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2017-06 19

[Special]Korean Superstitions about Dreams

Dream interpreting existed in various civilizations, especially in the ancient times and the Eastern part of the world. Korea is not an exception to the culture of dream interpreting. Many modern Koreans think that dreams may denote certain meanings related to one’s fortune. As a result, specific details about the meanings of diverse dreams exist in Korea. Auspicious dreams and ominous dreams Dreams are generally distinguished as lucky or unlucky according to its content and prominent symbols related to it. Dreams without any notable symbols are considered to have no significant meaning and can be ignored. Due to the importance of the presence and meanings of the symbols, sometimes even nightmares may be a dream with good meaning. Even though a good or bad figure appears, what happens to it in the dream is most important when interpreting the dream. For example, if something bad happens to a good symbol, or vice versa, the meaning of the dream changes. In cases where others want to buy one’s dreams, selling the dream is possible with the exchange of money or valuable items. Generally, dreams about dragons are considered the best of dreams as they are thought to bring huge success and fortune. There is an old belief that dragons are imaginary but auspicious animals. Dreams about pigs are also the lucky kind that may foretell the procurement of money. This is because ‘don’, the pronunciation of Chinese character for ‘pig’, is similar with that of ‘money’. Strangely, a death of a family member in a dream denotes that that certain individual would live long. Additionally, dreams about one’s ancestors reappearing means good luck. Beautiful natural elements such as a rainbow, stars, and flowers are thought to bring luck as well. Pig dreams are thought to bring large sums of money. (Photo courtesy of lomangce.tistory.com/77) Conversely, dreams about losing a tooth is a bad omen because they signify that something bad will happen to one’s intimate friends or family. Many dreams regarding babies, such as hugging them, are strangely unlucky. They mean that some agony or worry will trouble the dreamer, and one’s honor and fortune will also collapse. Losing one’s shoes is also one of the bad dreams that is thought to deprive one of of his or her job or friends. In addition, being chased by someone means that one is feeling nervous or isolated, and may experience failure. Taemong, or dreams before a birth of a baby Most Koreans have vivid dreams before conceiving a child, which are called taemong. The dreamer is not limited to the baby’s mother but includes its father, other family members, or even friends. Different symbols in the dream tell whether the baby is a boy or a girl. For example, some taemong that symbolize the birth of a boy are the sun, a big fish, a serpent, and red pepper. On the other hand, a half moon, a small snake, and flowers are a few of the elements of a girl’s taemong. Korean mothers are very interested in taemong, because they may fortell whether the baby is boy or a girl and also its future. (Photo courtesy of blog.naver.com/ynp0052/140172062101) There are various stories of special taemong that were dreamt for the birth of famous people in Korean history. An enormous bull with a fiery red sun perched between its two horns, riding a cloud in the mountains appeared in the taemong of King Sejong, who created hangul with his men in the Joseon Dynasty. As the bull tripped and the sun tumbled down, a boy dressed in red jumped in and swallowed the sun. The taemong of the former president Kim Dae-jung who won a Nobel Peace Prize in the year 2000 showed the gods from the heavens. Also, a dragon and a snake twisted together and rising to the heavens is the taemong of Park Ji-sung, a legendary soccer player. Although Koreans enjoy the idea that dreams may foretell the future, or possess a special kind of meaning, most people today do not seriously believe in dream interpreting. However, some people tend to take precautions when they have had bad dreams, and decide to buy a lottery ticket after having good dreams. Jang Soo-hyun luxkari@hanyang.ac.kr

2017-05 22

[Special]Confusing Korean Words

In every country, there are some confusing pairs of words with analogous pronunciations and meanings, even though the words are clearly different. The Korean language is not an exception, and there are quite a few pairs of words that even Koreans sometimes get mixed up. This week’s article in News H is to help foreign learners of Korean to be aware of the differences of those words, and use them properly in correct situations. Words that have either similar meanings or sounds Natda (낫다, 낮다) Nata (낳다) are three separate words that sound almost the same but have anything to do with each other. 낫다 is used in situations where somebody recovers from an illness or pain, or when something is superior than the other. 낮다, on the other hand, simply means ‘low’. 낳다 means to ‘give birth’ or ‘bring about a certain result’. Deokbun(덕분), ttaemun (때문), and tat (탓) are words that have similar meanings but used in different contexts. If a certain outcome occurs because of some matter, 때문 is used. However, 덕분 can be used if, and only if, a positive result occurs due to a certain cause. On the contrary, 탓 only works with causes that trigger undesirable situations. The three words come right after the cause, and the result follows after these words. Although ttaemun (때문) can be used in all cause-and-effect situations, it is generally used negatively. The calligraphy above means "Lead your life thinking that a result happened 'thanks to' a cause rather than 'because of' the cause." (Photo courtesy of http://blog.naver.com/yong1004kr/220883042877) Dareuda (다르다) and teullida (틀리다) are misused very often even by Koreans, most notable by senior citizens. The former means ‘two things that are being compared are different’ or ‘something stands out more than others’. The latter means ‘something, such as a fact or an answer to a question, is wrong’ or ‘to be hopeless’. Due to the fact that many people get mixed up with the two words, there is a well-known expression, “다른거지 틀린게 아니다” which means ‘something is different, not wrong’. Words with both similar sounds and meanings Gareuchida (가르치다) and garikida (가리키다) are commonly confused Korean words not only because of their smiliar pronunciations but their due to their definitions as well. 가르치다 means 'to teach somebody a skill or a knowledge' and 가리키다 means 'to point at somebody or something'. The reason for the confusion comes from the idea that the definitions of both words are related, in the way that teaching and pointing are actions that are both directing something. The mistake of misusing machida (맞히다) and matchuda (맞추다) is frequent due to their complicated usages and similar pronunciations. In cases where an answer to a question is correct, 맞히다 is used. When comparing something with another, 맞추다 is used. Therefore, 맞추다 is used when comparing an examination paper with a separate answer sheet. Another definition of 맞히다 and 맞추다 is ‘to aim or hit’ and ‘to set, adjust, or assemble’, respectively. Thus, when a person tries to hit a bird with a bow, 맞히다 is used. In addition, when a person gets his suit made, 맞추다 is used. Itda (잊다) and ilta (잃다) are words that have analogous sounds and definitions, such as in the case of 맞히다 and 맞추다 mentioned above. The former means ‘to forget’, and the latter means ‘to lose’. People get mixed up because the two words means to lose something. In the case of 잊어버리다, it means to lose what one had remembered. Itda (잊다) and ilta (잃다) is one example of various confusing Korean word pairs. To find out more about the Korean language, click here to visit the National Institute of Korean Language website. (Photo courtesy of Daehak Naeil) Familiarizing yourself with the aforementioned words would help greatly, especially when writing in Korean. To be a knowledgeable user of the Korean language, it is a necessity to be mindful of these words instead of continually misusing them. To find more confusing words or commonly misspelled or misused words, visit the website of theNational Institute of Korean Language, an institute that researches and organizes the rules of the Korean language, including its confusing vocabulary. Jang Soo-hyun luxkari@hanyang.ac.kr

2017-04 10

[Special]Korean Couple Culture

The question of whether one is dating or not a big issue in Korea, and Korean couples tend to spend a quite a lot of time together. Korean couples exhibit unified ways of expressing love, which can even be as naturally called as a ‘couple culture’. Although formulaic in some ways, the following features of how Koreans date may enlighten couples on maintaining better relationships. Growing intimate through anniversaries and message-sending Most couples celebrate anniversaries year after year, but Korean couples go even further. It is the norm in Korea to celebrate 100th day anniversaries, counting from the day they officially began their relationship. Korean couples usually celebrate 100th, 200th to 300th, then 500th, and 1000th day. Those days are celebrated by eating out at pleasant restaurants, having cake, exchanging love letters, flowers and presents. Teen couples even go as far as to celebrate their 22nd day calling it ‘two-two’, meaning they became ‘two’ instead of ‘one’. This is because they break up much earlier than adult couples, but still want to celebrate a special event with their loved ones. Some people celebrate 50th-day anniversary as well. Couples exchange presents together on their 100th day anniversaries. (Photo courtesy of S.I.VILLAGE) Other events that Korean couples enjoy which are not related to their dating days are the 14th day of each month. The 14th day events originate from Valentine’s Day. The most famous 14th day event besides Valentine’s is White Day, which is on March 14th. In Korea, women give chocolates to men on Valentine’s and men returns candies to women on White Day. Other days’ include Rose Day on May 14th, and Wine Day on October 14th, which is simply exchanging roses and drinking wine together, respectively. On Black Day, which is on April 14th, some singles eat jajangmyeon, or noodles with black soybean sauce together and promise themselves next year, they would be able to find partners and celebrate White Day. Koreans also like to use text messengers frequently, such as KakaoTalk or Between, in order to feel they are together when they are alone. Many couples constantly report their daily lives if they are not busy. Although this may be bothersome, couples can understand each other more deeply by having these kinds of conversations. The frequency of sending messages can be interpreted as love and attention for their partners. Therefore, couples get upset and fight when their partners seem careless about message-sending. There are, however, some Korean couples who do not want to be bothered by messages- but they also at least send good morning and good night texts to one another. Between is similar to KakaoTalk but different in that it is a one-on-one messenger app. Couples can not only text but record memorable days and post photos. (Photo courtesy of Vulcan Post) Dates courses, couple rings, and matching items Korean couples usually visit cafes, watch movies, and take a walk together. However, to break away from the boring, general style of dating, they prepare a ‘date course’ to make their dates much interesting and enjoyable. Due to Korean couples’ tendency to visit places and make special memories, theme cafes such as cat and dog cafes are very popular. There are also couple date course apps called Daisy and Date Pop. The ‘date course’ varies by weather and season, and the most famous course is visiting Yeouido or Lake Seokchon in spring to see cherry blossoms in full bloom. Cherry blossom festival is a famous date course for Korean couples. (Photo courtesy of http://blog.enter6.co.kr/1733) Couples all over the world buy their rings before their marriage; however Korean couples purchase their rings by the 100th day. The so-called ‘couple rings’ are usually less expensive than marriage rings, but still come with various decorations and designs. Targeting couples who are finding unique couple rings, there also exists ring making theme cafés to help those who desire to create their own rings. Finally, matching clothing items and accessories are worn by Korean couples which include hats, shoes, bracelets, and much more. The similar fashion of couples is called ‘couple look’, and it is on the wish lists of many couples. Korean couples with a ‘couple look’ is not hard to find, varying from clothes with similar patterns to ones with the exact same colors and designs. Usually, couples wear the ‘couple look’ when they are on special dates, such as going to an amusement park. Many Korean couples like to wear matching clothes. (Photo courtesy of Dispatch) Jang Soo-hyun luxkari@hanyang.ac.kr

2017-03 20 Important News

[Special]For a Convenient Campus Life

A school is the students' hub of life. Spending almost two-thirds of their day, students not only take lectures but also take breaks, hang out with friends and study. With so much work to do, many would have encountered difficulty not knowing where to print assignments before class, or where to withdraw money after banks have closed. It would be much more helpful to maintain a convenient campus life to be equipped with the knowledge of the location of school facilities and services. School Facilities One may prefer a quiet atmosphere to study, but a moderate amount of white noise may increase concentration. In the case where one favors a comfortable environment, empty classrooms and cafes are not the only alternative to Paiknam library study rooms. Study lounges in some college buildings in HYU are available to every Hanyangian. The newly built study lounges of engineering building 1, 2 have spacious interior and plenty of room to study and rest. A much quieter study room, which is also new and pleasant, is provided in the humanities building. A part of the student lounge in engineering building 1. Study lounge in the humanities building. Those who study in groups can reserve study rooms and empty classrooms in each college through corresponding administrative offices. Additionally, seminar rooms and creative zone in Paiknam Library, and the library in the college of law building are able to be reserved on-line through Paiknam Library’s online homepage. In addition, group study room in the renovated student cafeteria in Hanyang Plaza is preparing to be provided for the use of students. There are a lot of facilities that can aid students besides study lounges, such as ATM machines, printing shops, resting lounges for female students, and shower rooms. For students who have to use banking services can visit the Shinhan bank in the Alumni Association Building. However, because the building is far from many places in the university, ATM machines are located from place to place in the campus. Although printing is available in most PC rooms in each college building, many printing shops are also there for quicker service. However, be aware that T-money card is mainly used for paying copies in PC rooms, but one has to pay in cash in printing shops when the price is lower than 1,000 won. A map of ATMs and printing shops in school. Resting lounges for female students vary in sizes and interior, and the most cleanest and comfortable ones are in the Engineering Building 1, the Humanities Building, and the College of Natural Sciences. The woman-only resting lounge in the student union building is currently in the process of renovation. One resting room for male students is available in the B1 floor of the Business Administration building. Shower rooms are also situated here and there in the campus, however, only cold water is provided in most places. Therefore, using them in only in hot weather or emergency situations is recommended. A map of women and men's resting lounges. A map of shower rooms in the campus. Jang Soo-hyun luxkari@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Choi Min-ju Designs by Kim Hye-im

2017-02 27

[Special][CULTURE] Museums Worth Visiting

The National Museum of Korea The National Museum of Korea, situated in Yongsan-gu, Seoul, is the biggest and most loved museum of Korean and Asian history. The museum mainly features artifacts and treasures from prehistoric times to the Joseon Dynasty and the Korean Empire. The collection also includes relics from China, Japan, and middle, eastern, and southern Asia. The National Museum of Korea. Click here to visit its homepage. (Photo courtesy of Ezy Economy) Some of the museum’s most famous collections are the massive Ten-Story Pagoda of Gyeongcheonsa Temple site from the Goryeo Dynasty, and the Genre Painting Album of Danwon, a famous painter who drew ordinary people’s daily life in the Joseon Dynasty. Other notable artifacts are the golden crown and girdle of Silla during the Three Kingdoms period and Pensive Bodhisattva statue from the same period. Admission is free, although costs for special exhibitions may vary. Currently, the special exhibition “Egyptian Treasures from the Brooklyn Museum” is on display. Ten-Story Pagoda of Gyeongcheonsa Temple site (top right), Dancing Child from Genre Painting Album of Danwon (top left), golden crown and girdle (bottom right), and Pensive Bodhisattva statue (bottom left). (Photos courtesy of Daum and Naver blogs) There is a tourist program in the museum for foreigners called “Korean Culture”, which includes Korea’s traditional cultural activities such as Korean painting and calligraphy, and making lacquerware inlaid with mother-of-pearls and Korean seals. Guided tours for foreigners are provided in English, Chinese, and Japanese. Near the National Museum of Korea, The National Hangeul Museum is located, which is about Hangeul’s history, design, and the principles behind it. To pay a visit to the National Museum of Korea, take a subway and get off at Ichon station on the Jungang Line and Line 4. The museum is open every day except the 1st of January, Seollal, and Chuseok. Seoul Museum of Art The Seoul Museum of Art, or SeMA, comprises three separate museums- the Main Building in Seosomun-dong, Jung-gu, Nam[South]-Seoul Branch near Sadang metro station in Gwanak-gu, and the Buk[North]-Seoul Branch in Nowon-gu. Art exhibitions of all sorts are held in these two museums, spanning vast genres of art from paintings and photography to fashion, design and film. SeMA mainly displays artworks by Korean artists, both young and old, including the permanent exhibition of a famous Korean painter Cheon Kyeong-ja. In addition, Western and non-Western artworks are also displayed in SeMa, and a Latin American arts exhibition is to be opened this year. Currently, at SeMA Seosomun Museum of Art, a special exhibition called “Renoir: Images of Women” is being held. The Seosomun Main Building of SeMA. Click here to visit its homepage. (Photo courtesy of Robert Walters Korea) SeMA holds its own biennale, called SeMA Biennale Mediacity Seoul, which focuses on contemporary art- especially media art. Artists from Korea and all over the world participate in the event. The latest Biennale was held in 2016, with the next one expecting to be held in 2018. There are lots of different educational programs offered: a ceramic clay modeling course and an oriental painting course for foreigners can be registered for at the Nam-Seoul Living Arts Museum. SeMA is closed every Monday and on January 1st. Gwacheon National Science Museum Gwacheon National Science Museum is in the city Gwacheon, Gyeonggi-do, near Seoul Grand Park. It stands as one of the most representative science museums in Korea. The museum covers a broad range in science. By visiting the museum, one can briefly explore the world of the fundamental sciences, such as biology, chemistry and physics. Advanced scientific technology can also be glimpsed upon. The museum features the scientific development of ancient Korea, such as the turtle ship devised by Joseon's naval commander Yi Sun-shin, and geojunggi, a pulley created to be used when constructing the Hwaseong fortress in the city of Suwon by Jeong Yak-yong. There is a planetarium, an astronomical observatory, and an insect ecology center there as well. Gwacheon National Science Museum. Click here to visit its homepage. (Photo courtesy of the Ministry of Science, ICT and Future Planning's Daum blog) The museum offers on hands-on scientific experience, and tries to make science more approachable for both the young and the old. For instance, one can experience the operations of a Tesla coil and plasma phenomena, as well as seeing various sea animals, insects and fossils. Visiting the Gwacheon Science Museum with children is highly recommended. The admission fee for adults is 4,000 won, and 2,000 won for children. The museum is closed on Mondays and on January 1st. Jang Soo-hyun luxkari@hanyang.ac.kr

2017-02 07 Important News

[Special]Hanyangians Abroad and Beyond

The number of international students at Hanyang University, as well as within Korea, appear to increase every year. About 90,000 students were estimated to be studying in Korea as of 2016. Reasons behind their visits form around inquisitiveness about and personal interest in Korea and its culture, not excluding job opportunities. Likewise, students of Hanyang fly to countries abroad to learn languages, expose themselves to new cultures and get work experience. This week, News H met four HYU students, Lee Shin-hee (Advertising and Public Relations, ERICA, 4th year), Kim Nam-hyung (Division of International Studies, 4th year), Lee Je-na (Sociology, 4th yr) and Kwon Hyun-min (Industrial Engineering, 4th year), who all went abroad on exchange student programs, an internship and a working holiday respectively. Exchange students in the US and the UK Shin-hee (left) and Nam-hyung (right) each visited the US and the UK respectively as exchange students. Q1. How long did you live abroad as an exchange student, and what countries have you visited? Can you tell us the reason why you went there? Shin-hee: I stayed in America from August 2015 to July 2016 at LeTourneau University in Texas. I spent two semesters there as an international student, taking a minor in Marketing in the School of Business. I chose the US because I wanted to practice my English a lot, and I wanted to experience the student life there. Nam-hyung: I went to the UK and studied at the University College London. I spent the fall semester of my junior year there, and lived there from September 2016 to January this year. My reason for going abroad was to learn politics, studying at a foreign university as a politics major. Because I lived in Europe when I was young, I felt more comfortable with the UK than the US. Since using English wasn't a problem for me, I felt I could understand the lectures better at an English-speaking country. Q2. Are there any routes in making foreign friends? What were some notable experiences you had with foreign students during your stay? Shin-hee: The club I chose in the university I went to was the cross-country running team. Club members were surprised and glad that an exchange student chose to participate, and the atmosphere was really welcoming as a result. There are summer breaks and fall breaks in American universities, which enable students to take a leave from school for about one week. I decided to take a trip to the seaside with my friends during the summer break. During my fall break, I visited to the Grand Canyon with my friends. Another thing that I remember, and definitely don’t regret, is that I threw my own farewell party. That was because I wanted to treat my friends back, who really helped me a lot during my stay. "I prepared my own farewell party because I wanted to treat my American friends back. Like this, you can make a personal influence regardless of whether you're an international student or not." (Photos courtesy of Lee Shin-hee) Nam-hyung: There were five people in my dorm, and those friends were the ones I got very close to. When a new semester starts, there is a welcoming party for one week. I met nice people there. Also, there are lots of clubs, such as Beyonce, Harry Potter, and sci-fi. In Korea, you choose one or two clubs and you devote yourself to it, but in the UK, the choice of clubs has more flexibility and freedom. Nam-hyung's trip to Stonehenge. (Photo courtesy of Kim Nam-hyung) Q3. What did you learn most out of your experience abroad? Shin-hee: I learned that the influence of a given environment affects people beyond imagination. What is left as your asset depends on how much you tried to challenge and adapt to in the culture you are faced with. That’s a matter of courage, you see. Nam-hyung: What I learned is much related to studying. I was surprised by the heated atmosphere of debate that was going around in the classes. It was very different from Korean-style lectures. I learned that by actively searching and striving, you can really make your studying experience more interesting and engaging. Additionally, I learned basic life skills, like cooking and socializing with people. Q4. Any tips on living as an exchange student? Shin-hee: I used my international student status as a privilege. Because I was an exchange student, I don’t have to be in the know about what the other students already know. I asked lots of questions and that was how I could communicate more with the people there. Nam-hyung: Never be afraid of doing things alone. There may be situations where you want to do something but you don’t have any friends to do it with you. Don’t hesitate even then. There may be more dynamic events when you are out alone. Working holiday to Australia, internship to Germany Hyun-min (left) visited Australia for a working holiday, and Je-na (right) went to Germany for an internship at KOTRA. Q1. What country have you visited and why? What was your work there? Je-na: For six months from the second half of 2015 to first half of 2016, I went on a foreign internship to KOTRA (Korea Trade-Investment Promotion Agency)'s trade building in Munich, Germany through the school. KOTRA is a state funded organization that promotes and facilitates trade and investment of Korea's SMEs (Small to medium sized enterprises). I lived in Germany from middle school to high school, so I can speak both German and English. I applied for the internship while I was searching for work experience in Korea and other countries, following a professor’s advice on internship programs the school provides. I assisted office work as an intern, did some cleaning, answered phone calls, and consulted some buyers. I also got a more worthwhile experience, being able to German for work thanks to the trust that the director instilled in me. I participated in interpreting at a BMW conference, and in a special KBS program that featured Munich. I was lucky to be involved in those moments. Je-na's work desk at KOTRA. (Photo courtesy of Lee Je-na) Hyun-min: I went on a working holiday to Australia for 21 months, from April 2014 to January 2016, with three of my friends. I had a great longing for living abroad since I was young. I chose Australia for my working holiday due to the interesting stories I had heard from my private tutor about his own working holiday experience in Australia. I also wanted to feel for myself the active atmosphere of the country. During my stay, I worked in restaurants. I washed dishes, did simple ingredient preparations, and also did room service while I was working in a big hotel. Hyun-min (third from right) and his friends in Australia. (Photo courtesy of Kwon Hyun-min) Q2. Were there any requirements for the jobs? Je-na: Certified English test scores and other language scores are required, corresponding to which country you visit. A copy of your transcript and resume are also needed, and an English interview is held thereafter, with one intern being selected for each trade building. Hyun-min: There are age requirements, from 18 to 30, and there has to be neither medical disqualifications nor criminal records. Q3. What is an advantage of a brief stay abroad? Hyun-min: I now have the confidence to live in any country that I can think of. I have experienced something unique, so I'm now equipped with the ability to manage my life and also broaden my outlook. Hyun-min, Je-na, Nam-hyung and Shin-hee (left to right) pose together. Jang Soo-hyun luxkari@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Choi Min-ju

2017-01 16

[Special]The Room Culture of Korea

When foreigners visit Korea, one of the first differences they encounter is that Koreans like to gather together and entertain themselves visiting bangs, rooms that provide leisure activities. There are a variety of these ‘rooms’ in Korea, and the most popular rooms in Korea are PC rooms, singing rooms, and Korean spa rooms. These three popular types of rooms in Korea that guarantee enjoyment when visited alone or with friends. PC room Teenagers playing online games in a PC room. (Photo courtesy of https://goo.gl/Gs0ayN) PC rooms are dark lighted big rooms that contain a lot of desks divided with small walls and chairs. On the desks are headphones and computers boasting high performance to serve convenience in playing online games, such as League of Legends and Overwatch. People either pay before or after they play. Most PC rooms’ users are male teenagers and university students. They like to come to PC rooms with their friends after school, since playing online games is one of the biggest hobbies in Korea. PC rooms in the past were considered unsanitary, and the main reason was because people were allowed to smoke. However, because today’s PC rooms’ users are not allowed to smoke, the rooms are of much cleaner environment and even serve drinks and snacks such as ramyeon, tteokbokki, rice cakes served with spicy sauce, and fried rice. Singing room The interior of a singing room. (Photo courtesy of https://goo.gl/85A17p) Although the idea of singing room, or karaoke, started in Japan, it is very popular in many Asian cultures, especially Korea. In each room, there are chairs or sofas, tambourines to add more excitement, microphones, speakers playing background music, and a special remote control that allows the singer to choose which song they are going to sing. The songs include pop music worldwide, animation and children’s songs, and even special effects such as clapping and whistling noises. Most importantly, there is a screen that resembles a TV that shows the lyrics of the song. When a person finishes singing each song, the screen shows the score of how well he or she has done. Today, there is a new type of singing room called ‘coin singing rooms’ that allows people to pay for each number of songs they sing. The rooms are much smaller but cheaper, when compared with the costs of original singing rooms that depend upon the time they spend there. Sometimes, ‘service times’ are given in those singing rooms which allow people to enjoy a bonus time to sing more songs. Korean spa In jjimjilbangs, there are many rooms which are heated to maintain hot temperature. (Photo courtesy of https://goo.gl/7F7ue6) Korean spa, or jjimjilbang in Korea consists of a sauna and multiple rooms of hot temperature. The main reason why Koreans like to visit jjimjilbang is because of the belief that jjimjil, or sweating, lets out the harmful waste products in the body. In addition, the casual atmosphere that allows people to chat freely with snacks is another reason why jjimjilbang is so popular in Korea. There are different names for each room, such as amethyst room, red clay room, and salt room. The rooms are decorated and named after the elements that compose them. The temperature of the rooms varies as well. The most general and popular snacks in jjimjilbang are shikhye, a sweet flavored drink made of rice and hard-boiled eggs. A sauna in a jjimjilbang. (https://goo.gl/Vkc85L) Many elderly men and women enjoy jjimjilbang, but today as many of its facilities include fitness centers, computer rooms, free movie rooms, and a big TV set, men and women of all ages like to go to there as well. Sauna is used after people are finished with visiting each room and done with jjimjil. Also with different temperature, there are hot and cold water pools. Sometimes, there also exists hot steam shower as well. Supsokhanbang Land in Shinchon, Seoul, Heoshimcheong in Donrae-gu, Busan, Kyeongsangnam-do and Shimhanok Spa in Jeonju city, Jeollabuk-do are a few of the most popular jjimjilbangs in Korea. There are certainly a lot of exciting activities outdoors, such as hiking and playing football. However, PC rooms, singing rooms, and Korean sauna rooms show that people can enjoy themselves indoors as well. In this freezing weather, a visit to one of these rooms will be a smart choice to have fun. Jang Soo-hyun luxkari@hanyang.ac.kr

2016-12 12

[Special]The Legends of Korean Wildflowers

In the old days, people liked to imagine and make stories about the origin of natural objects, such as constellations, animals and plants. Korean ancestors also enjoyed creating tales about nature, and one of the most frequent themes was flowers. Koreans believed when a person dies with han, the feeling of sorrow and resentment, his or her spirit bloomes as a flower. That is the reason why there are such sad stories affiliated with wildflowers in Korea. This week, News H introduces the tales of Korean wildflowers of all four seasons. The Korean 'granny' flower The Korean pasque flower, named halmiggot in Korean which means ‘granny flower’, is a perennial plant blooming in winter to spring which has a burgundy-colored, bell-shaped bud. Its name is derived from its appearance, with a curvy stem pointing toward the ground and soft, white hairs covering the flower to its leaves, resembling an old lady. Above is a photo of a halmiggot, or 'granny flower'. (Photo courtesy of http://blog.naver.com/ehdyto02/220295462069) There was a loving grandmother who raised three granddaughters due to the untimely death of their parents. She raised them with love and care, and as time passed, they all got married. The lonely old lady set out one winter day to visit each of them. However, she was neglected by the first and second granddaughters who married rich men, answering her visit with great disapproval. After being ousted from their houses, the old lady turned to visit the third granddaughter, who married a poor woodcutter. Her house was very far away, and the lady was cold and weak. The next day, the third granddaughter found her grandmother dead. She mourned for her grandmother and buried her near her house. A flower bloomed on her grave, which greatly resembled the old lady’s white hair and curved back, and the third granddaughter believed that her grandmother’s spirit came back and bloomed as the 'granny flower'. Dandelion, a symbol of undying love Dandelion, or mindlae, is a common spring flower worldwide, but there are special white and yellow dandelions that breed in Korea. The dandelion is a symbol of devoted love. In Koera, there exists the phrase ilpyundanshim mindlae, which stems from its legend of a young woman waiting for her husband during wartime. There are special white and yellow dandelions that bloom only in Korea. (Photo courtesy of http://blog.daum.net/negajoa/12869806) A long time ago, there was a woman named Mindlae whose husband left to fight in war. She waited for him for three years, but heard the news that her husband died in battle. Mindlae followed her husband to death shortly after. The next spring, on the paths that she walked past while waiting for her husband, yellow flowers that nobody had seen before appeared. People thought they were the symbol of her spirit, and called the flowers mindlae after her name. Lychnis, the tragic story of a baby monk Lychnis, or lychniscognate, is a pretty orange flower that blooms in summer. It blossoms in a mountainside andis. Dongjaggot, meaning 'baby monk flower', originated from a legend of a young monk that lived in the mountains with an old monk. The name dongjaggot originated from the legend of a young monk who faced an unfortunate death. (Photo courtesy of http://www.hyulimbook.co.kr/flower_01_1/479118) A long time ago, two lonely monks, an old monk and a baby monk, were living in a small temple, depending on each other, in a deep forest. One early winter, the old monk had to leave the baby monk alone in the temple to go down the village to ask for donations to get through the winter. However, an early heavy snowfall blocked the way back to the temple. The old monk waited for the snow to melt with a heavy heart, but only could go back to the temple in the spring the year after. The old monk found the baby monk frozen to death while waiting. The devastated monk buried the baby, and the next summer, scarlet flowers that resembled the baby’s flush on his cheeks blossomed on the spot. People called the small orange blooms, dongjaggot, after the baby monk. Aster, the story of a girl who picked mugworts Aster is a lilac-colored autumn flower that resembles some species of chrysanthemum and is called ssukbujaengi in Korean. The name means mugwortpicker and the blacksmith’s daughter at the same time, indicating the heroine of the flower’s tale. The ssukbujaengi is a lilac-colored autumn flower that resembles some species of chrysanthemum. (Photo courtesy of http://www.g-enews.com/ko-kr/news/article/sh/201410270933520120990_1/) A long time ago, there was a very poor blacksmith, who had eleven children. The eldest daughter helped out, digging out mugworts for her siblings. So, the villagers called her Ssukbujaengi, or mugwort picker. One day, Ssukbujaengi found a wounded deer in the mountain where she picked mugworts. She took the deer and cured it gently. The deer was very thankful and promised to repay her kindness. On the same day, Ssukbujaengi found a man caught in a boar trap. She saved the man, and after a short talk, she became fond of him. The man promised to return that autumn. From that day, Ssukbujaengi waited for years but the man did not come, and her mother became ill. Ssukbujaengi decided to pray to the mountain god for her mother, and suddenly the deer appeared, and gave her a purple pocket with three marbles in it. “Put the marble inside your mouth and say wishes out loud, then it will come true,” the deer said. She wished for her mother’s health, and she recovered instantly. Then she wished for the man to come back, and he appeared. However, he revealed that he was a married man, but asked her to live with him. Ssukbujaengi, thinking about his wife and son, wished for the man to return home. Years have passed, but she still could not forget the man and remained unmarried. And one day, while concentrating on picking herbs for her siblings, she tripped and was killed due to the fall. After her death, a lot of edible plants grew in the mountains and people called them ssukbujaengi. The plant had purple petals and was yellow inside, like the color of the pocket and marbles she carried around. These flowers can easily be found in the wild in all seasons in Korea, drawing any bystander to appreciate their beauty and scent. While a flower symbolizes and implies emotions such as love, desire, or hope in many cultures, it is interesting to see that in Korea, there are rather sad stories of han behind flowers, adding special meanings to their ethereal grace. Jang Soo-hyun luxkari@hanyang.ac.kr

2016-11 07

[Special]The Life of Korean High School Students

This year's suneung, the Korean university entrance examination, is on November 17th, which only leaves one weekend. Right now, at this moment, Korean high school students, especially the seniors (3rd year students), are exerting themselves in a final push to prepare for the test. High schoolers brace themselves not only for suneung, but also for midterms and finals in each semester, taking classes from early morning to late afternoon, and studying well into the night. This, at first glance, seems tough- but most Koreans who study in Korea go through and overcome this tedious livelihood. A Day of a Korean High School Student 6:30 a.m.~7:50 a.m. Waking up and preparing to go to school. Most Korean students are required to wear school uniforms, which include PE clothes. Nowadays, however, more casual clothes are provided to enhance comfort for students. In some schools, seondobu, the student committee for enforcing school rules, is present with teachers who are in charge of student supervision to check students’ dress and hair. Students in each class take turns doing jubeon activities, which requires arriving school early and being the last to leave the classroom. Their job is to clean and tidy up their homeroom. High school students wear uniforms in Korea. (Photo courtesy of dramafever.com) 7:50 a.m.~1:00 p.m. Classes start. After the homeroom teacher’s short announcements and words of encouragement for the day, jaseup is held, which means that some time is given to students to do some self-studying in the morning. After jaseup, classes begin. Students stay in each of their designated classrooms which is decided before the beginning of each year, and wait for teachers come to the classroom to teach. The education curriculum for Korean students is divided into two different parts: i-kwa (Natural Sciences) and mun-kwa (Liberal Arts). Students can choose between these two divisions, regarding their preference, skill, and future careers. However, the long tradition of i-kwa and mun-kwa will end in the school year of 2018, being merged into one curriculum. The subjects that students typically learn are Korean language and literature, English, mathematics, science (biology, chemistry, physics and earth science), social studies (such as history, economics, and ethics), and a second language (Chinese, Japanese, French and more). On Wednesdays, there are special hours that allow students to engage in club activities, such as the school news broadcasting system, the school press, bands, or sports clubs. On the other hand, students who are not associated in any clubs are able to engage in other activities, such as cooking, watching movies, or drawing cartoons. 1:00 p.m.~2:00 p.m. Lunch break. School lunch is equally distributed to students in the student cafeteria, or the homeroom if there is no dining area in the school. After eating lunch, male students tend to play soccer or basketball in the school yard. Girls like to chat with their friends or go around the field for a walk. Others visit their friends in different homerooms. Some students use this time to study more, or get some sleep. Korean school lunch. (Photo courtesy of http://blog.naver.com/happy_lstarl/220280972127) 2:00 p.m.~5:00 p.m. Three more classes are held. After they end, the homeroom teacher comes in and gives some additional announcements and dismisses the students. When the teacher leaves, pre-arranged groups of students take turns to clean up the class as designated cleaners for the week. 6:00 p.m.~10:00 p.m. Yaja session. Students participate in yaja, studying by themselves after school, or go to hagwons (private academies) to complement their learning. There are also after-school lessons provided by teachers as well, usually at a much lower fee than private academies. Yaja session is held in each classroom or in a separate building or room. Students study by themselves, doing their homework, revising, or preparing for the next day's classes. Yaja session in high school. (Photo courtesy of http://blog.naver.com/jinjeopecc/220749970564) The Sun Shines at the End of the Marathon Living as a Korean high school student is extremely burdensome because of high competition, an immense workload, a tight schedule, and the stress arising from the pressure and the uncertainty of whether they would be able to enter their dream university or not. However, many Koreans treasure memories from their high school days. They reminisce that those days were the time of their lives when they put in their best efforts and achieved the huge accomplishment of entering university. In addition, because high school students need to depend on one another to find the strength to carry on, Koreans typically make lasting best friends in those years. As the saying goes, “The night is darkest before dawn”, students’ hard endeavors are not in vain. Their work would be rewarded as a lasting reminder of what they earned through their efforts to reach whatever dreams they aspire towards. Jang Soo-hyun luxkari@hanyang.ac.kr