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2018-06 07

[Campus]Hanyang University ranked third in number of CEOs in KOSDAQ listed company

Hanyang University ranked third place in number of CEOs of KOSDAQ listed company. On May 23, the KOSDAQ-Listed Companies Association surveyed and compiled statistics of 1,550 CEOs' major, age, and gender in 1,269 KOSDAQ-listed companies. Among the CEOs of KOSDAQ-listed companies, 300 (19.4%) of them are graduates of Seoul National University, 160 (10.3%) are from Yonsei University, 126 (8.1%) are from Hanyang University, and 109 (7.0%) from Korea University. By majors, 723 CEOs(46.6%) majored in Science and Technology, 578 of them (37.3%) in Business, 137 (8.8%) in Social Sciences. The CEO's average age was 55.7, and there are 43 female CEOs (2.8 %) while 1,507 of them are male (97.2 %).

2018-06 07

[Special]2018 Spring Festival: Enjoyable Festival Without Alcohol, RACHIOS!

Lions, who really know how to relax and have a good time, gathered together for the annual school festival. There was a lot of confusion this year due to the prohibition on selling alcohol, but the festival was a success. The student council said that under the theme of Rachios: Bisang, they showed their desire to offer different types of entertainment. Let's take a glimpse of the day and night of the Seoul Campus Festival, which were a brilliant variety of events and performances by many singers. ▲ One, wo three~! A picture of a student posing for a 'life photo' at the HY-lion exhibition in front of the main building. ▲ The college student game contest finals held by various universities was held at the Seoul campus. The outdoor theater, full of tension, was crowded with spectators. ▲On the 24th of last month, on the night of the first successful day of the festival, the campus was packed with more people. ▲ During the three days of the festival, there were club performances in Hanmadang. This performer is singing a ballad song in a sweet voice that suited the cool weather. ▲ Students are enjoying the cheerleading performance. ▲ Singer Yunha, who visited Seoul campus, had a good time with the students of Hanyang on the 23rd. ▲ Singer 10cm performced in the final concert on the evening of the 23rd . He was touched and his eyes filled with tears by the audience's group singing.

2018-05 28

[Academics][Researcher of the Month] Efficient and Aesthetic Hybrid Solar Cells

Professor Ko Min-jae recently made the cover article of Advanced Energy Materials with “Room-Temperature Vapor Deposition of Cobalt Nitride Nanofilms for Mesoscopic and Perovskite Solar Cells.” The research Ko has been conducting since 2008 deals with the hybrid solar cell, which is more flexible, lighter and more versatile than conventional silicon solar panels. The article focuses on Ko and his research team's development of a power conversion efficient nanofilm made of cobalt nitride (CoN). As it can be dye-sensitized and bent freely, Ko proposes that this material can be applied on flexible and wearable devices in the future, at an affordable cost. “If we use CoN nanofilms, electricity can be generated from everyday devices and objects, not only from thermoelectric or nuclear power plants. By utilizing natural renewable energy, the human race can develop sustainably, and that is very important,” Ko mentioned in the interview. The new finding can also generate power from weak lights such as the sun on a cloudy day or even from indoor fluorescent lights. The reason behind the reduced cost is the simple production process. Conventional silicon solar panels require special devices to assemble, which are big and expensive. Finding the right combination of substances that induce stable synergy is the hardest part and the reason Ko’s lab is one of the leaders in the solar power field. Ko mentioned, “Idea is the key, and it is wonderful that I can see if the idea works or not in two days.” It is predicted that the CoN nanofilm will be commercialized in five years. "Fighting!" Ko and his students are posing and assuring their will to work hard. From the left, Yoo Yong-suk (Chemical Engineering, Master's program), Ko Min-jae and Kim Dong-hwan (Chemical Engineering, 4th year). Kim So-yun dash070@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Kang Cho-hyun

2018-05 14

[Academics][Excellent R&D] Heading for the World of New Physics

The field of physics is largely divided into three categories: particle, optics, and condensed matter physics. Especially in the field of particle physics, the Standard Model is a theory that explains almost every phenomenon in the universe. However, how would you feel if something that you’ve been trusting for the last 50 years turned out to be wrong? Professor Cheon Byung-gu (Department of Physics), is trying to solve this question through his new research project titled "Study of Heavy Flavor Physics using e+ e- Collision." News H met Cheon Byung-gu (Department of Physics) to hear more about New Physics. The Standard Model is a theory describing three of the four fundamental forces in the universe, which are the electromagnetic, weak, and strong interactions, not including the gravitational force, along with classifying all known elementary particles This has been believed to be consistent due to successfully providing all experimental predictions, but leaves certain phenomena, such as dark matter and dark energy, unexplained. Therefore, this signifies there is a certain particle that has not yet been discovered and yet must be in existence. Cheon, therefore, is developing and planning to proceed with research through a Belle Ⅱ experiment, to search for this very particle. Cheon proceeds with his experiment through colliding an electron and a positron together to uncover a new particle through rare decay events. They are so extremely small that making these two particles collide is extremely difficult; therefore, it can only be done using special vehicles, the SuperKEKB collider and the Belle Ⅱ detector, which is a kind of microscope capable of seeing objects smaller than a nucleus. Once these new particles are discovered, they could provide the foundation for a novel theory named New Physics, beyond the Standard Model. An image of an electron and a positron colliding, making an occurance of new particles seen as blue lines. (Photo courtesy of Cheon) The Super KEKB shoots countless electrons from one side and positrons from the other side, providing an instantaneous luminosity 40 times higher than that of the previous KEKB collider. Then the Belle Ⅱ detector identifies the particles, using seven kinds of sub-detector systems, including a calorimeter trigger system, that selects events that are valuable enough to investigate further. The researchers could have better sorted sets of events to analyze through this detector at real time operation, which Hanyang University group is leading its own independent line. Cheon’s final goal is to find a New Physics phenomenon beyond the current Standard Model through the Belle Ⅱ. These physical studies might not look like something that could directly be connected to everyday life. However, much of our abundant technology in our life has its foundation in physics. “Medical technological skills such as X-ray, CT, and PET detectors all started with knowledge of physics. In the field of physics, new discoveries and new acknowledgements contribute to the mental wealth of humankind,” said Cheon. "Don't be afraid to show your abilities as a world leader!" Cheon is currently working not only as a researcher, but also continues his lectures and manages academic affairs as the dean of the Department of Physics. He has online meetings with researchers in Japan every week to continue his research, trying to let his students improve to be talented people who can contribute to society. “I wish to provide my students with an environment where they can work with foreign researchers. I hope all Hanyangians in the 21st century will also be willing to look not only at Korea, but to the whole world.” On Jung-yun jessica0818@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Kang Cho-hyun

2018-05 10

[Academics][Excellent R&D] Weaving Technology into the Fibers of Our Lives

The development of smart technology has brought forth a spectacular display of new products in recent years. Under the common label "smart," smartphones, smartwatches, smart homes and other technology used to gather, process, and analyze massive amounts of data have now seeped into some of the most critical parts of our daily lives. In fact, the only limit on the ways of utilizing this technology is our imaginations. In this sense, Professor Bae Ji-hyun (Department of Clothing and Textiles) has made a new attempt to tear down another wall between smart technology and an essential component of our lives: clothing. Introducing the clothes of the future In essence, Bae’s research is an adaptation of wearable devices. Specifically, she aims to introduce electronic devices to our everyday clothing. Among a diverse array of available options, this research targets the field of healthcare. The idea is that by planting electronic devices in our clothes, we can codify data such as bio-signals, physical movements, or even environmental changes to monitor our health status. Generally speaking, clothing and electronic devices intuitively dawn on us as two very disparate domains. This probably has to do with the nature of clothing, which necessitates regular washing, as well as the imaginable discomfort of having metallic devices attached to our clothes. So how does Bae plan to overcome this fixation? The secret is in the fabric. Bae Ji-hyun (Department of Clothing and Textiles) uses a prototype glove to give an explanation of her research. The functional fibers in the glove allow movements to be detected and transmitted in the form of electrical signals. In the big picture of introducing electronic devices to clothing, Bae’s specific area of research is the development of functional fibers that can act as sensors. Furthermore, she has to design the textile organization in a way that allows it to be woven into a wearable form. By endowing fiber, the most basic unit of clothing, with the ability to react to stimuli such as light, movement, and temperature, we could use clothing to transmit, store, and analyze a variety of changes. According to Bae, the most prominent method to enable this function is by mixing conductive macromolecule particles or nano-particles in the process of weaving the fiber strands. Another common method is to coat ordinary thread, such as nylon or silk, with functional substances. Although Bae’s research is only in its initial stage, the projected benefits of the study raise great anticipation. For one, it will bring an immense improvement to the quality of healthcare for the elderly. This is especially timely considering the growth of the elderly population in our society. Not only will smart clothes reduce the cost of healthcare for retired citizens, it will provide higher efficiency by constantly monitoring and diagnosing the state of the wearer. It can also be used to service the disadvantaged such as the monitoring of infants or people with disabilities. Bae also expressed the hope of adapting this new technology to assist the activities of people working under dangerous conditions, such as soldiers or fire fighters, to improve their safety. As previously mentioned, the ways in which the technology can be used is only limited by our imaginations. (a) The sensor part of the glove woven with conductive fiber (b) The change of resistance value following the movement of the finger (c) Demonstration of a sign language detection system using the conductive-fiber based glove (Photo courtesy of Bae) The background story It has only been a year since Bae was recruited as a professor at Hanyang University. Prior to the position as a professor, she worked at an electronics company. Having earned her degree in textile engineering, Bae became immersed in the relationship between textiles and electronic technology while working at the firm. “Once I saw the connection, there were so many possibilities that became obvious to me," answered Bae. Through her previous firm, she was able to participate in a government project to develop wearable devices, providing her with an insight into the prospect of the technology. According to Bae, the hardest part of her research so far has been the novelty of the field. As is true in the case of most technologies these days, her research requires extensive collaboration with other fields. For the immediate research of smart clothes, the fields of electronic engineering and textiles are crucial. Furthermore, as the target of her research is the field of healthcare, some medical insight is also required. Other than that, convergence with a wide scope of academic fields is necessary in order to consider the subsidiary details of the research, such as the environmental impact of the product or the economic costs of commercializing the technology. However, a lack of public interest in the field makes it difficult for Bae to secure opportunities for cooperation with other fields. Although most of Bae's existing joint research projects are done through external networks, she hopes that internal convergence studies at Hanyang will also take place soon. Efforts as an educator Despite the difficulties of her research, Bae confessed that the hardest part of her job is teaching students. As she had no prior experience of interacting with pupils, she devotes a significant amount of her hours to understanding the needs of her students. “I believe that my current priority is to figure out how to be a good professor to my students,” added Bae. Bae wants to encourage students to maintain an open attitude when communicating with others. “Even in joint research, you need to have respect for others’ expertise in their respective fields, as well as an open mind to approach a common problem from diverse directions.” Bae argued that the same holds true for human interaction, which is an important lesson to take to heart when entering society. In the end, she believes that the synergy created from interactions and convergence is what provides us with the momentum to grow. Lee Chang-hyun pizz1125@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Lee Jin-myung

2018-05 09

[Special][Saranghandae] A Big Step to Promote Global Communication

Just a few years ago, the translations for the official Hanyang website were in a state of catastrophe. There was no consistency in the terminology used, and there was an overall insufficiency of contents available in foreign languages. This frail structure soon became a bigger problem as the university gradually increased its engagement in international programs, such as exchange student programs, foreign internships, and language institutes. So what changed all of this? The answer is the Global Communication Committee (GCC). First initiated to address the inconsistencies in the various English titles within the university organization, GCC has extended its role to facilitate Hanyang University’s expansion of activities on a global platform. Providing a wide array of linguistic assistance in English and Chinese, it is now considered an integral tool on Hanyang’s path to becoming a truly global institution. ▲ (from the right) professor Ben Park, Jessica Warren, student assistant Park Hye-jung, Kwon Hee-jung, Nam Hyo-jin Introducing the Global Communication Committee Established in March of 2016, GCC consists of two departments that respectively handle content in English and Chinese. The English department consists of two professors and three graduate student assistants while the Chinese department is made up of one professor with two student assistants. There is also a supervisor and a chairperson who oversee the entire project. Situated on the fourth floor of the new Administration Building, GCC engages in four main activities: 1. Translating promotional content created by the Media Strategy Center, 2. Translating and managing English/Chinese content on the official website of Hanyang University, 3. Translating and consenting of key public documents generated from other departments, 4. Serving in a committee that establishes the official names and titles that exist within Hanyang University. Delving a little deeper into what GCC does, one of their major tasks is translating news articles written by student reporters. In an effort to share recent and noteworthy news with the foreign faculty and students, GCC took special attention in making these articles available in other languages. Regarding the process of translations, much of the writings are done by the student assistants, who then send their work to the professors who work for GCC for review and editing. In addition to news articles, GCC provides English versions of various notifications and updates from the university, which foreign students had trouble comprehending in the past. Other specific tasks include revising the English versions of congratulatory remarks given in major school events such as the bi-annual Paiknam Prize ceremony, and the university’s entrance/graduation ceremonies. The last role of GCC that cannot be stressed enough is the designation of official names for school departments and various titles. In the past, when these titles were translated freely by individuals, there was major confusion among foreign students and professors when discussing certain departments or facilities. Furthermore, the lack of an official, organizational title itself was a major breach in the university’s global competency. At the end of 2017, GCC had provided official titles for all departments, facilities, and faculty positions for Hanyang University. Furthermore, throughout the year, GCC had serviced 67 requests for translation from other departments, published 7 different printed forms of magazines, brochures, and catalogues, and uploaded 285 English news articles as well as 135 in Chinese. "Providing a wide array of linguistic assistance in English and Chinese, it is now considered an integral tool on Hanyang’s path to becoming a truly global institution." The engines behind the committee Ben Park and Jessica Warren are the two professors in charge of the final editing of the various English documents that pass through GCC. Whether it is a letter to be sent to a partner university, or a compilation of a new faculty manual, it is only after Ben and Jessica give consent that they become the official work of Hanyang University. “It’s a very important job. I had often heard from my colleagues that the English translation of the website was, quite frankly, embarrassing. I feel proud of how much progress we’ve made,” commented Ben. The two professors also work for the Center for Creative Convergence Education, where they teach classes such as Professional Academic English and Presentation and Writing Skills in English. It has not been long since Ben and Jessica began working for GCC. Ben began working for GCC in the fall semester of 2017 and Jessica since March of 2018. Prior to their position with GCC, Jessica had worked extensively in the field of English editing. For her, the biggest change in her work as a member of GCC is that the result of her revisions is now much more influential in scope and depth. As she was used to instructing students on a one-on-one basis, her editing tasks for GCC involve the production of something that so many people will see and be affected by was eye awakening. “My proudest moment while working for GCC was taking part in the translation of the new attendance program and its manual,” mentioned Jessica. She explained that her participation felt like a direct and practical effort in helping her English speaking colleagues.Ben has also had extensive experience in editing from his years as an ESL teacher in the United States. As such, he places quite an emphasis on the grammatical soundness of the papers he receives. “I try as much as I can to keep to the original structure intended by the writer,” answered Ben. For him, the hardest part of the job was editing translations that still had a Korean fixture. “Direct translations are usually very dense and awkward. It takes strict mental work to figure them out.” On the other hand, Jessica confessed that she finds these pieces entertaining, in a way that is similar to a puzzle. Either way, it was clear that both professors held great pride and interest in their role with GCC. They also agreed that they were surprised at how many programs and systems the university has in place for its students, and that the thought of making these opportunities more accessible to Executive Vice President Lee Sung-chull ▲ Executive Vice President , Lee Sung-chull Executive Vice President Lee Sung-chull is the founder and current chairperson of GCC. Also having served as the first Dean of the Division of International Studies, he has dedicated his time at Hanyang University by nurturing its global capacity. According to Dr. Lee, the main motivation for the establishment of GCC was the lack of a systematic management in its English affairs, despite the significant scale of our university. “Not only were all of the names of our buildings different, but professors and students could only check school notifications in Korean, and various English publications in the university were coordinated at the individual department level.” He also added that it imposed embarrassing complications when corresponding with foreign institutions. Executive Vice President, Dr. Lee expressed his satisfaction about the progress that GCC has made so far. “Every department, building, and infrastructure now has an official name, and we have sorted out the complicated number of titles for the professors.” Furthermore, he was very content with how the university website has turned out. He felt that what had consisted of rigid, direct translations is now very smooth and natural. Moreover, he felt that the visual design and concept of the improved website went beyond the domain of words, creating a welcoming platform for everyone. Meanwhile, he desires to make GCC more widely known. Though he was happy to hear that there was a steady growth in the requests for translation from other departments, he sought to position GCC in a more integral role at Hanyang University. “We are currently catering to English and Chinese, the two most commonly used languages on our campus. But as Hanyang University grows more global, there will be further expansion of languages as well as faculties to meet this new demand.” Emphasizing the ‘Communication’ in the name, Global Communication Committee, Executive Vice President, Dr. Lee has expressed hope that the committee will not just facilitate communication with foreign institutions, but amongst ourselves as members of Hanyang. With such dedication and support from all levels of GCC, Dr. Lee’ s aspirations do not seem very far-fetched. By Lee Chang-hyun (Student Reporter) global@hanyang.ac.kr

2018-04 30

[Academics][Researcher of the Month] Applying Terahertz to Weld-Line Detection

The weld-line among moulding injected plastic products have long presented a challenge in the production of plastic. Destruction of a specific plastic product has been considered necessary in the process of examining any existing weld-lines within the material. However, based on his newly released paper "Terahertz time-domain spectroscopy of weld-line defects formed during an injection moulding process," Kim Hak-sung (Mechanical Engineering) has coined the concept of applying terahertz radiation in this examination process. Based upon the terahertz time domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS), Kim has introduced a novel method of detecting weld-lines among moulding injected plastic products in a nondestructive manner. The THz-TDS technique In order to understand the THz-TDS system, one must become familiar with the actual concept of terahertz. Terahertz refers to a frequency unit of electromagnetic waves, counting up to one trillion cycles per second. Its long microwaves and wavelengths provide it a high permeability which allows terahertz to surpass materials other than metal. This high permeability leads to the THz-TDS, a spectroscopic technique in which the properties of matter are examined through different phases of terahertz radiation. In short, when shot at a specific target, the phases of terahertz radiation differ while surpassing different materials. Professor Kim Hak-sung (Mechanical Engineering) explained the benefits of terahertz radiation and how it can be applied to more practical fields. Although THz-TDS was an already-existing technique, it was Kim who applied it to the more practical field of finding weld-lines among plastic products. Weld-lines are lines that occur around areas where two flow fronts meet, yet are unstably "welded" together in the moulding process. These weld-lines cause weak areas among the moulded part, which may lead to a breakage of the product when the part is under pressure. Until now, the inevitable destruction of the whole product has been regarded as the only method of scrutinizing the existence of weld-lines. However, Kim has introduced a new method, which allows the weld-lines to be detected without breakage. Applying THz-TDS to weld-line detection As mentioned above, different phases of terahertz radiation occur when surpassing different materials. This variation of phases allows one to determine the specific material that the terahertz radiation is currently transcending through. Thus, when shooting terahertz radiation at moulding injected plastic products, the distinctions that occur among phases would be the areas where weld-lines, different layers than other parts of the product, are detected. This would eliminate the necessity of the current destructive weld-line determination process, as simply shooting terahertz radiation at the plastic products enables the investigation method to be possible without any force input. The phases of terahertz radiation differ according to the existence of weld-lines, which allows the detection of such weld-lines within plastic products. (Photo courtesy of Kim) Kim implemented a scanning method when conducting experiments to prove his theory. While attaching a mirror to the terahertz radiation, he moved the specimens according to their reflections. In order to make the reflections happen, the mirror was given a metalized-coating, considering the fact that terahertz surpasses all materials but metal. He managed to make a reflective-equipment that made the reflections occur on a much faster period, which allowed him to gather more results in a shorter time. According to Kim, the equipment is in its initial stage, yet developments are still being made towards totally eliminating minor errors. Hardships and future plans Despite achieving striking results, Kim also had hardships while conducting his research. Kim is a professor in the department of mechanical engineering, whereas terahertz research is related to the field of electronic engineering. Conducting research in a totally different field irrelevant to his major resulted in Kim having to look into two completely distinctive areas. However, he continued his research with only his students, without engaging in any form of joint research with others from departments in more closely-related fields. Oh Gyung-hwan, one of Kim's student assistants and co-leaders of this research, and Kim (left and right) commented on the importance of one finding his or her own reasons for conducting research and remarked that they want to help students find such causes. Such thought may result from Kim’s belief that research must be conducted in a positive manner. Kim mentioned, “I want my students to find their own reasons of pursuing specific research, while being proud of their achievements at the same time." He also added that this research was also conducted worldwide, and hence, his students should be proud of the significant results their global research. As for his future plans, Kim declaimed, “Despite my hardships in this study, I would like to do more research in a variety of other fields, while maintaining a firm stance within my major of mechanical engineering.” Choi Seo-yong tjdyd1@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Choi Min-ju

2018-04 02

[Academics][Researcher of the Month] Controlling Hydrogen in a Chemical

During the 2018 Pyeongchang Winter Olympics, Hyundai allowed free trial rides of NEXO, their new fuel cell vehicle, to twenty thousand people, deriving huge attention and public interest on the new innovation of hydrogen-powered fuel cell vehicles. A total of 733 vehicles were reserved on the 19th of March which was the first day of sale by pre-order. This attention to fuel cell vehicles has also increased the interest in the methods the consumers can receive their fuel: hydrogen. Professor Suh Young-woong (Department of Chemical Engineering) introduced a novel method of the transfer of hydrogen through his research, "2- (N-Methylbenzyl) pyridine: A Potential Liquid Organic Hydrogen Carrier with Fast H2 Release and Stable Activity in Consecutive Cycles." Suh's research paper was published in the ChemSusChem journal. Hydrogen is the main fuel cars like NEXO require in order to run. However, researchers face an immense difficulty when working with this sensitive gas. Hydrogen is great when powering the car itself. However, the transport of this gas requires much pressure and delicacy. For example, if hydrogen is made in Ulsan, it needs to be transported to major cities such as Seoul, since people will need to charge their cars. In order to transport this hydrogen, the gas needs to be pressured under 700 bars (the unit of measuring pressure), with specially produced tanks. This presents the danger of enormous explosion as well as economic problems. Collaborating with three other universities to alleviate these current concerns, Suh helped introduce a new chemical substance that can store and release hydrogen safely. This new chemical material allows hydrogen to inflow and release within itself at a certain temperature. This results in a massive improvement over the current status as it can transport much more hydrogen in a single tank, with much more safety. Moreover, they can release hydrogen from the chemical at 230 degrees Celsius, while the present technology requires a temperature of 270 degrees Celsius. This chemical material can even be reused up to a hundred times, which even makes it more efficient. The image of the new chemical structure The two arrows are showing the inflow and the release of Hydrogen. (Photo courtesy of Suh) This research took each of the three teams one and a half years to finish. They had to go through endless trial and error procedures with seven different chemicals. “There wasn't any preliminary research we could have referenced. Some chemicals didn't work, and some chemicals would work but released hydrogen at the same 270 degrees Celsius,” reminisced Suh. As a result of their efforts, Suh was able to find a method that could inpour and discharge hydrogen from the chemical. This chemical is not yet fully developed in its validity. However, this is the closet chemical that is on the verge of commercialization. "Communicate with a lot of people and practice reading and writing!" Suh is currently researching not only the storage of hydrogen, but the creation of hydrogen itself. His research team is working on producing hydrogen from biomass, which is organic matter whose residual energy can be harvested to produce consumable energy. He is trying his best to develop technology related to hydrogen, an alternative fuel the whole world is anticipating. “As a professor, I want to produce a lot of outstanding researchers to conduct better research in society,” said Suh. “And to all Hanyangians, I wish for each and every one of you to find your own unique path and to fully dedicated yourself to it!” On Jung-yun jessica0818@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Kang Cho-hyun

2018-03 07

[Performance]Paiknam Academic Information Center & Library Wins Korea Library Award

▲Paiknam Academic Information Center & Library received the first ever Korean library award at the 50th Korea Library Awards on February 22nd On February 22, the director of the Paiknam library Eom Ik-sang won the grand prize at the 50th Korea Library Awards. Hanyang was the sole recipient among the other universities. The Korean Library Awards is given by the Korean Library Association for selecting organizations and individuals who have contributed to the development of libraries nationwide. Paiknam library was recognized for its efforts on 'innovation' by remodeling libraries for user convenience and sharing their performances at seminars. ▲ Director Eom receiving the prize "I am very pleased to receive a meaningful prize in the year of the 70th anniversary of the opening of Hanyang University Library," said Professor Eom at the Department of Chinese Language & Literature. He added "We will do our best to contribute to other universities by making the Paiknam Academic Information Center a model of the nation`s university library."

2018-03 05

[Academics][Researcher of the Month] The Result of a Small Curiosity

For centuries, cancer has been mankind’s mulish enemy that has taken away countless lives. Scientists and researchers are unceasingly putting effort into developing a cure for cancer, including Choi Je-min (Department of Life Science) who recently paved another road to effectively treating cancer in his paper “Regulation of chitinase-3-like-1 in T cell elicits Th1 and cytotoxic responses to inhibit lung metastasis.” First, starting his research from a small curiosity for a certain component in our cell called chitinase, Choi unveiled the secret related to the immune system for cancer and accomplished the first step of creating a drug for the disease. "My research began from the question 'why?'" Chitin may sound familiar due to its presence in the exoskeletons of arthropods such as crabs, lobsters, and shrimps and some insects and molluscs. A derivative of the word is chitinase, which is a component that reshapes or dissolves and digests chitin for animals. Such a component also exists in the human body, which has no specific function of its own. Knowing this fact, Choi was eager to find out why it still exists in our body and what it does. Without a function, the component lost its name and has come to be called ‘chitinase-3-like-1.’ “If it is completely useless, why do we have it? When such a question arises, we biologists experiment in one of two ways: remove it or increase its amount. In this case, I decided to remove it to see what happens in the testing mouse. Since chitinase is used to protect the body in plants, I guessed that it would have something to do with our immune system.” After removing the component from the mouse, Choi’s discovery was surprising. The type of cell called T cell which plays a key role in cell-mediated immunity, specifically Th1 and CTL, were greatly activated. In other words, chitinase-3-like-1 were acting as the deactivator of the T cells, which play a central role in battling cancer. Choi had two model mice in his experiment, one with the component and the other without it. He inserted cancer cells in both mice and compared the outcome. Expectedly, the mouse without the component showed much lower development of cancer while the other showed the opposite. This means by removing chitinase-3-like-1, which allows the T cells to be activated, immunity for cancer considerably increases. “The experiment let me figure out that if chitinase-3-like-1 are removed from our body, it could work as an excellent anticancer treatment.” Quenchingly, his question was answered by the result of his experiment. Choi and his students are conducting their research on chitinase-3-like-1. Based on his finding, Choi took another step to develop an anticancer drug. Since it is impossible to remove DNA from the human body, there had to be another way to remove the component from our body. Therefore, he went ahead and worked to create a drug that restrains the chitinase-3-like-1-creating DNA from producing more of the component. With a technique called RNA-interference which removes the undesired or mutated RNA in the body, Choi targeted the chitinase-3-like-1 RNA after converting it to RNA from DNA and attempted to remove the undesired component to increase cancer immunity. Using a technique called peptide-based drug delivery, Choi attached the RNA version of the component with peptide bonds in the drug and aimed to spread the medicament throughout the body. This resulted in deactivation of the chitinase-3-like-1-creating DNA and thus an escalation of cancer immunity. “Although it could take about a decade before this drug becomes commercialized and widely used, it could be a breakthrough once it does. The underlying prinicple of my research is always to produce a useful outcome that could actually be put into use and not just end in the lab. I could say that our establishment philosophy ‘Love in deed’ fits well with my goal,” smiled Choi. He emphasized that it is always important to sometimes question the basic things, even the things that are already proven to be a fact. Through his research and experiments, Choi wants to discover more unknown facts. Choi will continue his research to experiment with cells and create more drugs to be used practically. "'Love in deed' in the laboratory!" Jeon Chae-yun chaeyun111@hayang.ac.kr Photos by Choi Min-ju