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2017-02 07 Important News

[Special]Hanyangians Abroad and Beyond

The number of international students at Hanyang University, as well as within Korea, appear to increase every year. About 90,000 students were estimated to be studying in Korea as of 2016. Reasons behind their visits form around inquisitiveness about and personal interest in Korea and its culture, not excluding job opportunities. Likewise, students of Hanyang fly to countries abroad to learn languages, expose themselves to new cultures and get work experience. This week, News H met four HYU students, Lee Shin-hee (Advertising and Public Relations, ERICA, 4th year), Kim Nam-hyung (Division of International Studies, 4th year), Lee Je-na (Sociology, 4th yr) and Kwon Hyun-min (Industrial Engineering, 4th year), who all went abroad on exchange student programs, an internship and a working holiday respectively. Exchange students in the US and the UK Shin-hee (left) and Nam-hyung (right) each visited the US and the UK respectively as exchange students. Q1. How long did you live abroad as an exchange student, and what countries have you visited? Can you tell us the reason why you went there? Shin-hee: I stayed in America from August 2015 to July 2016 at LeTourneau University in Texas. I spent two semesters there as an international student, taking a minor in Marketing in the School of Business. I chose the US because I wanted to practice my English a lot, and I wanted to experience the student life there. Nam-hyung: I went to the UK and studied at the University College London. I spent the fall semester of my junior year there, and lived there from September 2016 to January this year. My reason for going abroad was to learn politics, studying at a foreign university as a politics major. Because I lived in Europe when I was young, I felt more comfortable with the UK than the US. Since using English wasn't a problem for me, I felt I could understand the lectures better at an English-speaking country. Q2. Are there any routes in making foreign friends? What were some notable experiences you had with foreign students during your stay? Shin-hee: The club I chose in the university I went to was the cross-country running team. Club members were surprised and glad that an exchange student chose to participate, and the atmosphere was really welcoming as a result. There are summer breaks and fall breaks in American universities, which enable students to take a leave from school for about one week. I decided to take a trip to the seaside with my friends during the summer break. During my fall break, I visited to the Grand Canyon with my friends. Another thing that I remember, and definitely don’t regret, is that I threw my own farewell party. That was because I wanted to treat my friends back, who really helped me a lot during my stay. "I prepared my own farewell party because I wanted to treat my American friends back. Like this, you can make a personal influence regardless of whether you're an international student or not." (Photos courtesy of Lee Shin-hee) Nam-hyung: There were five people in my dorm, and those friends were the ones I got very close to. When a new semester starts, there is a welcoming party for one week. I met nice people there. Also, there are lots of clubs, such as Beyonce, Harry Potter, and sci-fi. In Korea, you choose one or two clubs and you devote yourself to it, but in the UK, the choice of clubs has more flexibility and freedom. Nam-hyung's trip to Stonehenge. (Photo courtesy of Kim Nam-hyung) Q3. What did you learn most out of your experience abroad? Shin-hee: I learned that the influence of a given environment affects people beyond imagination. What is left as your asset depends on how much you tried to challenge and adapt to in the culture you are faced with. That’s a matter of courage, you see. Nam-hyung: What I learned is much related to studying. I was surprised by the heated atmosphere of debate that was going around in the classes. It was very different from Korean-style lectures. I learned that by actively searching and striving, you can really make your studying experience more interesting and engaging. Additionally, I learned basic life skills, like cooking and socializing with people. Q4. Any tips on living as an exchange student? Shin-hee: I used my international student status as a privilege. Because I was an exchange student, I don’t have to be in the know about what the other students already know. I asked lots of questions and that was how I could communicate more with the people there. Nam-hyung: Never be afraid of doing things alone. There may be situations where you want to do something but you don’t have any friends to do it with you. Don’t hesitate even then. There may be more dynamic events when you are out alone. Working holiday to Australia, internship to Germany Hyun-min (left) visited Australia for a working holiday, and Je-na (right) went to Germany for an internship at KOTRA. Q1. What country have you visited and why? What was your work there? Je-na: For six months from the second half of 2015 to first half of 2016, I went on a foreign internship to KOTRA (Korea Trade-Investment Promotion Agency)'s trade building in Munich, Germany through the school. KOTRA is a state funded organization that promotes and facilitates trade and investment of Korea's SMEs (Small to medium sized enterprises). I lived in Germany from middle school to high school, so I can speak both German and English. I applied for the internship while I was searching for work experience in Korea and other countries, following a professor’s advice on internship programs the school provides. I assisted office work as an intern, did some cleaning, answered phone calls, and consulted some buyers. I also got a more worthwhile experience, being able to German for work thanks to the trust that the director instilled in me. I participated in interpreting at a BMW conference, and in a special KBS program that featured Munich. I was lucky to be involved in those moments. Je-na's work desk at KOTRA. (Photo courtesy of Lee Je-na) Hyun-min: I went on a working holiday to Australia for 21 months, from April 2014 to January 2016, with three of my friends. I had a great longing for living abroad since I was young. I chose Australia for my working holiday due to the interesting stories I had heard from my private tutor about his own working holiday experience in Australia. I also wanted to feel for myself the active atmosphere of the country. During my stay, I worked in restaurants. I washed dishes, did simple ingredient preparations, and also did room service while I was working in a big hotel. Hyun-min (third from right) and his friends in Australia. (Photo courtesy of Kwon Hyun-min) Q2. Were there any requirements for the jobs? Je-na: Certified English test scores and other language scores are required, corresponding to which country you visit. A copy of your transcript and resume are also needed, and an English interview is held thereafter, with one intern being selected for each trade building. Hyun-min: There are age requirements, from 18 to 30, and there has to be neither medical disqualifications nor criminal records. Q3. What is an advantage of a brief stay abroad? Hyun-min: I now have the confidence to live in any country that I can think of. I have experienced something unique, so I'm now equipped with the ability to manage my life and also broaden my outlook. Hyun-min, Je-na, Nam-hyung and Shin-hee (left to right) pose together. Jang Soo-hyun luxkari@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Choi Min-ju

2017-02 06

[Special]Genealogy of Korean Surnames

A family tree of genealogy is a record of the totality of one’s ancestors from its originators to recent times by connecting numerous family units. It structures a family history where relations by blood and other factors are depicted in a systematic way, including personal details of family members. With a relatively high interest in family histories by the general public, Korea has the highest number of preserved genealogical records in the world. Being called 'jokbo', the genealogical table of Korea has been well preserved and stored by the Korean Ministry of Information and Communication to complete and smoothen the understanding and the holistic picture of its contents. Genealogical record of the Yoo family. (Photo courtesy of The Academy of Korean Studies) History of genealogy Reflecting Chinese influence of using its characters, Korean ancestors had adopted the use of Chinese letters for their family names since the Era of the Three Kingdoms. The very first family name of Korean history is recorded to be 'Go' (or 'Ko'), borne by the founder of the nation Goguryeo, Jumong. Conceivably, the king acquired his surname from the first letter of the country, all three letters in which were written in Chinese. Forerunners of history obtained their surnames in the identical manner, picking up a letter from words that has relevance to their lives or that holds personal meanings. For instance, the exceedingly dominant last name of Korea, Kim, came to its being through King Suro, who was said to be born in a golden egg—the Chinese character for Kim means gold. As it was the initial stage of family-name-system endorsement, people without surnames surpassed those with one in number during the Era of the Three States. Each nation had its indigenous surnames, differing in its formation and origin. According to the method aforementioned, people very often derived their surnames from the location of their habitation: a man who lived in Kangsu will have Kang as his family name. Genealogical database Ten of most common surnames in Korea. Collecting the scattered genealogical records from all over the country and arranging it in a database system could benefit both the scholars and and the general Korean public. Academically, it will help strengthen the foundation of the Korean discipline and expand its horizon with the wealth of diverse raw data it can provide for its studies. Additionally, by Koreanizing the genealogical data that is currently recorded in Chinese, making it more accessible, the general population will gain more interest in this subject. According to a census in 1997, there exists 287 different family names in Korea, all of which descended from different backgrounds and origins. Although not mainstream, a number of Korean surnames such as Kyo, Keun, Myo, Sam, Jeo, and Jeup exist, while most dominant groups are ranked as shown in the chart. Jeon Chae-yun chaeyun111@hanyang.ac.kr

2017-01 23 Important News

[Special]Registration Warfare with Mouse-Shields and Finger-Swords (1)

Universities in South Korea operate their course registration system through a fiercely competitive method. It is employing computers, laptops, or mobile phones (limited in some schools) to log in to a school enrollment website and register for wanted courses right on a designated day and time. However, due to the limited number of students that can sign up to each course, only a few can set up their new timetable with the courses of their wishes. The reasons behind the successes of so-called ‘winners' are varied, such as fast internet, server, or computer, along with the golden time that led the deliberate mouse-clicking to success, which tend to involve luck. Due to the ramifications the Korean course enrollment system brings, university administrators are at a deadlock over what method is most appropriate for fair and practical registration. Traditional mode of registration Many universities of South Korea, also involving Hanyang University, operate their course registration system on a first come, first served basis. First, students get ready before the assigned registration date with their computers and the Internet server connection ready. Because PCs (personal computers) and home Wi-Fi (wireless fidelity, a system that transmits mass data wirelessly) may incur malfunction, a host of students go to South Korean PC rooms for guaranteed internet connection speed and computer quality. Then, students open up the server time clock, a virtual countdown that will guide them to click the registration button at a precise moment. Below is an example of the course registration system of Hanyang University. After careful consideration of what courses one should or wants to take, one would open the course registration site (http://sugang.hanyang.ac.kr) and log in. Then, subjects will be added to the ‘desired courses’ list. The list resembles the following: Red box 1 means ‘view the schedule of selected courses’. When clicked, it shows how the student’s timetable will look like. Example: 2. When red box 2 is clicked on, a syllabus and additional information about the selected course will pop up. Example: 3. Clicking red box 3 at the designated registration time would lead to the enrollment of a student to the selected course. However, the flaw of this registration system is found as follows: If the number of the enrolled students (number in the red box) exceeds the maximum number of students acceptable (number in the blue box), it means that students have to compete for the course. Whomever clicks on the 'Register' button first will get the course safely into their timetables. Even though all students pay the same tuition fees to receive equal opportunities to education, the courses they will end up taking depend on the millisecond the registration buttons are clicked, including the state of the computer being used and the Internet speed. In the case of a popular major, such as the Department of Business Administration, a number of students from other divisions apply for double or multiple majors to this department. In this case, the students desiring business administration courses are increased, causing fiercer competition between students to grab desired courses as their own. Pupils whose original major is Business Administration are rendering this circumstance as terribly unfair, as they are losing their rights to rightfully receive education from their majoring department. In addition, students who lack the financial ability to afford better internet connection will have significantly lower chances of being enrolled to their desired courses. Due to these problems, numerous South Korean universities are figuring out ways to amend the system. Alternative mechanisms One of the course enrollment systems that some universities now implement is the ‘registration basket system’. Konkuk University is one that employs this system. The way it works is analogous to the traditional system, but it distributes time prudently for students. First, students will select courses that they desire and add them to the registration basket, which is akin to Hanyang University's 'desired courses tab'. The number of students enrolled for the desired courses will not be shown until the registration date. Then, at the first registration date, the university server will automatically register students to the courses that did not have exceeding numbers of enrolled students. Those whose chosen courses had exceeding numbers will not be signed up, which means that some of them will need to decide whether they will keep the course for possible registration at a later date, or not. After a few changes, the second registration date will come and the server will again automatically sign students up. Those who could not register even on the second go will have to compete for their desired courses in the traditional way for the third time. Even though this system is considered effective in that it gives equal opportunities for students, it is criticized by busy students. Because the system requires a maximum of three registration dates, some are bound to consider the system time-consuming. Another system that Yonsei University implements is called the ‘Mileage and Time Ticket System’. The university bestows each student 5000 mileage points for course registration. The amount may differ depending on the number of courses a student wishes to take. Each student has an opportunity to distribute and bet a certain amount of points to each course. For example, if a course is popular, then a bigger mileage number will be bet on it. After the betting, the university server automatically calculates the sum and signs students up considering the mileage and the maximum enrollment number. Even though the system requires profound mental calculation and probability skills, it is considered one of the best registration systems due to its creativeness and legitimacy. Kim Ju-hyun kimster9421@hanyang.ac.kr

2017-01 23 Important News

[Special]Representations of Hanyang

The word 'Hanyang' can be linked up with various objects and ideas: lion, Korean forsythia, the color blue, the founding philosophy, 'Love in Deed and Truth', the slogan, 'the Engine of Korea' and more. Commingling sundry representations and symbolic images together, the symbol and the character of Hanyang University play a major role in establishing the identity of Hanyang more distinctly and uniquely as a university. Underneath the character mark lies the designers of the Hanyang logo- the Design Management Center, which has been managing the symbol of HYU, and Kim Yoon-shik (Department of Visual Package Design, '07), who designed the logo of Hanyang that resembles a lion’s face. Additionally, Jang Dae-jin (Department of Advertising and Public Relations, 4th year) has sketched buildings of our campus and produced them into postcards, which are distributed at occasional events by the admission office or the promotion team. The evolution of Hanyang’s logo A symbol of a university portrays the school’s identity, vision, and tradition, which altogether represents the university itself. It greatly contributes to formation of University Identity—the symbol mark and the logotype—that summarizes the overall characteristics and values of the school. The Design Management Center has been in charge of designing and managing the logo of Hanyang University since its establishment in 2005, ultimately aspiring to make Hanyang a brand and increase the competitiveness of the university. The center not only plans and manages Brand Hanyang, but also navigates the application of the University Identity, arranges school events, and consults promotional images of the school. The logo of Hanyang University has gone through three major changes, adding additional meanings in each phase. The first stage of the logo includes the word Hanyang in Korean, framed by the Chinese character meaning ‘head’ and ‘big’. At this stage, the logo failed to contain more of the school’s philosophical aspects, which necessitated the second logo to be more comprehensive. Commemorating the 37th anniversary of the school’s establishment, the symbol contained the school’s founding philosophy, the founding year, and the symbolic flower. The overall shape of the symbol evolved to be round, indicating an active campus. At last, the newest logo was formed in 2009, on monumentalizing the 70th anniversary of Hanyang's founding. The new version took the implication of the logo to the next level: the round shape symbolized Hanyang’s embracing love towards mankind, and the letter 'Hanyang University' on top connotates Hanyangians’ direction towards the global stage. Logos are visual images of the school's values, philosophy, and purpose. (Photos courtesy of the Design Management Center) From creativity to innovation Another form of Hanyang’s logo was designed by Kim Yoon-shik in 2011, exhibiting the word 'Hanyang' in Korean as a lateral view of a lion’s face. Kim, as the vice president of his department, was given the duty of sketching the design of the department’s flag. He started out with a determination that the lion image must be included. Then coming across a similar idea of his senior’s, he differentiated and designed a lion’s face with the word 'Hanyang' in Korean. Receiving rounds of applause for his work, Kim was offered to expand the usage of his logo, eventually rendering it the school’s official symbol. “I was simply honored and thankful that my design was regarded with such dignity. I intended to use Korean letters to create this design, hoping to enlarge the language’s scope in artistic domains. One thing I hope is to not set a restriction on designing other schools’ symbols by using Korean letters, simply because our school already made a preceding one. Nonetheless, I made the lion’s facial expression appear fierce and spirited, to indicate Hanyang’s vigorous and strong pride,” remarked Kim. Kim's design of Hanyang symbol. (Photo courtesy of Hanyang University) Views of Hanyang on postcards On top of the cherished symbols, Jang Dae-jin also contributed to Hanyang’s promotional aspects, sketching various views of the university’s buildings and producing them as postcards. He filled his notebook page by page in his spare time during his military service and sent it to the school’s promotional team, which selected a number of them and turn them into postcards. Jang’s drawings not only show his love for Hanyang University, but also manifests his passion for drawing as an urban sketcher. Jang possesses incredible drawing skills, which he hopes to use as a driving force toward his ultimate goal- to promote the beauty of Korea abroad and to draw many different cities worldwide in his notebook. Postcards of Jang's sketches portray the Hanyang campus. (Photo courtesy of Jang) Jeon Chae-yun chaeyun111@hanyang.ac.kr

2017-01 16

[Special]The Room Culture of Korea

When foreigners visit Korea, one of the first differences they encounter is that Koreans like to gather together and entertain themselves visiting bangs, rooms that provide leisure activities. There are a variety of these ‘rooms’ in Korea, and the most popular rooms in Korea are PC rooms, singing rooms, and Korean spa rooms. These three popular types of rooms in Korea that guarantee enjoyment when visited alone or with friends. PC room Teenagers playing online games in a PC room. (Photo courtesy of https://goo.gl/Gs0ayN) PC rooms are dark lighted big rooms that contain a lot of desks divided with small walls and chairs. On the desks are headphones and computers boasting high performance to serve convenience in playing online games, such as League of Legends and Overwatch. People either pay before or after they play. Most PC rooms’ users are male teenagers and university students. They like to come to PC rooms with their friends after school, since playing online games is one of the biggest hobbies in Korea. PC rooms in the past were considered unsanitary, and the main reason was because people were allowed to smoke. However, because today’s PC rooms’ users are not allowed to smoke, the rooms are of much cleaner environment and even serve drinks and snacks such as ramyeon, tteokbokki, rice cakes served with spicy sauce, and fried rice. Singing room The interior of a singing room. (Photo courtesy of https://goo.gl/85A17p) Although the idea of singing room, or karaoke, started in Japan, it is very popular in many Asian cultures, especially Korea. In each room, there are chairs or sofas, tambourines to add more excitement, microphones, speakers playing background music, and a special remote control that allows the singer to choose which song they are going to sing. The songs include pop music worldwide, animation and children’s songs, and even special effects such as clapping and whistling noises. Most importantly, there is a screen that resembles a TV that shows the lyrics of the song. When a person finishes singing each song, the screen shows the score of how well he or she has done. Today, there is a new type of singing room called ‘coin singing rooms’ that allows people to pay for each number of songs they sing. The rooms are much smaller but cheaper, when compared with the costs of original singing rooms that depend upon the time they spend there. Sometimes, ‘service times’ are given in those singing rooms which allow people to enjoy a bonus time to sing more songs. Korean spa In jjimjilbangs, there are many rooms which are heated to maintain hot temperature. (Photo courtesy of https://goo.gl/7F7ue6) Korean spa, or jjimjilbang in Korea consists of a sauna and multiple rooms of hot temperature. The main reason why Koreans like to visit jjimjilbang is because of the belief that jjimjil, or sweating, lets out the harmful waste products in the body. In addition, the casual atmosphere that allows people to chat freely with snacks is another reason why jjimjilbang is so popular in Korea. There are different names for each room, such as amethyst room, red clay room, and salt room. The rooms are decorated and named after the elements that compose them. The temperature of the rooms varies as well. The most general and popular snacks in jjimjilbang are shikhye, a sweet flavored drink made of rice and hard-boiled eggs. A sauna in a jjimjilbang. (https://goo.gl/Vkc85L) Many elderly men and women enjoy jjimjilbang, but today as many of its facilities include fitness centers, computer rooms, free movie rooms, and a big TV set, men and women of all ages like to go to there as well. Sauna is used after people are finished with visiting each room and done with jjimjil. Also with different temperature, there are hot and cold water pools. Sometimes, there also exists hot steam shower as well. Supsokhanbang Land in Shinchon, Seoul, Heoshimcheong in Donrae-gu, Busan, Kyeongsangnam-do and Shimhanok Spa in Jeonju city, Jeollabuk-do are a few of the most popular jjimjilbangs in Korea. There are certainly a lot of exciting activities outdoors, such as hiking and playing football. However, PC rooms, singing rooms, and Korean sauna rooms show that people can enjoy themselves indoors as well. In this freezing weather, a visit to one of these rooms will be a smart choice to have fun. Jang Soo-hyun luxkari@hanyang.ac.kr

2017-01 16 Important News

[Special]Discourse with the 45th Student Council - Seoul Campus

With the simple but significant name 'Hanmadi,' meaning one word, the 45th student council of Hanyang University has embarked upon its prologue. Listening to the words of all students and representing them, the student council is preparing to achieve grand goals to enhance students’ rights and quality of life at school. Based on the teamwork they developed through voluntary activities for rural communities and the supporting experiences at the 44th student council, President Lee Kyung-eun and Vice-president Choi Kyung-sang are full of hope and desire to advance the council together. News H met the student council to hear about the holistic scheme and the current progress of preparation. The logo of the 45th student council shows its aspirations to carefully listen to and consider students' needs of Hanyang University. (Photo courtesy of the Hanmadi Student Council) Satisfying the rudimentary needs of students Three biggest concerns of the student council are lowering of tuition fees and increasing entrance rates to the school dormitory. Due to a host of students going through hardships paying tuition fees, previous student councils have been trying their best to reduce the fee. “Reduction in tuition fee is the most significant problem to be resolved and this concern is being carefully debated at the Hanyang University Tuition Advisory Committee,” said Choi. Also, the importance of scholarship programs is being addressed, since the appropriation of the scholarship budget is being reduced. Another goal of the Hanmadi Council is to publish the “living expenses scholarship for the future,” or the Misaeng scholarship in Korean, as an official policy. This Misaeng scholarship program, which about 600 students applied and 364 students got accepted to, provides students with living expenses based on their economic conditions. “It is crucial to establish the Misaeng scholarship as an official policy of the school and settle the student council as the vanguard position to stimulate this scholarship program. Considering the flaws of this recent scholarship program, we are planning to enhance it through reviewing student surveys,” said Lee. Along with reductions in tuition fee, increasing the dormitory acceptance rate is another momentous goal of the council. The newly built accommodations have been announced to be accepting only freshmen beginning from the following semester. Initiated by strong oppositions, the council has negotiated with the school authorities to change the policy by allowing dormitory entrance of more seniors. “The original plan was successful, as many seniors who live away from home can now reside in dormitories. We think that the next step should be contacting and persuading with Seongdong-gu Office to allow more dormitory constructions,” added Choi. According to Lee, there are problems such as an unclear standard in dormitory acceptance and irregularities in assigning rooms, which she ponders to be an urgent problem to be solved. Lee Kyung-eun, the president of the student council (left), and Choi Kyung-sang, the vice-president (right), are explaining the plans for 2017. Necessity of impartial debate based operation Both Lee and Choi emphasize the significance of debate and conversation between the school and students, while the student council being the linking medium. The Hanyang University Tuition Advisory Committee is one of the debates considered imperative by the council. The committee consists of five students from the Seoul and ERICA campuses, five school administrators, and a recommended guest. “Since the recommended guest is the key holder of a fierce debate of five to five, it is crucial that the guest is selected with care. However, the guest is currently recommended by the University president, which our council considers to be impartial,” added Lee. Thus, the council is in the progress to renovate the operation of the committee to lead the results to reduction in tuition fee. Another debate session that the Hanmadi council is looking forward to be successful is the College Education Issue Joint Confrontation T/F team for the 2016-2017 reorganization of education. “This team is a debate session proceeded during the Central Operation Committee. The committee consists of presidents and vice presidents of all departments and during the debate session, we discuss each department’s concerns regarding their educational environment, contents, dissatisfactions, and more,” said Lee. The committee along with the discussion session is kicking off its start with flattering anticipations. Student Council of 2017- Hanmadi, with its motto of listening to students, is looking forward to enhance the rights and quality of life for students. “It has been almost three years since we worked together at the student council, and now we became the president and a vice president. We are not in these positions to be greeted with cheerful ovations, but to serve the students to meet their needs and solve problems,” said both Lee and Choi. Because school and the society are interconnected worlds, the student council of 2017 is looking forward to agonize together with students about both matters and try their best to bring out the effortful results. The Hanmadi student council is looked forward by students, while singing out its beginning with hopeful visions. Kim Ju-hyun kimster9421@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Kim Youn-soo

2017-01 08

[Special][Op-ed] A Birth Map to Raise the Birth Rate?

The population of a country is closely relevant to its economy and future. Looking at Korea’s situation with lowering birth rate and aging society, it is not too much of an exaggeration to say that there is a red light on its future. At least a 2.1 birth rate is needed to maintain Korea’s concurrent population, but 1.24 is what Korea is dealing with. While young people avoid having babies, baby boomers (people who were born between the years 1946 to 1964) already have or are retiring from work. If the situation continues, the number of elderly people will be surpassing that of the young, taking a toll on the nation's productivity and wellbeing. South Korea is a country with a significantly low birth rate in international standards. So what has the government done? From 2006, the Korean government has been setting out a plan every five years to encourage more young couples to have babies. The plan proposed as their third, which will last from 2016 to 2020, includes incentives that support couples to buy their own houses, pay hospital bills, and to take maternity leave. However, it is said by a lot of young couples that such plans are not enough as they are implemented only under very specific conditions. What recently went viral online was a rather inventive but shocking plan suggested by the Ministry of the Interior. It is a so-called 'birth map of Korea', which displays shades of pink to rank provinces and cities in Korea by the number of women who can bear children. The Internet buzzed with furious outbursts from netizens. People were outraged at how the government considered women as a means to produce children. Pure disgust was directed at the map, which was only a manifestation of how a civilized modern society still denigrates women. As civic reaction was overwhelmingly strong and negative, the government’s website was shut down within hours. Darker shades of pink show provinces or cities with higher numbers of women capable of childbearing. On the right, the purple province in Seoul, Mapo-gu, has 85.174 women in it who are fertile. (Photo courtesy of the Ministry of the Interior) It is true that the government’s desperate tryout was seriously lacking basic sense. The birth map is completely incapable of raising the birth rate in Korea. It merely appeared as a belittlement towards women. Women are not the only ones needed to produce offspring- men are also entitled to the responsibility as much as women are. Such a map solely bears throws accountability to women as if the lowering birth rate is their fault. What really makes people hesitate There can be various reasons as to why young Koreans refuse to have babies, which are also inevitably linked to other changes or problems within Korea. The reasons can be discussed in two different cases. First, there are more Koreans who even do not want to marry, and one significant reason behind it is the enhancement of women’s rights, which is of course, a legitimate phenomenon. From the 1960s to 1970s, women were expected to have babies without much choice. Compared to men, women also had a lesser chance of being educated. From the 70s, an increasing number of women received college degrees rather than merely graduating from middle or high school. As women began to have more freedom and a wider selection of to what to do with their lives, they were able to focus on developing professional careers as men do. Thus, marriage and childbearing became a choice rather than a duty. According to the survey, one of the biggest concerns circulating childbearing is high costs of education. (Photo courtesy of the Ministry of Health and Welfare) Second, even when a married couple decides to have a baby, they need detailed financial plans for the future. According to the Korea Institute for Health and Social Affairs (KIHASA), a couple generally spends 46% of their income to raise one child. In the case of Korea, that rate can be even higher considering the costly educational fees parents expend every month. Consequently, Korean couples have more to consider when deciding to add up a family member. Of course, a married couple can have babies with less restraint when the woman is willing to give up her career. Generally, it is extremely difficult for women to keep their jobs at Korean companies and be a mother at the same time. Even though there are policies that allow both the father and the mother to take a year-break from work for their newborn, there are still invisible pressures for women from their workplace. Such discrimination results in women giving up their professional life, irrelevant to their abilities or accomplishments. From the survey, women replied they hesitate to use up their allotted maternity leave, because they worry about getting back to work afterwards. As such, it is imperative to recognize that Korea’s low birth rate is not something that can be solved with a one-dimensional approach, like dispensing small sums of money to couples or mapping out fertile women. Rather, the issue requires an overall change in cognizance, along with effective policies. Korea needs to step alongside women’s changed roles in society, which is now more equal to that of men than ever. Policies regarding maternity leave should be ensured for all women, and companies that covertly refuse to follow along should be penalized. Financial support given to families with newborn babies should be more generous, including differing standards according to social class. Most importantly, daycare centers should be built more and supported for by the government, with prolonged hours for working parents. If such measures could induce couples to consider producing offspring, that would be because babies will no longer be considered a burden, but a gift. Yun Ji-hyun uni27@hanyang.ac.kr

2017-01 02 Important News

[Special]Hanyang's New K-MOOC Series I

MOOC refers to Massive Open Online Course. As its name suggests, it is a platform that offers free online lectures for everyone. Compared to conventional online lectures which only allowed students to passively watch the given lectures through the monitor, MOOC differentiates itself with a new open educational environment. MOOC emphasizes its counter-interactive features which allow both professors and students to discuss about the lectures they took. The fact that the students are from different backgrounds helps one another to widen their perspective while sharing their thoughts. K-MOOC officially opened its online homepage in October 2015 and there are about 20 Korean universities participating in uploading lectures. This week, News H introduces two of the newly opened lectures from Hanyang University (HYU): Reassessment of Korean Independence Movement History and Chemistry for Everyday Life, which was opened on October 17th 2015, and will continue until the end of this month. The official homepage of K-MOOC. (Photo courtesy of K-MOOC) No future for those who forget history Reassessment of Korean Independence Movement History is a course prepared and taught by Professor Park Chan-seung (Department of History). The online lectures share the common contents from the Park’s offline lecture at HYU, which is called History of Korean Independence Movement. To attract more students, the lecture was re-made with an easier content. “Majority of the students who took the course were second and third year high-school students,” said Park. The course covers the history from the years 1910 to 1945, which encompasses the history of Japan’s colonization of Korea to Korea’s independence. Through explaining different ways and forms of independence movements, Park aims to promote deeper understanding of Korean’s independence movements and the meaning of it. "The fact that Korea achieved independence from Japan is meaningful in a lot of ways, one of the most significant one is that the event led to more independence of countries around the world, by Korea on its lead," said Park. “Until the 1990s, there were less studies and researches done on Korean Independence Movement. Thus, college students and high school students did not have a chance to study with more updated version of Korean history textbooks. That is why I opened the course, to deliver the newest researches to students,” explained Park. There are a total of 14 weeks of courses, each divided into two lectures. While learning the history can be felt boring to a lot of students, Park tried to make it more interesting by focusing on storytelling specific episodes and showing a lot of pictures to make it more realistic. The book used for the course is ‘The History of Korean Independence’ written by the professor himself. Park planned the course to remind his students of the importance of the past Korean independence movement. (Photo courtesy of K-MOOC) “It was a challenge for me to film an online lecture. I realized how arduous process it could be, from filming, writing a script, to editing. I wish we had more abundant time to prepare it ahead,” said Park. “Still I loved interacting with students online and the course will be opened at the next session as well.” For international students who would like to take the course, they can change the subtitles into English through the settings. Little science knowledge makes life better Chemistry for Everyday Life is a course also planned and taught by Professor Kim Min-kyung (Department of Chemistry) and Center for Integrated General Education. It is also the course taught in HYU as well since 2012. As the name of the lecture tells itself, it aims to help students understand chemical phenomenon that is easily seen in everyday life. “While chemistry seen and used in everyday life, there are a lot of people who can’t understand why and how it happens. So, I wanted this lecture to start from explaining very basic and fundamental knowledge of chemistry. As it was designed for students who majored Humanities rather than Natural Science, it is more accessible and easily understandable,” said Kim. The course is divided into 6 weeks, with 3 lectures each. “Based on my teaching experience, I added the parts which I thought was essential to understand the basics of chemistry and focused on chemical materials that are easily seen and accessible in everyday life,” said Kim. “There are experiments students can do by themselves, and there will be offline extra classes for the experiments specifically, I hope that can be added early this month or next semester,” said Kim. Chemistry for Everyday Life is designed to help more people learn basic knowledge of chemistry. (Photo courtesy of K-MOOC) As the lectures are opened to unknown mass online, Kim had to be careful not to mention names of certain corporates and products. Moreover, to reduce the concerns of misunderstanding, several parts of the lectures had to be edited. “I tried my best not to put my personal thoughts or experience in my lecture, which was the hardest part. Also, I felt really shy to see myself in the online lecture that will be seen by a lot of people,” said Kim. While Kim was shy to film herself for the lecture, she is one of the most popular professor among the students of HYU. From 2009 to 2016 straight, Kim was honored to win the “Best Teacher Award”, which was given to professors who received positive feedbacks from lecture evaluations. “I feel thankful to students who gave positive feedbacks to my lecture. I think they allowed me to have a chance to participate in K-MOOC as well. I hope in the next semester, I could open ‘Chemistry for Everday Life II’ as an intermediate chemistry course.” Yun Ji-hyun uni27@hanyang.ac.kr

2016-12 27

[Special]Pet Dog Cafés in Korea

There is an increasing trend of visiting peculiar theme cafés in South Korea and a ‘pet dog café’ is deemed a charming and attractive place to visit. Like an ordinary café, they sell drinks and provide warm and snug atmosphere to couples, friends, and family. However, what’s novel about this pet dog café is that there are a diversity of dogs welcoming you, and also visitors can bring their own pets to the café. Confluent of animal-friendly theme and a cozy café became an innovative idea in the leisure market and the continuing popularity is demanding for more pet dog cafés. Changing social attitudes towards dogs Due to the rapid economic growth of South Korea, social development could not keep up with the increasing wealth in the country. Unlike other OECD countries where the pace of economic development was equivalent to the social recognition development, South Korea struggled with instilling ethical values among the citizens. One of the issues that South Korea was putting forward as its main predicament was enhancing the social recognition of animals, especially dogs. Attitudes of people treating animals as a 'possession' were often found in the increasing rate of animal abandonment. However, with the advent of pet dog café, people received closer accessibility to dogs and time to share a sympathetic communion with animals. This change occurred, further enhancing the social recognition on dogs- people began to regard dogs as their friends or family. In average, a pet dog café holds about a dozen dogs and facilities needed to take care of their welfare. Thus, when visitors make a call on the café, they are able to experience firsthand the rearing dogs for a short time. As people learn about rearing dogs and the singularities of them, they can make the ultimate decision of whether they can be potential and ethical owners or not when they adpt dogs. Many animal protection activists claim for the necessity of this process which South Korea lacks. However, with the prevalence of pet dog cafés, people had closer accessibility to dogs and the experience of nurturing them, which led people to be careful and mature in considering all odds before the adoption of dogs. Above is the biggest pet dog café in South Korea located near Hapjeong Station- 'Bow Story'. (Photo courtesy of Bow Story) Defects of pet dog cafés and how to overcome them Despite the positive social effects that pet dog cafés are creating, few defects are detected as the café market grows. The most bulky concern of animal protection activists is the welfare of animals. Even though there are many café owners who treat their dogs as family, some vicious owners were found to be treating their dogs as only a means to lucrative business. According to Hankook Ilbo, “part-timers lacking professional knowledge about dogs have to handle the responsibility of 10 to 20 dogs at a time, which results in inappropriate hygiene and canine management method.” The size of the café is also a concern, since for active dogs, 10 meter-squared sized space is not enough for them to relieve their physical stress. Since part-timers are often times unable to distinguish what food can and can’t be given to dogs, there are increasing perils for the health and hygiene of dogs. In order to resolve these problems, the most significant solution to ponder upon is amending the law. If the animal protection law is amended, then it will strictly forbid any pet dog cafés that are trying to run its business with inappropriate facilities, hygiene, and staff. The pet dog cafés should be large enough to accommodate numerous dogs, and the owner must relieve all dogs’ stress through physical activities. Also, the bodily secretion of dogs should be instantly cleaned and their hygiene and health should be kept up to a high level- through methods such as bathing dogs once a month, taking the dogs to regular checkups, taking care of their fur and dental health periodically. Further, when owners employ part-timers, they should pass certain tests regarding knowledge on dogs to prove themselves to be qualified enough to take responsibility of caring for a number of dogs. Pet dog café owners should adopt responsibility for their dogs, akin to a family member. (Photo courtesy of Cosmopolitan) Even though pet dog cafés need more improvement, they were effective enough to influence South Korea’s social recognition on animals. With the proximity to dogs and their lifestyles, people were able to approach them as their friends or family. As the Korean government is considering the amendment of national animal protection law, it is time for pet dog café owners to also regard themselves not only of business managers but of their dogs’ mothers and fathers. Kim Ju-hyun kimster9421@hanyang.ac.kr

2016-12 26

[Special]How Koreans Celebrate the Festive Season

From the year-end to the start of a new year is the winter holiday season. People summarize their year’s accomplishments and plan their New Year’s resolutions for another new start. From December to January, take a peek into the lives of Koreans through a chronological timeline. When it comes to the middle of December, a lot of Koreans start to have year-end parties with their colleagues. Unlike countries in the west where time spent at the end of a year is more family-oriented, Koreans spend as much time with people from work. At the year-end parties, they tend to get more comfortable with one another and talk about things beside work more freely. They believe that the more they get closer with one another, the more efficient and effective their work will be. Koreans also enjoy the festive mood with friends and family, holding private parties and gatherings. Year-end parties with colleagues promote better cooperation between members in different units. (Photo courtesy of Kim Chang-gyun) While the year-end parties continue until the end of the month, Christmas comes along, which is one of the biggest holidays in the world. While Christmas is originally a Christian holiday to celebrate the birth of Jesus, it is now settled as a universal festivity for everyone regardless of their religion both in the West and the East. While people living in the West generally gather with families on Christmas Eve and on Christmas Day, Koreans tend to spend it with their lovers. It is one of the biggest occasions of the year to exchange gifts and have a romantic date night. Koreans spend Christmas with their lovers. (Photo courtesy of KJ Times) One of the iconic and symbolistic events at the start of the New Year is the Bosingak bell-ringing ceremony, which is also known as Watch-Night bell. When the clock hits midnight, the bell is rung 33 times to welcome the New Year. There are 16 people who are given the opportunity to ring the bell- five of them being governmental representatives of Seoul and the Jongno district, and 11 citizens who were recommended by the public through the official Seoul Metropolitan Government website. Around the very final days of the year, a lot of Koreans take a short trip with families, friends, and lovers. Koreans think that watching the sunrise of the very first day of the year is a memorable event that lasts throughout the whole year. They make their wishes whilst watching the sunrise and reaffirm their new year’s resolutions. The Bosingak bell-ringing ceremony is held every year on December 31th, just before midnight. For people who want to see the sunrise in Seoul, Nam-san Palgakjeong is recommendable. Being a popular spot for both Koreans and foreigners, there are shows and ceremonies prepared as well. In Gangwon province, Jeongdong-jin is the most representative attraction to watch the sunrise. The fact that more than 580 thousand people visit Gangwon province at this time proves the popularity of the region. In Gyungsangbuk province's Ulsan Homigot, there is a famous landmark statue which makes the scenery more beautiful. Namsan, Palgakjeong (Photo courtesy of soon 1991, tistory) Jeongdong-jin (left) and Ulsan Homigot (right). (Photos courtesy of gdjbal79,naver blog) Celebration of the New Year ends in January or February, whenever the Lunar New Year is. Seollal is one of the most highly celebrated holiday in Korea. In the morning of Seollal, the tradition for all family members is dressing up in hanbok (Korean traditional clothing) for the special occasion and gather in front of the ritual lacquer table for charye. Charye refers to a ritual done for the ancestors to give thanks on special holidays, which is a commitment for all generations. While there are abundant amounts of food prepared for the ceremony and for the whole family, the main dish which cannot be dismissed is tteokguk, which is a soup made with plain rice cake. The widespread concept is that when you eat a bowl of tteokguk, you are one year older. During charye, each food is placed in a specific order and direction. (Photo courtesy of koreanculture.org) Yun Ji-hyun uni27@hanyang.ac.kr