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2017-03 29
2017-03 20

[Performance]Hanyang University ranked 34th in THE 'Industry Collaboration'

Hanyang University ranked 34th in the world rankings of universities that publish the highest proportions of research output in collaboration with industry as announced by the Times Higher Education (THE). The UK's Times Higher Education announced the rankings of universities that publish the highest proportions of research output in collaboration with industry from the recent article entitled "South Korean universities lead way on industry collaboration." According to the article, Hanyang University has published 4.06 percent of its total 22,424 publications via collaboration with industry. <The rakings of unversities that show the highest proportions of research output in collaboration with industry (Korean universities)> Ranking (World rankings) University The proportions of collaboration with industry (the number of total publications) 1(1) POSTECH 22.98(13,545) 2(8) Sungkyunkwan University (SSKU) 8.84(30,406) 3(11) KAIST 6.05(20,768) 4(32) GIST 4.11(5,833) 5(34) Hanyang University 4.06(22,424) 6(37) Seoul National University 4(61,449) Among Korean universities, POSTECH was selected as the top university to publish the highest proportions of their research output in collaboration with industry with 22.9 percent of its total 13,545 publications via such links. It was followed by SKKU with 8.84 percent of its total 406 publications, KAIST with 6.058 percent of 20,768, GIST with 4.11 percent of 5,833, Hanyang University with 4.06 percent of 22,424, and Seoul National University with 4 percent of 61,449. UK's Times Higher Education is an university evaluation agency which announces THE world university rankings every year. Unlike world university rankings, Asian University rankings, small universitiy rankings, and emerging university rankings, which are announced by the agency every year, the rankings of universities in collaboration with industry were announced this year for the first time based on data from 2007 to 2016.

2017-03 06

[Student]Experiences at Hanyang, Francesca's story

Francesca Barbieri, the student from Humanitas University, the private university at Italy dedicated to the medical sciences, participated Hanyang summer program for her medical training. She shared her remarkable experiences and memories here at Hanyang University. Prescription For Growing: Learn Skills But Especially Make Friends I would have never imagined to realize such a big project in such a short time. I found myself on the other side of the world just after a few months I started thinking about it. As I knew about the possibility of obtaining a travel grant, I applied and was then accepted by the cardiology Professor Kyung -Soo KIM. Humanitas therefore gave me the opportunity to spend more than 40 days at the Hanyang University Medical Centre, in Seoul. There, I attended the cardiology wards, outpatient visits and the cardiology research laboratory. To tell the truth, the difficulties of such an experience can be many and discouraging. But everything becomes so pleasant and worthy when you meet the right group of people. Professor Kim and his group of physicians, residents, laboratory members and students accepted me as if I had always been one of them. My family and friends were definitely far away, but I found myself in an environment in which I never felt alone, I could ask anything I needed and was given all the possible help. Trying to follow them during the working day was though, with no doubt. I used to spend between 12 and 13 hours per day in the hospital, some in the clinic, some in the laboratories. As a second year student, I felt to have a solid theoretical knowledge but it was the first time for me to approach the practical clinical environment or research designs and laboratory protocols. I arrived as a very worried student, concerned about what to expect. I came out after 40 days with a basic knowledge of the main heart diseases, how to use the laboratory equipment, how to follow an experimental research design. This was achieved thanks to the constant, careful and personal tutoring I was provided, I always had at least one physician or one researcher on my side. I came out as part of a group of friends, and this was the most surprising and precious aspect. The attention they paid to the success and profit of my experience was invaluable. As invaluable is what I have learnt. Sometimes it is unbelievable how much we can grow in such a short time. * Original article at Hunimed.edu (link)

2017-02 28 Important News

[Academics][Researcher of the Month] Blue Ocean of Materials Science

Conspicuous or not, our surroundings play a crucial role in navigating our health, holding accountability for small and big degenerations for mankind’s physical wellbeing. Among all, two indispensable elements in our life, air and water, have slow and accumulative effect on the health of the population. Professor Kim Ki-hyun (Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering), whose studies focus on environmental pollution, delineated the means of applying advanced materials in his review paper “Carbon nanotubes: a novel material for multifaceted applications in human healthcare.” Carbon nanotubes in biotechnology As modern material technology has been advancing considerably, its application seems ever-expanding in diverse fields, with nanomaterials as the convenient and indispensable companion. Based on a research paper conducted by other scholars, Kim wrote another, centralizing on the uses of carbon nanotubes (CNT), an emerging nanomaterial that is seeing the light in the biomedical and environmental fields. Its application is versatile: drug delivery, sensing, water purification, composite materials, and bone scaffolds. More specifically, CNTs could be used to alleviate myocardial infarction by enlarging clogged blood vessels, expediting drug delivery, and organizing bone structures in needed parts. Kim outlines his review paper on the application of carbon nanotubes in the biomedical field. Despite all the medical benefits, advanced materials including CNT also have the potential to bring adverse effects. As alien substances could disturb immune or antibody responses, the body functions to react against them. Especially, in case of new materials, unprecedented resistance could occur, and thus their potential impacts must be taken into consideration through attentive examination for possible toxicity. Nonetheless, as long as the criteria are met, CNT and other materials could spark revolutionary breakthroughs that would change the future of mankind. “I think that endless developments are yet to come in the field of materials science to help other research fields like environment and human health flourish. Better materials in terms of cost efficiency and functional effectiveness would be improved while there is yet no limits to such developments. Materials science and nanomaterials would not only be fruitful in biomedical fields but also environmentally,” commented Kim. His interest in new materials are extended toward environmental progress, starting with the sensing of pollutants and purifying polluted medium. The blue ocean Materials science could often be referred to as the 'blue ocean' since there are more to be discovered than what has been excavated so far. On top of this, collaboration with environmental issues is not conventional. Kim is involved in research for integrated environmental monitoring technology, digitizing and managing air, water, and soil pollution. He is looking forward to fuse newly unveiled materials in his research, hoping to bring a constructive result to lay a bridge between materials science and environmental engineering. To set an example, metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) could be used to mitigate environment pollution: volatile organic compounds (VOC) in the air spawns odor while propagating carcinogens if transferred into the human body through the respiratory system. As the material for sensing or removing such hazardous pollutants, MOFs are regarded as one of the highly promising solutions. What is to be underscored here is the infinite possibility of combination of the materials, which are not only capable of being used alone but also of being employed in cooperation with other materials. Kim's research will continue to be centered around mitigating environmental pollution with newly excavated materials. Jeon Chae-yun chaeyun111@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Choi Min-ju

2017-02 06

[Academics][Researcher of the Month] Al-FCG Ready for Action

Professor Sun Yang-guk of the Department of Energy Engineering is February’s Researcher of the Month for his active role in exploring the field of energy engineering. In his paper, “Compositionally Graded Cathode Material with Long-Term Cycling Stability for Electric Vehicles Application”, Sun explains how adding aluminum into the cathode makes batteries last longer and become more stable compared to other rates of composition. The Al-FCG61 that Sun has developed has shown a high rate of energy efficiency even at 100% depth of discharge (DOD), which draws attention in the field. Sun explains his research with assisted diagrams. As the supply and demand of the electric vehicle is on the rise, most of the batteries in the market last from 150km to 400km, meaning that once the battery is fully charged, the car would move between the distance within. What accounts for the difference is the capacity as to how much cathode can hold up. In order for cars to go beyond 300km at least, the capacity of the cathode would have to be over 200A/h. The only problem to this is that it gets difficult to make it stable and it could blow up. There are various prototypes ranging from generation 1 to generation 4 and the study carried out in Sun's paper is on generation 3. Gradients of different components from inner to outer parts of nickel particle. (Photo courtesy of Sun) Capacity retention, which is the lifespan of a battery, would rise with 61% of nickel with FCG full concentration gradient, which is what Sun has developed in order to create a more stable and long-lasting battery that would hold a larger capacity. Within the mold, Sun has created a two-way particle that contains a high percentage of nickel inside with lower percentage of nickel on the outside. This concentration gradient is created due to the fact that nickel has its advantage of being able to increase the capacity of the battery while it makes the battery more unstable with exothermic reaction. Along with the nickel, Sun has increased the percentage of the manganese inside the particle since it has the advantage of making the cathode more stable. Depth of discharge (DOD) is the rate at which battery is either charged 60% or 100%, and this is tested before electric vehicles are sold for inspection. The average usage of an electric vehicle is at around 2,500 cycles for 10 years, and the Al-FCG has proven to be more energy efficient even at 100%. Most of the batteries do not last long at DOD100 due to the expansion of volume inside the battery. This means that the battery would lose its efficiency as time goes. Al-FCG has shown its Coulombic efficiency rate of 84.5% even at DOD100, while batteries currently in the market show an average of 50% at 2000 cycles. This new battery devised by Sun is not only more energy efficient, but more cost efficient as well. Sun wishes to make more efficient batteries. Sun is continuously researching to keep the DOD level at 100% even after 2000 cycles. With his findings, the electric vehicle industry would definitely benefit hugely in terms of cost and energy efficiency. With different materials, Sun wishes to develop other types of batteries that would bring more comfort to society. Kim Seung-jun nzdave94@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Kim Youn-soo

2017-01 16 Important News

[Student]Hanbok Beloved Worldwide

From 4th of January to 9th of January, hanbok making class was held in Human Ecology Building by Won Young. She has studied about hanbok and designing at Hanyang University (HYU) while attending Department of Clothing and Textile. The classes were held two hours everyday excluding the weekends, for four times. How it all started Won Young is Malaysian Chinese and also a Korean gyopo. While she was living in China, she says that there used to be a lot of tribes wearing different types of traditional clothes which is when she first encountered hanbok. “I have seen hanbok a lot on the television but once I came to Korea, I couldn’t see anyone wearing it in real life,” Won said. In order to make up for the discomfort of the hanbok, she started studying about life hanbok and became interested in the designs. Won (right) teaches Helene (left) how to use the sewing machine. She has created a startup team called TS (Time and Space) which consists of two people at the moment. Since she has studied in the field of fashion, Won thought of creating a brand of her own or creating a platform. Although there used to be websites where flower printings were available, it seemed to be a waste to cut out the pieces while designing her own patterns. This is how Won came up with the idea of DIY fabric in which she designs her own patterns and inserts the prints within the patterns. While attending at HYU, Won has participated in diverse programs created for international students but she felt that something was missing. “It seems like I was just looking around rather than doing something at the complete experiencing level. I think there are a lot of foreigners who would think like me,” said Won. This is how she came up with the idea of hanbok making class. Reactions towards the program A total number of fourteen students from diverse countries have participated in this program. Cho Yu-jin (faculty at Department of Clothing and Textile) and Lee Ye-jin (acquaintance of Won) have helped out with this event. Cho has helped out with the over lock while Lee has helped with the translation with the foreign students. Since the students participating in this program did not have any experiences or were not related major to fashion or designing, they had a hard time putting this together and one of them had to do all the sewing all over again from the sketch. Renu (left) and Azira (right) enjoys the program. Most of the students who have participated in the program had a similar idea in a sense that they were not aware of hanbok and how it could be utilized in daily life as well. Hwang An-ki (Media Communication, 2nd yr) said, “I was not well aware of Hanbok in the first place but as I was making it, it came to me as a beautiful traditional clothing.” Since foreign students who do not return to their home countries have not much to experience, they all claim that it has been a great experience for them. “I think it’s quite interesting that some people still wear traditional clothes since we don’t have them in Denmark. I think hanbok is very beautiful costume,” claimed Helene (Korean Studies, Master’s program). Although it has been a short period of time, all the students were able to finish their hanboks. After the session has finished, participants have matched their casual clothes along with hanbok and had photo session afterwards. “Through making the hanbok, foreign students would have been able to have the sense of achievement and feel the traditional culture of Korean costume. Also, by being able to have felt a new type of experience of making clothes, some people would have found a new hobby as well,” added Won. The students who have participated will keep in contact with each other and exchange information on hanbok flea markets or Korean culture experiences. Through this program, foreign students now understand Korean culture a little more. Since it has been a greatly developed program where it has been a talent donation of Won, students from diverse countries were able to experience the beauty of hanbok. Won hopes that she could carry out more programs related to hanbok in the future as well and provide lessons as part of the Korean wave towards foreigners. Kim Seung-jun nzdave94@hanyang.ac.kr Photo by Kim Sang-yeon Photo by Moon Hana

2017-01 02 Important News

[Academics][Researcher of the Month] Scientific Integration Approach to Programmable Nuclease (1)

When a baby is identified to have been born with a rare, incurable disease, it would bring about concerns and sorrow to the newborn and the parents. However, with the prospective research on CRISPR Cas-9 system, or a programmable nuclease, a host of diseases will prevented without further ado. Professor Bae Sang-su of the Department of Chemistry explains the mechanism of the CRISPR Cas-9 system through his research “Structural roles of guide RNAs in the nuclease activity of Cas-9 endonuclease”. Also, he reveals the course of his life towards scientific integration that shapes the bright future of scientific studies. Structural properties and significance of CRISPR Cas-9 The significance of this research paper is that it explains the structural mechanisms of the CRISPR Cas-9 system and how it can modify or edit DNAs in cells. CRISPR-Cas 9 stands for Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats, which relies on a protein named Cas-9. As it is called by the name of 'molecule scissors', it introduces the new spectrum of genome editing technology. Even though there already have been two programmable nuclease systems which are the Zinc Finger Nuclease and the TALENs(Transcriptor Activator Like Effector Nuclease System). The former is the first generation of the genome editing system that is compiled of one zinc finger and three to four nucleases. The title originated from the chemical component zinc, because this DNA contained certain amount of zinc. Then the second generation of genome editing system developed, which was called the TALENs that contained the base named xanthomonas originating from vegetable pathogens. “These two generations were startling contributions to scientific development, but with the advent of the third generation of genome editing, the CRISPR Cas-9 system, the scientific world could not contain its surprise,” said Bae. The CRISPR Cas-9 system was simpler in application to various circumstances and in the modification of DNAs. The significance of the CRISPR Cas-9 system is that it can enhance the welfare of human life in various aspects. “This technology is currently being applied to plants and animals, and also is in process of availing itself to humans by amending laws. Application of the system to humans will take 10 years at the most, since the research is developing at a fast pace,” explained Bae. An example of genome-modified plant through the CRISPR Cas-9 system that Bae provided was a modified mushroom in the United States. Discoloration of mushrooms by time lapse was prevented due to the CRISPR Cas-9 system, and the mushroom could maintain its original color for a long time. Bae explained that “not only does the CRISPR Cas-9 system treat incurable diseases of humans, but it can also modify DNAs in plants and animals to increase marketability.” Bae is explaining the significance of the CRISPR Cas-9 system. However, the genome editing system has been controversial in the scientific academia due to its resemblance to genetically modified organisms, also called GMO. According to Bae, there is a blunt difference between the two because GMO requires DNAs extracted from other organisms to modify the sample, while the CRISPR Cas-9 system modifies DNAs in the sample itself. “Even though some experts call the CRISPR Cas-9 system a part of GMO, the American Food and Drug Administration has acknowledged the genome editing program as a discrete system,” said Bae. Another controversy that the CRISPR Cas-9 system is incurring is the occurrence risk of a tailored baby. Even though there is a low possibility in creation of so called 'monsters', the prospect of the system is inexhaustible that the scientific academia can’t forecast the future application of the CRISPR Cas-9 system. “The application of the system should be discreetly considered and contemplated, in order to prevent any accounts of abuse incurred by a little crack of regulations,” said Bae. Scientific integration approach and its synergy effects One of the reasons why Bae could successfully reveal the mechanism of this newly found technology was due to his academic background. Bae got his bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral degrees in physics, while pursuing chemical studies in his post-doctoral program. Once he became a professor in the chemistry department, he encountered the Method of the Year- 2013 published by Nature Method, which was introducing the new technology, the CRISPR Cas-9 system. As Bae was carried away by the astonishment, he got involved in the genome engineering research in earnest. “Although there could be some drawbacks for me to research biological technology because I majored in physics and chemistry, I thought that I can sublimate these flaws into advantages through scientific integration,” said Bae. Because he majored in physics, he could access the research in a physician’s perspective of ‘how and why’, instead of a biologist’s perspective of ‘so.’ According to Bae, he demonstrated his full potential and capabilities in this research as both physician and chemist, because he could inquire the structural mechanisms of the system and create programs using various physical means like razors. In his teenage years, Bae was interested in studying science since he was a student of natural sciences and engineering. Moment by moment, Bae immersed himself in scientific research, and in his graduate school years, he spent great energy and time researching for scientific development. Due to his diverse academic background, Bae could successfully pursue his amalgamative research in different scientific fields. Now, another approach to scientific integration is in progress, as the CRISPR Cas-9 system is being applied to different fields. “As a scientist researching the CRISPR Cas-9 system, I have to cooperate with experts from profoundly dissimilar fields. Lack of knowledge between each others’ academic branches and hardship in communication may bring about discord. Thus, efforts to understand and study each others’ academic knowledge through cooperation is the key to successful results,” said Bae. A scientific integration approach has been the key to successful research on the CRISPR Cas-9 system. Bae's ultimate goal is to apply this original research of CRISPR Cas-9 system to different fields through joint research. To the question of how he will encourage and foster junior scholars at Hanyang University, he answered with ‘confidence.’ “I have studied and researched at various universities with different experts, and I have realized that students of Hanyang University are equally capable to these scientists. With confidence and courage to carry on their majors with tenacity, students of Hanyang University can demonstrate their capabilities to the fullest,” said Bae. Kim Ju-hyun kimster9421@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Kim Youn-soo

2016-12 15

[Donation]'Hanyang Harmony' Supports Bicycle Donation Project in Vietnam

‘Hanyang Harmony’, the alumni volunteers of Hanyang University, provides bicycles to Binh Dinh Province in Vietnam as a donation project. Hanyang Harmony signed a business agreement with Seongsu Community Center, along with Seoul Bicycle Network and Seoul Province Self-sufficiency Center at Hanyang University Seoul Campus in Seongdong-Gu on the 15th. Four organizations will jointly ship second-hand bicycles that have been repaired at local self support centers in Seoul, and provide them to students in need at Tây Sơn District. Director Kim Yong-soo said, “the Binh Dinh Province is a deeply wounded area due to the Vietnam War. Following the various activities that have been started since 2014, we hope that this bicycle support project will convey the spirit of reconciliation, love and sharing to local residents.” ※Hanyang Harmony is a volunteer corps made by Hanyang university alumni in order to live up to its founding philosophy: ‘Love in Deed and Truth’. It was established in 2012 and was reorganized into a corporation entity in 2015. ▲From left, Executive Secretary of Seoul Province Self-sufficiency Center, Park Jin-soo, Manager of Seoul Bicycle Network Kim Kyung-mi, Director of Hanyang Harmony, Kim Yong-soo and Manager of Seongsu Community Center, Park Eul-jong

2016-12 08

[General]Hanyang-UC Berkeley reexamines partnership contract

Hanyang University and UC Berkeley (U.S.) discussed reexamining partnership contract on November 15. President Lee Young-moo, on his business trip to the U.S., met Liu, Dean of Academic Affairs of UC Berkeley, and Professor Domizka Masayosi, Associate Dean of Academic Affairs of UC Berkeley. President Lee suggested expansion of bilateral exchanges by offering scholarship benefits on Hanyang summer school to students of Berkeley. If the proposal becomes concrete, the possibility of expanding a wide range of exchanges between the two parties will be increased. Moreover, a meeting with the members of Global Social Venture Competition (GSVC), an organization formed by Berkeley MBA students, was held. President Lee and Lee Gi-jeong, Vice President of International Affairs, also had a meeting Hanyang alumni Ha Hyun-dong (Chemical Engineering, '06) and Park Chang-yoon (Mechanical Engineering, '08) who are working on their master’s and doctor’s degrees at UC Berkeley. UC Berkeley is a public university located in California, USA, with 38,000 enrolled students. It manages to operate 7,000 lectures 300 majors. 29 Hanyang faculty members are graduates of Berkeley. ▲President Lee Young-moo in a meeting with official members of UC Berkeley.

2016-11 01 Important News

[Academics][Researcher of the Month] Professor Paik Un-gyu

Professor Paik Un-gyu of the Department of Energy Engineering is November's Researcher of the Month for his active role in exploring the field of energy engineering. Recently, he has led a research team in developing significant improvement of sodium-ion batteries (SIBs), explained in the paper, 'SB@C coaxial nanotubes as a superior long-life and high-rate anode for sodium ion batters'. This specific study focuses on ways to increase the efficiency of the sodium-ion battery, which can possibly replace the popular lithium-ion batteries. Paik spoke about his study as well as his experience as a professor. (Photo courtesy of Paik) “There are other excellent professors who deserve this honor for than me. Yet, I am still very thankful for it,” said Paik. “The research was about sodium-ion batteries, which is rarely known to the public. The main objective was to reduce problems and improve effectiveness of sodium-ion batteries to replace lithium-ion batteries in the future.” Currently, lithium-ion batteries are commonly used in various electronic devices including smartphones. However, the main problem of lithium-ion batteries is the cost of lithium itself. There are certain limits for the Korean government to secure enough lithium mines from overseas. Therefore, a more parallel, affordable solution is to replace lithium with sodium in making ion batteries. Similar to lithium-ion batteries, sodium-ion batteries have issues of rapid operating-capacity fading due to large volume expansion during sodiation. Sodiation is the process of using sodium for a battery. Smartphone batteries bubbling up like a balloon is an example of volume expansion in lithium-ion batteries. “To reduce volume expansion, we tuned the morphology and structure at the nanoscale using carbonaceous materials as the buffer layer,” explained Paik. “Hence, a carbon-coating with a thermal reduction strategy was developed to create a unique tube-like structure, known as Sb@C coaxial nanotubes.” In other words, the hollow space within the specially-created tube can make space available for the accommodation of volume expansion. Another way to increase sodium-ion batteries' efficiency is to improve the charge and discharge system. The charging speed of a battery depends on electron conduction; how fast electrons move within its electric field. Carbon-coated nanotube, a conduction material, allows the conduction of electrons to quicken and enables diffusion to take place, making both sides of the tubes accessible for the charging system. Therefore, by reducing the risk of volume expansion and enhancing the charge system, sodium-ion batteries can be applicable in replacing lithium-ion batteries. The nanotube enhances the quality of sodium-ion batteries. (Photo courtesy of RSC Publisher) Other than this specific study, Paik has contributed immensely in researching applicable, practical studies of nanoparticles and nanodevices used in semiconductors. Most of his studies focus on what can be done to improve technology by working with industries in various sectors. “I personally believe that the reason why I am a researcher is to find practical ways to help the society. The fundamental studies are also important, but I tend to use the basic principles to apply them to real and effective technology,” said Paik. His passion for energy engineering has led him to become one of the professors to have published the most research papers at Hanyang University. Like his accomplishment in energy engineering research, Paik emphasized the need for passion for students who strive for success. “Today, we are facing a more skill-intensified society where work requires advanced expertise in an area. As learners, students must have passion for studying,” said Paik. “Even though the society is rapidly changing at each moment, if students take consistent steps through learning, it can be a strong benefit for them once they have amassed required knowledge.” As a professor, Paik has guided many students in taking the same steps that he himself has gone through for the past 24 years of learning and researching. “In science, understanding the boundaries of each important experiment is necessary, which must be overcome to produce an outcome. Likewise, I hope my role as a professor can assist students to overcome those limitations.” As a professor, Paik guides students to strive for success. (Photo courtesy of Paik) Park Min-young minyoungpark118@gmail.com