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2017-04 04 Important News

[Student]My First Semester at Hanyang University

In Hanyang University (HYU), there are approximately 2500 international students, including those who came as exchange students. Every new year, more international students are coming to HYU with high hopes and expectations to further their studies and to have a new experience. This week, News H met with 3 of the new international students in this spring semester. From Pakistan, Abubakar Sharafat (Civil Engineering, Integrated Master’s-Doctor’s Program) As he has much time in Korea, Sharafat said he wants to visit as many places as he can in Korea. After graduating from his university, Sharafat wanted to continue his studies. While searching for graduate schools, Sharafat started to have an interest in Korea and HYU. “At the company I was working at after graduation, several colleagues of mine recommended Korea. They told me that Korea is highly developed in the field of Civil Engineering, and HYU is the best school in engineering studies,” said Sharafat. Besides from the fame of HYU in engineering studies, friends of Sharafat who already studied in HYU, also told positive experience they had to Shrafat. Positive experience of friends motivated him to choose the HYU. “Now, because of my recommendation, my sister will also join me in HYU, which is a good news.” “I am currently here as a scholarship student of the Pakistan government, I will be here for about 5 years, so I will have to get used to many things in Korea like the language and food,” said Sharafat. Still, Sharafat said that he was surprised to see many commonalities between the culture of Pakistan and Korea. “Soon after I came to Korea, I found out that Koreans and Pakistanis both emphasize the respect for elders. Other than that, when I went to the field trip to Damyang with other international students, we got to make Korean traditional rice snack, which is also the famous sweet treat in Pakistan, called ‘Maronda’.” From France, Guzelya Marisova (International business management, Master’s program) Some of the left things-to-do for Marisova is to study Korean hard, visit Kookiwon (National Taekwondo Institute), and Hanwok village. Marisova’s decision to come to HYU and Korea is highly relevant with her love toward taekwondo. She has been playing taekwondo for 13 years now since she was 11. When she grew older and moved to France from Kazakhstan in 2014, she won a world champion title in WASCO (World All Style Combat Organization). “I first witnessed taewondo in a demo show back in my school when I was living in Kazakhstan. As soon as I saw it, I thought it was what exactly I need, and that I could protect myself with it. Since then, coming to Korea was one of my bucket lists,” said Marisova. While learning taekwondo, she was also impressed with the Korean culture, ‘ye’ (manners and respects between people) that is permeated inside of it. Her love toward taekwondo naturally led her to learn Korean as well. Even before coming to Korea, Marisova said she was taking Korean classes. Currently in HYU as well, Marisova is taking a Korean class. “I am still in the level of a beginner, but I hope staying in Korea will help me learning it faster, to communicate in Korean fluently.” Marisova also shared how thankful she is for the kind and clear instructions of Korean professors. While Marisova is quite familiar with some culture of Korea, She said she witnessed cultural stereotype in the country. “One thing I noticed in Korea was a cultural stereotype still existing in Korea,” explained Mariova. “As I am not a white Caucasian, people generally don’t think I could be a French. It is understandable because immigration is not as widespread in Korea.” From Germany, Ildikó Brust (Business Administration, 3rd year) If she has a chance, Brust said she wants to visit DMZ one again, as far as civilians are allowed to go. Among the 3 students, Brust is the one who is having the completely new experience in HYU and in Korea. “Before coming to HYU, I absolutely knew little about Asia, which was the reason why I chose Korea. I wanted to go to a place that is completely different in every way and that gave quite a surprise to my family and friends,” said Brust. Similar to other international students, Brust was able to find out about HYU because of her friend’s recommendation. “One of my German friend told me all about the amazing experiences she had in HYU, which really led me to come to HYU.” “What I really find cool is how big and modern the campus is, it is really different from my school back in Germany. I find it very nice to see all the convenience facilities like cafeterias and coffee shops inside the campus,” said Brust. Also, in classes, Brust was amazed how participative and helpful students are. "People tend to be more individualistic in Germany, but in Korea people have a stronger sense of community. I really do appreciate how students always try to help me.” Until now, one of the most memorable place Brust went in Korea was Demilitarized Zone (DMZ). “Even before coming to Korea, I was planning to visit DMZ. Korea is the only country separated in the world now and we hear all the shocking and terrible news about North Korea. I wanted to see a little bit of that myself.” After visiting DMZ, Brust thought she would want to go there one more time, to further inside where civilians can still go. Whether it is just for a semester or more years to come, News H hope all international students to have a best experience inside HYU. Yun Ji-hyun uni27@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Moon Hana

2017-03 06

[Student]Experiences at Hanyang, Francesca's story

Francesca Barbieri, the student from Humanitas University, the private university at Italy dedicated to the medical sciences, participated Hanyang summer program for her medical training. She shared her remarkable experiences and memories here at Hanyang University. Prescription For Growing: Learn Skills But Especially Make Friends I would have never imagined to realize such a big project in such a short time. I found myself on the other side of the world just after a few months I started thinking about it. As I knew about the possibility of obtaining a travel grant, I applied and was then accepted by the cardiology Professor Kyung -Soo KIM. Humanitas therefore gave me the opportunity to spend more than 40 days at the Hanyang University Medical Centre, in Seoul. There, I attended the cardiology wards, outpatient visits and the cardiology research laboratory. To tell the truth, the difficulties of such an experience can be many and discouraging. But everything becomes so pleasant and worthy when you meet the right group of people. Professor Kim and his group of physicians, residents, laboratory members and students accepted me as if I had always been one of them. My family and friends were definitely far away, but I found myself in an environment in which I never felt alone, I could ask anything I needed and was given all the possible help. Trying to follow them during the working day was though, with no doubt. I used to spend between 12 and 13 hours per day in the hospital, some in the clinic, some in the laboratories. As a second year student, I felt to have a solid theoretical knowledge but it was the first time for me to approach the practical clinical environment or research designs and laboratory protocols. I arrived as a very worried student, concerned about what to expect. I came out after 40 days with a basic knowledge of the main heart diseases, how to use the laboratory equipment, how to follow an experimental research design. This was achieved thanks to the constant, careful and personal tutoring I was provided, I always had at least one physician or one researcher on my side. I came out as part of a group of friends, and this was the most surprising and precious aspect. The attention they paid to the success and profit of my experience was invaluable. As invaluable is what I have learnt. Sometimes it is unbelievable how much we can grow in such a short time. * Original article at Hunimed.edu (link)

2017-01 16 Important News

[Student]Hanbok Beloved Worldwide

From 4th of January to 9th of January, hanbok making class was held in Human Ecology Building by Won Young. She has studied about hanbok and designing at Hanyang University (HYU) while attending Department of Clothing and Textile. The classes were held two hours everyday excluding the weekends, for four times. How it all started Won Young is Malaysian Chinese and also a Korean gyopo. While she was living in China, she says that there used to be a lot of tribes wearing different types of traditional clothes which is when she first encountered hanbok. “I have seen hanbok a lot on the television but once I came to Korea, I couldn’t see anyone wearing it in real life,” Won said. In order to make up for the discomfort of the hanbok, she started studying about life hanbok and became interested in the designs. Won (right) teaches Helene (left) how to use the sewing machine. She has created a startup team called TS (Time and Space) which consists of two people at the moment. Since she has studied in the field of fashion, Won thought of creating a brand of her own or creating a platform. Although there used to be websites where flower printings were available, it seemed to be a waste to cut out the pieces while designing her own patterns. This is how Won came up with the idea of DIY fabric in which she designs her own patterns and inserts the prints within the patterns. While attending at HYU, Won has participated in diverse programs created for international students but she felt that something was missing. “It seems like I was just looking around rather than doing something at the complete experiencing level. I think there are a lot of foreigners who would think like me,” said Won. This is how she came up with the idea of hanbok making class. Reactions towards the program A total number of fourteen students from diverse countries have participated in this program. Cho Yu-jin (faculty at Department of Clothing and Textile) and Lee Ye-jin (acquaintance of Won) have helped out with this event. Cho has helped out with the over lock while Lee has helped with the translation with the foreign students. Since the students participating in this program did not have any experiences or were not related major to fashion or designing, they had a hard time putting this together and one of them had to do all the sewing all over again from the sketch. Renu (left) and Azira (right) enjoys the program. Most of the students who have participated in the program had a similar idea in a sense that they were not aware of hanbok and how it could be utilized in daily life as well. Hwang An-ki (Media Communication, 2nd yr) said, “I was not well aware of Hanbok in the first place but as I was making it, it came to me as a beautiful traditional clothing.” Since foreign students who do not return to their home countries have not much to experience, they all claim that it has been a great experience for them. “I think it’s quite interesting that some people still wear traditional clothes since we don’t have them in Denmark. I think hanbok is very beautiful costume,” claimed Helene (Korean Studies, Master’s program). Although it has been a short period of time, all the students were able to finish their hanboks. After the session has finished, participants have matched their casual clothes along with hanbok and had photo session afterwards. “Through making the hanbok, foreign students would have been able to have the sense of achievement and feel the traditional culture of Korean costume. Also, by being able to have felt a new type of experience of making clothes, some people would have found a new hobby as well,” added Won. The students who have participated will keep in contact with each other and exchange information on hanbok flea markets or Korean culture experiences. Through this program, foreign students now understand Korean culture a little more. Since it has been a greatly developed program where it has been a talent donation of Won, students from diverse countries were able to experience the beauty of hanbok. Won hopes that she could carry out more programs related to hanbok in the future as well and provide lessons as part of the Korean wave towards foreigners. Kim Seung-jun nzdave94@hanyang.ac.kr Photo by Kim Sang-yeon Photo by Moon Hana

2017-01 02 Important News

[Student]Glitters, a Friendly Guide for Foreign Students (1)

There are a lot of foreign students around the world who visit and attend Hanyang University (HYU). Due to cultural differences and lack of information about the school system, exchange students may experience difficulties in campus life in Korea. The Division of Business Administration is one of the majors that attracts and admits a large number of foreign students. Therefore, many local students who major in business are likely to take classes with foreign exchange students. Glitters, also referred to as global supporters or ambassadors in the Division of Business Administration, are there to help foreign students by giving them information on Korean culture, corporations, and campus life. This week, News H met one of the members of Glitters, Woo Sung-jun (Business Administration, 3rd yr), to hear about Glitters’ activities. Woo, as a Glitters member, explained about the organization and its activities. A budding organization that helps exchange students “Glitters is a student organization comprised of 10 members, for assisting exchange students’ campus life at HYU and providing info about Korea. Although Glitters was created by the administrative team of the Division of Business Administration, its programs are planned, developed, and carried out by the students,” Woo said. Especially because Glitters was established at the beginning of last year, the members put a lot of effort in creating programs by themselves for international students. Woo said that members of Glitters had some concerns related to how it should take a first step into the right direction as founding members. However, due to biweekly meetings, conversations and cooperation between members, they could create helpful activities for international students and greatly satisfy those who participated. “Glitters provides various chances for business students to get in touch with the business environment. It can broaden the horizon and network of the students. I believe that student can gain lots of benefits from joining the events that are organized by Glitters,” Kwan Ho Yin, an exchange student from Hong Kong, commented. Self-made programs for international students Glitters provides a variety of programs for foreign students that include orientation for international students, 'Nori-ters' (Nori meaning play) during school festival time, ‘Conversation Salons’, and visits to Korean companies. Of all the programs, one of the most successful and popular activities developed by Glitters were two visits to Korean corporations. Woo was the team leader of the two visits. “The two companies that we selected were start-up corporation named Maru 180, visited on November 11th, and a major Korean broadcasting company called JTBC, visited on November 28th.” According to Woo, the choice was due to informing exchange students the concept of start-up corporations that do not exist in foreign countries, and also showing the atmosphere of a rising broadcasting network. Visits to two Korean corporations, Maru 180 (top) and JTBC (bottom). After Glitters selected the companies, contacting, making the advertising posters, planning the program schedule, interpretation between the executives and the international students were all taken care of by the members themselves. “The utmost objective of the visits was interaction. Especially after visiting Maru 180, we tried to give prior information to students about the company that we were planning on going to, in order to proceed well with the Q&A and interview sessions that we planned.” According to the executive of Maru 180, there are few occasions where foreign students visit Korean corporations. Glitters provided the very opportunity for international students to experience, feel the atmosphere, and know more about Korean companies. “About the Conversation Salons, we came up with the form, theme, contents and the questionnaires for communication between exchange students and Koreans. This program intrigued many Korean students because they could have the chance to talk to foreigners,” Woo explained. Glitters started the Conversation Salons with the Samsung batteries issue, but then moved onto more casual topics such as life in Korea. Not only did Glitters organize Conversation Salons and visits to Korean corporations, but they also provided two orientation sessions for foreign students to introduce Korean campus life, global students’ assisted schoolwork and planned Nori-ters, which was also the name of their booth during the school festival that allowed foreign students to experience Korean traditional games and food. “We are planning to provide more activities that can meet the needs of international students, to help them adjust well in the Division of Business Administration and know more about Korea and Korean businesses,” Woo said. After every program, Glitters receives feedback from participants and try to reflect their opinions for subsequent programs. “As a Glitters member, working for international students, I feel like I'm fulfilling important values for international friends. I also learned how to understand and care for foreign students. Anyone who is interested in helping exchange students is welcome to join us as a new member of Glitters. English is an important aspect, but it's even more critical to have the knack for instilling in international friends a life value here in Korea, as well as making the most of of working together as a group.” Woo cheerfully added. Glitters members feel pride in organizing programs and providing information about Korea for international students. Jang Soo-hyun luxkari@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Moon Ha-na