandi does not regulate its employee’s working hours, usage of holidays, dress codes, or even workspaces. “You can take your work downstairs to Starbucks if you want to,” smiled Seo. Instead, the company is operated around work objectives set by individual employees and Key Performance Indicators (KPI). The environment Seo created is "no matter where or how you work, what matters is that you do your job." Seo aims to grow Brandi to the extent where it is acknowledged as Korea’s number one fashion-tech company. “There are not many fashion-tech companies in Korea as there are overseas,” lamented Seo. He believes that it is time for Korea to follow the global trend. Kim So-yun dash070@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Choi Min-ju

2018-03 08

[Faculty]Hanyang College of Engineering’s Dean Becoming the President of all Engineering Deans

Engineering education has been growing in importance in Korean society ever since the beginning. Now it is emphasized more than ever as the Fourth Industrial Revolution or Industry 4.0 has started to prevail in our lives. Industry 4.0 is a name for the current trend of automation and data exchange in manufacturing technologies. It includes cyber-physical systems, the Internet of things, cloud computing, and cognitive computing. News H met Jung at his office in a sunny day. Although he must have been busy as the school was starting, he was very embracing and welcoming. This year, Hanyang University’s Dean from the College of Engineering, Jung Sung-hoon was elected as the president of Korean Engineering Deans’ Association. The association was founded in 1991 to promote and better the engineering education in Korea. News H visited Jung to congratulate him on his election and to hear more of his stories. Q. Congratulations on your election! How do you feel? A. Well, first of all, it is a big honor for me having this big position. And I am very thankful that I can hand this honor to Hanyang University, as HYU’s dean is the president of the Deans’ Association across the nation. Q. What does the Korean Engineering Deans’ Association do exactly? A. We collect opinions and discuss the current problems in the engineering education, and try to fix the problems through delivering our opinion to government bodies such as the Ministries of Trade, Industry, and Energy. I have a meeting with the vice vice-ministers from the Ministries of Trade, Industry, and Energy and the Ministry of Science and ICT. Q. What do you aim to accomplish during your time in office? A. There are about 160 colleges that are members of the Association, but only about 60 schools are actively participating now. I personally hope that I can bring more participation during my time, as engineering education is becoming more important these days. I feel sorry for the fact that not many schools are implementing new curriculums that can nurture competent students who are apt in this Industry 4.0 era. Q. What do you think was the key to your election? A. First of all, the Association appoints its president from Seoul and the other areas in turn, and this year was Seoul’s turn. And since Hanyang University is nearly the representative of the Korean engineering education,I was nominated as the candidate. It’s a bit embarrassing for me to say it out loud for myself, but I was elected unanimously. (laughter) Jung emphasized that Hanyang Graduate School of Engineering is world class, so students who are interested in advancing their academics should not hesitate to enroll in the graduate school in Hanyang. Jung and the word “engineering” are inseparable, as he graduated from HYU College of Engineering himself, came back as a professor, held the position of vice-dean and dean, and is now becoming the President of the Deans’ Association. “I would not have been able to come this far without love for engineering,” smiled Jung. He recalls that the three years of working in the textile factory right after graduation also helped him to gain profound insight into the industry. Jung mentioned that engineering is in the field rather than in books. That is why he still encourages his students to go work in the factory, even for months. “Students nowadays do not prefer working in the factories, but it really helps them understand and apply what they have learned in class. That will be the engine for their future careers, whatever they do,” said Jung, with a bitter smile. Jung is in the office from the 1st of March 2018 to the end of February 2019. With the passion and enthusiasm that has led him so far, we expect him to bring about the betterment of engineering education in Korea too. Kim So-yun dash070@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Choi Min-ju

2018-02 05

[Faculty]Founding the First Korean Dance Troupes Association

There is an old saying on unity, ‘united we stand, divided we fall’. It is important for people to cooperate and organize to raise their voice on issues and deliver their will more effectively. Professor Moon Young-chul, from the Department of Dance, has been a professional ballet dancer for over forty years and has always had the urge to bring dance troupes in Korea together for common goals. Thanks to his hard work, more than fifty organizations from three different fields of dance from – Korean dance, modern dance, and ballet – were able to cut the ribbons on July 13, 2017. Although it was a Saturday, Moon came to school for practice. Voicing out issues One of the many issues that Moon and the Korean Dance Troupes Association (tentative title) are interested in is the military issue of Korean male dancers. As dancing requires daily practice in a specific condition, male dancers in the nation are having a difficult time continuing their career while having to serve in the military for almost two years. There are very limited opportunities for exemption compared to other fields of art such as music. While there are more than 240 awards which are subject for the exemption annually, male dancers must win first prize from one of the four events to be exempt from military duty, which are the Dong-A Dance Competition, Seoul Dance Festival, Korea Dance Festival, and the Korea Newbie Dancer Competition. “Korean dancers are good, but the condition is harsh up to the point where foreign dance companies ‘import’ our dancers” lamented Moon. Moon plans to discuss such issues with the head of other dance troupes and bring them up to the table as much as he can. The association also aims to provide foundations for the member organizations to brand themselves, promoting Korea to the world. Moon’s MoonYoungChul Ballet Pomea contributes a lot in that sense. As well as the media work and teaching, Moon works hard to live up to another title of his, 'a ballet dancer'. (Video courtesy of Moon) Leading creative ballet in Korea MoonYoungChul Ballet Poema was founded in 2003 by Moon when he started teaching in HYU. He brought Hanyang graduates and students together to perform creative ballet, scripts inspired from literature. ‘Poema’ means poet in Spanish. Moon named his organization as such because he believes ballet dancing is like a poet, literary and delicate. The organization performs once a year with original pieces. Moon organized his ballet group aiming to make the creative ballet group that represents the whole nation. In a sense, he has already achieved that goal. The MoonYoungChul Ballet Poema has won dozens of awards in Korea and has been invited to perform in Saint Petersburg, Russia for four years in a row. The most recent performance was titled <The Blue Bird>, from Maurice Maeterlinck’s script <The Blue Bird (1908)>. A video clip from last year, The MoonYoungChul Ballet Poema performing <The Blue Bird> (Video courtesy of Moon) Moon himself occasionally performed in the play although he does not plan to take the stage this year. When asked what motivated him so much from a young age to continue in ballet and constantly strive to dance, produce, and engage in backstage jobs, Moon replied that “ballet is like a drug to me. I just can’t live without it.” With the passion he has inside, he aspires to provide more stage for his students now. “Students need motivation to keep them practicing every day. I feel like it is my duty now to find and give as much opportunity to them,” smiled Moon. Recently appointed as the 17th president of the Dance Research Journal of Korea, Moon will be busier than ever. “Dance and procrastination never go along. The one who keeps working and keeping themselves busy will survive,” emphasized Moon. He wishes his students to participate more in the academic realm of ballet, as its importance is growing day by day. Kim So-yun dash070@naver.com Photos by Choi Min-ju

2018-01 15

[Alumni]The New Head Coach of the School Basketball Team Expresses Confidence

Once upon a time, there was a shooting guard on the Hanyang University’s (HYU) basketball team who led the team to win the competition. Twenty-three years later, the player returned to his home team to teach his pupils. This week, News H met the new head coach of HYU's basketball team, Chung Jae-hun (Business, ’96). "I am deeply honored to come back home for teaching." About the coach himself A shooting guard is one of the five positions in a basketball game. He or she is the one who mainly attempts long range shots such as Stephen Curry in the modern NBA. Chung used to play as a shooting guard when he was in college. One of the moments that he remembers playing was his turn around shot against the Korea University team. 1995 was the year when HYU shared the top spot with Korea and Chungang University. After graduation, Chung became the founding member of Daegu Orion Orions, which is now called Goyang Orion Orions. The newly appointed head coach further explained his long passion towards leadership. “The frustration became bigger for me to lose a game as a coach, than to lose as a player,” said Chung. That is why he decided to retire from the court in 2002 after winning the 2001 season with the Orions. Now coming back to his home school as a head coach, Chung is inspired to grow the players as big as the alumnus already on the court. “I feel greatly honored and pressured at the same time,” smiled Chung. Hanyang's proud basketball team from last season. We ended up in 8th place last year. (Photo courtesy of HY-Ball) Prospects for the team Chung sees that the biggest strength of the team is speed. However he also recognizes its weakness which is the lack of height and defense. “We have many offensive options on the team but we lack defensive strategies.” Therefore he is planning to focus on improving the defense by emphasizing the centers to get more involved in boxing out, overcome the physical attributes by engaging in zone defense strategies and attempting to trap the opposition in the corners. Boxing out refers to blocking the opposition players from getting involved in rebounds, which is when the ball bounces back from the rim. Zone defense is when players mark the players according to their own respective areas. “Practice makes perfect,” said the head coach, looking determined. The only way to make up such shortcomings is to practice day and night. In the morning, the team is scheduled for weight lifting, defensive strategies in the afternoon, and personal skill training during the night. As Chung remembers his team back in the days in HYU, most players were able to do shoots, passes, dribbles and drives. Nevertheless, he feels like the students nowadays are less impressive, in terms of their abilities. “Still, by working to improve ourselves little by little, we will be able to have competitiveness through the use of various strategies,” mentioned Chung, with hope in his eyes. "Instead of fancy plays that catch the attention of the crowd, I will defend and rebound more to improve the team," said Bae Kyung-sik (Sports Industry, 4th year), the captain of the team. When asked what his goal is for next season, Chung replied with humbleness: “We aim to make it to the play-offs." A playoff is a competition played after the regular season by the top competitors to determine the league champion or a similar accolade. Once our team makes it to the playoffs, Chung believes that the team can possibly reach the final four. “Me and the whole team shares the goal of reaching the final four. Although people might think that we are not a strong team, we aim high,” Chung aspires. The new season starts from March. Let us keep our eyes on the upcoming games and the progress Chung will bring to the team. Kim So-yun dash070@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Choi Geun-baik

2018-01 08

[Student]Winners of I·SEOUL·U Storytelling Competition

Two proud Hanyang University (HYU) students won first place in the I·SEOUL·U storytelling competition. It is hosted by the Seoul Metropolitan Government with its total prize money mounting up to 20 million won. Choi Hyun-jun (Entertainment Design, 3rd year), and Nam Jung-yeon (Communication Design, 3rd year), a close friend within the College of Design, teamed up for their first competition ever and were honored with the crown. From the left, Choi Hyun-jun (Entertainment Design, 3rd year), and Nam Jung-yeon (Communication Design, 3rd year). They were both interested in design from a young age. For the first time in forever The I·SEOUL·U storytelling competition is a part of Seoul's effort to promote its brand name: I·SEOUL·U. Its participants can depict their very own unique story about Seoul through a video, article, or poster. Nam and Choi chose video as it is Choi's major in school. There were a total of 625 pieces submitted, with one first place award, three second place awards, and six third place awards. Although lots of design college students participated in such competitions, it was the first time for both Nam and Choi to participate in one. “To be honest, I was afraid before. I was not sure of my own abilities,” mentioned Choi. Beginner’s luck or not, Choi and Nam showed perfect teamwork throughout November when they prepared for the competition. “People always ask us if we ever had conflicts, but we never had one,” smiled Choi. As a pair of close friends, they both mentioned that having someone to watch over and support one another was the key to completing their video. Choi, majoring in entertainment design, did most of the editing work. “Although putting 3D into videos is not part of my curriculum, I was able to self teach myself through a video society ‘Intro’ in our school,” said Choi. Nam, on the other hand, brainstormed with Choi and edited pictures and graphics in the video. Take a look at Choi and Nam's ingenious story. (Video courtesy of Choi and Nam) The hardest part of the production was the filming. Because the team had to rent a 4K camera, they had to fit all of their filming schedule into one day. Considering that the sites were dispersed all around Seoul, they had to begin in the early morning, use time in its utmost efficiency and wrap up before sunset. The time lapse sunset in the video was taken by the team in the peak of Inwang mountain for four hours. When asked about the source of their brilliant ideas, Nam answered, ‘lots of brainstorming and our imagination.’ For instance, Nam always used to think, ‘what if there is another reason for people walking in the street?’ and they came up with an idea of magnets pulling people around in the streets. “The whole point of the video was to visualize the extraordinary reasons behind ordinary activities in our imagination,” said Nam. Creativity to gravity The inspiring ideas of the team was the crucial reason for attracting the minds of people. The winner of the I·SEOUL·U storytelling competition is first decided on the professionals’ evaluation on creativity, art, aptness to the topic, and utility. Then, the remaining 40% is up to the people’s choice. We do not know exactly how many votes the team received, but assuming from the results, Choi and Nam must have caught people’s eyes with their original ideas. "There was no secret recipe for overcoming hardships. We just bore with it. Pulling all-nighters is a usual thing for design students anyways," said Choi. When asked about the usage of their prize money of 5 million won, both plan to spend the money on purchasing devices related to their major. Nam would like to purchase a tablet so that she can enhance her productivity during the semester, and Choi plans to buy a camera, supposedly a choice based on the difficulty they had filming videos the past month. Choi and Nam would like to challenge once again in a competition, as they find each other a perfect teammate. Right now, however, they have their hands busy on their internship. “I am learning a lot, managing a project from A to Z. Making a video for my school project and for a client are two very different jobs, but I enjoy it,” mentioned Choi, with a smile on his face. Both plan to proceed in their profession according to their major. With the passion and ability they have now, they have a bright future ahead. Kim So-yun dash070@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Choi Min-ju

2017-12 26

[Student]Let the Class of 85 Be a Step Forward to Your Dreams

‘Tell me what you want to do, and the 85s will help!’ is the slogan of the second 85 Dream Scholarship, which is funded by the graduates of Hanyang University who were admitted in 1985. Their donation first started last year with the late night meal during exams for the class of 15, who are 30 years junior to the class of 85. Then, with much success with the last year’s Dream Scholarship, the class of 85 alumni came back this year with much more financial assistance. News H met three of the eight lucky teams to hear more about their stories. "I am constantly learning to improve the contents in Si-garette, and also regarding the copyright issue. The fact that I have enjoyed every step enabled me to come this far. Take a piece of literature instead of a cigarette Song Yu-su (Advertising & public relations, 4th year) and his team ‘Si-garette’ are looking forward to making their ideas come true in the real-world thanks to the support of the Dream Scholarship. The team name ‘Si-garette’ is also the name of their product, a combination of Si (which means poetry in Korean) and cigarette. Twenty short pieces of literature, poetry, or fun facts are rolled into a box that opens like a cigarette box. “I found that people smoke because the world never says ‘si(yes)’. I wish Si-garette can help people bear the world better,” said Song. The Si-garette contains 20 short stories and contents in a rolled paper like cigarette. Contents can be previewed in Si-garette's instagram account: @sigarette_pocketpoem Si-garette team plans to utilize the grant on an automated machine. When Song first thought of the idea three years ago, he neglected that rolling the papers and putting it into a box could cause a hassle in mass production. Before this June, Song focused on recruiting writers to provide their works to be published through Si-garette. “But in reality, the machine cost too much as we have to make a special one to serve our purpose. Other business competitions would not fund the project because I did not aim to profit from this,” reflected Song. But thanks to the Dream Scholarship, the long aspiration of Song is at the brink of realization. The first copies will be handed out for free to increase the recognition among people, and with the reputation, Song hopes for a paid sponsorship from private companies. Then, the profit will be used to publish the books of underground writers. “I love writing, but I know that I am not good enough to be a full-time writer. That is why I chose to help other writers through such projects,” said Song, with a humble smile. "My story brought a sense of empathy, and I think that was the key to my winning the scholarship." Blowing the dust off from the paper The next beneficiary we met is a soon-to-be comic artist, Lee Jin-hyun (Advertising & Public Relations, 2nd year). Lee has been drawing cartoons from a young age, but the pressure of college admission made her put the papers aside. She recently had a chance to take the dust off from the rusty dream, ironically when she got sick and had to withdraw from school temporarily. “I had time to think about my old dream and decided to pursue it,” Lee said. Lee desires to draw and write a story about an Indian child selling tea on street. It is a combination of Lee’s interest in tea and India. When asked: ‘what do you think was the key to your winning?’, Lee answered, “a feeling of sympathy.” “I suppose the seniors agreed to my story and wanted me to learn more with the scholarship they granted.” Lee plans to register for art academy as she has never formally learned drawing. Lee added that the seniors wish her to persist on one story and upload them to amateur platforms such as ‘Naver challenge for the best’. “I would like to say thank you for the class of 85 seniors, and I dream to help my juniors in thirty years,” said Lee. Mentor for the mentors Being a mentor to someone requires excellent interpersonal skills, especially if the mentee is a sensitive child during puberty. Team ‘Mentos’ is going to publish a guidebook for all the college mentors out there, guiding children. “There practically is no education nor training for the mentors, although there are so many programs and institutions initiating mentor programs,” lamented Sim Young-woo (Philosophy, 3rd year). That is why the three friends gathered up to become a mentor for the mentors. From the left, Ryoo Chang-hee (Philosophy, 3rd year), Sim Young-woo (Philosophy, 3rd year) and Lim Se-hoon (Philosophy, 3rd year). All three team members: Sim Young-woo (Philosophy, 3rd year), Lim Se-hoon (Philosophy, 3rd year) and Ryoo Chang-hee (Philosophy, 3rd year) have at least two years of experience as a mentor. Based on their unique experiences, Sim is in charge of the ‘academics’ part, Ryu in ‘life’, and Lim in the ‘experience’ part of the book. As diverse as their experiences, the motivation to become a mentor is all vastly different. Ryu, for instance, dreamt of becoming an instructor at private academies. However, he constantly felt like the students stop their interaction and relationship with the tutor when their time of struggle for college admission comes to an end. As he aspired to set up his own institute where students and teachers can remain in a good, long-lasting relationship, he applied for several mentoring programs to learn the secret. “Initially I thought I would quit after a promised year like most of the work I do, but witnessing my small help becoming a big one for the kids was so rewarding for me to keep doing the mentoring job up until now,” smiled Ryu. "All three of us once dreamt of becoming educators, but not now. The reason we are doing this project is to leave our footsteps behind so that our fellow university students can have something to refer to when they feel lost, which we ourselves wished for." Their book, consisted of aforementioned three parts, aims to provide a well-rounded guide for beginning mentors from ‘how to start a conversation’ to ‘how to say farewell without hurting the mentee’. They started writing the book this April, with the help of the Hanyang Academic Town that supports students’ noble ideas for research. But the aid was not enough for them to print as many copies they had intended to. “So we actually planned to use our own money,” said Sim. “That is why we are going to use all of the scholarship into printing,” added Lim. The ‘Mentors’ team finished their first draft before the final exam. “Now it is the real beginning. We have to design the book, edit the contents, and actually publish it. It is going to be one very busy vacation,” said Ryu with much delight in his voice. The three philosophers’ faces were filled with joy and passion throughout the interview. We look forward to reading their book in the Center for Social Innovation. Kim So-yun dash070@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Choi Jin-myung, Kang Cho-hyun