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2017-03 13 Important News

[Special]Korea’s Delivery Service

A peaceful, relaxing Sunday afternoon at home seems perfect, until one’s stomach suddenly growls for survival. At this moment, it is only natural to not want to get up and cook a meal, but it is also impossible to ignore the call coming from one's stomach. From grocery shopping, cooking and then cleaning up afterwards, it could be a real hassle to make one’s own meal. Perhaps all these things are simply unaffordable due to one's busy life. In Korea, a convenient option for these circumstances exists: food delivery service. The metal box and motorcycle Korea, a historically agricultural nation, regarded food highly and followed strict table manners from days past. On top of this, Confucian teachings taught not to carry food or even lift them off the table. This may sound contradictory, as Korea is often dubbed as the “baedal minjok,” or delivery nation when translation. The trend first began around the middle of the twentieth century with the introduction of Chinese food and portable military food supply from America during times of war. Jjajang-myun is the most classic delivery food that set this trend in motion. Jjajang-myun (black bean sauce noodles) is the pioneer of delivery food. (Photo courtesy of http://blog.daum.net/roxy_sl/93) On the streets, in front of personal or franchise restaurants and in parking lots, delivery motorcycles with a metal box attached to its back can easily be found. Almost all food delivery is done with a motorcycle, not a car, to increase time and fuel efficiency. The diversity of food being delivered has greatly increased, literally, to include any menu item. Most restaurants today offer delivery service in an attempt to boost their competency, and, thus, not fall behind on the trend. A deliverer is holding a metal box saying "quick delivery." (Photo courtesy of luckyturtles.com) Delivery and culture The delivery culture does not only bring convenience and advantages to people's lives but also it fosters an enjoyable and conventional culture. Most typically, the picnic culture has grown hand-in-hand with the delivery culture. Clement weather equates to picnic day usually at parks with friends, family, or significant others. Either hand packaged or delivery food is accompanied to the picnic, with the majority opting for the latter. The most popular picnic site in Seoul is Han River park, with the most frequently chosen menu being fried chicken and beer as its partner. “Chimaek” is a recently coined term referring to chicken and beer, and this word is incredibly often linked with another word, “Hangang,” Han River. A blogger's picture of chimaek along Han River. (Photo courtesy of beer2day.com) In addition, another trend has formed as a result of the flourishing delivery food service: late-night meals. Born together is yet another newly coined term “yashik,” meaning late-night food. Since food can be obtained with zero effort at anytime, people began to enjoy food late at night, usually after getting home from work. Lying on the sofa and watching television, it is tempting to reach for the phone and dial a number to order some food to satisfy the puckish belly. Apparently, more than just a few people feel this desire at night, eventually giving rise to yashik culture which was happily consummated by the delivery culture. Famous delivery applications on smartphones. (Photo courtesy of namedia.tistory.com) To further make it easier and handy, food delivery applications has entered the picture. With a smartphone at hand, one can painlessly skim through all the menus and prices of food available and that are ready to order and enjoy anytime and anywhere. School, the park, office, home, hospital, even at the beach, delivery food reaches every corner of the country and is a big part of the culture today. Jeon Chae-yun chaeyun111@hanyang.ac.kr

2017-03 05 Important News

[Special][LIFESTYLE] Homemade Korean Food

Selecting the right ingredients to plating beautifully makes a great cook, but, ordinary people, who live on mere bread and rice as their meals, find it difficult to cook proper food for themselves. Although quite modest compared to fancy dishes served in restaurants, the following are some of the most beloved meals for Koreans. Recipes for gimbap, soybean sprout bulgogi, and royal stir-fried rice cake now follows, so be ready to take notes. Gimbap Ingredients: dried seaweed, cucumber, egg, carrot, pickled radish, imitation crab meat, ham, rice, sesame oil, someone to go on a picnic with Top: Chop up the ingredients evenly. Bottom: Stir-fry the ingredients. Top: Roll up the ingredients on the dried seaweed. Bottom: Cut the gimbap to the size you want. Enjoy your picnic with gimbap! Soybean sprout bulgogi (two servings) Ingredients: soybean sprout, pork loin, spring onion, onion, winter mushroom, sesame leaf, cooking wine, soy sauce, sugar, crushed garlic, chili powder, red chili paste, (sesame seed, sesame oil – optional), someone to invite to your place From top left, clockwise (1-4) 1: Pour in 300g of soybean sprout 2: Chop up the spring onions and onion. Add to the pan 3: Add the winter mushroom according to your taste 4: Cut up 10 sesame leaves and add 400g of pork loin From left to right (5-6) 5: Mix together cooking wine, soy sauce, sugar, crushed garlic, chili powder, red chili paste at a 1:1:1:1:1 ratio and add in ½ tablespoons of crushed garlic and sesame oil 6: Pour the sauce on top and add in sesame seed to your taste Boil the ingredients on the pan until the meat is well-cooked. Royal stir-fried rice cake (two servings) Ingredients: rice cake, beef sirloin, onion, paprika, oyster mushroom, spring onion, sugar, soy sauce, crushed garlic, (sesame seed, sesame oil, pepper – optional), someone to enjoy your food 1 paprika, 400g beef sirloin, 1 spring onion, ½ onion, oyster mushroom as preferred From top left, clockwise (1-4) 1: Pour in 100ml water, 2 tablespoons of sugar, and cook the beef 2: Add in 50ml soy sauce and 1 tablespoon of crushed garlic 3: Put 300g rice cake into the pan 4: Throw in the rest of the vegetables From left to right (5-6) 5: Add some sesame seeds, 1 tablespoon of sesame oil and pepper to your taste 6: Do some plating for your visitor and enjoy the food These simple steps will turn you into a great cook even without the lavish plating skills or the senses of a professional cook. Preferences differ from person to person, so the recipe can be modified and custom-made according to your own taste. Always remember: confidence in cooking is the first step to becoming an excellent chef. Invite your partner, friends, or family to your home this weekend and let them taste the best homemade Korean food- made by none other than you! Kim Seung-jun nzdave94@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Kim Seung-jun

2017-02 27

[Special][CULTURE] Museums Worth Visiting

The National Museum of Korea The National Museum of Korea, situated in Yongsan-gu, Seoul, is the biggest and most loved museum of Korean and Asian history. The museum mainly features artifacts and treasures from prehistoric times to the Joseon Dynasty and the Korean Empire. The collection also includes relics from China, Japan, and middle, eastern, and southern Asia. The National Museum of Korea. Click here to visit its homepage. (Photo courtesy of Ezy Economy) Some of the museum’s most famous collections are the massive Ten-Story Pagoda of Gyeongcheonsa Temple site from the Goryeo Dynasty, and the Genre Painting Album of Danwon, a famous painter who drew ordinary people’s daily life in the Joseon Dynasty. Other notable artifacts are the golden crown and girdle of Silla during the Three Kingdoms period and Pensive Bodhisattva statue from the same period. Admission is free, although costs for special exhibitions may vary. Currently, the special exhibition “Egyptian Treasures from the Brooklyn Museum” is on display. Ten-Story Pagoda of Gyeongcheonsa Temple site (top right), Dancing Child from Genre Painting Album of Danwon (top left), golden crown and girdle (bottom right), and Pensive Bodhisattva statue (bottom left). (Photos courtesy of Daum and Naver blogs) There is a tourist program in the museum for foreigners called “Korean Culture”, which includes Korea’s traditional cultural activities such as Korean painting and calligraphy, and making lacquerware inlaid with mother-of-pearls and Korean seals. Guided tours for foreigners are provided in English, Chinese, and Japanese. Near the National Museum of Korea, The National Hangeul Museum is located, which is about Hangeul’s history, design, and the principles behind it. To pay a visit to the National Museum of Korea, take a subway and get off at Ichon station on the Jungang Line and Line 4. The museum is open every day except the 1st of January, Seollal, and Chuseok. Seoul Museum of Art The Seoul Museum of Art, or SeMA, comprises three separate museums- the Main Building in Seosomun-dong, Jung-gu, Nam[South]-Seoul Branch near Sadang metro station in Gwanak-gu, and the Buk[North]-Seoul Branch in Nowon-gu. Art exhibitions of all sorts are held in these two museums, spanning vast genres of art from paintings and photography to fashion, design and film. SeMA mainly displays artworks by Korean artists, both young and old, including the permanent exhibition of a famous Korean painter Cheon Kyeong-ja. In addition, Western and non-Western artworks are also displayed in SeMa, and a Latin American arts exhibition is to be opened this year. Currently, at SeMA Seosomun Museum of Art, a special exhibition called “Renoir: Images of Women” is being held. The Seosomun Main Building of SeMA. Click here to visit its homepage. (Photo courtesy of Robert Walters Korea) SeMA holds its own biennale, called SeMA Biennale Mediacity Seoul, which focuses on contemporary art- especially media art. Artists from Korea and all over the world participate in the event. The latest Biennale was held in 2016, with the next one expecting to be held in 2018. There are lots of different educational programs offered: a ceramic clay modeling course and an oriental painting course for foreigners can be registered for at the Nam-Seoul Living Arts Museum. SeMA is closed every Monday and on January 1st. Gwacheon National Science Museum Gwacheon National Science Museum is in the city Gwacheon, Gyeonggi-do, near Seoul Grand Park. It stands as one of the most representative science museums in Korea. The museum covers a broad range in science. By visiting the museum, one can briefly explore the world of the fundamental sciences, such as biology, chemistry and physics. Advanced scientific technology can also be glimpsed upon. The museum features the scientific development of ancient Korea, such as the turtle ship devised by Joseon's naval commander Yi Sun-shin, and geojunggi, a pulley created to be used when constructing the Hwaseong fortress in the city of Suwon by Jeong Yak-yong. There is a planetarium, an astronomical observatory, and an insect ecology center there as well. Gwacheon National Science Museum. Click here to visit its homepage. (Photo courtesy of the Ministry of Science, ICT and Future Planning's Daum blog) The museum offers on hands-on scientific experience, and tries to make science more approachable for both the young and the old. For instance, one can experience the operations of a Tesla coil and plasma phenomena, as well as seeing various sea animals, insects and fossils. Visiting the Gwacheon Science Museum with children is highly recommended. The admission fee for adults is 4,000 won, and 2,000 won for children. The museum is closed on Mondays and on January 1st. Jang Soo-hyun luxkari@hanyang.ac.kr

2017-02 20

[Special][TRAVEL] Take Two: Gwangju

Especially famous for its diverse types of food, Gwangju is a city worth being visited by anyone. This article covers some of the famous places within Gwangju that will dazzle its wayfarers. News H paid a real visit to capture its beauty and relish in its ambience firsthand. [1913 Songjeong Market] Located in front of the KTX station, this market is one of the most accessible places to visit. The market opened with the construction of Songjeong Train Station, and its entrance sign proudly boasts its year of completion- 1913. While keeping the traditionality within the market, it has been remodeled to attract the younger generation to the markets, creating a trendy and tidy place to go shopping. On the pavements, in front of every store, the year of the store's grand opening is engraved, which gives the site an increased sense of heritage. 1913 Songjeong Market connects the past with the present. [Penguin Village] Famous for its wall paintings, Penguin Village is possibly one of the most artistic villages in Korea. Although the place is not big in scale, a lot of art figures and paintings decorate the whole village making it a hot spot for photographers. It was once an abandoned village only inhabited by the elderly. The way the inhabitants walked resembled that of penguins, which is why the village was named in such a way. The people who lived in the village started decorating the place with pieces of junk- it developing into a form of art, people started to pique interest in the Penguin Village. Penguin Village is one of the most artistic and picturesque villages in Korea. Tours with different themes are offered by the village, as well. [5.18 Memorial Park] On May 18, 1980, Gwangju and the Jeolla Province held massive democratic demonstrations against the new military regime, leading a coup to topple the government at the time. Countless citizens, including students and the elderly, were injured or killed during the incident, as orders to massacre civilians came from the then-government and President. The Memorial Park was created in Gwangju in order to commemorate and atone those who fought for democracy and justice. The park consists of a 5.18 reference room, auditorium, statues, fountain squares and other convenience facilities. People visit the park to commemorate the victims or simply take a peaceful stroll along its paths. The Memorial Park is appreciated by the many, reminding them of the 5.18 tragedy. Maintained by Gwangju Metropolitan City, Gwangju's tourism website provides tour schedules and optimal routes for visitors. It would be a great idea to plan a visit to the city in all its tranquility as a short trip before the new semester begins. Click here for the website Kim Seung-jun nzdave94@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Kim Seung-jun

2017-02 13

[Special]A Typical Day at School During Winter Break

On a typical Thursday during winter vacation, the campus seems quite empty and idle on the surface. As It turned out, beneath it were some bustling Hanyangians working on their own tasks. Taking a glimpse into their schedules, it was clear that students were spending their break being occupied by various duties and responsibilities. News H this week brought few students’ stories about their life during this winter break. As student council officers Park Yun-dong (English Language and Literature, 2nd year) and Ko Ga-yeon (English Language and Literature, 2nd year) are the president and vice president of their major and are therefore in charge of assisting numerous events and activities. Attending weekly meetings held among the student council members of the department, school affairs seem to lie at the center of their vacation. Their main objectives are to outline programs for the two-nights-three-days bonding camp for the freshmen, increase the number of convenient facilities in the basement room, and plan for upcoming back-to-school events. “Doing what I’m delegated to keeps me busy enough. Giving myself more time to focus on my personal concerns would be too overwhelming. As the president, I don’t want to fail anybody!” exclaimed Park. Park (left) and Ko (right) are planning upcoming back-to-school events. As seniors At the café near the outdoor theater, a group of three were putting their heads together, working on a task with flaming devotion. It turned out that they are seniors at the Department of Mechanical Engineering, trying to get their graduation thesis finished. They unfolded their achievements of the past two months during the break, most of which were heavily related to academics and career-building: taking official exams, preparing for graduate school, and looking for jobs. It was evident that the three had no spare time to invest in enjoyable, relaxing activities. They are all ready to graduate and step into the bigger society. Kim Jae-yoon, Kim Tae-wan, and Lee Gun-woo (left to right) are working on their graduation thesis with ardor. As a band member Alone in the practice room of the club Dasalnolae was an electronic guitarist Heo Ji-min (Department of Chinese Language and Literature, 2nd year), rehearsing a song to be performed at the freshmen bonding camp. Dasalnolae is a band club in the College of Humanities, performing at events like camps and school festivals. The nearest performance is going to be at the camp aforementioned, possibly attracting new recruiters. “I come to school more than three times a week to practice. The song I was just practicing is Uptown Funk, which is one of the songs we are performing in less than two weeks. I am actually the captain of the electronic guitar team, so it's only natural that I practice more. I guess during this break I didn't do anything much besides coming to school for music practice,” recalled Heo. Heo comes to school more than three times a week to practice. As a graduate student A graduate student couple from the Department of Earth Resources and Environmental Engineering were near the Hanyang Plaza, on their way to grab a bite to eat during lunch break. Eldalatony Marwa is currently studying to get her doctorate degree, while her husband El-Sayed Salama had already achieved the same goal. As full-time student and researcher, they are required to come to school every day to carry out experiments, rendering their vacation virtually nonexistent. “Although we would like to go on trips, we obviously can’t. We still manage to visit places nearby, like Namie Island or even to Busan during weekends. I’m eagerly looking forward to getting my doctorate degree this June,” remarked Marwa. El-Sayed (left) and Marwa (right) goes to their laboratory everyday. As individual students Enjoying hot coffee and cordially conversing, Kim Jae-hyun (Bio-Engineering Major, 3rd year) and Kim Jae-yoon (Department of History, 1st year) were in a café in the Humanities Building. When asked why they came to school during vacation, they simply answered they wanted to hang out since they hadn't seen each other for a while. Jae-hyun is currently taking a year off because he wants to focus on his personal studies aside from school work. His goal is to become a prominent pharmacy researcher. On the other hand, Jae-yoon just returned from military service and is ready to return to school this semester. He made the big decision to reregister as a first-year student, although he was to be a sophomore this year. Jae-yoon wasn't content with his achievements during his first year, which is why he wants to start over and put more effort into academic work. Jae-yoon (left) and Jae-hyun (right) are talking about their school plans. Jeon Chae-yun chaeyun111@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Moon Ha-na

2017-02 12

[Special][Op-ed] Mobility Rights for the Disabled

During national holiday seasons in Korea, issues always arise. In Korea, where people go to visit their parents and relatives living in different locations throughout the country, it is always a problem for the disabled to find proper transportation to travel to locations that are generally more than 2-3 hours away. Most recently, on January 26th, two disabled people tried to take a bus at the Seoul Express Bus Terminal to visit their parents and families in Busan for Seollal, one of the biggest national holidays celebrating the Lunar New Year. However, they were rejected and offered no help. The reason for this was because intercity buses are not properly equipped with special facilities for disabled passengers. An activist is holding a picket saying, "We need a bus that anyone can use". (Photo courtesy of Beminor) While such incidents involving the disabled was deemed a problem a long while back, it's surprising that the law itself already mentions the protection of disabled people's rights akin to the basic human rights of all people. Rights to mobility for the disabled is a part of accessibility rights. It means that a disabled individual should be able to move around and reach a desired destination using different transportation systems. It also states that the government should assure the rights of disabled people to use public transportation like taxis, buses, and the subways in Korea to enable them to travel around freely, just as it is granted for people with no disabilities. “Public” transportation, not for the disabled There are approximately 32.552 buses in Korea and 20 percent of them are made as low-floor buses, with no steps, which allow people with physical difficulties or those on wheelchairs to get onto the bus easily. While the number of such buses are seriously lacking for disabled people, it can even be said that they aren't able to fully utilize the existing ones to their convenience. When people on wheelchairs try to ride on a low-floor bus, drivers would oftentimes ignore and reject them, claiming that they don't know how to control the lift, or that it's simply broken. "We (disabled passengers) want to go home too!" (Photo courtesy of Beminor) The case with trains and subways are not so different. The KTX, run by Korail, has 2 to 4 disabled seats on each train, but disabled passenger is still restricted from using other facilities inside the train like the cinema or restaurant. On other trains besides the KTX - Mugungwha and Saemauel trains - it is almost impossible for the disabled to ride in them, as basic facilities weren't built inside, or the way to get to the trains is unsafe for people in wheelchairs. With taxis, the Seoul Metropolitan City introduced 'call taxis' for the disabled in 2003. It was for people with level 1 and 2 brain damage, or those on wheelchairs. While the project started out with 100 cabs, the number increased to about 500 cabs in 2017. While the introduction of call taxis did increase in other regions as well and did match the number required by law, it is still said by a lot of users that it is hard to get serviced on a daily basis. They have to wait for about 40 minutes when traffic isn't busy, and 3 to 4 hours during rush hour. Getting to work every day, which is just a daily routine for non-disabled people, is a daily concern for the disabled because of limited transportation systems. A disabled passenger is getting on a special call-taxi. (Photo courtesy of Beminor) Better welfare for all While there are increasing demands for the disabled to be guaranteed their rights, it is unnerving to witness that the government’s budget for their welfare is simply not enough. While the budget has been on the increase every year by 20 to 30 percent, because the issue has been gaining more attention in the last several years, existing policies and infrastructures are insufficient compared to the number of people who are in need of more help and attention. In the short run, the government should increase specially equipped taxi and vehicles. In the longer run, buses and subways should be equipped with lifts to help the disabled hop on and off with more ease. To create and implement such policies, a separate department of law and policy for the disabled within the government would be of significant help. While the aforementioned policies could be easier said than done, it is more important for our society to shift our perspectives of the disabled. As disabled people are unable to move around freely, people should understand the importance of their mobility rights, and that being assured for all people regardless of their physical or mental state. For the drivers of various public transportation, it is essential for the companies or institutions to educate their employees to service disabled passengers on par with other passengers. It is important for the Korean society to ponder more about what equality is. (Photo courtesy of disabilityrightsca) Yun Ji-hyun uni27@hanyang.ac.kr

2017-02 07 Important News

[Special]Hanyangians Abroad and Beyond

The number of international students at Hanyang University, as well as within Korea, appear to increase every year. About 90,000 students were estimated to be studying in Korea as of 2016. Reasons behind their visits form around inquisitiveness about and personal interest in Korea and its culture, not excluding job opportunities. Likewise, students of Hanyang fly to countries abroad to learn languages, expose themselves to new cultures and get work experience. This week, News H met four HYU students, Lee Shin-hee (Advertising and Public Relations, ERICA, 4th year), Kim Nam-hyung (Division of International Studies, 4th year), Lee Je-na (Sociology, 4th yr) and Kwon Hyun-min (Industrial Engineering, 4th year), who all went abroad on exchange student programs, an internship and a working holiday respectively. Exchange students in the US and the UK Shin-hee (left) and Nam-hyung (right) each visited the US and the UK respectively as exchange students. Q1. How long did you live abroad as an exchange student, and what countries have you visited? Can you tell us the reason why you went there? Shin-hee: I stayed in America from August 2015 to July 2016 at LeTourneau University in Texas. I spent two semesters there as an international student, taking a minor in Marketing in the School of Business. I chose the US because I wanted to practice my English a lot, and I wanted to experience the student life there. Nam-hyung: I went to the UK and studied at the University College London. I spent the fall semester of my junior year there, and lived there from September 2016 to January this year. My reason for going abroad was to learn politics, studying at a foreign university as a politics major. Because I lived in Europe when I was young, I felt more comfortable with the UK than the US. Since using English wasn't a problem for me, I felt I could understand the lectures better at an English-speaking country. Q2. Are there any routes in making foreign friends? What were some notable experiences you had with foreign students during your stay? Shin-hee: The club I chose in the university I went to was the cross-country running team. Club members were surprised and glad that an exchange student chose to participate, and the atmosphere was really welcoming as a result. There are summer breaks and fall breaks in American universities, which enable students to take a leave from school for about one week. I decided to take a trip to the seaside with my friends during the summer break. During my fall break, I visited to the Grand Canyon with my friends. Another thing that I remember, and definitely don’t regret, is that I threw my own farewell party. That was because I wanted to treat my friends back, who really helped me a lot during my stay. "I prepared my own farewell party because I wanted to treat my American friends back. Like this, you can make a personal influence regardless of whether you're an international student or not." (Photos courtesy of Lee Shin-hee) Nam-hyung: There were five people in my dorm, and those friends were the ones I got very close to. When a new semester starts, there is a welcoming party for one week. I met nice people there. Also, there are lots of clubs, such as Beyonce, Harry Potter, and sci-fi. In Korea, you choose one or two clubs and you devote yourself to it, but in the UK, the choice of clubs has more flexibility and freedom. Nam-hyung's trip to Stonehenge. (Photo courtesy of Kim Nam-hyung) Q3. What did you learn most out of your experience abroad? Shin-hee: I learned that the influence of a given environment affects people beyond imagination. What is left as your asset depends on how much you tried to challenge and adapt to in the culture you are faced with. That’s a matter of courage, you see. Nam-hyung: What I learned is much related to studying. I was surprised by the heated atmosphere of debate that was going around in the classes. It was very different from Korean-style lectures. I learned that by actively searching and striving, you can really make your studying experience more interesting and engaging. Additionally, I learned basic life skills, like cooking and socializing with people. Q4. Any tips on living as an exchange student? Shin-hee: I used my international student status as a privilege. Because I was an exchange student, I don’t have to be in the know about what the other students already know. I asked lots of questions and that was how I could communicate more with the people there. Nam-hyung: Never be afraid of doing things alone. There may be situations where you want to do something but you don’t have any friends to do it with you. Don’t hesitate even then. There may be more dynamic events when you are out alone. Working holiday to Australia, internship to Germany Hyun-min (left) visited Australia for a working holiday, and Je-na (right) went to Germany for an internship at KOTRA. Q1. What country have you visited and why? What was your work there? Je-na: For six months from the second half of 2015 to first half of 2016, I went on a foreign internship to KOTRA (Korea Trade-Investment Promotion Agency)'s trade building in Munich, Germany through the school. KOTRA is a state funded organization that promotes and facilitates trade and investment of Korea's SMEs (Small to medium sized enterprises). I lived in Germany from middle school to high school, so I can speak both German and English. I applied for the internship while I was searching for work experience in Korea and other countries, following a professor’s advice on internship programs the school provides. I assisted office work as an intern, did some cleaning, answered phone calls, and consulted some buyers. I also got a more worthwhile experience, being able to German for work thanks to the trust that the director instilled in me. I participated in interpreting at a BMW conference, and in a special KBS program that featured Munich. I was lucky to be involved in those moments. Je-na's work desk at KOTRA. (Photo courtesy of Lee Je-na) Hyun-min: I went on a working holiday to Australia for 21 months, from April 2014 to January 2016, with three of my friends. I had a great longing for living abroad since I was young. I chose Australia for my working holiday due to the interesting stories I had heard from my private tutor about his own working holiday experience in Australia. I also wanted to feel for myself the active atmosphere of the country. During my stay, I worked in restaurants. I washed dishes, did simple ingredient preparations, and also did room service while I was working in a big hotel. Hyun-min (third from right) and his friends in Australia. (Photo courtesy of Kwon Hyun-min) Q2. Were there any requirements for the jobs? Je-na: Certified English test scores and other language scores are required, corresponding to which country you visit. A copy of your transcript and resume are also needed, and an English interview is held thereafter, with one intern being selected for each trade building. Hyun-min: There are age requirements, from 18 to 30, and there has to be neither medical disqualifications nor criminal records. Q3. What is an advantage of a brief stay abroad? Hyun-min: I now have the confidence to live in any country that I can think of. I have experienced something unique, so I'm now equipped with the ability to manage my life and also broaden my outlook. Hyun-min, Je-na, Nam-hyung and Shin-hee (left to right) pose together. Jang Soo-hyun luxkari@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Choi Min-ju

2017-02 06

[Special]Genealogy of Korean Surnames

A family tree of genealogy is a record of the totality of one’s ancestors from its originators to recent times by connecting numerous family units. It structures a family history where relations by blood and other factors are depicted in a systematic way, including personal details of family members. With a relatively high interest in family histories by the general public, Korea has the highest number of preserved genealogical records in the world. Being called 'jokbo', the genealogical table of Korea has been well preserved and stored by the Korean Ministry of Information and Communication to complete and smoothen the understanding and the holistic picture of its contents. Genealogical record of the Yoo family. (Photo courtesy of The Academy of Korean Studies) History of genealogy Reflecting Chinese influence of using its characters, Korean ancestors had adopted the use of Chinese letters for their family names since the Era of the Three Kingdoms. The very first family name of Korean history is recorded to be 'Go' (or 'Ko'), borne by the founder of the nation Goguryeo, Jumong. Conceivably, the king acquired his surname from the first letter of the country, all three letters in which were written in Chinese. Forerunners of history obtained their surnames in the identical manner, picking up a letter from words that has relevance to their lives or that holds personal meanings. For instance, the exceedingly dominant last name of Korea, Kim, came to its being through King Suro, who was said to be born in a golden egg—the Chinese character for Kim means gold. As it was the initial stage of family-name-system endorsement, people without surnames surpassed those with one in number during the Era of the Three States. Each nation had its indigenous surnames, differing in its formation and origin. According to the method aforementioned, people very often derived their surnames from the location of their habitation: a man who lived in Kangsu will have Kang as his family name. Genealogical database Ten of most common surnames in Korea. Collecting the scattered genealogical records from all over the country and arranging it in a database system could benefit both the scholars and and the general Korean public. Academically, it will help strengthen the foundation of the Korean discipline and expand its horizon with the wealth of diverse raw data it can provide for its studies. Additionally, by Koreanizing the genealogical data that is currently recorded in Chinese, making it more accessible, the general population will gain more interest in this subject. According to a census in 1997, there exists 287 different family names in Korea, all of which descended from different backgrounds and origins. Although not mainstream, a number of Korean surnames such as Kyo, Keun, Myo, Sam, Jeo, and Jeup exist, while most dominant groups are ranked as shown in the chart. Jeon Chae-yun chaeyun111@hanyang.ac.kr

2017-01 23 Important News

[Special]Registration Warfare with Mouse-Shields and Finger-Swords (1)

Universities in South Korea operate their course registration system through a fiercely competitive method. It is employing computers, laptops, or mobile phones (limited in some schools) to log in to a school enrollment website and register for wanted courses right on a designated day and time. However, due to the limited number of students that can sign up to each course, only a few can set up their new timetable with the courses of their wishes. The reasons behind the successes of so-called ‘winners' are varied, such as fast internet, server, or computer, along with the golden time that led the deliberate mouse-clicking to success, which tend to involve luck. Due to the ramifications the Korean course enrollment system brings, university administrators are at a deadlock over what method is most appropriate for fair and practical registration. Traditional mode of registration Many universities of South Korea, also involving Hanyang University, operate their course registration system on a first come, first served basis. First, students get ready before the assigned registration date with their computers and the Internet server connection ready. Because PCs (personal computers) and home Wi-Fi (wireless fidelity, a system that transmits mass data wirelessly) may incur malfunction, a host of students go to South Korean PC rooms for guaranteed internet connection speed and computer quality. Then, students open up the server time clock, a virtual countdown that will guide them to click the registration button at a precise moment. Below is an example of the course registration system of Hanyang University. After careful consideration of what courses one should or wants to take, one would open the course registration site (http://sugang.hanyang.ac.kr) and log in. Then, subjects will be added to the ‘desired courses’ list. The list resembles the following: Red box 1 means ‘view the schedule of selected courses’. When clicked, it shows how the student’s timetable will look like. Example: 2. When red box 2 is clicked on, a syllabus and additional information about the selected course will pop up. Example: 3. Clicking red box 3 at the designated registration time would lead to the enrollment of a student to the selected course. However, the flaw of this registration system is found as follows: If the number of the enrolled students (number in the red box) exceeds the maximum number of students acceptable (number in the blue box), it means that students have to compete for the course. Whomever clicks on the 'Register' button first will get the course safely into their timetables. Even though all students pay the same tuition fees to receive equal opportunities to education, the courses they will end up taking depend on the millisecond the registration buttons are clicked, including the state of the computer being used and the Internet speed. In the case of a popular major, such as the Department of Business Administration, a number of students from other divisions apply for double or multiple majors to this department. In this case, the students desiring business administration courses are increased, causing fiercer competition between students to grab desired courses as their own. Pupils whose original major is Business Administration are rendering this circumstance as terribly unfair, as they are losing their rights to rightfully receive education from their majoring department. In addition, students who lack the financial ability to afford better internet connection will have significantly lower chances of being enrolled to their desired courses. Due to these problems, numerous South Korean universities are figuring out ways to amend the system. Alternative mechanisms One of the course enrollment systems that some universities now implement is the ‘registration basket system’. Konkuk University is one that employs this system. The way it works is analogous to the traditional system, but it distributes time prudently for students. First, students will select courses that they desire and add them to the registration basket, which is akin to Hanyang University's 'desired courses tab'. The number of students enrolled for the desired courses will not be shown until the registration date. Then, at the first registration date, the university server will automatically register students to the courses that did not have exceeding numbers of enrolled students. Those whose chosen courses had exceeding numbers will not be signed up, which means that some of them will need to decide whether they will keep the course for possible registration at a later date, or not. After a few changes, the second registration date will come and the server will again automatically sign students up. Those who could not register even on the second go will have to compete for their desired courses in the traditional way for the third time. Even though this system is considered effective in that it gives equal opportunities for students, it is criticized by busy students. Because the system requires a maximum of three registration dates, some are bound to consider the system time-consuming. Another system that Yonsei University implements is called the ‘Mileage and Time Ticket System’. The university bestows each student 5000 mileage points for course registration. The amount may differ depending on the number of courses a student wishes to take. Each student has an opportunity to distribute and bet a certain amount of points to each course. For example, if a course is popular, then a bigger mileage number will be bet on it. After the betting, the university server automatically calculates the sum and signs students up considering the mileage and the maximum enrollment number. Even though the system requires profound mental calculation and probability skills, it is considered one of the best registration systems due to its creativeness and legitimacy. Kim Ju-hyun kimster9421@hanyang.ac.kr

2017-01 23 Important News

[Special]Representations of Hanyang

The word 'Hanyang' can be linked up with various objects and ideas: lion, Korean forsythia, the color blue, the founding philosophy, 'Love in Deed and Truth', the slogan, 'the Engine of Korea' and more. Commingling sundry representations and symbolic images together, the symbol and the character of Hanyang University play a major role in establishing the identity of Hanyang more distinctly and uniquely as a university. Underneath the character mark lies the designers of the Hanyang logo- the Design Management Center, which has been managing the symbol of HYU, and Kim Yoon-shik (Department of Visual Package Design, '07), who designed the logo of Hanyang that resembles a lion’s face. Additionally, Jang Dae-jin (Department of Advertising and Public Relations, 4th year) has sketched buildings of our campus and produced them into postcards, which are distributed at occasional events by the admission office or the promotion team. The evolution of Hanyang’s logo A symbol of a university portrays the school’s identity, vision, and tradition, which altogether represents the university itself. It greatly contributes to formation of University Identity—the symbol mark and the logotype—that summarizes the overall characteristics and values of the school. The Design Management Center has been in charge of designing and managing the logo of Hanyang University since its establishment in 2005, ultimately aspiring to make Hanyang a brand and increase the competitiveness of the university. The center not only plans and manages Brand Hanyang, but also navigates the application of the University Identity, arranges school events, and consults promotional images of the school. The logo of Hanyang University has gone through three major changes, adding additional meanings in each phase. The first stage of the logo includes the word Hanyang in Korean, framed by the Chinese character meaning ‘head’ and ‘big’. At this stage, the logo failed to contain more of the school’s philosophical aspects, which necessitated the second logo to be more comprehensive. Commemorating the 37th anniversary of the school’s establishment, the symbol contained the school’s founding philosophy, the founding year, and the symbolic flower. The overall shape of the symbol evolved to be round, indicating an active campus. At last, the newest logo was formed in 2009, on monumentalizing the 70th anniversary of Hanyang's founding. The new version took the implication of the logo to the next level: the round shape symbolized Hanyang’s embracing love towards mankind, and the letter 'Hanyang University' on top connotates Hanyangians’ direction towards the global stage. Logos are visual images of the school's values, philosophy, and purpose. (Photos courtesy of the Design Management Center) From creativity to innovation Another form of Hanyang’s logo was designed by Kim Yoon-shik in 2011, exhibiting the word 'Hanyang' in Korean as a lateral view of a lion’s face. Kim, as the vice president of his department, was given the duty of sketching the design of the department’s flag. He started out with a determination that the lion image must be included. Then coming across a similar idea of his senior’s, he differentiated and designed a lion’s face with the word 'Hanyang' in Korean. Receiving rounds of applause for his work, Kim was offered to expand the usage of his logo, eventually rendering it the school’s official symbol. “I was simply honored and thankful that my design was regarded with such dignity. I intended to use Korean letters to create this design, hoping to enlarge the language’s scope in artistic domains. One thing I hope is to not set a restriction on designing other schools’ symbols by using Korean letters, simply because our school already made a preceding one. Nonetheless, I made the lion’s facial expression appear fierce and spirited, to indicate Hanyang’s vigorous and strong pride,” remarked Kim. Kim's design of Hanyang symbol. (Photo courtesy of Hanyang University) Views of Hanyang on postcards On top of the cherished symbols, Jang Dae-jin also contributed to Hanyang’s promotional aspects, sketching various views of the university’s buildings and producing them as postcards. He filled his notebook page by page in his spare time during his military service and sent it to the school’s promotional team, which selected a number of them and turn them into postcards. Jang’s drawings not only show his love for Hanyang University, but also manifests his passion for drawing as an urban sketcher. Jang possesses incredible drawing skills, which he hopes to use as a driving force toward his ultimate goal- to promote the beauty of Korea abroad and to draw many different cities worldwide in his notebook. Postcards of Jang's sketches portray the Hanyang campus. (Photo courtesy of Jang) Jeon Chae-yun chaeyun111@hanyang.ac.kr