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2018-08 07

[Academics][Excellent R&D] Developing Revolutionary Energy Harvesters

As it is a global agenda to adopt a lifestyle that is more environmentally friendly, developing technology that allows eco-friendly processes and production outcomes has also shifted into focus. Professor Sung Tae-hyun's (Electrical Engineering) research on energy harvesting technology is a prime example that shines a ray of hope onto our path of sustainable development. According to research from Cambridge University, only 12 percent of electric power generated from a power plant is used, while the other 88 percent goes to waste. Consequently, "energy harvesing," the idea of saving and using the wasted energy, has become a crucial research topic for more effective and efficient use of energy generated. It would eiminate concerns about creating a completely different type of power plant or unintentionally harming the environment. "Energy harvesting technology will allow us to convert various types of wasted energy into usable energy,” said Sung. Sung Tae-hyun (Electrical Engineering) explains the different types of energy and how massive an amount of it is wasted. There are different types of convertible energies such as piezoelectric energy (electric energy created from vibration), heat energy (electric energy created from heat), and photovoltaic energy (electric energy created from lighting). Sung focused on piezoelectric and photovoltaic energy when researching energy harvesting technology. The purpose of his research was to successfully create an "energy harvestor" with a sensor that detects the different types of energy, then converts them accordingly to electric energy that is entirely usable and more environmentally friendly. “Sensor technology is actually the core of the Fourth Industrial Revolution since everything is connected through internet of things (IoT). It can detect anything anywhere without limitations, and that’s what would make the energy conversion process more efficient, especially in places where all types of energy are generated.” Energy harvestors demonstrated in a smart factory (Photo courtesy of Sung) Sung is in charge of Hanyang University's (HYU's) SEED laboratory that researches energy harvesting technology. In 2011, it even broke a record for retaining the world’s best piezoelectric energy harvesting data. According to Sung, he approached the energy waste problem by first communicating with the workers in the field, detecting and redefining the problem at hand, moving on to the ideation process, creating prototypes, and then testing it out to see if it was realistically applicable and effective. Sung is now in the process of testing out the developed energy harvestors in four big industries such as LED production, smart factories (industry where the whole production process is combined with digital automation solutions), and industries where both offices and production scenes are located in the same building and power plants. “Currently, we are working on the development and commercialization of applicable IoT sensors applied to energy harvestors, but we hope to create harvestors with massive energy conversion capacity in the future. Not letting any energy go to waste is the main goal,” said Sung. Sung explains the application process of energy havestors in various industries. Behind Sung’s passionate research, there was a strong drive that was truly inspirational. “Our lab is called the SEED lab, like the seed in an apple. You may know how many seeds are generally in an apple, but you never know how many of them will actually become an apple. It is the work of a miracle, and that is the kind of miracle that our lab members wish to achieve together. I ask myself, what kind of fruit am I expecting in 10 or 20 years when I’m planting this seed? In other words, what is my goal in life that takes the form of the fruit? There are so many people that eat the seed before it grows just to fulfill their self-interest. I’d say that those people are myopic, as they may be full and satisfied for the moment, but they will not be in the future. It sure takes a long time to grow and harvest the seed, but once it grows and starts to bear fruit, a never-ending cycle begins. One seed will bear hundreds of fruits ever year. So the next question is, how will you use these fruits? For me, that’s the question of what I want to achieve in my life, and my life goal is to give back the fruits I’ve harvested to the society, and spread the happiness.” Sung talks about his beliefs and philosophy, ending with some inspirational advice for Hanyang students. “I hope that I can share this belief with the Hanyang community. I hope that we can work together to grow the seeds of Hanyang into a strong tree that will bear many fruits, and spread the miracle to the world. That being said, I would like to tell the students not to be afraid of failure, to have a life-goal that can change the world, not to be devastated from failure, to always be positive but not conceited nor arrogant, and to love challenges. Our body is systematically goal-oriented, and once we have a goal, it becomes our drive to keep going even when we are tired. On top of that, if you think that our purpose in life is for the happiness of our community, then you will become a true global leader.” Park Joo-hyun julia1114@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Choi Min-ju

2018-07 30

[Academics][Researcher of the Month] Observation of Unique Properties of Anti-PT-Symmetric Systems

Professor Song Seok-ho (Department of Physics) has recently announced his research on the observation of an Anti-Parity-Time (APT)-Symmetric exceptional point and energy-difference conserving dynamics in electric circuit resonators. When dividing an electric circuit in half, the two parts show a symmetric stream in both time and space. This is referred to as Parity-Time (PT) Symmetry, which enables electricity to flow in the same stream in both directions inside an electric circuit. By "breaking" the unidirectional converter, the symmetric stream of the forward and backward propagation differs, and the PT-Symmetric form is broken. This picture shows the breaking of the Parity-Time (PT) - symmetric form and how the flow of light changes. By breaking the symmetric middle part, the forms of foward and backward propagation differ, which allows for the creation of diodes. (Photo courtesy of Song) Breaking the PT-Symmetric form allows for the creation of diodes which are semiconductor devices that allow electricity to flow only in one direction and prevent any form of backward propagation. Being a key element of the flow of electricity within an electric circuit, the creation of photodiodes has been a long-term goal in the field of nanophotonics. Based upon the idea of substituting electricity with light, which would allow electric devices to be used with higher speed and energy efficiency, nanophotonics have long been troubled with a loss of energy due to the absence of diodes which allow the efficient flow of energy. Thus, Song’s current research of creating diodes through the "breaking" of PT Symmetries has significance, as it may provide a foothold for the creation of photodiodes. Song has verified his research by successfully breaking symmetries within electric circuits formed with resistance-electric condensers. The experimental process was made as simple as possible based upon the professor’s belief that easy verification leads to easy commercialization. “It is the process of thinking out ideas that should be given effort, whereas the experimental process should be done with ease,” explained Song. This can be seen in the fact that only simple devices with educational purposes were used in the verification of this research. Professor Song Seok-ho shared his research philosophy of the making process which should receive the bulk of time and effort. On the other hand, he mentioned that the experimental process should be conducted as simply as possible, as simple verification leads to simple commercialization. When asked of his future plans, Song explained how he has managed to break through one mere field of nanophotonics. He also maintained that “there are so many fields to overcome. By applying concepts to each field, breaking through the current limitations of physics is my next goal.” Succeeding with the observation of anti-PT-symmetries, it does not seem like it will be long before Song provides another foothold towards a novel breakthrough in the field of nanophotonics. Choi Seo-yong tjdyd1@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Choi Min-ju

2018-07 05

[Academics][Excellent R&D] Laying the Stepping Stones for Future Software Technology

From chemistry to physics, scientific fields take great strides every day. This is even more the case for computer science, with the world having embarked on the 4th industrial revolution - a revolution created through an extensive integration of information technology. Technologies such as artificial intelligence, big data, and the Internet of Things (IoT) have already been brought to reality to a certain extent. In light of these advances, the improvements in software technology by Professor Won You-jip (Department of Computer Science and Engineering) have received grand recognitions for tearing down the barriers to continuous development. The interview with Won You-jip (Department of Computer Science and Engineering) was held in his office on July 4th, 2018. A rough explanation of Won's research would be as follows: if we modify a standard computer, expanding its memory capacity by 100 times, and increasing the number of Central Processing Units (CPU) to 100, the seemingly improved computer would not be 100 times faster than before. In fact, it would be even slower than the standard version. The essential problem lies in the software; the algorithm for the new computer would have to be redesigned to manage the expanded resources in the most efficient manner. “It would be like driving a supercar on an unpaved road,” explained Won, providing a metaphor to emphasize the pointlessness of developing hardware without the sufficient software to manage it. However, the reality is that the speed of software development has remained rather stagnant compared to the restless development of hardware technology. On this point, Won’s research has received a passionate welcome by the international community for paving new roads for the future of software technology. Althernative designs for CPU management and Input/Output management as proposed by Won's research (Photo courtesy of Won Youjip) In a nutshell, Won provided key technologies for operating systems to support scalability, that is, the ability to add more CPUs, and for them to quickly make full use of the software. To elaborate, he categorized the roles of operating systems into CPU management, huge memory management, and file input/output management, and developed essential technologies for each domain after an analysis of the latest trends and prospective future of their hardware. Won essentially solidified the possibility of scalability, maximized the used of large-scale memory space, and improved the I/O management to prevent operation delays. Won’s research was greatly facilitated with the help of the Electronics and Telecommunications Research Institute (ETRI), who granted access to their super computer for research and experiments. With their assistance and his dedication, Won has been recognized as the forerunner in his field, having won two Best Paper Awards from conferences held by USENIX, also known as The Advanced Computing Systems Association. Won was awarded two among the three Best Paper Awards ever given to recipients in Korea. No other countries in Asia have ever won the award. USENIX conferences are the most respected and historical in the field, with the programming language JAVA having been introduced in one of their past conferences. Won considered being awardedthe award for best paper at USENIX to be an extreme honor. Once Won introduces the final version of his work, it is expected to allow software to be designed for manycore (computers with many cores) hardware to be built in 50 to 60 years-time. It will support super computers, allowing AI calculations and machine deep learning. Furthermore, it will be applied to servers to maximize the use of their resources, contributing significantly to their efficiency. Won’s findings not only enable future technology, but make it economic and efficient. Won is also a dedicated instructor. When asked of his greatest aspiration, Won answered that his wish is for his students to become the best developers of Silicon Valley. He interacts with his students on a frequent basis, well above the domains of lab work. A piece of advice that he had for his students was to become the best. “Rise above your failures, keep your head up, and become the best in your field,” commented Won. He believes that regardless of the skill or profession, if there is something you want to do, you should "Start digging and get to the bottom of it.” Lee Chang-hyun pizz1125@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Kang Cho-hyun

2018-06 26

[Special][Card News] [Excellent R&D] Organic-Inorganic Hybrid Multi Layers

▲ Click to read the English article - [Excellent R&D] Organic-Inorganic Hybrid Multi Layers

2018-06 25 Headline News

[Academics][Researcher of the Month] Finding a Cure Through Direct Intranasal Delivery

Flaviviruses like the West Nile virus (WNV), Japanese encephalitis (JEV), and Zika are neurotropic, causing neurological complications or death to those with low immune systems. There is now a cure in development called the siRNA approach which has demonstrated promising results in treating viral infections in animal models. However, several complications exist when it comes to treating humans. Lee Sang-kyung (Department of Bioengineering), along with his fellow researchers, has come up with a solution in his paper "Small Interfering RNA-Mediated Control of Virus Replication in the CNS is Therapeutic and Enables Natural Immunity to West Nile Virus." Lee Sang-kyung (Department of Bioengineering) explains the direct intranasal delivery process on June 22nd. The small interfering RNA (siRNA) is a therapeutic strategy targeting illnesses such as cancer, inflammation, and genetic disorders. This strategy was proven to be successful in treating various viral infections including encephalitis-induced morbidity and mortality, in animal subjects. However, there have been several complications regarding its application to human brains. One of the challenges was due to human anatomy being quite different from that of animal test subjects like mice. After the long research process, it was clear that direct delivery of siRNA to the brain was the best method of treatment. However, not only was finding the right treatment of viral encephalitis (inflammation of the brain) challenging, but the direct delivery of siRNA effectively across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) was a huge block as well. The blood-brain barrier is a filtering mechanism of the capillaries that carries blood to the brain and spinal cord tissue, blocking the passage of certain substances. This basically means that intruding substances are blocked so nothing goes in, and nothing goes out. This makes it harder for the research to continue. The intranasal delivery device that allows mice to be seated in a natural "Mecca" position. (Photo courtesy of Lee) To overcome this problem, Lee and his fellow researchers came up with the intranasal delivery method that allows a substance's direct delivery to the brain while circumventing the challenges associated with the blood-brain barrier. This method was based on the unique connection in human anatomy between the brain and the outer world through the olfactory nerve. Lee was able to invent an intranasal delivery device for WNV-infected mice at late stages of the neuroinvasive disease in hopes of demonstrating that the treatment would bring results in recovery. The mice seated on the platform were naturally placed into the "Mecca" position, which is the best angle for proper direct drug delivery. The siRNA delivered through this route revealed a remarkable therapeutic effect in reducing brain viral load, neuropathology, and mortality even when the treatment was initiated at late stages of WNV infection. Furthermore, the treatment allowed the natural protective immune responses to be triggered outside of the brain that would result in prevention after recovery. This discovery will allow active studies to be conducted in brain research and therapy in the future. Lee explaining the difference in human and animal nasal cavities in his lab, June 22nd. However, there are still more challenges to overcome. Animal subjects used in the experiments such as mice, have the anatomical difference of having a nasal cavity that is six times larger than that of a human being's. This means that the amount of the substance that can be absorbed through a human nasal epithelium (a type of animal tissue) is reduced. The "Mecca" position is a crucial discovery in the steps to overcoming such challenge, but further research is needed. Lee hopes that through the use of the intranasal drug delivery device, they will be able to discover the optimized method of delivery which will be suitable to human anatomy, thus preventing thousands from suffering and death. Lee's research and discovery can be read in detail in the Cell Host & Microbe scientific journal as well as on Signet Biotech's website (signetbiotech.com). Park Joo-hyun julia1114@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Lee Jin-myung

2018-06 18

[Academics][Excellent R&D] Organic-Inorganic Hybrid Multi Layers

Barrier films that have the ability to block moisture and aerial gas have long been a concern of the packaging industry, especially in the display business. The penetration of such substances leads to a degradation of display materials to protect, which is the main reason why barrier films are utilized. Song Tae-seob (Department of Energy Engineering) has provided a solution to this troublesome dilemma, by proposing the use of using organic-inorganic hybrid multi layers. The use of inorganic materials when making a barrier film is highly effective in blocking the penetration of other substances, but the heat treatment and the use of the equipment comes with a high price tag. On the other hand, organic materials have an easier production process, yet are relatively more vulnerable to penetration by moisture and air. Thus, Song has converged these two materials, which would result in a barrier film higher in both ability and cost efficiency. Song Tae-seob (Department of Energy Engineering) explained how converging organic and inorganic materials can result in the production of a barrier with higher abilities and improved cost efficiency. According to Song, there have been techniques to combine the two materials, but they have not yet been applied to the production of barrier films. Thus, the remaining task for Song was to focus upon making a convergence of the two materials and managing to evenly spread and disperse the inorganic material within the organic solution. "Inorganic materials have a tendency to crumple down within an organic solution. Therefore, finding a way to alleviate this mass and allow them to spread evenly within the solution is a key factor to our research," explained Song. Being a professor in the Department of Energy Engineering and primarily studying batteries, Song has had hardships in this relatively unfamiliar field of research. As it is applying an already existing technique, Song and his laboratory members have focused on developing their technologies while avoiding existing patents. Having the need to develop a product from a new perspective with a novel concept, while diverting from current technologies, Song had another barrier to overcome. However, once such hardships are overcome and the current research is fully conducted, the outcomes will be significant. By localizing the novel barrier film technique, the domestic industry will prosper economically. “The domestic display business will benefit from being supplied with products that are more efficient in both cost and capacity. Furthermore, the barriers can also be extended to various businesses such as solar cells, which have also been troubled with moisture and air penetration," commented Song. Song and his students showing their strong will to develop an organic-inorganic hybrid material barrier. From the left, Lee Kang-chun (Energy Engineering, PhD Degree), Song, Jo Seong-han, Kim Gae-un, and Park Sang-woo (Energy Engineering, Master's program). Choi Seo-yong tjdyd1@daum.net Photos by Choi Min-ju

2018-06 17

[Campus]Among the top 100 companies, six CEOs are from Hanyang University

Hanyang University ranked fourth in number of CEO executives in the top 100 companies in Korea. In May, Hyundai Management analyzed the age and educational background of 123 CEOs, excluding foreign CEOs, among the top 100 companies (excluding financial, insurance, and public corporations). The results showed that Hanyang University has produced six CEOs, ranking 4th among major universities in Korea. Seoul National University had the largest number of CEOs (29, 23.6%), followed by Korea University (22, 17.9%), Yonsei University (17, 13.8%), Hanyang University (6, 4.9%), and Sungkyunkwan University (5, 4.1%). The Academic Backgrounds of CEOs among the Top 100 Corp. (Unit: people) Seoul National University 29 Korea University 22 Yonsei University 17 Hanyang University 6 Sungkyunkwan University 5 Yeungnam University · Inha University 4 each Kyungpook University · Kyunghee University · Pusan National University 3 each Konkuk University · Dankook University · Sogang University · Ulsan University · Chungang University · Chungnam University 2 each Kangwon National University, Dongguk University, Donga University, Myongji University, Ajou University, Jeju University, Jeju University · Korea Broadcasting Network · New York State University · Boston University · American University · Iowa State University, UCLA, Yale University 1 each Others 1 Total 123 The results of this study, in terms of their majors, are summarized as follows: Business Administration (38), Chemical Engineering (10), Economics (7), Shipbuilding Engineering (6), and Mechanical Engineering and Electronics Engineering (5 each). The average age was 59.71 years. By age group, the number of people has been indicated as follows: over 70 years (7 people), 65~69 (10 people), 60~64 (45 people), 55 ~ 59 (47 people) , and 45~49 (4 people). ▶ 'Hyundai management' research (click)

2018-06 15

[Performance]Hanyang University Ranks 151st in 2018 QS World University Rankings

Hanyang University was ranked 151st, up four notches from last year in the 2018 World University Evaluation, announced on June 7th by Quacquarelli Symonds (QS), a British agency that conducts university evaluations. Hanyang University has been on the rise for the past nine years, from 354th in 2010, to 219th in 2014, 193rd in 2015, 171st in 2016, and 155th in 2017. This year, QS World University ranked 4,848 universities in 85 countries by evaluating the four fields of research, education, graduates, and globalization. There were six indicators: ▲ Employer Reputation (score 40%), ▲ Citations per Faculty (20%), ▲ Faculty Student Ratio (20%), ▲Employer Reputation (10%), and ▲ International Faculty (5%,), ▲ International Students (5%). Among the six evaluation criteria, Hanyang University acheived the best results in the catogories of ▲Employer Reputation (103rd) and ▲Faculty Student Ratio (155th). The other rankings were as follows: ▲Academic Reputation (178th), ▲International Students (370th), ▲Citations per Faculty (421st), and ▲International Faculty (470th). The highest ranked among Korean universities was Seoul National University (36th). It was followed by ▲KAIST (40th), ▲POSTECH (83rd), ▲Korea University (86th), ▲Sungkyunkwan University (100th), ▲Yonsei University (107th), ▲Hanyang University (151st), ▲Kyunghee University (264th), ▲GIST (315th), ▲Ewha Womans University (319th), ▲Hankuk University of Foreign Studies (397th), and ▲ Chung Ang University (397th), along with 12 other domestic universities ranked among the top 400 in the world. The Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) ranked first in the world after also achieving first place last year. Stanford University came in second, Harvard University third, California Institute of Technology (Caltech) fourth, and Oxford University and Cambridge University tied for fifth place. According to a June 7th article by the Chosun Ilbo, "Universities that are strong in science and technology, not only in Korea but around the world, also have a favorable trend in evaluation rankings." The Chosun Ilbo said that the QS World University Rankings evaluated universities that were strong in science and technology as a whole, and the engineering colleges that have abundant new technology-related research have an advantage in the sector of publications per faculty member since they support the quality of studies. ▶ Source: QS official website Direct Link to: Hanyang Univerisy QS Ranking

2018-06 07

[Campus]Hanyang University ranked third in number of CEOs in KOSDAQ listed company

Hanyang University ranked third place in number of CEOs of KOSDAQ listed company. On May 23, the KOSDAQ-Listed Companies Association surveyed and compiled statistics of 1,550 CEOs' major, age, and gender in 1,269 KOSDAQ-listed companies. Among the CEOs of KOSDAQ-listed companies, 300 (19.4%) of them are graduates of Seoul National University, 160 (10.3%) are from Yonsei University, 126 (8.1%) are from Hanyang University, and 109 (7.0%) from Korea University. By majors, 723 CEOs(46.6%) majored in Science and Technology, 578 of them (37.3%) in Business, 137 (8.8%) in Social Sciences. The CEO's average age was 55.7, and there are 43 female CEOs (2.8 %) while 1,507 of them are male (97.2 %).

2018-06 07

[Special]2018 Spring Festival: Enjoyable Festival Without Alcohol, RACHIOS!

Lions, who really know how to relax and have a good time, gathered together for the annual school festival. There was a lot of confusion this year due to the prohibition on selling alcohol, but the festival was a success. The student council said that under the theme of Rachios: Bisang, they showed their desire to offer different types of entertainment. Let's take a glimpse of the day and night of the Seoul Campus Festival, which were a brilliant variety of events and performances by many singers. ▲ One, wo three~! A picture of a student posing for a 'life photo' at the HY-lion exhibition in front of the main building. ▲ The college student game contest finals held by various universities was held at the Seoul campus. The outdoor theater, full of tension, was crowded with spectators. ▲On the 24th of last month, on the night of the first successful day of the festival, the campus was packed with more people. ▲ During the three days of the festival, there were club performances in Hanmadang. This performer is singing a ballad song in a sweet voice that suited the cool weather. ▲ Students are enjoying the cheerleading performance. ▲ Singer Yunha, who visited Seoul campus, had a good time with the students of Hanyang on the 23rd. ▲ Singer 10cm performced in the final concert on the evening of the 23rd . He was touched and his eyes filled with tears by the audience's group singing.