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2018-06 26

[Special][Card News] [Excellent R&D] Organic-Inorganic Hybrid Multi Layers

▲ Click to read the English article - [Excellent R&D] Organic-Inorganic Hybrid Multi Layers

2018-06 25 Headline News

[Academics][Researcher of the Month] Finding a Cure Through Direct Intranasal Delivery

Flaviviruses like the West Nile virus (WNV), Japanese encephalitis (JEV), and Zika are neurotropic, causing neurological complications or death to those with low immune systems. There is now a cure in development called the siRNA approach which has demonstrated promising results in treating viral infections in animal models. However, several complications exist when it comes to treating humans. Lee Sang-kyung (Department of Bioengineering), along with his fellow researchers, has come up with a solution in his paper "Small Interfering RNA-Mediated Control of Virus Replication in the CNS is Therapeutic and Enables Natural Immunity to West Nile Virus." Lee Sang-kyung (Department of Bioengineering) explains the direct intranasal delivery process on June 22nd. The small interfering RNA (siRNA) is a therapeutic strategy targeting illnesses such as cancer, inflammation, and genetic disorders. This strategy was proven to be successful in treating various viral infections including encephalitis-induced morbidity and mortality, in animal subjects. However, there have been several complications regarding its application to human brains. One of the challenges was due to human anatomy being quite different from that of animal test subjects like mice. After the long research process, it was clear that direct delivery of siRNA to the brain was the best method of treatment. However, not only was finding the right treatment of viral encephalitis (inflammation of the brain) challenging, but the direct delivery of siRNA effectively across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) was a huge block as well. The blood-brain barrier is a filtering mechanism of the capillaries that carries blood to the brain and spinal cord tissue, blocking the passage of certain substances. This basically means that intruding substances are blocked so nothing goes in, and nothing goes out. This makes it harder for the research to continue. The intranasal delivery device that allows mice to be seated in a natural "Mecca" position. (Photo courtesy of Lee) To overcome this problem, Lee and his fellow researchers came up with the intranasal delivery method that allows a substance's direct delivery to the brain while circumventing the challenges associated with the blood-brain barrier. This method was based on the unique connection in human anatomy between the brain and the outer world through the olfactory nerve. Lee was able to invent an intranasal delivery device for WNV-infected mice at late stages of the neuroinvasive disease in hopes of demonstrating that the treatment would bring results in recovery. The mice seated on the platform were naturally placed into the "Mecca" position, which is the best angle for proper direct drug delivery. The siRNA delivered through this route revealed a remarkable therapeutic effect in reducing brain viral load, neuropathology, and mortality even when the treatment was initiated at late stages of WNV infection. Furthermore, the treatment allowed the natural protective immune responses to be triggered outside of the brain that would result in prevention after recovery. This discovery will allow active studies to be conducted in brain research and therapy in the future. Lee explaining the difference in human and animal nasal cavities in his lab, June 22nd. However, there are still more challenges to overcome. Animal subjects used in the experiments such as mice, have the anatomical difference of having a nasal cavity that is six times larger than that of a human being's. This means that the amount of the substance that can be absorbed through a human nasal epithelium (a type of animal tissue) is reduced. The "Mecca" position is a crucial discovery in the steps to overcoming such challenge, but further research is needed. Lee hopes that through the use of the intranasal drug delivery device, they will be able to discover the optimized method of delivery which will be suitable to human anatomy, thus preventing thousands from suffering and death. Lee's research and discovery can be read in detail in the Cell Host & Microbe scientific journal as well as on Signet Biotech's website (signetbiotech.com). Park Joo-hyun julia1114@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Lee Jin-myung

2018-06 18

[Academics][Excellent R&D] Organic-Inorganic Hybrid Multi Layers

Barrier films that have the ability to block moisture and aerial gas have long been a concern of the packaging industry, especially in the display business. The penetration of such substances leads to a degradation of display materials to protect, which is the main reason why barrier films are utilized. Song Tae-seob (Department of Energy Engineering) has provided a solution to this troublesome dilemma, by proposing the use of using organic-inorganic hybrid multi layers. The use of inorganic materials when making a barrier film is highly effective in blocking the penetration of other substances, but the heat treatment and the use of the equipment comes with a high price tag. On the other hand, organic materials have an easier production process, yet are relatively more vulnerable to penetration by moisture and air. Thus, Song has converged these two materials, which would result in a barrier film higher in both ability and cost efficiency. Song Tae-seob (Department of Energy Engineering) explained how converging organic and inorganic materials can result in the production of a barrier with higher abilities and improved cost efficiency. According to Song, there have been techniques to combine the two materials, but they have not yet been applied to the production of barrier films. Thus, the remaining task for Song was to focus upon making a convergence of the two materials and managing to evenly spread and disperse the inorganic material within the organic solution. "Inorganic materials have a tendency to crumple down within an organic solution. Therefore, finding a way to alleviate this mass and allow them to spread evenly within the solution is a key factor to our research," explained Song. Being a professor in the Department of Energy Engineering and primarily studying batteries, Song has had hardships in this relatively unfamiliar field of research. As it is applying an already existing technique, Song and his laboratory members have focused on developing their technologies while avoiding existing patents. Having the need to develop a product from a new perspective with a novel concept, while diverting from current technologies, Song had another barrier to overcome. However, once such hardships are overcome and the current research is fully conducted, the outcomes will be significant. By localizing the novel barrier film technique, the domestic industry will prosper economically. “The domestic display business will benefit from being supplied with products that are more efficient in both cost and capacity. Furthermore, the barriers can also be extended to various businesses such as solar cells, which have also been troubled with moisture and air penetration," commented Song. Song and his students showing their strong will to develop an organic-inorganic hybrid material barrier. From the left, Lee Kang-chun (Energy Engineering, PhD Degree), Song, Jo Seong-han, Kim Gae-un, and Park Sang-woo (Energy Engineering, Master's program). Choi Seo-yong tjdyd1@daum.net Photos by Choi Min-ju

2018-06 17

[Campus]Among the top 100 companies, six CEOs are from Hanyang University

Hanyang University ranked fourth in number of CEO executives in the top 100 companies in Korea. In May, Hyundai Management analyzed the age and educational background of 123 CEOs, excluding foreign CEOs, among the top 100 companies (excluding financial, insurance, and public corporations). The results showed that Hanyang University has produced six CEOs, ranking 4th among major universities in Korea. Seoul National University had the largest number of CEOs (29, 23.6%), followed by Korea University (22, 17.9%), Yonsei University (17, 13.8%), Hanyang University (6, 4.9%), and Sungkyunkwan University (5, 4.1%). The Academic Backgrounds of CEOs among the Top 100 Corp. (Unit: people) Seoul National University 29 Korea University 22 Yonsei University 17 Hanyang University 6 Sungkyunkwan University 5 Yeungnam University · Inha University 4 each Kyungpook University · Kyunghee University · Pusan National University 3 each Konkuk University · Dankook University · Sogang University · Ulsan University · Chungang University · Chungnam University 2 each Kangwon National University, Dongguk University, Donga University, Myongji University, Ajou University, Jeju University, Jeju University · Korea Broadcasting Network · New York State University · Boston University · American University · Iowa State University, UCLA, Yale University 1 each Others 1 Total 123 The results of this study, in terms of their majors, are summarized as follows: Business Administration (38), Chemical Engineering (10), Economics (7), Shipbuilding Engineering (6), and Mechanical Engineering and Electronics Engineering (5 each). The average age was 59.71 years. By age group, the number of people has been indicated as follows: over 70 years (7 people), 65~69 (10 people), 60~64 (45 people), 55 ~ 59 (47 people) , and 45~49 (4 people). ▶ 'Hyundai management' research (click)

2018-06 15

[Performance]Hanyang University Ranks 151st in 2018 QS World University Rankings

Hanyang University was ranked 151st, up four notches from last year in the 2018 World University Evaluation, announced on June 7th by Quacquarelli Symonds (QS), a British agency that conducts university evaluations. Hanyang University has been on the rise for the past nine years, from 354th in 2010, to 219th in 2014, 193rd in 2015, 171st in 2016, and 155th in 2017. This year, QS World University ranked 4,848 universities in 85 countries by evaluating the four fields of research, education, graduates, and globalization. There were six indicators: ▲ Employer Reputation (score 40%), ▲ Citations per Faculty (20%), ▲ Faculty Student Ratio (20%), ▲Employer Reputation (10%), and ▲ International Faculty (5%,), ▲ International Students (5%). Among the six evaluation criteria, Hanyang University acheived the best results in the catogories of ▲Employer Reputation (103rd) and ▲Faculty Student Ratio (155th). The other rankings were as follows: ▲Academic Reputation (178th), ▲International Students (370th), ▲Citations per Faculty (421st), and ▲International Faculty (470th). The highest ranked among Korean universities was Seoul National University (36th). It was followed by ▲KAIST (40th), ▲POSTECH (83rd), ▲Korea University (86th), ▲Sungkyunkwan University (100th), ▲Yonsei University (107th), ▲Hanyang University (151st), ▲Kyunghee University (264th), ▲GIST (315th), ▲Ewha Womans University (319th), ▲Hankuk University of Foreign Studies (397th), and ▲ Chung Ang University (397th), along with 12 other domestic universities ranked among the top 400 in the world. The Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) ranked first in the world after also achieving first place last year. Stanford University came in second, Harvard University third, California Institute of Technology (Caltech) fourth, and Oxford University and Cambridge University tied for fifth place. According to a June 7th article by the Chosun Ilbo, "Universities that are strong in science and technology, not only in Korea but around the world, also have a favorable trend in evaluation rankings." The Chosun Ilbo said that the QS World University Rankings evaluated universities that were strong in science and technology as a whole, and the engineering colleges that have abundant new technology-related research have an advantage in the sector of publications per faculty member since they support the quality of studies. ▶ Source: QS official website Direct Link to: Hanyang Univerisy QS Ranking

2018-06 07

[Campus]Hanyang University ranked third in number of CEOs in KOSDAQ listed company

Hanyang University ranked third place in number of CEOs of KOSDAQ listed company. On May 23, the KOSDAQ-Listed Companies Association surveyed and compiled statistics of 1,550 CEOs' major, age, and gender in 1,269 KOSDAQ-listed companies. Among the CEOs of KOSDAQ-listed companies, 300 (19.4%) of them are graduates of Seoul National University, 160 (10.3%) are from Yonsei University, 126 (8.1%) are from Hanyang University, and 109 (7.0%) from Korea University. By majors, 723 CEOs(46.6%) majored in Science and Technology, 578 of them (37.3%) in Business, 137 (8.8%) in Social Sciences. The CEO's average age was 55.7, and there are 43 female CEOs (2.8 %) while 1,507 of them are male (97.2 %).

2018-06 07

[Special]2018 Spring Festival: Enjoyable Festival Without Alcohol, RACHIOS!

Lions, who really know how to relax and have a good time, gathered together for the annual school festival. There was a lot of confusion this year due to the prohibition on selling alcohol, but the festival was a success. The student council said that under the theme of Rachios: Bisang, they showed their desire to offer different types of entertainment. Let's take a glimpse of the day and night of the Seoul Campus Festival, which were a brilliant variety of events and performances by many singers. ▲ One, wo three~! A picture of a student posing for a 'life photo' at the HY-lion exhibition in front of the main building. ▲ The college student game contest finals held by various universities was held at the Seoul campus. The outdoor theater, full of tension, was crowded with spectators. ▲On the 24th of last month, on the night of the first successful day of the festival, the campus was packed with more people. ▲ During the three days of the festival, there were club performances in Hanmadang. This performer is singing a ballad song in a sweet voice that suited the cool weather. ▲ Students are enjoying the cheerleading performance. ▲ Singer Yunha, who visited Seoul campus, had a good time with the students of Hanyang on the 23rd. ▲ Singer 10cm performced in the final concert on the evening of the 23rd . He was touched and his eyes filled with tears by the audience's group singing.

2018-05 28

[Academics][Researcher of the Month] Efficient and Aesthetic Hybrid Solar Cells

Professor Ko Min-jae recently made the cover article of Advanced Energy Materials with “Room-Temperature Vapor Deposition of Cobalt Nitride Nanofilms for Mesoscopic and Perovskite Solar Cells.” The research Ko has been conducting since 2008 deals with the hybrid solar cell, which is more flexible, lighter and more versatile than conventional silicon solar panels. The article focuses on Ko and his research team's development of a power conversion efficient nanofilm made of cobalt nitride (CoN). As it can be dye-sensitized and bent freely, Ko proposes that this material can be applied on flexible and wearable devices in the future, at an affordable cost. “If we use CoN nanofilms, electricity can be generated from everyday devices and objects, not only from thermoelectric or nuclear power plants. By utilizing natural renewable energy, the human race can develop sustainably, and that is very important,” Ko mentioned in the interview. The new finding can also generate power from weak lights such as the sun on a cloudy day or even from indoor fluorescent lights. The reason behind the reduced cost is the simple production process. Conventional silicon solar panels require special devices to assemble, which are big and expensive. Finding the right combination of substances that induce stable synergy is the hardest part and the reason Ko’s lab is one of the leaders in the solar power field. Ko mentioned, “Idea is the key, and it is wonderful that I can see if the idea works or not in two days.” It is predicted that the CoN nanofilm will be commercialized in five years. "Fighting!" Ko and his students are posing and assuring their will to work hard. From the left, Yoo Yong-suk (Chemical Engineering, Master's program), Ko Min-jae and Kim Dong-hwan (Chemical Engineering, 4th year). Kim So-yun dash070@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Kang Cho-hyun

2018-05 14

[Academics][Excellent R&D] Heading for the World of New Physics

The field of physics is largely divided into three categories: particle, optics, and condensed matter physics. Especially in the field of particle physics, the Standard Model is a theory that explains almost every phenomenon in the universe. However, how would you feel if something that you’ve been trusting for the last 50 years turned out to be wrong? Professor Cheon Byung-gu (Department of Physics), is trying to solve this question through his new research project titled "Study of Heavy Flavor Physics using e+ e- Collision." News H met Cheon Byung-gu (Department of Physics) to hear more about New Physics. The Standard Model is a theory describing three of the four fundamental forces in the universe, which are the electromagnetic, weak, and strong interactions, not including the gravitational force, along with classifying all known elementary particles This has been believed to be consistent due to successfully providing all experimental predictions, but leaves certain phenomena, such as dark matter and dark energy, unexplained. Therefore, this signifies there is a certain particle that has not yet been discovered and yet must be in existence. Cheon, therefore, is developing and planning to proceed with research through a Belle Ⅱ experiment, to search for this very particle. Cheon proceeds with his experiment through colliding an electron and a positron together to uncover a new particle through rare decay events. They are so extremely small that making these two particles collide is extremely difficult; therefore, it can only be done using special vehicles, the SuperKEKB collider and the Belle Ⅱ detector, which is a kind of microscope capable of seeing objects smaller than a nucleus. Once these new particles are discovered, they could provide the foundation for a novel theory named New Physics, beyond the Standard Model. An image of an electron and a positron colliding, making an occurance of new particles seen as blue lines. (Photo courtesy of Cheon) The Super KEKB shoots countless electrons from one side and positrons from the other side, providing an instantaneous luminosity 40 times higher than that of the previous KEKB collider. Then the Belle Ⅱ detector identifies the particles, using seven kinds of sub-detector systems, including a calorimeter trigger system, that selects events that are valuable enough to investigate further. The researchers could have better sorted sets of events to analyze through this detector at real time operation, which Hanyang University group is leading its own independent line. Cheon’s final goal is to find a New Physics phenomenon beyond the current Standard Model through the Belle Ⅱ. These physical studies might not look like something that could directly be connected to everyday life. However, much of our abundant technology in our life has its foundation in physics. “Medical technological skills such as X-ray, CT, and PET detectors all started with knowledge of physics. In the field of physics, new discoveries and new acknowledgements contribute to the mental wealth of humankind,” said Cheon. "Don't be afraid to show your abilities as a world leader!" Cheon is currently working not only as a researcher, but also continues his lectures and manages academic affairs as the dean of the Department of Physics. He has online meetings with researchers in Japan every week to continue his research, trying to let his students improve to be talented people who can contribute to society. “I wish to provide my students with an environment where they can work with foreign researchers. I hope all Hanyangians in the 21st century will also be willing to look not only at Korea, but to the whole world.” On Jung-yun jessica0818@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Kang Cho-hyun

2018-05 10

[Academics][Excellent R&D] Weaving Technology into the Fibers of Our Lives

The development of smart technology has brought forth a spectacular display of new products in recent years. Under the common label "smart," smartphones, smartwatches, smart homes and other technology used to gather, process, and analyze massive amounts of data have now seeped into some of the most critical parts of our daily lives. In fact, the only limit on the ways of utilizing this technology is our imaginations. In this sense, Professor Bae Ji-hyun (Department of Clothing and Textiles) has made a new attempt to tear down another wall between smart technology and an essential component of our lives: clothing. Introducing the clothes of the future In essence, Bae’s research is an adaptation of wearable devices. Specifically, she aims to introduce electronic devices to our everyday clothing. Among a diverse array of available options, this research targets the field of healthcare. The idea is that by planting electronic devices in our clothes, we can codify data such as bio-signals, physical movements, or even environmental changes to monitor our health status. Generally speaking, clothing and electronic devices intuitively dawn on us as two very disparate domains. This probably has to do with the nature of clothing, which necessitates regular washing, as well as the imaginable discomfort of having metallic devices attached to our clothes. So how does Bae plan to overcome this fixation? The secret is in the fabric. Bae Ji-hyun (Department of Clothing and Textiles) uses a prototype glove to give an explanation of her research. The functional fibers in the glove allow movements to be detected and transmitted in the form of electrical signals. In the big picture of introducing electronic devices to clothing, Bae’s specific area of research is the development of functional fibers that can act as sensors. Furthermore, she has to design the textile organization in a way that allows it to be woven into a wearable form. By endowing fiber, the most basic unit of clothing, with the ability to react to stimuli such as light, movement, and temperature, we could use clothing to transmit, store, and analyze a variety of changes. According to Bae, the most prominent method to enable this function is by mixing conductive macromolecule particles or nano-particles in the process of weaving the fiber strands. Another common method is to coat ordinary thread, such as nylon or silk, with functional substances. Although Bae’s research is only in its initial stage, the projected benefits of the study raise great anticipation. For one, it will bring an immense improvement to the quality of healthcare for the elderly. This is especially timely considering the growth of the elderly population in our society. Not only will smart clothes reduce the cost of healthcare for retired citizens, it will provide higher efficiency by constantly monitoring and diagnosing the state of the wearer. It can also be used to service the disadvantaged such as the monitoring of infants or people with disabilities. Bae also expressed the hope of adapting this new technology to assist the activities of people working under dangerous conditions, such as soldiers or fire fighters, to improve their safety. As previously mentioned, the ways in which the technology can be used is only limited by our imaginations. (a) The sensor part of the glove woven with conductive fiber (b) The change of resistance value following the movement of the finger (c) Demonstration of a sign language detection system using the conductive-fiber based glove (Photo courtesy of Bae) The background story It has only been a year since Bae was recruited as a professor at Hanyang University. Prior to the position as a professor, she worked at an electronics company. Having earned her degree in textile engineering, Bae became immersed in the relationship between textiles and electronic technology while working at the firm. “Once I saw the connection, there were so many possibilities that became obvious to me," answered Bae. Through her previous firm, she was able to participate in a government project to develop wearable devices, providing her with an insight into the prospect of the technology. According to Bae, the hardest part of her research so far has been the novelty of the field. As is true in the case of most technologies these days, her research requires extensive collaboration with other fields. For the immediate research of smart clothes, the fields of electronic engineering and textiles are crucial. Furthermore, as the target of her research is the field of healthcare, some medical insight is also required. Other than that, convergence with a wide scope of academic fields is necessary in order to consider the subsidiary details of the research, such as the environmental impact of the product or the economic costs of commercializing the technology. However, a lack of public interest in the field makes it difficult for Bae to secure opportunities for cooperation with other fields. Although most of Bae's existing joint research projects are done through external networks, she hopes that internal convergence studies at Hanyang will also take place soon. Efforts as an educator Despite the difficulties of her research, Bae confessed that the hardest part of her job is teaching students. As she had no prior experience of interacting with pupils, she devotes a significant amount of her hours to understanding the needs of her students. “I believe that my current priority is to figure out how to be a good professor to my students,” added Bae. Bae wants to encourage students to maintain an open attitude when communicating with others. “Even in joint research, you need to have respect for others’ expertise in their respective fields, as well as an open mind to approach a common problem from diverse directions.” Bae argued that the same holds true for human interaction, which is an important lesson to take to heart when entering society. In the end, she believes that the synergy created from interactions and convergence is what provides us with the momentum to grow. Lee Chang-hyun pizz1125@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Lee Jin-myung