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2018-04 17

[Opinion]Spring is Approaching

A wave of tension pervaded the country as April 3rd drew closer. It was the date of the North-South Joint Performance in Pyeongyang, the capital of North Korea. The abrupt developments in the relationship between North and South Korea following their co-participation in the Pyeongchang Olympics presented a peculiar situation for citizens. With conflicting sentiments of hope and wariness, the nation waited under a silent tension as the date of the performance grew near. The first cultural interaction of any kind between North and South Korea dates back to 1985. Most of the events were composed in a similar manner: the two countries would prepare a stage for performers and exchanged cultural contents in an effort to ease the sentimental disparities between the divided nations. However, such events were severely criticized by both sides, as they were evaluated as encouraging ideological competition underneath the formalities of the event. Accordingly, efforts to promote harmony gradually moved to the domain of sports, a realm more detached from political ideology. Such efforts eventually dried up as tensions between the nations heightened. The North-South unified team competing in the World Table Tennis Championship in 1991 (Photo courtesy of Yonhap News) Fortunately, this performance was a great success. It was a notable milestone, as it reestablished an air of hope for the public. It was one thing for us to see news reports on the recent growth of diplomatic interactions between North and South Korea, and another to see our favorite singers and K-pop idols performing in what we have grown to perceive as the most dangerous place in the world. Arguably being true, as the two countries are still in a state of ceasefire, the performers were technically behind enemy borders. Despite the nation’s composure, perhaps to the point of preceived indifference by the third party, everyone held their breath until the performers returned safely. Adding to the ripple of relief as the performance ended on a positive note, another noteworthy aspect of the event is its historical significance. Along with the co-participation in this year’s Winter Olympics, this was the first great amicable interaction between the divided nations in nearly a decade. The success of the event is even expected to facilitate further talks of cooperation in the North-South Korea Summit, which is scheduled to take place in the Joint Security Area of Panmunjeom on April 27th. The last summit was held in 2007, and this will be the third official summit between North and South Korea. A celebratory photo of the performers on the stage in Pyeongyang (Photo courtesy of Ilyosisa). The long drought of diplomatic and cultural interaction among the divided peninsula began with a gunshot incident in Geumgang Mountain in 2008, where a South Korean tourist was fatally shot by a soldier in North Korea. When North Korea failed to provide reliable support for their justification of the shooting, ties between the two countries began to crumble. The deterioration of the relationship quickly accelerated as North Korea began to pursue its military ambitions, engaging in nuclear experiments and intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM) development, to the dismay of international society. As a result of the North's aggressive stance, people were confused to see the recent eagerness for cooperation by North Korea, and rightfully so. In light of the historical context, how this momentum of reconciliation plays out will greatly shape the public's perception of North Korea in the future. This is especially true for the younger generation, who will witness cooperation between the two countries for the first time. The current situation will exert massive influence on their manner of interaction in the decades to come. Needless to say, every diplomatic step must be taken with great discretion. On that note, the successful completion of the North-South Joint Performance in Pyeongyang is an indicator of a great start. "A good start is half the work" is how the old saying goes, but a good start is nevertheless, only half of the work. Further dedication to establishing a solid foundation for reconciliation and stability will ensure sustainable benefits to be reaped by both nations, and will perhaps be the key to finally ending the war. Lee Chang-hyun pizz1125@hanyang.ac.kr

2018-04 09

[Special]Fine Dust Threatening Korean People’s Health

On some days, you must have experienced logging into your social media account to find the endless pictures of blue skies posted by your friends. A day with a blue sky in South Korea has become something to celebrate, take pictures of, and be happy about. This was not the case several years ago. What happened to Korea? A photoshoot of Jamsil, Seoul covered with fine dust on January 4th. (Photo courtesy of Weekly Donga) What is fine dust? Fine dust consists of fine particulate matter (PM). There are two levels of measurement: fine PM is smaller than 10 µm in diameter (PM10), and ultrafine PM is smaller than 2.5 µm in diameter (PM2.5). For understanding, a PM 2.5 particle is thirty times thinner than a human hair. Because the particles are so minute, they are absolutely invisible to bare eyes and can permeate our skin, causing various health problems. Korea is using a six-grade forecast system for fine dust and ultrafine particle concentration: good, normal, poor, bad, very bad, and dangerous. From the poor level (81~150µm/m3per day), vulnerable sections of the population such as the elderly, young, and people with respiratory or cardiovascular disease are advised to refrain from outdoor activities and stay indoors. Fine dust officially became a problem in 2013. Before then, the concentration level of fine dust was not high enough for people to pay attention to. Ever since the official forecast began in February 2014, public awareness about and efforts to reveal the sources and regulate them have been increasing. Fine dust concentration level (Photo courtesy of Seoul Solution) How problematic is it? The effects of fine dust range from a mild sore throat to increased chance of cerebrovascular (related to brain and blood vessels) diseases. According to the Korean Medical Association, the environmental catastrophe can cause respiratory problems such as bronchial or asthmatic diseases, and also expose people to conjunctivitis, namely itchy eyes and skin rashes. This particular symptom is serious due to the infinitesimal size of the dust particles. As it is too microscopic, it can easily pass through our natural filter in the nose and throat, permeate as deep as into the alveolus, the micro-organs in the lungs where gases can pass in or out of the blood. To make matters worse, studies have shown that fine dust can also cause mental diseases such as depression and dementia. Because people are exposed to less sunlight every day and cannot go outside as much as desired, on top of constant worries about the pollution and their health, air quality largely influences people’s daily lives. Namely, the Korean Baseball Organization postponed games scheduled on April 6thin Seoul, Suwon, and Incheon due to the government warning of the fine dust danger level. This had never happened in Korean baseball history before. Same place, different fine dust level. It is getting harder and harder to see a clear sky in Seoul. (Photo courtesy of YTN) Reasons still not clear What is the source of all the dust? Unfortunately, there is no clear answer to the question. The Ministry of Environment has announced that 30 percent to 60 percent of the fine dust floating in Korea's atmosphere is from China. On top of this official statement, Chinese government’s plan to move some of its factories to nearby cities such as Tianjin further provoked Korean citizens’ anger towards the Chinese government. Observation of the air components in Seoul during the Chinese New Year supported the claim that China is a major contributing factor of air pollution, as chemical substances used in massive fireworks were detected. However, there are abundant research that counters such a claim. Many research operations assert that although we cannot deny the influence of Chinese factories for the current phenomenon, domestic ones also contribute to the pollution. Some even suggest that secondary particles generated in the atmosphere as a result of chemical synthesis make up most of the pollutants. Discerning sources and asking for compensation is extremely difficult in the case of solving the air quality dilemma, as chemicals emitted into the air from domestic factories highly resemble those produced in China, and the flow of air and air pressure also play a big role in determining the air quality for the day. The Seoul metropolitan government has been trying to reduce fine dust particles emitted domestically through automobile and construction site regulations, but it has not seemed to alleviate the situation. Careful scrutiny by research institutes along with the government into the sources and possible solutions is an urgent need for people. Kim So-yun dash070@hanyang.ac.kr

2018-03 20

[Special][Click&Zoom-in] Time Flows Specially in the Hanyang Museum

"Why am I pleased suddenly, as I say what is done cannot be undone? As it is, it has its own meaning. Old memories are beautiful as the world says." These are part of the lyrics of "Past," sung by Yoo Jae-ha on his first album Because I Love You. If the past that passed away is powerful, it means its value continues to the present. Leaving a single album, singer Yoo Jae-ha passed away at the age of 26. An exhibition titled "With you forever, Yoo Jae-ha" memorializes the late Yoo Jae-ha (Department of Composition, '81) as a genius composer on his 30th anniversary of this death, and is being held at the Hanyang University Museum. Written by: Choi Mi-rae(student reporter) / Photo by. Ahn Hong-bum ▲ Landscape of the Hanyang University Museum Time traveling on campus When entering the lobby in the Hanyang University Museum, a calm atmosphere that washes off heat from the campus covers the eyes and ears. On the right side of the lobby, you can see an exhibition for Yoo Jae-ha which opened first in early November last year. The exhibition is largely divided into Yoo Jae-ha's life and the music heritage he left behind. Hwang Na-young, an academic researcher in the museum administrative team, said, "While an exhibition is being shown, music should be heard. I was concerned about how the audience could listen to a lot of music in the exhibition space." She also said, "We also focused on how we could show the vitality of Yoo Jae-ha's music which is so beloved, although he left only one album." In collaboration with this exhibition, "Eco of Sounds," "A Tree Grown by Sounds," and "Gae-bae-jam," Hanyang University music clubs, held busking performances with his songs and showed his musicality with was beyond the times. When Yoo Jae-ha's songs resonated within the voices of the young performers, the campus held the fragrance of the 1980s for a brief moment. In this way, the museum has provided various opportunities to allow visitors a glimpse of the past. The museum, which opened with research and excavation in 1979, will celebrate the 40th anniversary of its opening in 2019. In the five-story building, the first floor is of research in the liberal arts, and the second floor has a seminar room. Visitors can visit special exhibitions on the 3rd floor, and permanent exhibits on the 4th and 5th floors. The special exhibition is held twice a year, normally with a relatively large one in the first half and a small one in the second half. Besides these exhibitions, graduation showcases of students are sometimes held. This Yoo Jae-ha exhibition is a small theme exhibition, highlighting a famous Hanyangian. Theme exhibitions that feature people was on the third floor and it exhibited famous figures including Park Mok-wol, a poet who has served as a professor of Hanyang until now, and Dr. Lee Man-young who produced the first computer in Korea ▲ The third installment of Hanyang's people, an exhibition "With you forever, Yoo Jae-ha" memorializes the late Yoo Jae-ha (Department of Composition, '81) for his 30th anniversary, highlighting his life and works. You can see the guitar and piano he used and the LPs he collected. A section was prepared where you can listen to pop songs and other songs sung by him for his brother. ▲ On the 4th floor of the museum, there is a traditional art room. You can appreciate beautiful Korean pottery from Goryeo Celadon to Buncheong Ceramics and White Porcelain. Preparation for the future of the old ones At the museum, we are making efforts to improve the facilities for safe storage of relic monuments and the convenience of visitors. In the first half of 2017, the constant temperature and humidity controller of the storage room was replaced. Hanyang University Museum is recognized as an excellent institution among university museums. On the 2nd floor, the seminar room, which is a departure point for campus tours targeting high school students, was transformed with the sponsorship of a graduate named Gang Sung-Hui (Department of History, '75). The old outer wall, the museum cafe, and the benches are scheduled to be completely repaired in January. The lighting and showcases of the exhibition spaces are also scheduled to be improved according to recent trends. The permanent exhibition spaces on the 4th and 5th floors will be transformed considerably, aligning with the 80th anniversary of the opening in 2019. At the museum, we do various things besides the obvious exhibition preparation. Excavation of remains such as from Hanam I-sung Mountain Fortress, Hwaseong Dang Castle, and Seoul Amsa-dong are also important. It is also not easy to manage the excavated relics. Since all the artifacts uncovered from the earth are owned by the state, the artifacts stored under the consignment from the National Central Museum and Cultural Heritage Administration undergo periodic inspections every year. A project which is has recently begun is a collection database conversion project which is support by national funding. It is necessary to check the artifacts and update the data of all the collections are 30,000 in total. ▲ The new seminar room in Hanyang Museum A treasure trove worth sharing with others The museum is an institution in the school, but there are also more external visitors than we might realize. There are also educational programs such as a variety of special theme exhibitions and campus tours and career experience programs held in cooperation with the Seongdong Gwangjin Office of Education. In 2018, cultural courses for adults are being prepared. About eight courses will be prepared for each semester. Registered students can also apply for them. Besides these activities, since 2017, we have operated an internship program for students in collaboration with various departments. Through this program, students can learn about museum management and experience exhibition planning directly. Hwang Na-young, an academic researcher, said, "It is a pity that some students miss the opportunities offered by the museum," and "The Hanyang museum is in a good position, which is cool in the summer, warm in the winter, and has a rest area on the 4th floor. I'd like you to come and visit here to use it in comfort." The Hanyang University Museum plays a role as a cultural institution of the local community and plans to show a variety of programs in the future. ▲ Museum Family: from left, Cho Nam-cheol, museum director; Choi Hyo-young·Park Hee-ju·Hwang Na-young·Jang Myung-sun, academic researchers. Hanyang University E-Magazine/ Jan-Feb, 2018 (only in Korean)

2018-03 12

[Opinion][Op-Ed] #MeToo

Min Byung-doo, a member of the Korean National Assembly who was accused of sexual harassment through the widely spreading Me Too movement in South Korea, announced his decision to resign on the 10th of March, 2018. He is the first to voluntarily resign as a result of accusations brought forth by the Me Too movement. Likewise, the movement is gaining much power and influence in Korea, helping women from all walks of life to make their voices heard. The #Me Too movement is now a global movement. How it all started Now a global movement for women’s rights, Me Too was started in the United States in 2006 by Tara Burke and was popularized by Alyssa Milano. The movement gained international acknowledgment just last year when the renowned movie director Harvey Weinstein was accused of sexual harassment and non-consensual sex by more than 80 women. Among the accusers, famous actresses such as Gwyneth Paltrow and Eva Green were included. The phrase #MeToo started to be used on Twitter. The movement spread to other industries within the US, but also to other countries. Now it is estimated that the Me Too movement has been diffused to at least 85 countries worldwide including India, Canada, Japan, and the United Kingdom. Many of the cases involve people working in the same industry with male offenders in a higher position victimizing their female subordinates. Prosecutor Seo Ji-yeon on JTBC Newsroom. The screenshots subsequently say, 'What happened in 2010?' and 'Weren't there other people present, too?' (Photo courtesy of JTBC) Me Too, South Korea Korea, although a bit late, is catching up with the global trend. On January 29th, a brave prosecutor named Seo Ji-yeon reported her experience of sexual assault by her senior who, until this story was released on JTBC’s Newsroom, used to be the Justice Ministry’s Prosecution Bureau chief Ahn Tae-geun. She explained what happened at the funeral eight years ago, whether it was her intention or not, pulling the trigger of the Me Too movement in Korean society. Lee Jae-jung, previously a lawyer and now a congresswoman, showed her support the following day. Lee later shared her experience of sexual harassment, too. The Me Too movement in Korea then started to spread like a wildfire when students and staff anonymously accused renowned writers and celebrities. Poet Go Eun was one of the first big names to be reported. Lee Yoon-taek, Oh Tae-suk, Cho Geun-hyun, and the deceased Cho Min-gi followed in their wake. The movement that started with the legal industry was transmitted to the literary world and the film industry, where seniors and big names have god-like power over the wannabes. Men with power were accused of harassing or raping dozens of women in lower positions. Differences and problems; Korea is not a gender equal society Yet, there seems to be a significant difference between the Me Too movement in Korea and the US. While many famous actresses voiced out to report their experiences and publicly showed support to the movement in the US, the majority of the allegations made in Korea are anonymous. Some say that Korean women are putting less at stake by hiding behind anonymity, and that the movement can be misused to disgrace innocent people. There are already ‘believe-it-or-not’ stories of women threatening their ex-boyfriends or men they're in a hostile relationship with to ‘me-too’ them to the public. However, the truth behind so many Korean women choosing to wear the mask of anonymity to tell their stories is due to the presence of factual defamation and the secondary victimization by the public and the press. Factual defamation is a type of criminal offense where a person can be prosecuted for openly telling something about someone, although it is true. However, Korea still chooses to keep its factual defamation law, along with Myanmar, Kenya, and Indonesia, despite the advice from the United Nations Human Rights Committee to abolish the regulation in 2015. However, the Constitutional Court ruled factual defamation to be constitutional in the following year. It can be tough for victims of sexual violence to officially report the case to the police. That is due to the unique social atmosphere of Korea. Another reason is that there is an uncomfortable culture in Korea where the victim of sexual violence is often accused of being a gold digger or being the cause of the incident. Women luring men with the promise of sex and then threatening to report them to the police unless a settlement is paid is a scam called ‘flower-snakes (ggot-baem)’ in Korea. While only 0.05% of the total sexual violence cases turn out to be scams, it is often questioned whether the accusers are ‘real victims,' especially when the accused is a famous figure. The public's doubt and the press's articles written in an offender-friendly tone inflict secondary harm to the victims. In short, women in Korean society are already putting a lot at stake just by openly sharing their experiences. They could be prosecuted for hurting the offender’s reputation, be portrayed as a flower snake by the public, lose their job, or be counter-sued for calumny. Famous figures would have to put their entire career, as well as future opportunities, on the line to publicly support or participate in the Me Too movement. The fact that the participants of the movement are considered brave and the fact that women have to put their career at risk to tell the truth, shows how much is left for Korean society to improve to achieve equality. Kim So-yun dash070@hanyang.ac.kr

2018-03 08

[Infographics]Hanyang, received the 3rd largest amount of government subsidy

Hanyang University has the third largest amount of government subsidy in Korea. On January 29th, the Korea Higher Education Research Institute (KHERI) reported a list of private schools who have received large amounts of government subsidy in 2016. According to the report, Yonsei University ranked 1st receiving 315.5 billion won, followed by Korea University receiving 276.3 billion won. Hanyang University received 257.6 billion won, while Sungkyunkwan University received 220.2 billion won, followed by Kyunghee University receiving 141.7 billion won. The additional universities who had received government subsidy included POSTECH at 139.8 billion won, Konkuk University at 138 billion won, Ewha W. University at 123.9 billion, Youngnam University at 115billion won, and Chung-Ang University at 113.6 billion won. KHERI mentioned, “5 trillion, 514.7 billion won was given to private schools in 2016 as government subsidy, rating 22.6% of its earning.” It also reported that 8 out of 10 top universities receiving the most amount of government subsidy were located in the Seoul area (based on its original campus). KHERI added, excluding POSTECH, that the government subsidy was mainly given to large schools located in Seoul carrying more than 20 thousand students. For the amount of government subsidy given per student, POSTECH ranked in first place with 43.16 million won, followed by Korea University of Technology and Education (12.18 million won), Sungkyunkwan University (8.23 million won), Yonsei University (7.93 million won), Sogang University (7.9 million won), Hanyang University (7.79 million won), Korea University (7.41 million won), The Catholic University of Korea (72 million won), Ajou University (7.17 million won), and CHA University (6.71 million won). The amount of government subsidy given per student from the top 10 universities is 6.63 million won per student on average, compared to the 4.1 million won, which is the average amount given to 4 year private schools in Korea. The result is 2.53 million won higher. ▼ Government subsidy for private schools in Korea (unit: 100 million won, %) rank name amount percentage by total percentage by income amount of subsidy per student( 10 thousand won) 1 Yonsei 3105 5.6 21.0 793 2 Korea 2763 5.0 23.7 741 3 Hanyang 2576 4.7 30.2 779 4 Sungkyunkwan 2202 4.0 24.0 826 5 Kyunghee 1417 2.6 19.6 425 6 POSTECH 1398 2.5 33.1 4316 7 Konkuk 1380 2.5 22.8 481 8 Ewha Women's 1239 2.2 20.2 575 9 Young Nam 1150 2.1 24.9 458 10 Chung-Ang 1136 2.1 19.6 393

2018-03 06

[Opinion][Op-ed] The Backstage of the Olympics, Gwandong Hockey Center

The 2018 Pyeongchang Olympics finished successfully thanks to millions of people participating and lending a hand to the procedures of the Olympics. I myself also took part in the Gwandong Hockey Center, as a translator in the Sports Presentation Department (SPP) for 18 days. The actual field of the Olympics required much more work than normal people think and was concluded successfully due to the participants’ hard work. What was my job? The Olympics do not require solely the players on the field. For a game to run, announcers have to tell the crowd what’s going on and increase their excitement through music and videos. Various entertainment consisting of celebrity appearances and unique events during the intermission periods are also required. All of these tasks listed above are accomplished through the SPP. They mostly work inside the control room, divided as the audio, video, entertainment team and the announcers. Therefore, all of the videos, excluding the actual broadcast of the games, and all of the sound the spectators hear are the result of the SPP’s work. Within these complicated procedures, I worked as a translator on the video team, in the SPP of the Gwandong Hockey Center. The blue box seen in the center of the picture is the control room. As the Olympics are an international event, it is not only Koreans working behind the stage. On the video team, the team directors were American, with the rest of the video team – the editors, playback operators, camera directors and the runners being Korean. That meant that the translators had to know everything going on in the video team and had to make simultaneous translations during the whole Olympic period. Each person on the video team had their own roles, and translators had the extra job of writing daily reports related to all of the videos played that day. The SPPs schedule’ was decided by the number of games that day. People would go to work four hours before the start of the first game. The doors for the spectators open an hour and a half before the game, meaning they have to be fully ready in two hours. Therefore, when we had three games, we had to leave our accommodation at 7:20 a.m. in the morning and come back around 12:30 to 1:00 a.m. at night. People generally had four hours of sleep everyday and then continued their work. Playback operators checked new daily videos and kept track of them while the editors made new highlight videos of the games and various announcement videos. The camera directors and the runners went through the events and performances planned for the day, since their filming had to be played live on the electronic display board. All questions, instructions and comments were translated by me, including the cameras filming events and performances. Each and every one in the Olympics worked hard behind the scenes. The woman hockey, Team Corea Not only was Gwandong Hockey Center my workplace, but it was also the center of attention during the Olympics. North and South Korea’s unified team played in the Gwandong Hockey Center, pulling in great attention worldwide. Even though Team Corea lost their matches, media outlets around the world payed attention to the games and the incidents surrounding them. Personally, being able to watch all of the incidents going on in the arena, I was able to come back home with unique experiences. After Team Corea's game ended, loud cheers were heard in the arena. The cheer squad in red also caught the spectators' eyes during the game. During the first game of Team Corea, North Korea’s cheering squad was present in the arena. As I normally stand beside the stage before the game and during intermissions, I was able to have a full view of the spectators and was able to see flocks of red. Endless lines of women in red clothes entered, filling up the seats one by one in several groups all around the arena. They seemed to stay still, but all of a sudden, they started cheering all at once. They continued cheering during the pre-games and intermissions, with no one leaving for the bathroom whatsoever. Moreover, quite a lot of people from our country also participated in the cheers, making the arena even more active. This however resulted in all of the SPP outside the control room to have problems listening to the intercom, which was essential to continue our events and performances. As the translator, I stood with the camera director beside the stage and the speakers. I had already been struggling to hear over the loud noises, but I had to increase the volume of the intercom to the highest level in order to translate the director’s words accurately. The attendance of the cheer squad was indeed meaningful, but at the same time gave hardships to workers like us. There were a couple more incidents related to Team Corea’s games even after the first game. These gave me headaches as a staff. However, looking back at it, they were such unique experiences that no one else could ever have had. A group photo of the SPP crew. A lot more people than you think were behind the scenes during the Olympics. 18 days of lack of sleep and tension are now finished. Everyone was extremely stressed out and sharp to finish the Olympics successfully, but still had each other to rely on. I was able to meet such passionate, enthusiastic people in their own areas, and am extremely glad such a chance like this came across to me. On Jung-yun jessica0818@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by On Jung-yun

2018-02 12

[Special]Changing Events for Freshmen

The freshmen of 2018 only have a few weeks left until they begin a brand new chapter in their university life. Before becoming an actual university student, various freshman events are usually prepared for a better, more comfortable start. Student council members from all departments thoroughly prepare for the best event, as it is the first encounter between the new students and Hanyang University (HYU). However, various controversies have been arising and have required alteration. Before-semester programs for freshmen Commonly at HYU, there are two events prepared for freshmen. Commonly known as ‘Mi-teo’ and ‘Sae-teo’, freshmen have the chance to meet their seniors and friends. Mi-teo and sae-teo are usually the first event that freshmen face while they are awaiting the start of school. These events are not official but still take up a lot of a freshmen’s school life. They can not only meet their friends and seniors, but they can also receive information that helps them proceed in their school life. However, there is also a dark side to these events. Various divisions accommodate in various places. (Photo courtesy of HYU Division of International Studies) There have been constant issues at this time of year regarding sae-teo. Various incidents related to safety or sexual harassment have happened each year, and quite a lot of people have made opinions on these alterations. Currently in HYU, The student councils from all departments have been making new measures for better safety each year, hoping for improvement through frequent meetings. The Seoul Campus has started their first sae-teo with the College of Business on the 11th. However, a lot of discussion had taken place in order to make this year’s events happen. At the start of this year, the Ministry of Education announced that all 4-year-universities must “proceed the orientation in the school, only for a day without any accommodations.” This announcement was hard-pushed mentioning that each division’s budget can be reduced when proceeding with the sae-teo before March, as freshmen aren’t official students of HYU before then. As a lot of people were sensitive to safety issues, HYU could not ignore the announcement that came down from the Ministry of Education. Different programs have been made to allow freshmen to settle into school. (Photo courtesy of HYU Division of International Studies) A change needed in the long-run The presidents from all departments had extremely frequent meetings within the division and between other departments, as they had already been proceeding with these events. On the official Facebook page of HYU's emergency planning committee, a statement was uploaded explaining the difficulties of having to cancel all events that had been planned. After a number of meetings, the president of HYU allowed the planned events to proceed with a couple of divisions, cancelling or delaying the sae-teo. It is inevitable for the school to take a careful stance since the overall responsibility for student safety is on the school. As many students have to go out of school to accommodate their events in another area, the possibilities for accidents increases. Moreover, as alcohol is included in the midst of these events, even more accidents can occur. The various, so-called, ‘cultures’ of universities are one of the people’s most worrisome problems, such as talent shows and the forcing of one to drink. All divisions and departments of HYU are, therefore, eliminating these talent shows and are making extra education programs regarding alcohol and sexual harassment issues. While they might not be perfect, they are, indeed, trying their best. More consideration is needed for freshmen events. (Photo courtesy of Hanyang University) It is obvious that students should be safe no matter what. Issues regarding budgets and in-school orientations are again a problem that needs to be dealt with in the near future. A radical change is not something that gives the best result. A long-term solution and plan needs to be considered by both the school and the students, as they feel the problems surrounding them. The culture is already gradually changing. It is time to gradually speed up this procedure so that these freshmen events can still remain--with its strength emphasized to its best. On Jung-yun jessica0818@hanyang.ac.kr

2018-02 04

[Special]What is More than Meeting the Eye

Lookism is defined as a “discriminatory treatment toward physically unattractive people.” This stereotype is spread throughout all sorts of social settings, and affects an individual in the important parts of their lives as in employment, romantic relationships, and so on. The term “lookism” was coined in the 1970s, and despite that, the word came into being quite recently, the phenomenon had been existent since human interaction. Criticism concerning appearance-oriented preference dates back to ancient and medieval records, from a wide array of scholars and religious figures. However, a new word having been coined to dedicate itself to this issue well describes how much the society has grown to become aware of it in recent times. Korea is a country that has not escaped this phenomenon. In fact, it is one of the most deeply influenced countries with lookism, being a mecca of plastic surgery and a massive consumer of cosmetic goods. Teen lookism As a fair indicator of lookism, sales of beauty products for teenagers have grown substantially in recent years. According to data provided by SK Planet, which operates a major platform for online commerce, the overall sale of beauty products increased by 29 percent in 2017. The growth percentage had recorded 251 percent rise in the previous year. One of the most dramatic rises in sales was in lip products such as lipsticks or liptints targeted towards teenagers, which rose by 549 percent. Cosmetics, as a long held subject of consumption for women, has transcended to men, and now even to young children. A result of a survey conducted by the Korea Citation Index reported that 42.4 percent of elementary school students wear makeup, and 43.4 percent of them began applying makeup in the fifth grade. Children's cosmetic usage has become so prevalent that the South Korean government is under discussion to create a new cosmetic's category to monitor and mandate children's products under stricter standards for their safety. An array of self teaching contents can be accessed on the internet (Photo courtesy of Youtube) This increased focus on beauty products and appearance has diverse contributing factors. For one, the advanced telecommunication technology provides a means of advertisement more pervasive and aggressive than ever, and the increased number of media outlets sheds light on a plethora of celebrities or Youtube stars that teenagers look up to and mimic. Furthermore, e-commerce platforms and numerous blogs and videos regarding makeup tips and recommendations lowers the entry barrier of purchasing and learning to apply makeup. This and the perennial desire of teenagers to appear as adults provides the driving force for the surge in cosmetic sales. Lookism for the 20s According to a market report done by a professional market research firm, Trendmonitor, among Korea, China, and Taiwan, Koreans in their 20s to 30s have expressed the lowest satisfaction towards their appearance. This may suggest that Koreans have a higher standard of beauty, or a somewhat higher level of inferiority. Whatever the reason may be, Korean youth spend countless hours and money on their appearance. Aside from cosmetics, plastic surgery is definitely one of the most common means that Koreans turn to for aesthetic improvement. According to the Economist, although Korea came in 7th place when it comes to the absolute number of plastic surgery done, the number of plastic surgeries in ratio to the population was by far the highest. A curious phenomenon in Korea is “employment plastic surgery,” illustrating the growing group of people going under the knife to increase their chances of getting employed. Another growing field of aesthetic consumption is hair loss treatment for men. Although the issue is not much of a problem for women, it has become a critical problem for young men. The treatment cost for hair loss targeting men in their 20s has risen by 34.2 percent during the past 5 years, surpassing that of men in their 30s and even 40s. In addition to hair treatment, Korean men have maintained the highest rate of individual cosmetic spending since 2014, according to the Wall Street Journal. This suggests that Lookism affects both genders with growing intensity. An iconic image that illustrates the prevalence of plastic surgery in Korea (Photo courtesy of Allkpop) Spending for the older generations A new consumer group dubbed the “young forty” has received focus in 2017 with people in their late 30s to 40s spending more on their looks and interests. In addition to this trend, the idea of “You Only Live Once” (YOLO) has pervaded through to the late generation. Although YOLO, a term and idea that began in the United States, originally referred to the youth who take risks and adventures, the term has taken a slight turn in Korea. It has caught the attention of older people who have taken it as a reminder that the time to enjoy life is limited, and that it is “never too late" to do anything. As a result, the national spending on traveling, sports, entertainment, and of course, looks, have increased profoundly by people in their 40s. Furthermore, plastic surgery, especially those targeting the eyes, has become popular for people in their 40s to 50s. As for people in their 30s, a growing number of people invest in their looks as an outlet of their desire to stand out. As the majority of workers in their 30s live a somewhat uniform life, working in offices in similar outfits, their desire to be noticed as original and unique has led to increased spending on clothes, cosmetics, and plastic surgery. Their financial capacity allows them to indulge in their desires without too much financial pressure. Young forty is a term coined and popularized here in Korea. (Photo courtesy of Mediask) The implications of Lookism One of the things that make lookism so hard to criticize and contain is that it is deeply inherent for us to be drawn to people who possess physically desirable traits. However, in the social realm, this instinctive preference that once may have been related to survival has now become harder to defend. With increased awareness of equality and materialism, there is now a definitive breach of morals when lookism prevails in a certain social interaction. Although romantic relationships are still a large part of personal preference, opportunities of employment and education should never be hindered by lookism. The mandate of “blind recruitment,” the receiving of resumes that do not contain photos, is a recent and a rather very late change that Korea has taken to address this issue. On the other hand, another critical and complicated issue of lookism is the problem of who gets to decide the standard of beauty. So far, conglomerates of cosmetic products and media outlets have massively influenced the public ideal and standards of beauty. But then again, if being plump and healthy had been a standard of physical epitome in medieval times, is it so wrong for the standard to now be skinny and tall? Historically, it has been proven that an appearance-oriented preference has existed with or without conglomerates and businesses. Although the public and society subject lookism under a negative light, it is an issue that has been created by, and can only be solved through individual choices. One small, yet critical step that we could take is to become more aware of the choices we make even if we do indulge in lookism. Regardless of whether we believe that lookism is immoral or natural, thinking about how large of a factor physical appearance plays in our individual social interactions will eventually help us define how we want to address this issue. Lee Changhyun pizz1125@hanyang.ac.kr

2018-01 29

[Special][Op-ed] Unified Korean Women's Ice Hockey Team in PyeongChang

The 2018 PyeongChang Olympics is about to raise its curtains in 10 days. Aside from the fact that the Olympics is the quadrennial global festival, PyeongChang is drawing the world's attention because of the IOC's (International Olympic Committee) approval of a unified team of the two Koreas. Although the discussion of unified participation began back in 2011 during the foundation of the PyeongChang Organizing Committee for the 2018 Olympic & Paralympic Winter Games, the decision was made when the deadline for submission was way overdue due to the seemingly hasty decision to share the 22 player roster in women's hockey. South and North Korean ice hockey players are taking a photo after the 2017 IIHF Women's Ice hockey World Championship in April 6th, 2017. (Photo courtesy of Yonhap News) Ice hockey is considered ‘the game’ in winter Olympics. The South Korean National Ice Hockey Team has never made it to the Olympics because they were not qualified. Therefore, 2018 is the first year ever for Korea to play in the big game. The International Ice Hockey Federation and the International Skating Union approved Korea’s entry as part of a special favor for the hosting country. Granting entry for the hosting country was abolished in 2006, while the following Winter Olympics – Toronto and Sochi – were hosted by countries with strong ice hockey teams. Korea ranks 23rd internationally. The issue of the unified team in women’s ice hockey appeared on the table in early January after Kim Jong-un's new year's greeting speech where he expressed his positive opinion in participating in the PyeongChang Olympics. In the high-level talks in the Panmunjom, North Korea’s participation in the game was discussed, leading to related discussions such as the use of the unified flag or how many athletes and cheerleaders should go to the South. In the following vice-minister level conference, both Koreas agreed to march together under the unified flag, and the ‘fear’ of the united team for women’s ice hockey became a real concern for many people. Then, the IOC agreed to ‘the Olympic deal’ on the 21st of January to grant united entry with 22 North Korean athletes, and most symbolically, accepting the South Korean government’s request to enlarge the quota for women’s hockey. The two Koreas will participate in the game with a total of thirty-five players, with twelve of them being North Korean. The coach, Sarah Murray – now the coach for the united team – will be mandated to use three North Korean players in each game according to the Olympic Korean Peninsula Declaration. South Korean president Moon Jae-in and the president of IOC Thomas Bach. Moon is assuring Bach that the Olympic Games would not be threatened by regional conflicts in September 20th, 2017. (Photo courtesy of insidethegames) The legal base for the unified team lies in the Special Act on the Support for the 2018 Olympic and Paralympic Winter Game, article 85, which was established in 2011. Despite the fact that the unified team is not a news, more than 70 percent of the South Koreans seem to disapprove the government’s decision. An Instagram post from the national hockey team player Lee Minji on 20th, January raised sympathetic sentiment among the people, too. She mentioned that “a second in the field is invaluable for every player” and that she cannot understand how “the decision will have a minor impact on the athletes”, criticizing the authority. Thomas Bach, president of IOC spoke “The Olympic Games show us what the world could look like, if we were all guided by the Olympic spirit of respect and understanding,” and I agree to his point that the Olympics should be about the spirit of peace and global unification. Although many Korean people harshly criticize the Moon administration as far as to call '2018 Pyongyang Olympics', it is understandable for the president to take the international spotlight to show the world how the two Koreas are working towards peace. One of the main reasons why South Korean corporates are having a hard time receiving foreign investment is the unstable political situation in the peninsula. Although many Koreans do not foresee the war to break anytime soon, the ten-year long hostility during the Lee and Park administration and Trump sitting in the Whitehouse did not help the situation between the North and South Korea. Now that Moon struggles to thaw the relationship, the Olympics seems like a huge opportunity to alleviate the distrust. 2018 PyeongChang Olympic will be the first Olympic in history for the two Koreas playing as one. Taking the Olympic spirit; "to build a peaceful and better world" into account, peacemaking after the tensions built up due to the missiles late 2017 seems like an adequate timing. Moreover, there are several widespread misunderstanding behind the name 'Pyongyang Olympics'. One is that the South Korean flag will not be raised during the games. The unified flag will fly only after the events where the North and South Koreas have jointly participated. Another misunderstanding that shared code of 'COR' is by the request of North Korea, while in fact, the code comes from French term (IOC's official language aside from English) Corée du Sud and Corée du Nord. The North and South Korea is entering the 2000 Sydney Olympics with a unified flag. The two Koreas marched together in the opening ceramony. (Photo courtesy of Hankyoreh) There are disagreements to the decision from the general public and the politics, pointing out that South Korea and the United States have agreed to postpone the annual joint military drill for North Korea taking part in the Olympic Games. Some papers wrote that this is all part of North Korea's plan to acquire more ballistic missiles and strengthen their military power. We do not know if that allegation is true or not, but North Korea would not have agreed to take part in the games if they had nothing to benefit from. By showing the two government's will to build peace and bring security in the international society, both nations will benefit during and after the games. Kim So-yun dash070@hanyang.ac.kr

2018-01 28

[Special][Op-ed] Invisible and Silent, Yet Deadly

What are some of the best-selling items these days? Sanitary masks are, indeed, one of the most compelling products. There has been a 380 percent increase in nasal sanitizer product sales, with a 213 percent rise in sanitary mask sales. What is the cause of this phenomenon? The severity of the fine dust in the air seems to be the catalyst of the sales boom. With the emission of toxicant chemicals from automobiles and industrial sites being the main culprit of the fine dust pollution crisis, Korean is going through a major pollution issue and is on its way to address that problem. What’s all the fuss about? Recently, emergency text messages informing citizens that the fine dust level is particularly bad that day are sent directly from the government, not to mention the myriad of people that can be seen wearing sanitary masks outdoors. This means the situation is really getting serious now, unquestionably demanding some counteractions to be taken. Korea has the highest density of fine dust concentration among the member countries of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), recording 32 micrograms of fine dust per cubic meter, while Iceland is on record for being the least polluted country, showing 2.9 micrograms of fine dust per cubic meter. The size of fine dust is about seven times smaller than the width of an average person’s hair, which can freely and effortlessly enter human bodies through the nasal cavity or through the skin, reaching deep inside and inducing various health issues such as dementia, stroke, dysrhythmia, angiosis, hair loss, nasal inflammation and much more. The biggest problem with the fine dust is that the particles are so small that they are unfilterable, meaning they can get to any part of the body and cause a wide variety of diseases. Fine dust is seven times smaller than a strand of hair. Among the developed nations in the OECD, South Korea has the worst air pollution. (Photo courtesy of npr.org) It is not the thought that counts, it is the action It is not hard to figure out that there is no quick-fix solution for Korea’s situation now. In response to the deteriorating issue, the Korean Ministry took action: since the harmful emission from automobiles is a great contributor to the overall situation, the government hoped to entice people to take public transportation by making it free of charge for one day. Though it sounds reasonable, this approach received considerable criticism for several reasons. First of all, this solution is only temporary, yet very costly. Moreover, voices were heard that the money should rather have been invested in developing technologies to converting current automobiles into electronic or other non-harmful types or in developing technologies to absorb or cleanse the polluted air. This approach was one of the four emergency actions established by the government, which are to be taken as the situation gets irrevocably worse. The other actions include an odd-even license plate policy (cars with license plates that end in an odd number can only be driven on an odd number date and vice versa), the reduction of factory operation hours, and the closing of parking lots. All these approaches evidently aim to reduce the toxic emissions from automobiles but do not aim to provide an alternative direction to remove the root of the problem. Citizens express great dissatisfaction about the actions the government has taken, voicing that they are only temporarily or partially resolving the trouble. However, to remove the root cause of the whole situation would cost a lot of money and if the government raises the tax rate to do so, people will surely show hostility as well. In an individualistic society, such as the one we live in today, people would care more about their own future than their country’s. In such a case, how can the government afford to meet both the requirements of the people and this monstrous disaster? Being aware that the silent monster is growing more and more powerful everyday, both the government and citizens are nervous. What we need in this situation is not arguments and criticisms but cooperation. The current situation necessitates a multilateral approach since its scale has exceeded the moderate level. More than one solution should be carried out by more than one group of people. An unilateral solution cannot effectively address such problem, meaning the government alone cannot single-handedly resolve the tragedy. There must be a cooperation between the government and the people, at the level of both individuals and corporations. The government should provide the least burdensome and the most effective solution and the citizens should cooperate in order to maximize the effect and to defeat the common enemy. Fine dust overwhelmingly covers the city. (Photo courtesy of DBpia Report for Research) Jeon Chae-yun chaeyun111@haynayg.ac.kr