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2018-12 06

[Student]Hanyang University student Khishgee Boldsukh will become a Korean national

Pictured above is Hanyang student Khishgee Boldsukh. (Photo courtesy of Kyunghyang Shinmun ) Mongolian national, Khishgee Boldsukh (Physical Education 18) is currently building his hopes of becoming a national player for the basketball club of Hanyang University. He has been in Korea for 10 years and has passed the naturalization test to acquire Korean nationality under the name, "Lee Keun-hwi" at the end of this month. He was living with his grandmother in Mongolia, but when she passed away, he legally moved to Korea with an F-3 visa in 2009. He has been interested in basketball since his childhood. After entering the school in Saehwa Elementary School in Changwon, South Gyeongsang Province, that is when is initial love for basketball began on the school yard playgrounds hooping it up with friends. Afterwards, as a basketball player at Pallyong Middle School and Masan High School in Changwon, he played hard by scoring double digit points in each game. Last year, only 40 high school basketball players from Korea participated in the Korea Basketball League (KBL) Youth Elite Camp, where special training is given by outstanding coaches in Korea. However, he has also faced many hardships along the way. He could not participate on the court because he was a foreigner at the National Youth Sports Festival and the National Sports Festival because only athletes with Korean nationality can play in these competitions. Not having had physical training experience, he also had a hard time getting into a college athletic program. Also, his injuries were not covered by insurance, making it more costly to treat them. Nevertheless, Khishgee Boldsukh did not give up. To mark the Taegeuk symbol, he entered the department of physical education at Hanyang University this month through a special admission exam. Seeing the growth potential of Boldsukh, Hanyang helped him enter the university. With the height of 18cm and a weight of 87kg, he possesses quick feet and long-range shooting ability. Jung Jae-hoon, the director of the Hanyang University basketball team said, "he has range and accuracy shooting from long distances." Concluding a long journey of hoop dreams to Korean nationality, Khishgee Boldsukh stated, "I am interested in domestic basketball, and I will achieve my dream."

2017-11 27

[Student]Step by Step, Changing the World

‘Changing the world’ might seem as a rather abstract goal to achieve as a university student. On the third floor of the Business School, there are 25 student interns whom are here for a semester in the Hanyang Business Lab to actually achieve this dream. Lee You-jin (Business Administration, 3rd year) and Yun Jeong-ah (Chinese Language and Literature, 4th year) were in the midst of reaching their goals through two missions: ‘Artist Tak’ and ‘Mindful Laundry’. Supporting students with ambition Hanyang Business Lab is one of the characterized programs of the Business school for students to better prepare themselves for the Fourth Industrial Revolution and to better experience the practical affairs of business. There are seven different labs in this program, starting from Artificial Intelligence to Quantitative Analytics. As the second semester’s members, Lee and Yun are working within the Social Innovation Lab with two other members led by professor Shin Hyun-sang. They work to make a platform that could positively influence the society and are therefore specifying their wishes through the two projects. From an individual artist to a platform Lee spends the whole day in the lab, creating better ideas for 'Artist Tak'. Lee is the manager of a facebook page ‘Artist Tak’, (Click HERE) which is a branded platform of Tak Yong-joon who became an artist after a general paralysis. “Tak suffered from a general paralysis after his honeymoon when he was 29. Most suffer depression after they are paralyzed. Unlike most people, he instead started drawing with the strength of his shoulder, which was the only part of his body he could freely move,” explained Lee. Although he drew over 1500 pieces of art, he couldn’t make a living due to the lack of promotion and acknowledgment. Therefore, Lee, along with her teammates, created a platform that could become a sustainable profit model. They started off from scratch to brand talented individuals, solely with the concept of 'everyone has a special talent'. “We first started through naming the brand along with designing the logo. Since the platform we were planning to design was an individual rather than an enterprise, we had difficulties in systemizing it,” reminisced Lee. After studying illustrations for this job, she herself made a logo that configurates a person drawing on a wheelchair and created a facebook page to better advertise this brand. They also sold his work at the 17 Hearts Festival held in HYU to better advertise it. The logo of 'Artist Tak' on the left, and a picture of the postcards they sold in the 17 Hearts Festival on the right. (Photo courtesy of Lee) In accordance with Tak’s request, they are donating a certain portion of their profits to NEXON Purme Children’s Rehabilitation Hospital to help those facing similar difficulties. Throughout the interview, Lee showed her desire for Tak to continue on with this platform for his living even after this project ends. “I wish we could make a system stable enough so that he could carry on this project easily by himself,” wished Lee. Her final goal is to make a social impact with less priority in making a profit. Lee commented, “My final goal is to become a CEO of a social enterprise. As for now, whatever I do after I graduate, I want to be in a position where I could give a positive influence on the society.” Washing off your depression "Someone who had the same experience can better understand them." “I myself suffered from depression in my early twenties,” Yun started off. “I visited various counselling centers and attended in school programs to overcome my insecurities but suffered from recurrences.” She had a thirst for helping the students in similar situations and therefore decided to take a scientific and systemized approach towards this matter. She applied ‘cognitive therapy’ into a platform to help those with depression to acknowledge their own status and recover the symptoms through their own cognitions. She created a facebook page named ‘Mindful Laundry’ (click HERE) and provided three steps in this model. First of all, she created videos for an entry, then introduced a mental inbody test so that the testers could be cognitive of their own state. As the last step, she intends to make gatherings between people with similar symptoms, to provide positive synergy. Yun’s idea is already being acknowledged in the society. She won a prize through this idea in the SBCA (Social Venture Competition Asia) held on the 10th. However, her duty isn’t as easy as it seems. “I take care of all of the activities required to maintain this platform. I create and visualize all the ideas needed and manage the facebook page by myself. The biggest difficulty definitely arises from the lack of manpower,” commented Yun. She added that she wanted to continue on this project even after this semester to achieve her goal. “A lot of people are suffering from depression in the current society even though you don’t reveal that fact in the first place,” commented Yun. She wishes to become a cozy nest for those in need of help. The four students of the Social Innovation Lab. They are still in the midst of achieving their dreams. Continuing different projects with the same goals, all members of the Social Innovation Lab are still working day and night to change the world in their own ways. A society where people can live with a hope, a society where people can easily reach for a hand is what they will be working on. We always have a better tomorrow ahead of us, thanks to these students with motivation. On Jung-yun jessica0818@naver.com Photos by Kang Cho-hyun

2017-10 17

[Student]Foreign Students of Hanyang University Helped the Damage of Mexico Earthquake

Foreign students studying at Hanyang University started a fundraising campaign on September 28 to help Mexico suffered a massive earthquake. This fundraising campaign was held for about a month with voluntary participation of foreign students, and domestic students also started to participate. About 7,000 foreign students including undergraduate students are currently attending Hanyang University. Meanwhile, a strong earthquake struck southern and central Mexico, killing hundreds of people according to a foriegn press. ▲ Foreign students at Hanyang University are participating fundraising campaign to help Mexico. A foreign student is putting money in the donation box. ▲ A foreign student proceeding with the fundraising campaign (the right at the picture) is handing out materials with explanations about Mexico earthquake. ▲ Foreign students proceeding with the fundraising campaign are requesting more participation prior to the start of the campaign.

2017-07 24

[Student]First Try, Best Result!

To foster future leaders of unfolding automobiles market and self-driving cars, Hanyang University (HYU) hosted its 15th Smart Model Car Competition at the Olympic Gymnasium on the 14th of July. Applause of encouragement and cheers were heard here and there with shout outs of supports being made each time a team took their turn to run their cars. Of the 20 teams that made it to the final, team Future Automotive Engineering (FAE) won the first place. All five members of the team are students of the Department of Automotive Engineering: Park Sung-woo (4th year), Shin Hyun-ki (4th year), Park Soo-hyun (4th year), Byun Hyo-seok (2nd year), and Byeon Moo-kyung (4th year). Participants were required to develop an embedded control system (a smart computer system enabling machines to operate on their own) and run their cars on the track, which was readily set in the Olympic Gymnasium, waiting for the entrants to come. Each team was to bring their cars to the start line and present its ability when called upon. The missions were as follows: cars must drive in the middle of the lane, must avoid obstacles, must speed down in the school zone and go back to the original speed after leaving the zone, should be able to go over the hill, and must make curves without departing the lane. Now, ready, set, go! The finished work of team FAE, the only one to complete the whole track. (Photo courtesy of FAE) Prize of 10,000,000 given to team FAE! Unforeseen and unforgettable “None of us expected to win the competition. Since all five of us has no experience of participating in a contest like this, we thought we would barely make it to the final,” began Byun. About 100 teams were present for the preliminary round, after which 20 teams were selected for the final. Much to their surprise, when team FAE passed the preliminary round ranking the 4th place, their goal changed to complete the track and make it to the finish line in the final. What was surprising was not only the fact that they have won the competition but also that they were the only team who made it to the finish line. “We were happy with the result, of course, but at the same time, we were quite shook from such unexpected outcome. We didn’t expect to be the only team to complete the track,” remarked Byun. The most essential requisite for the car was to keep itself in the middle of the lane, not crossing over to the other or departing it. When the car was free to drive, it had to maintain its speed and make curves as the track demanded. Then at some point, school zone was marked by thick, black lines in which the car had to slow down and avoid the obstacles. Marking the end of the school zone with another set of thick black lines, the car was to go back to its original speed and finish the track, passing a hill and stopping at the finish line without bumping into the blockage. FAE’s car has successfully fulfilled all these requirements and confidently marched to the end. Sung-woo, who was the team leader, was looking for fellow students who would join his team. The members came together as one team through acquaintance, since they took the same course. The team first gathered around April, in the middle of the semester, and met up from time to time to work on their automobile. It was after the semester was over that they deeply got down to their business and invested more time on constructing the car. They even got access to the 3D printer thanks to professor Yoon Soo-kyung and tested their designs, by mapping out where each part should lie. Nonetheless, they received no particular help from any of their professors to be fair. “This course named 'Microprocessor' we took was quite helpful in a way that it taught us about the parts we used for this competition.” Byeon Moo-kyung (left), Byeon Hyo-seok (middle), Park Soo-hyun (right) Fix it till you make it “Finding the right angle of the camera, which will be the eye of the car, was one of the most difficult tasks,” recalled Park. It was crucial to adjust the camera at the perfect angle because the car has to sense and move according to what it observes. If it is too short-sighted, the car will fail to perceive the other lane and if it is too far-sighted, the car will easily depart the lane. “We had to remove and adjust the camera countless times to find the perfect spot. Everything will go into nothing if the camera fails to observe the area correctly in the first place,” explained Byeon. In addition, more than ten parts had to be replaced because they were burned during the process. If one part goes wrong, the whole thing fails to function. Therefore, it was crucial that each part maintained its good condition. Overall, the process was not so smooth, as the members struggled to “Our team name was uninteresting, our car wasn’t that flashy, and we even had to fix it until the last minute. However, our car presented the best performance and eventually became the only car that finished the whole track. This was unexpected, but we’re very happy with how it all turned out,” said the members unanimously. "Small changes and corrections lead to a big difference!" Jeon Chae-yun chaeyun111@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Choi Min-ju

2017-06 12

[Student]Collective Intelligence Kicks In

“Two heads are better than one” is a phrase often used to describe a situation where a task is better carried when more than one person is involved. While some people prefer to study alone and concentrate to the full, others like to study in a group and exchange mutual help. The Smart Learning and Learning Center is running a 'Global Learning Community' program that supports community learning activities and cultural experience activities for major courses since 2014. The program, which allows 4 to 6 team members to study as well as cultural exchanges, is paid up to 500,000 won. We are actively conducting this semester, and we have looked into the Global Learning Community 7 activity, which is about a week before the final evaluation. Consistent and diligent studying Lee Ji-yeon, the principal researcher, is overseeing the overall progress. The global learning community is a program developed to develop creative learning methods and improve communication and collaboration skills through self-directed, community learning. It is also possible to develop global communication skills through exchange of learning and cultural exchange with foreign students. At the beginning of each semester, a team member who submits a detailed application plan will be selected by the Smart Teaching and Learning Center. Most students who apply for team are required to work with students who attend classes in the same major, but international students who are having difficulties in studying their major or those who want to study hard with other friends are more than welcomed to apply. The aim of the Global Learning Community Program is to provide an opportunity for Korean students and foreign students to study together in harmony and to share their knowledge and culture for better learning, obtaining mutual benefits from one another. The program intends to give a helping hand to those foreign students who are struggling to follow along with their class content due to language barrier. By having weekly meetings to review their class contents, students can stay away from procrastination and keep up with their learnings. On top of this academic pursuits, students are expected to experience different cultures from each other and broaden their cultural knowledge. Starting from this semester, supporter system has been adopted, in response to participant students’ feedback that it would be helpful to have a more thorough check-up system that manages the communication and difficulties among members of each team. There are total three assistant teachers, all of whom are graduate students. Each assistant teacher is in charge of helping students in different languages: Chinese, English, and Korean. "We have added a feedback system to support students' learning activities in depth and detail. For example, we have been using the supporter system since this semester to help foreign students understand how much they are learning, whether there is a need for learning support, or to facilitate communication between team members," commented Lee. Assistant teacher Noh Ah-young (Department of Education, Master’s Program) and one team leader, Ahn Jae-won (Division of Business Administration, 4th year) Outstanding team of exemplary work The 'Friends Management' team was conducted at the beginning of the 'Project Management' class in Business Administration. The group did not simply took the program as an opportunity for themselves to come together and help each other, but further extended to create a project in which they embraced other fellow students to join in. They created a culture exchange program where 20 students joined Korean traditional clothes hanbok experience and tea-house field trip. “When submitting the monthly report, a lot of students put the focus on what they studied and how they kept up with it. However, Ahn’s team showed innovativeness and creativity in their project and demonstrated perfectly for what this program aims to achieve,” commented Lee. Ahn’s team did a great job in bringing about a cultural exchange not only among its team members but to those outside the group, which makes its achievement even more outstanding. “This program provided me with an opportunity to get closer with people who I may have simply regarded as a temporary group project teammate.” Jeon Chae-yun chaeyun111@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Choi Min-ju

2017-06 05

[Student]Foreign students at Hanyang experienced field trip event

The Hanyang University Office of International Affairs organized a field trip to provide foreign students with opportunities to experience Korean culture and help revitalize rural areas. International students from Germany, France, Brazil, Mexico, Turkey and China were among the participants. ▲ Foreign students at Hanyang are making Kimbap at Banguok Village in Danyang-gun, Chungbuk Province on June 4. ▲ Foreign students at Hanyang are making Kimbap at Banguok Village in Danyang-gun, Chungbuk Province on June 4. ▲ Foreign students at Hanyang are making 'Sanchea Mandu' at Banguok Village in Danyang-gun, Chungbuk Province. ▲ Foreign students at Hanyang are making 'Sanchea Mandu' at Banguok Village in Danyang-gun, Chungbuk Province. ▲ Foreign students at Hanyang are making 'Dambukjang' at Banguok Village in Danyang-gun, Chungbuk Province. ▲ Foreign students at Hanyang are making 'Dambukjang' at Banguok Village in Danyang-gun, Chungbuk Province. ▲ Foreign students at Hanyang are painting on a mug cup in Banguok Village, Danyang-gun, Chungbuk Province on June 4. ▲ Foreign students at Hanyang are painting on a mug cup in Banguok Village, Danyang-gun, Chungbuk Province on June 4. ▲ Foreign students at Hanyang are painting on a mug cup in Banguok Village, Danyang-gun, Chungbuk Province on June 4.

2017-05 15

[Student]Pop Monster, an Enterprise for University Students

“Until all 3,600,000 university students are happy” is a slogan adopted by Pop Monster, an enterprise that works to divert wasted advertisement costs to students’ benefit. Just as a monster would pop up in front of its prey and leave an unforgettable impression, Pop Monster wants to present university students with monster-like support. Choi Ji-eun (Department of Biomedical Engineering, 4th year), the founder of the enterprise, has developed the idea of acting as a link between corporates and students to create a win-win situation out of the understanding that majority of university students go through financial hard times and enormous amount of money is going into waste from advertisements. From inventing in high school to business in university When Choi was in high school, she showed extraordinary talent in inventing. In fact, her admission type to Hanyang was inventors selection. She has fostered a great interest in devising innovative ideas since she was a high-schooler, proving her talent by winning numerous awards in inventing competitions. The entries she contributed included traffic light for red-greed blind and wheelchairs for paraplegia and paralysis, both of which won her big awards. Because she decided to attend inventing classes offered by a teacher she met from one of the inventing competitions, Choi had little time to invest in her school study. This was a big concern for her parents, since she needed to put her best effort in studying as a high school student but her talent showed otherwise. "I wanted to turn what was wasted into something that was beneficial." “I knew I had to set my career path and study hard to get a high score on the Korean SAT, I was much more drawn into other things than studying. I just wanted to do what I felt like doing.” Choi neither studied for nor took the Korean SAT and devoted her time in inventing, which eventually ended up becoming her career route. Her interest and passion for inventing did not lessen a bit but grew even more ardently during her university years. In 2014, Choi entered the School of Youth Startup run by Small and Medium Business Corporation, which aims to cultivate innovative thinkers under the age 39. When applying to the school with an inventive idea as a requirement, Choi only had vague sketches of ideas for Pop Monster, but still gave it a shot. Unsurprisingly, she got accepted to the school and has been receiving training for startup ideas, preparing her to complete her startup business, Pop Monster. As a university student, she wanted to target university students as her business’s main beneficiary. Pop! Here’s your share! Since Choi wants to deal with the wasted non-targeted advertisement costs, she knew the first thing she had to do was to solidly set her target—university students—because only then the efficiency of an advertisement will improve. Thinking about what university students would like the most, she has worked with various companies to benefit both the students and the companies. One of the projects she worked on was handing out commodities of those companies to students and extracting surveys, ideas, and reviews of those items from the students in return, which could help improve those items. Positive response had been obtained from both students and companies. Pop Monster’s main role is to interact with and intervene in the relations among advertisements and its targeted audience. With some profit made from the business, she generates programs in which university students could participate and earn scholarship. Students are required to write their situation story of why they need funding and how they are going to use it. Those selected students then have to send a review to Pop Monster on how they spent the fund they have received. Themes of funding vary from transportation fee and monthly rent to back-to-school celebration and home-trip expenses. Choi is working on more projects and programs that could result in win-win situation for both companies and students. “Until all 3,600,000 university students are happy!" Jeon Chae-yun chaeyun111@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Choi Min-ju

2017-04 04 Important News

[Student]My First Semester at Hanyang University

In Hanyang University (HYU), there are approximately 2500 international students, including those who came as exchange students. Every new year, more international students are coming to HYU with high hopes and expectations to further their studies and to have a new experience. This week, News H met with 3 of the new international students in this spring semester. From Pakistan, Abubakar Sharafat (Civil Engineering, Integrated Master’s-Doctor’s Program) As he has much time in Korea, Sharafat said he wants to visit as many places as he can in Korea. After graduating from his university, Sharafat wanted to continue his studies. While searching for graduate schools, Sharafat started to have an interest in Korea and HYU. “At the company I was working at after graduation, several colleagues of mine recommended Korea. They told me that Korea is highly developed in the field of Civil Engineering, and HYU is the best school in engineering studies,” said Sharafat. Besides from the fame of HYU in engineering studies, friends of Sharafat who already studied in HYU, also told positive experience they had to Shrafat. Positive experience of friends motivated him to choose the HYU. “Now, because of my recommendation, my sister will also join me in HYU, which is a good news.” “I am currently here as a scholarship student of the Pakistan government, I will be here for about 5 years, so I will have to get used to many things in Korea like the language and food,” said Sharafat. Still, Sharafat said that he was surprised to see many commonalities between the culture of Pakistan and Korea. “Soon after I came to Korea, I found out that Koreans and Pakistanis both emphasize the respect for elders. Other than that, when I went to the field trip to Damyang with other international students, we got to make Korean traditional rice snack, which is also the famous sweet treat in Pakistan, called ‘Maronda’.” From France, Guzelya Marisova (International business management, Master’s program) Some of the left things-to-do for Marisova is to study Korean hard, visit Kookiwon (National Taekwondo Institute), and Hanwok village. Marisova’s decision to come to HYU and Korea is highly relevant with her love toward taekwondo. She has been playing taekwondo for 13 years now since she was 11. When she grew older and moved to France from Kazakhstan in 2014, she won a world champion title in WASCO (World All Style Combat Organization). “I first witnessed taewondo in a demo show back in my school when I was living in Kazakhstan. As soon as I saw it, I thought it was what exactly I need, and that I could protect myself with it. Since then, coming to Korea was one of my bucket lists,” said Marisova. While learning taekwondo, she was also impressed with the Korean culture, ‘ye’ (manners and respects between people) that is permeated inside of it. Her love toward taekwondo naturally led her to learn Korean as well. Even before coming to Korea, Marisova said she was taking Korean classes. Currently in HYU as well, Marisova is taking a Korean class. “I am still in the level of a beginner, but I hope staying in Korea will help me learning it faster, to communicate in Korean fluently.” Marisova also shared how thankful she is for the kind and clear instructions of Korean professors. While Marisova is quite familiar with some culture of Korea, She said she witnessed cultural stereotype in the country. “One thing I noticed in Korea was a cultural stereotype still existing in Korea,” explained Mariova. “As I am not a white Caucasian, people generally don’t think I could be a French. It is understandable because immigration is not as widespread in Korea.” From Germany, Ildikó Brust (Business Administration, 3rd year) If she has a chance, Brust said she wants to visit DMZ one again, as far as civilians are allowed to go. Among the 3 students, Brust is the one who is having the completely new experience in HYU and in Korea. “Before coming to HYU, I absolutely knew little about Asia, which was the reason why I chose Korea. I wanted to go to a place that is completely different in every way and that gave quite a surprise to my family and friends,” said Brust. Similar to other international students, Brust was able to find out about HYU because of her friend’s recommendation. “One of my German friend told me all about the amazing experiences she had in HYU, which really led me to come to HYU.” “What I really find cool is how big and modern the campus is, it is really different from my school back in Germany. I find it very nice to see all the convenience facilities like cafeterias and coffee shops inside the campus,” said Brust. Also, in classes, Brust was amazed how participative and helpful students are. "People tend to be more individualistic in Germany, but in Korea people have a stronger sense of community. I really do appreciate how students always try to help me.” Until now, one of the most memorable place Brust went in Korea was Demilitarized Zone (DMZ). “Even before coming to Korea, I was planning to visit DMZ. Korea is the only country separated in the world now and we hear all the shocking and terrible news about North Korea. I wanted to see a little bit of that myself.” After visiting DMZ, Brust thought she would want to go there one more time, to further inside where civilians can still go. Whether it is just for a semester or more years to come, News H hope all international students to have a best experience inside HYU. Yun Ji-hyun uni27@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Moon Hana

2017-03 06

[Student]Experiences at Hanyang, Francesca's story

Francesca Barbieri, the student from Humanitas University, the private university at Italy dedicated to the medical sciences, participated Hanyang summer program for her medical training. She shared her remarkable experiences and memories here at Hanyang University. Prescription For Growing: Learn Skills But Especially Make Friends I would have never imagined to realize such a big project in such a short time. I found myself on the other side of the world just after a few months I started thinking about it. As I knew about the possibility of obtaining a travel grant, I applied and was then accepted by the cardiology Professor Kyung -Soo KIM. Humanitas therefore gave me the opportunity to spend more than 40 days at the Hanyang University Medical Centre, in Seoul. There, I attended the cardiology wards, outpatient visits and the cardiology research laboratory. To tell the truth, the difficulties of such an experience can be many and discouraging. But everything becomes so pleasant and worthy when you meet the right group of people. Professor Kim and his group of physicians, residents, laboratory members and students accepted me as if I had always been one of them. My family and friends were definitely far away, but I found myself in an environment in which I never felt alone, I could ask anything I needed and was given all the possible help. Trying to follow them during the working day was though, with no doubt. I used to spend between 12 and 13 hours per day in the hospital, some in the clinic, some in the laboratories. As a second year student, I felt to have a solid theoretical knowledge but it was the first time for me to approach the practical clinical environment or research designs and laboratory protocols. I arrived as a very worried student, concerned about what to expect. I came out after 40 days with a basic knowledge of the main heart diseases, how to use the laboratory equipment, how to follow an experimental research design. This was achieved thanks to the constant, careful and personal tutoring I was provided, I always had at least one physician or one researcher on my side. I came out as part of a group of friends, and this was the most surprising and precious aspect. The attention they paid to the success and profit of my experience was invaluable. As invaluable is what I have learnt. Sometimes it is unbelievable how much we can grow in such a short time. * Original article at Hunimed.edu (link)

2017-01 16 Important News

[Student]Hanbok Beloved Worldwide

From 4th of January to 9th of January, hanbok making class was held in Human Ecology Building by Won Young. She has studied about hanbok and designing at Hanyang University (HYU) while attending Department of Clothing and Textile. The classes were held two hours everyday excluding the weekends, for four times. How it all started Won Young is Malaysian Chinese and also a Korean gyopo. While she was living in China, she says that there used to be a lot of tribes wearing different types of traditional clothes which is when she first encountered hanbok. “I have seen hanbok a lot on the television but once I came to Korea, I couldn’t see anyone wearing it in real life,” Won said. In order to make up for the discomfort of the hanbok, she started studying about life hanbok and became interested in the designs. Won (right) teaches Helene (left) how to use the sewing machine. She has created a startup team called TS (Time and Space) which consists of two people at the moment. Since she has studied in the field of fashion, Won thought of creating a brand of her own or creating a platform. Although there used to be websites where flower printings were available, it seemed to be a waste to cut out the pieces while designing her own patterns. This is how Won came up with the idea of DIY fabric in which she designs her own patterns and inserts the prints within the patterns. While attending at HYU, Won has participated in diverse programs created for international students but she felt that something was missing. “It seems like I was just looking around rather than doing something at the complete experiencing level. I think there are a lot of foreigners who would think like me,” said Won. This is how she came up with the idea of hanbok making class. Reactions towards the program A total number of fourteen students from diverse countries have participated in this program. Cho Yu-jin (faculty at Department of Clothing and Textile) and Lee Ye-jin (acquaintance of Won) have helped out with this event. Cho has helped out with the over lock while Lee has helped with the translation with the foreign students. Since the students participating in this program did not have any experiences or were not related major to fashion or designing, they had a hard time putting this together and one of them had to do all the sewing all over again from the sketch. Renu (left) and Azira (right) enjoys the program. Most of the students who have participated in the program had a similar idea in a sense that they were not aware of hanbok and how it could be utilized in daily life as well. Hwang An-ki (Media Communication, 2nd yr) said, “I was not well aware of Hanbok in the first place but as I was making it, it came to me as a beautiful traditional clothing.” Since foreign students who do not return to their home countries have not much to experience, they all claim that it has been a great experience for them. “I think it’s quite interesting that some people still wear traditional clothes since we don’t have them in Denmark. I think hanbok is very beautiful costume,” claimed Helene (Korean Studies, Master’s program). Although it has been a short period of time, all the students were able to finish their hanboks. After the session has finished, participants have matched their casual clothes along with hanbok and had photo session afterwards. “Through making the hanbok, foreign students would have been able to have the sense of achievement and feel the traditional culture of Korean costume. Also, by being able to have felt a new type of experience of making clothes, some people would have found a new hobby as well,” added Won. The students who have participated will keep in contact with each other and exchange information on hanbok flea markets or Korean culture experiences. Through this program, foreign students now understand Korean culture a little more. Since it has been a greatly developed program where it has been a talent donation of Won, students from diverse countries were able to experience the beauty of hanbok. Won hopes that she could carry out more programs related to hanbok in the future as well and provide lessons as part of the Korean wave towards foreigners. Kim Seung-jun nzdave94@hanyang.ac.kr Photo by Kim Sang-yeon Photo by Moon Hana