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2017-12 04

[Academics][Researcher of the Month] Obesity, Everyone’s Enemy

Regardless of gender, age, and nationality, obesity is a health problem that is affecting an increasing number of people. While most people think obesity merely has to do with dietary habit, it shows close relations with metabolic diseases and cancer. In other words, obesity is not just caused by the consumption of large calories, but there are other possible factors to it. Kim Yong-hee (Department of Bio-Engineering), whose interest lies in obesity and the ways to prevent and cure it, discovered an innovative way to counteract obesity in his paper “Visceral adipose tissue macrophage-targeted TACE silencing to treat obesity-induced type 2 diabetes,” which was coauthored by two of the graduate school students of the department: Song Yoon-sung (2nd year) and Yong Seok-beom (3rd year). Kim explained that by targeting the inflammation caused by the excess fats, obesity can be treated. The existing method used to treat obesity was to suppress appetite by touching the nerve system, for it was mainly believed that the root cause of obesity was excessive-consumption. However, Kim discovered in his laboratory that obesity has to do with inflammation within fat-storing tissues, which are called adipose tissues. Inside a patient’s body, the excess fat that cannot be stored in the adipose tissue spreads to its surroundings, which then causes inflammation when in contact with other types of cells. A type of white blood cell that engulfs and digests foreign cellular debris called macrophage are largely responsible for obesity-induced adipose tissue inflammation. A breakthrough in Kim’s research is that obesity can be treated by preventing the accumulation of fat within the body, by controlling the inflammation through gene delivery, not by suppressing appetite. In such a scenario, the gene delivery system Kim and his students have invented in the laboratory refers to the targeted gene delivery system that is capable of selectively targeting the visceral (relating to the intestines) adipose tissue macrophages, which are the major cause of inflammation because they produce a type of protein called cytokine. The excess fats that cannot be stored in the adipose tissue spread to their surroundings, and when they come in contact with cytokines, that is when the inflammation springs. By targeting the inflammation, which is the root cause of obesity, the treatment for obesity is made possible. There have been several clinical studies that have highlighted the significance of inflammation regarding obesity, but few therapeutic approaches have been suggested. Through his research, Kim and his students have proposed a therapeutic strategy of targeted gene delivery that could safely treat the disease without any side effects. This strategy is also favorable in treating type 2 diabetes, which primarily occurs as a result of obesity. It is preventable by staying at a normal weight through regular exercise or dietary changes. This could also be the way to prevent obesity as well, which, in other words, means that the cause of the two diseases have the same outset, which is the inflammation within the tissues due to being overweight. Therefore, Kim’s proposal of therapeutic approach for obesity can also treat type 2 diabetes. Targeted gene delivery strategy could kill two birds with one stone. Building on his current studies, Kim’s future research aims to create more formulas for drugs that could treat obesity. “Liposuction is an extremely dangerous surgery because it sucks the good fats as well. Obesity is surely preventable or even cured for those who are not severely obese. However, those who are super-obese, their genes could transform into obese genes and this can affect their children. So, the targeted gene delivery approach can optimally be used in the future.” Kim specifically chose the topic of inflammation of obesity because he wanted to find a narrow gate and open it wide. Since not many solutions for obesity inflammation have been discovered, he wanted to delve into the studies of this topic and create a cure for the countless people waiting for treatment. Kim always aspires to study and research on topics that is subject to a breakthrough outcome. "I am interested in finding cures for diseases that do not have many treatments." Jeon Chae-yun chaeyun111@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Kabg Cho-hyun

2017-11 28

[Academics][Excellent R&D] Inventing Eyes for Robots

Augmented Reality, self-driving cars, and facial recognition are no longer a technology of future. Such advanced technologies are deep in our daily lives. In order for machines to properly function as they are meant to, they need something called ‘machine vision’. Machine vision (MV) is the technology and method used to provide imaging-based automatic inspection and analysis for such applications as automatic inspection, process control, and robot guidance, usually in industry. And the field that encompasses the subject is Computer Vision, which Lim majors. For December’s Researcher of the Month, News H interviewed Lim Jong-woo (Professor, Department of Computer Science) who recently won a major government project to acquire the source technology for such field. Lim is enthusiastically explaining how the technology can be applied in real lives. For example, with the structure modeling, calculating the altitude of a person's eye level (when wearing an AR/VR glasses) would be possble. The final goal of this four-year project is to develop a high-level video situation recognition technology based on structural modeling and geometrical analysis of images acquired in extremely congested situations such as the real environment. Structural modeling of a video means to draw lines and actually structure the surrounding environment within the video, either in a two-dimensional or three-dimensional form. Up to current technology, a system can process a single object in the video or occasionally multiple objects. However, it is not yet developed for computers to recognize and analyze a ‘congested’ video with dozens of moving objects, which is often the case in real life footage. “If developed further enough, a computer would be able to track irregular paths taken by a suspect from CCTV video and alert us,” mentioned Lim. (Left) Estimation of the structure of a space through existing technology (Right) Provisioned result of structure estimation (Photo courtesy of Lim) One of the ultimate goals of the project is to also integrate multi-object detection and tracking with the environment. “There are a lot of people trying to integrate detection and tracking technology,” said Lim. Because it is highly improbable for researchers to set a model human face for the computer to detect all human faces, integrating such technology with tracking a moving person is even more intricate and difficult. Nevertheless, if it does become reality, computers will be able to read the context of a specific video. For instance, because they can recognize each person, it would be able to write a storyline and understand relationships between characters in a show or a movie. As mentioned in the earlier part of the article, computer vision is a crucial part of augmented reality and autonomous cars. In the case of AR, the computer must be able to structure its environment to decide where to put the virtual object. Also, by such mapping, the machine can change its perspective in accordance with the user’s change of perspective. Furthermore, autonomous cars require even higher accuracy of computer vision in order to detect obstacles and prevent unwanted accidents. Unlike the facial detection of a camera app on our cellphone which is not really a matter of life and death, technology related to transportation has higher standards for that reason. "I aim to research for use, rather than a reasearch for research." Another surprising aspect of this research project plan is that the team will upload their findings on the web, free of charge as an open-source. When asked why not commercialize it, Lim answered “It is mutually beneficial for us to have the crowd test our algorithm and give feedback to us, as we cannot test it in every environment. Also, it is a trend to release algorithms open-source, because most of them fall short to be commercialized yet.” The research has begun this August and will be continued until the end of 2020. News H is looking forward to observing Lim’s progress and the social impact his team will bring. Kim So-yun dash070@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Choi Min-ju

2017-11 10

[Academics][Excellent R&D] Kim Doo-seop (Department of Sociology)

As of last year, there were more than 1.71 million foreign residents in Korea, which is 3.4% of the total population. The number of marriage migrants, also known as multicultural marriages, is also a large part of the total population at around 150,000. Professor Kim Doo-seop (Department of Sociology) has built a foundation for migrant research since establishing the ‘CSMR Multiculture Institute’ in 2011. This year, Hanyang University SSK Multicultural Research Project was selected as a project to enter the large-scale stage. ▲On the 6th, News H met Professor Kim Doo-seop (Department of Sociology) and discussed the contents of the SSK multiculture research project and the selected items to enter the large-scale stage. An ongoing process of building data on foreign migrants Unlike conventional wisdom, Korea is becoming a country where various cultures coexist. As mentioned above, nearly 4% of the total population are foreign residents or marriage migrants. Socio-scientific research on this phenomenon is crucial but various data such as related literatures should be preceded. Since 2011, Professor Kim's research team has built a foundation for migrant research through archives and database construction. In addition, he published four academic books on marriage immigrants and migrant workers, ten books on foreigners' statistics, and 54 papers in domestic and international journals. He has also internationally carried out other academic activities such as academic conferences, joint seminars, a colloquium, and academic presentations. Recently, as a result of the examination by the Korea Research Foundation, the SSK multicultural research project of Hanyang University was recognized as a significant research project with its importance and timeliness and selected as a large-scale research progect. This selection has been applied since last September and will receive research funds of 580 million won per year over the next four years. The name was also changed from 'CSMR Multicultural Institute' to 'CSMR Multiculture Management Center'. Professor Kim 's research team will expand the research project. A leap forward as a hub for immigrant and multicultural research First, the archive for migrants and DB construction, which have been done in the past, will continue to be supplemented. By August 31, the research team has collected about 1,300 related papers in the CSMR archive and will be adding future papers and constantly supplementing the search menu. The research subjects have also been expanded to set targets for collecting data on ethnic minorities abroad. Until now, archives and databases have been organized mainly on problems related to domestic issues such as multicultural families, marriage migrants, migrant workers, multicultural children, foreign students, etc. By expanding the study's target groups and diversifying the construction data, the center pursues stepping up to a global DB center for multiculture. In addition, the center plans to expand exchanges with scholars and research institutes in Korea and abroad and also exert their active efforts to nurture students by linking with the in-school research institute and graduate school curriculum. In line with the name of the Multiculture Management Center, they will ultimately make a leap into the hub of multicultural research and immigrants who have formed networks with major research institutes and scholars in the world. ▲ Professor Kim Doo-seop said, "We will contribute to policy alternatives and social consensus through future research." Professor Kim said, "The center provides a center for research on migrants through document archives and DB construction" and added, “It is meaningful to promote research through various interdisciplinary approaches and to form an international network of migrants and multicultural researchers. " Furthermore, he stated that the ultimate goal of the study is to contribute to the accumulation of demographic knowledge on migration and multiculturalism that Korean society faces and to provide policy alternatives and social consensus through ongoing activities of the Multiculture Management Center.

2017-11 10

[Academics][Excellent R & D] Professor Lee Sang-hoon (Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, College of Medicine)

Chronic diseases, such as Parkinson's disease, diabetes, dementia, and degenerative arthitis, cannot be cured and should be managed for life. To treat this, stem cells are being studied in medicine. Professor Lee Sang-hoon (Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, College of Medicine) has been conducting research on embryonic stem cell research for treatment of chronic diseases at the Medical Research Center (MRC) of Hanyang University since 2008. He will carry out further research until 2024. ▲ On November 6th, News H visited Prof. Lee Sang-hoon (Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, College of Medicine) and talked about stem cell and tissue regeneration research. (Source: Professor Lee Sang-hoon) Increased understanding of stem cells The relationship between chronic diseases and stem cell research is inevitable. First, in order for the disease to be treated, it is necessary to restore the cells that have been damaged by the disease. The reason why chronic diseases are not treated is because the damaged tissue is an organ that can not be recovered by the human body itself. Neurons and brain cells are destroyed, or genetic problems do not occur due to specific hormones, making a cure impossible. But there is a possibility. If the patient's stem cells can be cloned and cultured well, the cells can theoretically be differentiated into desired cells. Professor Lee has studied the theoretical techniques in detail. In 2008, Hanyang University MRC (Medical Research Council) conducted a research on the basic mechanism of stem cells under the name 'Stem Cell Control Research Center'. In detail, stem cells are cultured, and the number of stem cells is differentiated into tissue cells. Professor Lee conducted a 'stem cell behavior control study' that controlled this behavior. Since the study of stem cells at the time was at the beginning stage, he has been working on the mechanism of how a series of processes take place. Based on the research, he will carry out this research project. First of all, this research project will continue the basic mechanism research. In addition to the existing understanding, he will improve the understanding of stem cells, the understanding of the differentiation process, and the plan to apply it to other fields such as stem cells. ▲ Professor Lee's team will continue to study for higher stem cell understanding. (Source: Professor Lee Sang-hoon) Clinical application, industrialization and internationalization Through this project, his research team will receive a total of 7 billion research grants for seven years, one billion annually. As a new name, Hanyang University MRC 'Tissue Regeneration Promotion Research Center's goal is to develop cell transplantation and gene therapy technologies for Parkinson's disease, mass-production of stem cells with excellent therapeutic effects, and research on the development of affected parts using astrocytes. Parkinson's disease causes the destruction of dopamine-producing substantia nigra, which is intended for clinical application of cell transplantation or gene therapy. Mass production of stem cells can be used for clinical treatment, so mass production and industrialization are also important targets. Finally, research using stellate cells is also an important goal. When diseases such as dementia or Parkinson's disease are destroyed, not only the destroyed cells but also the surrounding environment becomes bad. Some of the environment is astrocytes. By transplanting stellate cells made by differentiating stem cells, it can improve the surrounding environment of the brain and help regenerate brain tissue. In this way, internationalization of research results through clinical application and industrialization process is being prepared. In addition to the domestic medical industry, it is also possible to enter the overseas markets in cooperation with Indonesian companies. In addition, research on the basic mechanism will be carried out continuously, so that degenerative diseases, which were chronic diseases in the future, will be gradually transferred to the treatment side.

2017-11 01

[Special][Saranghandae] Oasis Full of Information and Opportunities for Startup Nomads

“I fear someone in a garage who is devising something completely new.” This is what Bill Gates, founder of Microsoft Corporation answered when asked his competitive foe. It implies how crucial a new idea is to success. No matter how innovative the ideas are, however, making them into real businesses is not easy without any help. Hanyang University launched a global startup mentor group to support globalizing promising startup companies of HYU students. The opening ceremony took place on July 31st at Silicon Valley, and Global Start-Up Lab was open the day after the ceremony in San Jose, California. Support Younger Generation to Survive in Business Jungle Global startup mentor group was devised for students who need more systematic aid about globalizing their new companies. “HYU is one and only university that has well-managed systems and programs for incubating startup companies. Since Center for Global Entrepreneurship started off in 2009, Hanyang University has made remarkable progress expanding its area in education, funding and so on,” said Professor Yoo Hyun-oh, Director of the Center for Global Entrepreneurship. The mentor group consists of 30 HYU alumni as mentors who have had successful careers in Silicon Valley. The mentoring is planned to be conducted for a year and during its preparation mentors went through training for mentoring to give advice more effectively to mentees. This was why Global Startup Lab was necessary. It is going to be the space where the mentors have meetings for the program. Both undergraduates and graduates including international students who are willing to take part in the mentoring program as mentees can freely check the information about not only the program but also the mentors on global startup lounge website. Then one to one coaching begins through e-mails and video conversation after more specific matching. If the mentoring proceeds well and the mentees are expected to gain achievements, mentees can visit Global Startup Lab in San Jose. Depending on the outcome, other working places will be arranged as the mentoring continues. The main focus of this program is to guide students who run startup companies but those who are willing to map out their startups will also be welcomed. Also, further plans are in progress to make mentoring about global employment. Yoo said, “So-called stable jobs do not exist anymore. Getting a job and starting a business are not totally different things. You can get employed first and then start your own company later if you are prepared and know how to do so.” As this is the common career path that most of the mentors had, development of the program is positively expected. Find the Signs and Follow Your Heart It is unprecedented among national universities to make these efforts to help its students with founding startups. In addition to this mentoring program, more information is available by adding Hanyang Startup TalkTalk on KakaoTalk app. Various events or lectures that are useful for starting businesses are informed and users can also freely ask questions. Yoo put emphasis on efforts to get information by saying, “I wish more students could get informed using this system. Hanyang Startup TalkTalk has been promoted by supporters on campus and also banners can be easily found. Considering the time and money put into university life, students can never be more eager enough for productive information.” It is said that young generation is having the toughest time regarding employment. No matter how impressive resumés they have, the number of available jobs for them is unbelievably few. This situation and the Fourth Industrial Revolution made more and more people realize startup can bring a huge change. For HYU students who were not sure what kind of job they should have among the present ones, it might be a blessing in disguise in that they can create the jobs they want. Others who have had passion for making their own companies, it is such a great time to go for it with more support from their attending university. ▲ Professor Yoo Hyun-oh, Director of the Center for Global Entrepreneurship Do Not Be Afraid to Fail “There are more learning opportunities around than you actually think, especially for HYU students. Find out what you want to do with your life first. Stay alert and make the most of it. It is helpful to experience failures as soon as possible. When you are young, you can overcome obstacles faster. Do not be afraid to fail.” By Choi Mi-rae (Student Reporter) global@hanyang.ac.kr

2017-10 29

[Academics][Researcher of the Month] The Faster, Simpler, Easier, the Better!

Today, we live in the world where everything is becoming mechanized, meaning the field of electronics and mechanics are infinitely evolving. Conspicuous or not, there are small and big changes around us that make our lives more convenient and more efficient in various ways. Professor Hong Jung-pyo (Department of Automotive Engineering), in his paper, “Simple size determination of permanent-magnet synchronous machines” has established a milestone in the field of both electronics and mechanics, by proposing a means of simplifying the process of designing and developing machines. Hong’s research can determine the direction of the process of motor’s development. When designing and producing an instrument, engineers go through trials of experiments, trying to pick the best formula by observing the results of each experiment. Such a process demands laborious amounts of time and cost, which under certain circumstances can be unaffordable. A perfect, well-constructed device or motor has been made through stages of trial-and-error so far, being tested on their performance in each stage. However, with Hong’s proposal of simulation experiment, this entire step could be greatly reduced, simply by executing the experiment with the simulator. When working on a motor, it is important to harmoniously combine the techniques of both the electrician and the engineer. However, what is more important is, the two fields should not be seen separately. The two perspectives commingled as one will bring the best result, whereas if they are regarded separately, failures can arise, and it would be difficult to figure out where the problem originated from. The simulator Hong proposed in his paper acts not only as a catalyst in making the process of developing machines faster, simpler, and easier by exempting the trial-and-error step but also allows to preview an outcome of integrated viewpoint. “For a better understanding, imagine this picture. There is a device I’m trying to make, and I want to equip this circle-shaped part. After doing so, I still think I can improve the final product somehow, so I will try dismantling the part I just added and equip this oval-shaped part. When doing so, I have to carefully remove the circle-shaped part and re-equip the oval-shaped one and then compare the two results to see what the best combination is.” This process of trial-and-error and comparison, which is time-consuming, is what Hong wanted to resolve with his research. With the simulator, engineers can simply enter the input and compare the different outcomes and go for what is the best much more conveniently. Everything that moves, including cars, elevators, and airplanes, are all powered by electric motors. In the future, the range of usages will increase infinitely which means there will be experiments after experiments for the development of motor-based objects. In each case, Hong’s research can greatly reduce the development process and offer the direction of choices for better outcomes. His future research goal is to create a unified solution of electronics and mechanics, which will boost the usability of the machine itself. Hong’s research will be a constructive contribution to engineers. Jeon Chae-yun chaeyun111@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Park Young-min, Kim Youn-soo

2017-10 25

[Performance]2017 JoongAng Ilbo University Rankings, Seoul Ranked 3rd · ERICA 9th

Hanyang University ranked 3rd (ERICA 9th) in '2017 JoongAng Ilbo University Rankings'. On October 23, Joongang Ilbo released the results of 'Comprehensive Evaluation', which evaluates the comprehensive competitiveness of 4-year universities, 'Department Evaluation', which assesses the competitiveness of departments and 'Reputation Survey', which is conducted by human resources managers of various companies and institutions. This comprehensive evaluation was conducted for 61 4-year comprehensive universities with four or more departments among humanities, social science, engineering, natural science, medicine, arts and physical education. Four evaluation criteria (professor's research, educational conditions, student performance, and reputation) and 33 detailed indicators (professor's research achievement, educational conditions, student education, etc.) are evaluated out of 300 points. Universities specialized in science and engineering, such as KAIST and POSTEC, were excluded from this comprehensive evaluation. Hanyang University showed strengths in student education and performance. Seoul Campus is ranked 1st in 'Student Performance' (58 points), 3rd in 'Professor's Research' (70 points), 4th in 'Educational Conditions' (60 points), 5th in 'Reputation' (24 points), and 3rd in overall rankings with total 214 points. ERICA campus ranked 9th overall by achieving 6th (49 points) in 'Student Performance', 10th (62 points) in 'Professor's Research' category. The rankings of Seoul and ERICA campus dropped one stair from the previous year. On this comprehensive evaluation, Seoul National University (237 points) ranked the first this year as well as last year, followed by Sungkyunkwan (222 points), Hanyang (214 points), Korea (205 points), Yonsei (202 points), Sogang (189 points), Chung-Ang (184 points), Inha (182 points), Hanyang University ERICA (181 points), Kyunghee (180 points). This year’s department evaluation was divided into four categories: humanities, social science, engineering, and natural sciences. The evaluation index and score were applied differently based on the characteristics of the departments. In 'Humanities·Social Science Department Evaluation' the Seoul campus ranked 3rd in the humanities(179 points) and 2nd in the social sciences (188 points) category. ERICA campus ranked 14th in humanities (143 points) and 20th in social science (140 points). According to the Joongang Ilbo article, "Seoul Campus focused on finding a job suitable for student's aptitude through field placement (field placement participation rate, Humanities 3rd·Social Science 6th)". "Professors consulted continuously with many students and connected them to the training sites, and lots of students worked for the same company after six months of employment (Maintenance employment rate; Humanities 4th·Social Science 3rd)". Article added, "Hanyang University also established Industry Advisory Board (IAB) composed of incumbent workers including entrepreneurs, politicians, and civil servants and had a meeting with them twice each year to propose necessary training courses on the spot and participate in job mentoring." This evaluation was conducted for 50 universities in the humanities department, 57 universities in social science. In the evaluation of the humanities department, Seoul National University was ranked in the first, Sungkyunkwan University was ranked in the second, and Korea University (Seoul) was ranked in the third. In social science department, Seoul National University ranked the 1st, followed by Hanyang University (Seoul) and Korea University (Seoul). In the evaluation of 'Natural science and engineering department', Seoul Campus ranked 5th in the natural sciences (174 points) and 3rd in the engineering field (206 points). ERICA campus recorded the ranking of 10th in engineering (176 points). This year, Seoul Campus showed strengths in ‘startup support’ in the natural science and engineering sector. According to the Joongang Ilbo article, "the number of technology venture companies, certified by Technology Guarantee Fund and identified from which university the founders graduated, was 13,947. Among the founders of these companies, 498 people are from Hanyang University in Seoul Campus, second only to Seoul National University (525 people) ". The article emphasized, " Hanyang University focuses on entrepreneurship education, and the number of students who received entrepreneurship training last year was the highest (6580, including redundancy) among the evaluated universities”. In addition, 'Hanyang Startup Academy' was introduced as a program to support this. This program selects students and alumni with entrepreneurial items and develop this into a profitable model and support the cost (30 million ~ 150 million won). It has been running twice a year since 2012. "Half of the 500 start-up academy graduates have succeeded in establishing their business and their annual sales reach 150 billion won," said Kwon Tae-yeong, a team leader at Hanyang University. KAIST occupied the 1st place of the evaluation of natural science department among 49 universities. 2nd place is POSTECH, 3rd place is Seoul National University. 58 colleges were evaluated for engineering department with Sungkyunkwan University and POSTECH jointly ranked first and Hanyang University (Seoul) ranked third. In addition, Hanyang University received a good score in the 'reputation survey’ conducted by the JoongAng Ilbo with 61 research universities surveyed by the research institute ‘Research & Research’. First, according to a survey of "University you wish to recommend for admission" conducted by 550 human resource managers in companies and public institutions, Seoul Campus was ranked the 5th in natural sciences and 9th in liberal arts field. Seoul Campus occupied 4th place in natural sciences and 6th place in liberal arts field for a question "University you wish to recommend for admission", surveyed by 550 high school teachers. Seoul Campus was ranked 6th and ERICA campus was the 9th for the question "university with a high potential of development." ▶ 2017 Joongang Ilbo University Rankings- Comprehensive Evaluation (only in Korean) ▶ 2017 Joongang Ilbo University Rankings- Liberal and Social Science (only in Korean) ▶ 2017 Joongang Ilbo University Rankings - Natural Science and Engineering (only in Korean)

2017-10 25

[Event]Inside of the wonderful Autumn festivals

The autumn festivals brought out different atmospheres from the spring festivals. The quiet campuses were filled with students' laughter here and there, and with atmospheres of the students enjoying the performances at dusk. The autumn festivals offered relaxation and romance to students who were tired of school life. Despite the relatively small scale of the autumn festivals, experience booths and performances went off well on both campuses. Enjoying at booths during the time in-between classes The autumn festivals started on the 26th and lasted for three days on both campuses. On Seoul Campus, the festival was held by the student body ‘Hanmam’ and ‘Aehanjae festival planning committee’. The concept of the festival was ‘temporary holiday’. It came from an intention of being a festival feeling like resting for Hanyang students. On ERICA campus, the festival was held by ‘student club alliance’. ERICA campus gave a theme of ‘It was good, Autumn’in a sense that gives students a rest and colorful memories like autumn leaves. (Source: student club alliance) On the first day of the festivals, ‘exhibition of small groups’, ‘individual booths’, and ‘festival planning committee boots’ were set on Seoul campus. By the main gate ‘Aeji-moon’, exhibition bulletin boards, which introduced various small groups, were installed attracting students. At Hanmadang, ‘rabbits on the moon’ booth providing rice cake - making experience and delivered the rice cakes to student cafeteria workers, and ‘Paradise VR game’ booth providing VR experience were attracting students. Especially, ‘You and Me, Slime’ booth caught popularity. They targeted a young market where Slime, a kind of had fumble toy like a jelly, was popular. Nuclear Engineering Department of ‘what-is-nuclear-engineering’ booth, postcard sale booth, and Korean archery booth were also installed. On ERICA campus, 'flea market’ booths and food trucks were installed. At the flea market booths which had already appeared a few years ago, Hanyang University students were selling their handmade products. Accessories, clothing, as well as mini flowerpot, incense burner, cell phone cases, and a variety of products were displayed. Lee Hyun-joo (Sophomore, Ocean Convergence Engineering) who participated in the flea market booths for the cost of food and health checkups for alley cats, said, "It is a very good system that students can run their booths with good intentions through festivals". Colorful contents stood out On the second day, at the Seoul Campus Open-Air Theater, cheerleaders Luters and student club performances continued. Particularly, this year’s festival had a new stage of ‘Maybe-useful, Mysterious Encyclopedia for anything and everything.’ which was a parody of the recently gone-off entertainment program ‘Not-so-useful, Mysterious Encyclopedia for anything and everything.’ The students who came to the stage showed unusual and novel talent and provoked laughs. At ERICA Campus’ Lake Park, there was a song festival ‘It was a good song, Autumn' at which students showed off their singing skills. On this day, singer Han Dong-geun appeared as a surprise guest and sang a song with the final winner. A seminar by Hong Seok-Chun, the Hanyang University alumni, was held in the student hall. He gave a lecture on entrepreneurship and gave warm comfort to students as a life senior. On the third day, a famous Youtuber ‘himkong’ visited ERICA campus and held a sports competition with students. ‘Yellow Ribbon’ 416 Family Drama company consisted of members of family of the deceased from Sewol Ferry incident performed a play ‘Living in a Neighborhood, Dying in a Neighborhood’ at the welfare center. A night of Autumn, a feast of romantic performances When the sun set, the festival was getting more and more heated. The stage of invited singers was by far the highlight of the festivals. On Seoul campus, starting with ‘Urban Zacapa’ on 28th, ‘Epic High’, and ‘Cheong-ha’ on 29th continued the heat wave. Students who gathered at the open-air theater responded with a hot cheer. On ERICA campus, performances of singers matching with the sensibility of autumn such as 'Munmoon', 'Day Break', and 'Yoon Jong-shin' continued the festival’s nights. The lineup contrasted with the last spring festival, where hip-hop and dance singers were mainly performing. Lee Jin-oh (Department of Economics, 4), the chairman of the student club association, said, “I was hoping to give a space to sit down with friends and enjoy performances and chatting.” It was also noticeable that the festivals went orderly with less alcoholic beverages and drunk people. There was no liquor booth on Seoul campus. On ERICA campus, only one beer booth operated by the student club association was held. In addition, 20 security personnel composed of students were selected and placed in the festival main place, and they also worked on the safety management of students. However, some students responded that ‘liquor booths are a culture in college festivals”, and said, “it is natural that the participation rate is low because there are no liquor booths in this small autumn festival.” Also, some students from business school, and Economy Finance students on Seoul campus complained about the fact that Hanmadang and the open-air theater are so far away from each other that it is not easy to enjoy. We are looking forward to more developed Hanyang festivals, which will be developed not only through close communication between school and students, but also through various attempts.

2017-10 24

[Event]The 3rd Paiknam Prize

On October 16, Paiknam Memorial Association held ‘The 3rd Paiknam Prize’ at Paiknam Music Hall in Hanyang University, Seongdong-gu, Seoul. Paiknam Prize was established to honor Dr. Paiknam Kim Lyun-joon, the founder of Hanyang University. The winners of the 3rd Paiknam award are ▲Engineering: CEO of Nano Co. Ltd., Shin Dong-woo (57), ▲Music: former director of the National Chorus, Na Young-soo (79) ▲Human rights and service: former president of Ireland Mary Robinson (73) ▲ Engineering sector winner, Shin Dong-woo and his wife are taking a commemorative photo with Kim Chong-yang, Chairman of Hanyang Foundation. ▲Music sector winner, Na Young-soo and his wife are taking a commemorative photo with Kim Chong-yang, Chairman of Hanyang Foundation. ▲ Human rights and Service sector winner, Mary Robinson is taking a commemorative photo with Kim Chong-yang, Chairman of Hanyang Foundation. ▲ The National Chorus members are performing commemorative performances.

2017-10 13

[Special]A Growing Need to Address the LGBT Society

Last month, a public letter was published on the Korean edition of Christian Today towards the celebrity Hong Seok-cheon, in the form of an editorial. Written by Joseph Joo, a pastor and an anti-homosexual activist, the letter expressed his concerns for Hong’s potential candidacy in the election for the district office of Yong-san gu. As the first Korean celebrity to come out as a homosexual, Hong is the most prominent gay celebrity in Korea, having overcome the sexually conservative tone of Korean society. Convinced that Hong’s acclaimed desire to tackle the problems of Yongsan-gu is a cover for his pursuit to secure gay rights, Joo wrote his letter to dissuade Hong from running for office. Yongsan-gu itself holds a symbolic meaning because of its ethnic and sexual diversity, largely due to the Itaewon area. In his letter, Joo insisted in a gentle yet adamant tone that Hong drop his pursuit for office and seek repentance. This incident drew large public attention, shedding light once again on the issue of sexual minorities in South Korea. The first Korean celebrity to come out as a homosexual (Photo courtesy of Money S News) Sexual minorities and political refugees On the issues of LGBT (lesbians, gays, bisexuals, and, transsexuals), Korea lacks significant political dialogue. Rather than having positive or negative addressment on the various policies and issues concerning sexual minorities, there is not much spotlight shone at all. This neglect is gradually becoming a problem that even the international community is raising criticism. A critical area for the issue of sexual minorities in Korea is the military. According to article 92, clause 6 of the Korean military law, the court prohibits any military personnel from being involved in sodomy or related indecencies. This law is otherwise known as the “Anti-homosexual law”, which condemns homosexuals in the military. Considering that Korean men are mandatorily drafted to the army, this law, which has been in question of constitutional validity for nearly 20 years, provides a significant dilemma for homosexual men. There are two main options: either keeping homosexuality a secret for the duration of their military service, or to resist the draft for conscientious objection, which would lead to 2 years of incarceration. This dilemma eventually led some Korean men to seek for a political refuge. Countries such as France, Canada, and Australia have accepted Korean men as political refugees. The acceptance of these refugees itself is a significant international recognition of social incapability to address the issues of sexual diversity. In an article regarding this issue, the International Financial Times criticized that Korea is an “essentially conservative country that lags behind on social issues despite its rapid technological and economic development.” The Financial Times published an article this April on the military “scan” of gay personnel. (Photo courtesy of the Financial Times) Growing needs for addressment There are also severe problems in the education sector. Student education on sexual diversity is critical to prepare for the inevitable addressment of policies regarding sexual minorities in the future. As a result of exposure to western culture as well as books and films about sexual diversity, the number of Korean people coming out as LGBT is growing. The gay parade had taken root in Korea in recent years, and the rise of various LGBT interest groups indicates that this inevitable future will approach soon. However, the Ministry of Education fails to address the issue of sexual minorities and excludes the issue in public sexual education. In fact, the ministry canceled a specific training education for sexual education teachers last year on the basis that it had not been correspondent to the National level of school Sexual Education Standards. The underlying reason was that it included a section on sexual identity and the understanding of LGBTs. The National level of school Sexual Education Standards, introduced in 2015 by the Ministry of Education, has been under public criticism for its failure to provide proper education. Much of the guidance provided is impractical and is based on outdated notions of gender. In a more specific case, there is the Teenage 1388 Call Center. Operated by the Ministry of Gender Equality and Family in cooperation with the Korea Youth Counseling & Welfare Institute, the Teenage 1388 Call Center was established to provide anonymous counseling to various problems for teenagers. The problem was that the counselors of the center have advised students that homosexuality was something to be “treated”, and that it was “wise to avoid having convictions of homosexuality until becoming an adult.” It was revealed that the education courses for the counselors did not have appropriate content on sexual minorities. Even in universities, hate groups against the LGBT community are growing in numbers. In 2016, a professor of a Korean university was publically criticized for damaging a banner installed by the university’s queer community. Furthermore, many universities considered “prestigious” have hate groups and SNS accounts dedicated to shaming sexual minorities. Despite problems across a variety of sectors, the issue of sexual minorities receives very little spotlight with insufficient political debates and representation. Even in presidential pledges and debates, these issues traditionally received little attention. Only with continued efforts of the LGBT community has the issue been introduced in this year’s presidential election debates, and even then, there was only one candidate who pledged a policy in favor of them. Although most candidates emphasized their commitment to gender equality, most of them openly expressed that they were against homosexuality. Although the means and results of political debates remain unclear, what is apparent is that the need to address this issue is growing, and will continue to grow. Lee Chang-hyun pizz1125@hanyang.ac.kr