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2017-11 10

[Faculty][Excellent R&D] Kim Doo-seop (Department of Sociology)

As of last year, there were more than 1.71 million foreign residents in Korea, which is 3.4% of the total population. The number of marriage migrants, also known as multicultural marriages, is also a large part of the total population at around 150,000. Professor Kim Doo-seop (Department of Sociology) has built a foundation for migrant research since establishing the ‘CSMR Multiculture Institute’ in 2011. This year, Hanyang University SSK Multicultural Research Project was selected as a project to enter the large-scale stage. ▲On the 6th, News H met Professor Kim Doo-seop (Department of Sociology) and discussed the contents of the SSK multiculture research project and the selected items to enter the large-scale stage. An ongoing process of building data on foreign migrants Unlike conventional wisdom, Korea is becoming a country where various cultures coexist. As mentioned above, nearly 4% of the total population are foreign residents or marriage migrants. Socio-scientific research on this phenomenon is crucial but various data such as related literatures should be preceded. Since 2011, Professor Kim's research team has built a foundation for migrant research through archives and database construction. In addition, he published four academic books on marriage immigrants and migrant workers, ten books on foreigners' statistics, and 54 papers in domestic and international journals. He has also internationally carried out other academic activities such as academic conferences, joint seminars, a colloquium, and academic presentations. Recently, as a result of the examination by the Korea Research Foundation, the SSK multicultural research project of Hanyang University was recognized as a significant research project with its importance and timeliness and selected as a large-scale research progect. This selection has been applied since last September and will receive research funds of 580 million won per year over the next four years. The name was also changed from 'CSMR Multicultural Institute' to 'CSMR Multiculture Management Center'. Professor Kim 's research team will expand the research project. A leap forward as a hub for immigrant and multicultural research First, the archive for migrants and DB construction, which have been done in the past, will continue to be supplemented. By August 31, the research team has collected about 1,300 related papers in the CSMR archive and will be adding future papers and constantly supplementing the search menu. The research subjects have also been expanded to set targets for collecting data on ethnic minorities abroad. Until now, archives and databases have been organized mainly on problems related to domestic issues such as multicultural families, marriage migrants, migrant workers, multicultural children, foreign students, etc. By expanding the study's target groups and diversifying the construction data, the center pursues stepping up to a global DB center for multiculture. In addition, the center plans to expand exchanges with scholars and research institutes in Korea and abroad and also exert their active efforts to nurture students by linking with the in-school research institute and graduate school curriculum. In line with the name of the Multiculture Management Center, they will ultimately make a leap into the hub of multicultural research and immigrants who have formed networks with major research institutes and scholars in the world. ▲ Professor Kim Doo-seop said, "We will contribute to policy alternatives and social consensus through future research." Professor Kim said, "The center provides a center for research on migrants through document archives and DB construction" and added, “It is meaningful to promote research through various interdisciplinary approaches and to form an international network of migrants and multicultural researchers. " Furthermore, he stated that the ultimate goal of the study is to contribute to the accumulation of demographic knowledge on migration and multiculturalism that Korean society faces and to provide policy alternatives and social consensus through ongoing activities of the Multiculture Management Center.

2017-11 10

[Academics][Excellent R & D] Professor Lee Sang-hoon (Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, College of Medicine)

Chronic diseases, such as Parkinson's disease, diabetes, dementia, and degenerative arthitis, cannot be cured and should be managed for life. To treat this, stem cells are being studied in medicine. Professor Lee Sang-hoon (Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, College of Medicine) has been conducting research on embryonic stem cell research for treatment of chronic diseases at the Medical Research Center (MRC) of Hanyang University since 2008. He will carry out further research until 2024. ▲ On November 6th, News H visited Prof. Lee Sang-hoon (Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, College of Medicine) and talked about stem cell and tissue regeneration research. (Source: Professor Lee Sang-hoon) Increased understanding of stem cells The relationship between chronic diseases and stem cell research is inevitable. First, in order for the disease to be treated, it is necessary to restore the cells that have been damaged by the disease. The reason why chronic diseases are not treated is because the damaged tissue is an organ that can not be recovered by the human body itself. Neurons and brain cells are destroyed, or genetic problems do not occur due to specific hormones, making a cure impossible. But there is a possibility. If the patient's stem cells can be cloned and cultured well, the cells can theoretically be differentiated into desired cells. Professor Lee has studied the theoretical techniques in detail. In 2008, Hanyang University MRC (Medical Research Council) conducted a research on the basic mechanism of stem cells under the name 'Stem Cell Control Research Center'. In detail, stem cells are cultured, and the number of stem cells is differentiated into tissue cells. Professor Lee conducted a 'stem cell behavior control study' that controlled this behavior. Since the study of stem cells at the time was at the beginning stage, he has been working on the mechanism of how a series of processes take place. Based on the research, he will carry out this research project. First of all, this research project will continue the basic mechanism research. In addition to the existing understanding, he will improve the understanding of stem cells, the understanding of the differentiation process, and the plan to apply it to other fields such as stem cells. ▲ Professor Lee's team will continue to study for higher stem cell understanding. (Source: Professor Lee Sang-hoon) Clinical application, industrialization and internationalization Through this project, his research team will receive a total of 7 billion research grants for seven years, one billion annually. As a new name, Hanyang University MRC 'Tissue Regeneration Promotion Research Center's goal is to develop cell transplantation and gene therapy technologies for Parkinson's disease, mass-production of stem cells with excellent therapeutic effects, and research on the development of affected parts using astrocytes. Parkinson's disease causes the destruction of dopamine-producing substantia nigra, which is intended for clinical application of cell transplantation or gene therapy. Mass production of stem cells can be used for clinical treatment, so mass production and industrialization are also important targets. Finally, research using stellate cells is also an important goal. When diseases such as dementia or Parkinson's disease are destroyed, not only the destroyed cells but also the surrounding environment becomes bad. Some of the environment is astrocytes. By transplanting stellate cells made by differentiating stem cells, it can improve the surrounding environment of the brain and help regenerate brain tissue. In this way, internationalization of research results through clinical application and industrialization process is being prepared. In addition to the domestic medical industry, it is also possible to enter the overseas markets in cooperation with Indonesian companies. In addition, research on the basic mechanism will be carried out continuously, so that degenerative diseases, which were chronic diseases in the future, will be gradually transferred to the treatment side.

2017-10 29 Headline News

[Academics][Researcher of the Month] The Faster, Simpler, Easier, the Better!

Today, we live in the world where everything is becoming mechanized, meaning the field of electronics and mechanics are infinitely evolving. Conspicuous or not, there are small and big changes around us that make our lives more convenient and more efficient in various ways. Professor Hong Jung-pyo (Department of Automotive Engineering), in his paper, “Simple size determination of permanent-magnet synchronous machines” has established a milestone in the field of both electronics and mechanics, by proposing a means of simplifying the process of designing and developing machines. Hong’s research can determine the direction of the process of motor’s development. When designing and producing an instrument, engineers go through trials of experiments, trying to pick the best formula by observing the results of each experiment. Such a process demands laborious amounts of time and cost, which under certain circumstances can be unaffordable. A perfect, well-constructed device or motor has been made through stages of trial-and-error so far, being tested on their performance in each stage. However, with Hong’s proposal of simulation experiment, this entire step could be greatly reduced, simply by executing the experiment with the simulator. When working on a motor, it is important to harmoniously combine the techniques of both the electrician and the engineer. However, what is more important is, the two fields should not be seen separately. The two perspectives commingled as one will bring the best result, whereas if they are regarded separately, failures can arise, and it would be difficult to figure out where the problem originated from. The simulator Hong proposed in his paper acts not only as a catalyst in making the process of developing machines faster, simpler, and easier by exempting the trial-and-error step but also allows to preview an outcome of integrated viewpoint. “For a better understanding, imagine this picture. There is a device I’m trying to make, and I want to equip this circle-shaped part. After doing so, I still think I can improve the final product somehow, so I will try dismantling the part I just added and equip this oval-shaped part. When doing so, I have to carefully remove the circle-shaped part and re-equip the oval-shaped one and then compare the two results to see what the best combination is.” This process of trial-and-error and comparison, which is time-consuming, is what Hong wanted to resolve with his research. With the simulator, engineers can simply enter the input and compare the different outcomes and go for what is the best much more conveniently. Everything that moves, including cars, elevators, and airplanes, are all powered by electric motors. In the future, the range of usages will increase infinitely which means there will be experiments after experiments for the development of motor-based objects. In each case, Hong’s research can greatly reduce the development process and offer the direction of choices for better outcomes. His future research goal is to create a unified solution of electronics and mechanics, which will boost the usability of the machine itself. Hong’s research will be a constructive contribution to engineers. Jeon Chae-yun chaeyun111@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Park Young-min, Kim Youn-soo

2017-10 25

[Performance]2017 JoongAng Ilbo University Rankings, Seoul Ranked 3rd · ERICA 9th

Hanyang University ranked 3rd (ERICA 9th) in '2017 JoongAng Ilbo University Rankings'. On October 23, Joongang Ilbo released the results of 'Comprehensive Evaluation', which evaluates the comprehensive competitiveness of 4-year universities, 'Department Evaluation', which assesses the competitiveness of departments and 'Reputation Survey', which is conducted by human resources managers of various companies and institutions. This comprehensive evaluation was conducted for 61 4-year comprehensive universities with four or more departments among humanities, social science, engineering, natural science, medicine, arts and physical education. Four evaluation criteria (professor's research, educational conditions, student performance, and reputation) and 33 detailed indicators (professor's research achievement, educational conditions, student education, etc.) are evaluated out of 300 points. Universities specialized in science and engineering, such as KAIST and POSTEC, were excluded from this comprehensive evaluation. Hanyang University showed strengths in student education and performance. Seoul Campus is ranked 1st in 'Student Performance' (58 points), 3rd in 'Professor's Research' (70 points), 4th in 'Educational Conditions' (60 points), 5th in 'Reputation' (24 points), and 3rd in overall rankings with total 214 points. ERICA campus ranked 9th overall by achieving 6th (49 points) in 'Student Performance', 10th (62 points) in 'Professor's Research' category. The rankings of Seoul and ERICA campus dropped one stair from the previous year. On this comprehensive evaluation, Seoul National University (237 points) ranked the first this year as well as last year, followed by Sungkyunkwan (222 points), Hanyang (214 points), Korea (205 points), Yonsei (202 points), Sogang (189 points), Chung-Ang (184 points), Inha (182 points), Hanyang University ERICA (181 points), Kyunghee (180 points). This year’s department evaluation was divided into four categories: humanities, social science, engineering, and natural sciences. The evaluation index and score were applied differently based on the characteristics of the departments. In 'Humanities·Social Science Department Evaluation' the Seoul campus ranked 3rd in the humanities(179 points) and 2nd in the social sciences (188 points) category. ERICA campus ranked 14th in humanities (143 points) and 20th in social science (140 points). According to the Joongang Ilbo article, "Seoul Campus focused on finding a job suitable for student's aptitude through field placement (field placement participation rate, Humanities 3rd·Social Science 6th)". "Professors consulted continuously with many students and connected them to the training sites, and lots of students worked for the same company after six months of employment (Maintenance employment rate; Humanities 4th·Social Science 3rd)". Article added, "Hanyang University also established Industry Advisory Board (IAB) composed of incumbent workers including entrepreneurs, politicians, and civil servants and had a meeting with them twice each year to propose necessary training courses on the spot and participate in job mentoring." This evaluation was conducted for 50 universities in the humanities department, 57 universities in social science. In the evaluation of the humanities department, Seoul National University was ranked in the first, Sungkyunkwan University was ranked in the second, and Korea University (Seoul) was ranked in the third. In social science department, Seoul National University ranked the 1st, followed by Hanyang University (Seoul) and Korea University (Seoul). In the evaluation of 'Natural science and engineering department', Seoul Campus ranked 5th in the natural sciences (174 points) and 3rd in the engineering field (206 points). ERICA campus recorded the ranking of 10th in engineering (176 points). This year, Seoul Campus showed strengths in ‘startup support’ in the natural science and engineering sector. According to the Joongang Ilbo article, "the number of technology venture companies, certified by Technology Guarantee Fund and identified from which university the founders graduated, was 13,947. Among the founders of these companies, 498 people are from Hanyang University in Seoul Campus, second only to Seoul National University (525 people) ". The article emphasized, " Hanyang University focuses on entrepreneurship education, and the number of students who received entrepreneurship training last year was the highest (6580, including redundancy) among the evaluated universities”. In addition, 'Hanyang Startup Academy' was introduced as a program to support this. This program selects students and alumni with entrepreneurial items and develop this into a profitable model and support the cost (30 million ~ 150 million won). It has been running twice a year since 2012. "Half of the 500 start-up academy graduates have succeeded in establishing their business and their annual sales reach 150 billion won," said Kwon Tae-yeong, a team leader at Hanyang University. KAIST occupied the 1st place of the evaluation of natural science department among 49 universities. 2nd place is POSTECH, 3rd place is Seoul National University. 58 colleges were evaluated for engineering department with Sungkyunkwan University and POSTECH jointly ranked first and Hanyang University (Seoul) ranked third. In addition, Hanyang University received a good score in the 'reputation survey’ conducted by the JoongAng Ilbo with 61 research universities surveyed by the research institute ‘Research & Research’. First, according to a survey of "University you wish to recommend for admission" conducted by 550 human resource managers in companies and public institutions, Seoul Campus was ranked the 5th in natural sciences and 9th in liberal arts field. Seoul Campus occupied 4th place in natural sciences and 6th place in liberal arts field for a question "University you wish to recommend for admission", surveyed by 550 high school teachers. Seoul Campus was ranked 6th and ERICA campus was the 9th for the question "university with a high potential of development." ▶ 2017 Joongang Ilbo University Rankings- Comprehensive Evaluation (only in Korean) ▶ 2017 Joongang Ilbo University Rankings- Liberal and Social Science (only in Korean) ▶ 2017 Joongang Ilbo University Rankings - Natural Science and Engineering (only in Korean)

2017-10 24

[Event]The 3rd Paiknam Prize

On October 16, Paiknam Memorial Association held ‘The 3rd Paiknam Prize’ at Paiknam Music Hall in Hanyang University, Seongdong-gu, Seoul. Paiknam Prize was established to honor Dr. Paiknam Kim Lyun-joon, the founder of Hanyang University. The winners of the 3rd Paiknam award are ▲Engineering: CEO of Nano Co. Ltd., Shin Dong-woo (57), ▲Music: former director of the National Chorus, Na Young-soo (79) ▲Human rights and service: former president of Ireland Mary Robinson (73) ▲ Engineering sector winner, Shin Dong-woo and his wife are taking a commemorative photo with Kim Chong-yang, Chairman of Hanyang Foundation. ▲Music sector winner, Na Young-soo and his wife are taking a commemorative photo with Kim Chong-yang, Chairman of Hanyang Foundation. ▲ Human rights and Service sector winner, Mary Robinson is taking a commemorative photo with Kim Chong-yang, Chairman of Hanyang Foundation. ▲ The National Chorus members are performing commemorative performances.

2017-10 13

[Special]A Growing Need to Address the LGBT Society

Last month, a public letter was published on the Korean edition of Christian Today towards the celebrity Hong Seok-cheon, in the form of an editorial. Written by Joseph Joo, a pastor and an anti-homosexual activist, the letter expressed his concerns for Hong’s potential candidacy in the election for the district office of Yong-san gu. As the first Korean celebrity to come out as a homosexual, Hong is the most prominent gay celebrity in Korea, having overcome the sexually conservative tone of Korean society. Convinced that Hong’s acclaimed desire to tackle the problems of Yongsan-gu is a cover for his pursuit to secure gay rights, Joo wrote his letter to dissuade Hong from running for office. Yongsan-gu itself holds a symbolic meaning because of its ethnic and sexual diversity, largely due to the Itaewon area. In his letter, Joo insisted in a gentle yet adamant tone that Hong drop his pursuit for office and seek repentance. This incident drew large public attention, shedding light once again on the issue of sexual minorities in South Korea. The first Korean celebrity to come out as a homosexual (Photo courtesy of Money S News) Sexual minorities and political refugees On the issues of LGBT (lesbians, gays, bisexuals, and, transsexuals), Korea lacks significant political dialogue. Rather than having positive or negative addressment on the various policies and issues concerning sexual minorities, there is not much spotlight shone at all. This neglect is gradually becoming a problem that even the international community is raising criticism. A critical area for the issue of sexual minorities in Korea is the military. According to article 92, clause 6 of the Korean military law, the court prohibits any military personnel from being involved in sodomy or related indecencies. This law is otherwise known as the “Anti-homosexual law”, which condemns homosexuals in the military. Considering that Korean men are mandatorily drafted to the army, this law, which has been in question of constitutional validity for nearly 20 years, provides a significant dilemma for homosexual men. There are two main options: either keeping homosexuality a secret for the duration of their military service, or to resist the draft for conscientious objection, which would lead to 2 years of incarceration. This dilemma eventually led some Korean men to seek for a political refuge. Countries such as France, Canada, and Australia have accepted Korean men as political refugees. The acceptance of these refugees itself is a significant international recognition of social incapability to address the issues of sexual diversity. In an article regarding this issue, the International Financial Times criticized that Korea is an “essentially conservative country that lags behind on social issues despite its rapid technological and economic development.” The Financial Times published an article this April on the military “scan” of gay personnel. (Photo courtesy of the Financial Times) Growing needs for addressment There are also severe problems in the education sector. Student education on sexual diversity is critical to prepare for the inevitable addressment of policies regarding sexual minorities in the future. As a result of exposure to western culture as well as books and films about sexual diversity, the number of Korean people coming out as LGBT is growing. The gay parade had taken root in Korea in recent years, and the rise of various LGBT interest groups indicates that this inevitable future will approach soon. However, the Ministry of Education fails to address the issue of sexual minorities and excludes the issue in public sexual education. In fact, the ministry canceled a specific training education for sexual education teachers last year on the basis that it had not been correspondent to the National level of school Sexual Education Standards. The underlying reason was that it included a section on sexual identity and the understanding of LGBTs. The National level of school Sexual Education Standards, introduced in 2015 by the Ministry of Education, has been under public criticism for its failure to provide proper education. Much of the guidance provided is impractical and is based on outdated notions of gender. In a more specific case, there is the Teenage 1388 Call Center. Operated by the Ministry of Gender Equality and Family in cooperation with the Korea Youth Counseling & Welfare Institute, the Teenage 1388 Call Center was established to provide anonymous counseling to various problems for teenagers. The problem was that the counselors of the center have advised students that homosexuality was something to be “treated”, and that it was “wise to avoid having convictions of homosexuality until becoming an adult.” It was revealed that the education courses for the counselors did not have appropriate content on sexual minorities. Even in universities, hate groups against the LGBT community are growing in numbers. In 2016, a professor of a Korean university was publically criticized for damaging a banner installed by the university’s queer community. Furthermore, many universities considered “prestigious” have hate groups and SNS accounts dedicated to shaming sexual minorities. Despite problems across a variety of sectors, the issue of sexual minorities receives very little spotlight with insufficient political debates and representation. Even in presidential pledges and debates, these issues traditionally received little attention. Only with continued efforts of the LGBT community has the issue been introduced in this year’s presidential election debates, and even then, there was only one candidate who pledged a policy in favor of them. Although most candidates emphasized their commitment to gender equality, most of them openly expressed that they were against homosexuality. Although the means and results of political debates remain unclear, what is apparent is that the need to address this issue is growing, and will continue to grow. Lee Chang-hyun pizz1125@hanyang.ac.kr

2017-10 02

[Academics][Researcher of the Month] Producing Energy Through a Single Thread

'Lack of energy’ is an issue the whole world is focusing on. Various countries are searching for effective renewable energy and new materials that could replace the current energy sources. Professor Kim Seon-jeong (Department of Biomedical Engineering) discovered a new material every researcher was looking for. Kim's paper, “Harvesting electrical energy from carbon nanotube yarn twist” introduces the world’s first new material, which can produce energy through slight movements. Kim explains the concept of his new material Professor Kim’s research team started its first project in 2006 on artificial muscle. However, after his research, Kim realized its limitations as they were only able to move through an external energy source. Therefore, he thought of a new idea that the muscle would be more effective when it is able to produce energy by itself. Carbon nanotube is a new material which is a type of conductor and has a diameter of only a few nanometers. This material was made as a thread in the artificial muscle. However, when these threads were finely twisted into one direction, they were able to produce energy by itself through its contraction and relaxation without an applied voltage. Being made into a spring, their length can be changed as much as 30 percent on average. This new material, named as ‘twistron harvester yarn’, allowed a chance for the muscle to move by itself without a separate power source. This twistron harvester yarn looks and acts as if it were an ordinary thread. This states that making clothes out of this material is possible. Once this comes into realization, this would give a boost in making wearable devices, as producing electricity without an energy source is possible. Moreover, this thread is possible to use inside water, giving another possibility of an effective alternative energy. This has already been tested in the East Sea of Korea. Kim’s research team made a model consisting of a glass bottle connected with an electrode, the thread, a balloon, and an equipment that could measure electricity. As the twistron harvester yarn contracted and relaxed, electrical energy was verified from the ocean. Kim showed great passion in the research he was conducting. This research on the twistron harvester yarn was his fourth research. He has been working on artificial muscles for the past nine years before he started this research. “I didn’t start this research solely to find the twistron harvester yarn. I felt the limitations within the research I conducted earlier and was seeking for development,” reminisced Kim. He explained that he wasn’t the only person who conducted the research. Eight teams from three different countries worked on this new material for two years to deduct a better result. “We had a meeting through Skype every week, along with frequent visits to each team. Everyone had great passion and interest towards this research, and I believe that shows the firmness of this research,” said Kim. "Reach towards your own interest!" Kim also emphasized the attitudes Hanyangians should have towards their life. Even though he mainly teaches graduate school students, he wished all students could find what they truly wish to do. “Find something unique of your own. Find something you enjoy, and then you will be able to continue on with whatever you are doing. There are countless routes for all students. I wish students would keep challenging themselves to make the greatest results of their own,” wished Kim. Just as his words, Kim will continue with his work with great passion, for even better convenience for global citizens. On Jung-yun jessica0818@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Kim Youn-soo

2017-08 31

[Academics][Researcher of the Month] What Makes People Pro-Environment? (1)

“Whenever I go on a trip or big festivals, I always worry about all the trashes people throw away. It’s just too much.” Professor Hyun Sung-hyup of the Division of Tourism recently published his paper, "Fostering customers’ pro-environmental behavior at museum". The paper thoroughly investigates the affective and cognitive factors of individuals visiting museums and analyzes which factor has the most impact on their pro-environmental intentions. Hyun emphasized that most people are very environmentally friendly in their house. They recycle well, try not to waste food or water. However, the point is that the very same people behave entirely differently from the moment they leave their house. Trashes are disposed not separately, which then has to be combusted, letting carbon into the air. Tissues, water, food and all kinds of resources are wasted. Hyun wondered what is behind the people’s paradoxical behavior. He also wanted to figure out what needs to be triggered in order to resolve such paradox and to motivate eco-friendly behavior from the general public. A table showing relations of each factor and their effects (Photo courtesy of Hyun) Over the course of a year, Hyun went to a broad range of museums which deal with themes like art, war, and tradition to interview, survey and observe the visitors. From the data collected from 321 tourists, he ran statistical analysis simulation program to construct a conceptual framework that can predict people’s behavior in public spaces. He also sought for professional advice from other fields such as environmental specialists or professors in engineering for further insight. Based on his field research with dozens and hundreds of related papers he studied, Hyun found out that ‘Environmental Knowledge (EK)’ out of five cognitive factors, was the most significant factor in determining one’s environmentally responsible decision-making process. Hyun is explaining the process of his research. Hyun asserted that environmental education on a regular basis is essential. People with more professional knowledge on the vulnerability of the environment or the impact of their action is more inclined to show consistent behavior both in and outside of their home. "It seems like a lot of people lack education regarding the environment in both public and private sectors," said Hyun. Lamenting at such reality, Hyun wishes environmental education to be part of the public education curriculum in the near future. When asked what inspired him to become a researcher in Tourism, Hyun smiled and answered that his professors during college years influenced him a lot. “Hanyang University offers the best curriculum on Tourism, with respectful professors. I always looked up to them.” Hyun said he decided to study further because there are so much intriguing topics to research in the field of Tourism. He encourages future researchers in the field to boldly try out, because tourism is very future oriented, interdisciplinary and economically significant field of study. Hyun himself plans to vigorously research further on issues related with environment and tourism. “Researching while lecturing, mentoring and living personal life is tough but I still enjoy it,” said Hyun, with affection to his work. Kim So-yun dash070@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Choi Min-ju

2017-08 27
2017-07 30

[Academics][Researcher of the Month] World Class Solar Cell Developed

Professor Kim Eun-kyu of the Department of Physics is July’s Researcher of the Month for his active role in spreading knowledge in the field of physics. In his paper, “Iodide management in formamidinium-lead-halide-based perovskite layers for efficient solar cells”, Kim explains how he has created the ‘perovskite solar battery’ with the best efficiency in the world. Perovskite batteries have high efficiency and low production cost which is how it is gaining interest for the next generation solar energy source. Kim is explaining about the perovskite solar battery. Perovskite is material created out of anion, cation, and halide and is used inside the solar battery to create electricity. Kim has carried out his study along with Ulsan National Institute of Science Technology (UNIST) and Korea Research Institute of Chemical Technology (KRICT) and the paper has been introduced in the world renowned academic journal, Science. The research has been carried out through the support of Ministry of Science, ICT and Future Planning. The key theme of the research has been that through the control of halide, efficiency was to be raised from 20.0% to 22.1%. Currently, solar batteries are created with silicon materials but with the newly developed technology, new solar batteries could produce the highest efficiency with half the cost. Not only could it be used in the solar batteries, but they could also be used to produce new and renewable energy in the future with further integration of different technologies. Graphs showing the efficiency of the solar battery at 22.1% (Photo courtesy of Kim) Kim has started this study since all types of batteries should implement high level of efficiency. With high efficiency follows the lower production cost which was why this was important for the commercialization of the solar battery field. Kim and his research team are the best in the field currently showing the highest level of efficiency and still working for better technology. Although the technology itself has been developed to produce the most efficient solar batteries, mass production and commercialization problem is yet to be solved. Kim and his team are currently working on the perovskite battery to further test its safety and to control the halide. Although Kim and his research team have already reached their goal of creating the efficient battery and printing their paper on Science, further studies will be carried out to make the lives more convenient for people. Kim wishes to develop a more efficient solar battery in the future. Kim Seung-jun nzdave94@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Kim Youn-soo