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2017-04 10

[Student]Marathon, Veni, Vidi, Vici!

“At least I ran all the way” is a famous quote by Murakami Haruki, a famous novelist who gets motivated to write through running. Moon Sam-sung (Department of Sports Industry, 4th year) is also a runner who doesn't believe in quitting. Although he injured his fibula (a bone parallel to tibia) 5 weeks before the Seoul Marathon, held on March 19th, Moon decided to run all the way, and he won the Master’s division. Career as a runner Moon started his career as a runner at the age of 10. Moon was Jung Jin-hyuk's training partner for about 7 years. Jung is currently a marathon runner at KEPCO. Living ust a few meters away from each other in the same neighborhood, Moon was able to run alongside Jung, while holding to his dream of becoming the best runner in Korea. “My partner Jung has been the greatest gift that I could ever hope for. Thanks to him, I was able to win the biggest tournament in my middle school years twice in a row,” recalled Moon. The concept of a running partner is of great importance since partners motivate each other to reach their fullest potential and achieve the best in a shorter period of time compared to training alone. Moon remembers his childhood years as a runner. One tip that Moon gave when dealing with injuries was to never stop exercising. Even if you are injured, according to Moon, workout routines must be kept although not to your fullest capacity. “Your running ability will eventually return once you are able to train again. There is no need to be pressured mentally even though others may be training harder than you are,” said Moon. He claims that marathons all come down to mental strength after the 35km mark. “Anyone can train to run up to 35km. It’s after the 35km mark that people fail,” said Moon. He likens that stage as “not being able to eat anything for one week, being out of breath, and hammers being thrown on the legs with every step." Hard work pays off The 2017 Seoul Marathon was the first tournament where Elites (Korea Athletics Federation Runners) and Masters (Non-professional runners) started the race at the same time. Moon won the Masters division this year. Right after entering Hanyang University in 2011 on a full-scholarship, Moon quit his career as a professional runner due to a knee injury. After five years of inactivity, Moon started preparing for marathon running again last year. “Although people warned me not to run in this race, I wanted to try my best due to the hard work that I had put in my training sessions.” Moon, running in the 2017 Seoul Marathon. During his period of inactivity, Moon worked as personal trainer and recently started working as a coach at 'Bang Sun-hee Academy'. After completing military service, he tried saving up money for university by working as a personal trainer. “As I worked, I realized that I should eventually attend university and get a degree,” said Moon. He started running half marathons last year, and, in order to be ready for the full marathon, he had to lose about 10kg. “I prepared for the Seoul Marathon for about 100 days, and I was proud to win the race and prove my skills as a coach,” said Moon. In the first month, Moon trained on sprints, the second month on endurance, and the last month on both speed and endurance. Moon wishes to participate in the 2020 Tokyo Olympics. Although it has been a hard race so far, life itself is a marathon, and Moon plans on preparing for the realization of a bigger dream. “I want to participate in the Tokyo Olympics in 2020 along with my former partner Jung,” said Moon. With such vivid dreams, we have yet to await Moon’s next step as a professional runner. Kim Seung-jun nzdave94@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Moon Hana

2017-04 03 Important News

[Student]Spreading Warmth through Handwritten Letters

On a peaceful street called gamgodanggil of Jongno-gu, Seoul, stands a pink postbox. The black sign shows that after writing letters about one’s worries, the replies will come back within one or two weeks. Pausing at the sign for a moment, people then decide to stop by to disclose their worries to somebody unknown. The postbox named ongi, meaning warmth in Korean, is installed by Cho Hyun-sik (Department of International Studies, 4th yr), after reading “Miracles of the Namiya General Store” by Keigo Higashino by chance. “The overall plot of the book is that the characters from the past write letters about their worries to the characters of the future. I focused on the idea of revealing worries and being comforted through exchanging letters,” Cho said. Cho explaining the reporter about the operations of Ongi Postbox. The power of slowness and sincerity The plan was carried out due to his thought that even though SNS is popular these days, there are few people who listen carefully to others’ stories by heart. On the contrary to today’s social conditions which handwritten letters are disappearing, due to the discomfort that comes from slowness, Kim believes that there is a special value of the letters. “The slowness of handwritten letters would allow people to be relaxed enough to open up their hearts and disclose their stories,” Cho emphasized. Cho is the chief manager of Ongi General Store, with three other managers and 60 or so volunteers or ‘clerks’. The managers and the clerks write replies to the worries of people sent through Ongi Postbox. The installation of the postbox was on late Feburary this year, and the place of its location was chosen due to Cho’s personal preference of the street’s quiet, comfortable, and slow atmosphere. “I found ten people who wanted to be clerks of the Ongi General Store from the Internet, but then we wound up getting lots of letters which were more than we expected, ” Cho said. Merely a week after the installment of the post box, over 150 to 200 letters were sent by anonymous people. People visit the Ongi Postbox to write about their worries. . (Photo courtesy of Cho) “I didn’t know that there were going to be such a lot of letters, and that is why I came to decide more people were needed to reply them. There were no special requirements or even an interview. The most important thing was sincerity which people who applied to become clerks already possessed,” Cho said. As the manager of ongi general store, he spends his time discussing the management of Ongi General Store with other managers every day, and writing letters with his clerks in a café near Iwha Womans University on Monday, Tuesday, Friday. Each day, with a team of 15 clerks composed of different age group, they read, choose the person who is most relatable with the stories of the letters, and then reply their letters for two hours. As for the expenses for operating the postbox, such as the costs of stamps, letter papers, and envelopes, Cho provides through private tutoring. "The most difficult letters to reply were from children who felt that they were too fat and ugly. To the former letter, I wrote that time will solve the problem. To the latter, I replied that she would find other charms as she grows. I spend a lot of time and be careful with what I'm saying when I sending letters to children." (Photo courtesy of Cho) The importance of the freedom of choice in life According to Cho, he puts a lot of value in helping people, continuously participating in volunteering, such as helping prepare events for patients with Lou Gehrig’s disease. His belief was set after his grandmother’s death. “I was very close to my grandmother because she took care of me when I was young. When she was diagnosed with lung cancer and met her death, I thought a lot about how human life is so limited and how we will benefit from helping each other instead of having meaninglessly competitions, ” Cho reminisced. “My current plan is to increase the number of the postbox, and set up a booth complete with two writing tables as an extension of the postbox. I want people to be more comfortable and thus have more time to write out their worries. I’m preparing a crowdfunding for the project now. Then, I wish that Ongi General Store can develop into a non-profit organization to help comfort more people,” Cho said. "I believe in the value of helping people." (Photo courtesy of Cho) According to Cho, consistent reading and the experiences from his life help sympathize with the letters. "I was a very diligent student before I decided to take a leave of absence. I began to feel skeptical of dull, mindless studying although everybody else believes it is the right answer of life," he said. After he took a leave of absence, he tried running a street vendor, worked in a social enterprise, and went on traveling. He felt that there is no right answer but to live one’s own life. “If I write a letter to my past self, I want to tell myself that although I once worried a lot, all the difficult things turned out to help me instead. Nobody else lives for you, and the one who feel happiness from your life is yourself. So try what you truly want to do without regret or worries, ” Cho smiled. Cho's effort to spread warmth through heartfelt concerns about others' worries shines like sunlight. Jang Soo-hyun luxkari@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Kim Youn-soo

2017-03 27

[Student]Touring Around Hanyang With 'Tambang Tambang'

Nowadays, with the official launch of Pokémon Go in Korea, augmented reality games have become more familiar to people. ‘Tambang Tambang’ (tambang being a Korean word, meaning 'explore') is an augmented reality game which leads users to tour around the Hanyang campus while completing missions. The application was released on March 15th this year. Tambang Tambang was created by four students: its founder and leader Shin Kang-soo (Department of Policy Studies, 3rd year) and three members, Noh Ung-gi (Department of Sports Industry, 3rd year), Kim Na-yeun (Department of Applied Art Education, 4th year), and Yoo Eun-seo (Department of Applied Art Education, 4th year). Shin and No spoke about the stories behind Tambang Tambang. Let’s go tambang in HYU Playing Tambang Tambang is fairly easy, which makes it greatly accessible. One simply has to take a photo of a required sculpture or an object suggested in silhouette to pass each course. Once one completes a mission, he or she will be allowed to continue onto the next destination within the game. A major characteristic of the game lies in its feature that allows users to gain further information about an object or a specific place while playing the game, visiting the actual spot at the same time. The picture shows the future game display model. Displayed on the left is the overall map, and the mission page is shown on the right. (Photo courtesy of Tambang Tambang) The initiative model of Tambang Tambang is currently based on the HYU Seoul Campus. “As there are hundreds of high school or middle school students visiting HYU, we thought it could be hard for them to tour around the campus more effectively without a proper guide,” said Shin. Tambang Tambang aims to target those students, as playing the game will naturally lead them to learn about the campus as well. Currently, as one of the main way to advertise the game, they have collaborated with Saranghandae, the school's student ambassador group. “We designed the courses along with Saranghandae, the courses will include the school’s important spots like the Lion’s Rumble, Paiknam Library, and 88-stairs. The game will be later used in the campus tour program by Saranghandae,” said Noh. From assignment to business Four students with different majors first met one another through a lecture called ‘Social Entrepreneurship’, where students were expected to build and plan their own social business. “Our final assignment was to present our whole plan in front of the professor and the director of HYU social innovation center, Seo Jin-seok. After the presentation, Shin and his members received a suggestion from the director to make their project as an application. “I was really excited to be given the opportunity to proceed with the project. It wasn’t the first time that I had participated in a start-up business, but it was new for me to be the founder while leading the whole team,” explained Shin. Noh (left) and Shin (right) said that the release of Tambang Tambang was only possible because of every members' effort. For Shin and the members, making proper content, like the campus trajectories, and developing an application based on that was surely arduous work. “We had to spend hours actually visiting places we hadn't actually had a chance to visit. We got help from an existing walking course called Doollehgil, HYU’s campus trails that encompasses the campus’s 8 scenic points,” said Noh. Through enough research and incorporation of recommendations they received from their fellow students, Shin and his team were soon able to discover more spots worth taking note of. Making the overall contents of the game was the job of Shin and Noh. Designing was taken on by Kim and Yoo, who are capable of dealing with related computer programs. With financial support from HYU Social Innovation Center, they are currently being helped out with other technical problems through outsourcing. Shin shows how to complete a mission on Tambang Tambang. Learning through playing Currently, Shin and Noh said the number of downloads for Tambang Tambang stands at about 200. Of course, they aren't fully satisfied with the results, which is why they have been planning on creating bigger business models to upgrade Tambang Tambang. “We thought of creating Tambang Tambang as part of another game to introduce museums that exhibits materials regarding history, especially Korean history,” said Shin. Just like how Tambang Tambang can be played on HYU's Seoul Campus, the new version will work as a medium between museums and visitors. “We found out that the current methods of learning Korean history contributes negatively to its understanding among teenagers. There are various reasons for that, but the most critical one is that it usually fails to retain students’ attention as the subject itself is oriented towards memorizing,” said Shin. Tambang Tambang aims to increase students' interest in Korean history by making the learning process more entertaining. Certainly, there is still a long way for Shin and his team to go. “Three months was definitely not enough time for us to complete all the necessary work. We'll have to upgrade the game on many different aspects such as its music and effects,” mentioned Noh. “In the near future, we hope to become successful enough to support students who are living far away from Seoul to give them a chance to come to HYU,” said Shin and Noh. Tambang Tambang will be developed continuously in tandem with the team's higher goals. Yun Ji-hyun uni27@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Moon Hana

2017-02 08

[Student]Piano Genius Reintroduced as Band Leader

If you've seen K-Pop Star 2, a Korean music audition TV program for singers and dancers, you will remember a girl who was a so-called piano genius, Choi Ye-geun (Department of Applied Music, ERICA Campus, 3rd year). As a high school student, Choi amazed producers of the biggest Korean entertainment companies with her astounding musical talent, especially with her deep, soulful voice and hard-to-believe song arrangement abilities. After the audition, Choi decided to transfer to an arts high school to focus on her music career. Now, as a Hanyang University (HYU) student, Choi is living both as a band musician and a hardworking Hanyangian. The band’s first single, ‘Adult’ Choi's recent single, 'Adult'. (Photo courtesy of Reve Entertainment) While Choi’s steps following the audition were highly anticipated by a lot of her fans, she embarked on a new challenge, which was introducing a song with a band session. On January 2nd this year, Choi released the single ‘Adult’ in the name of 'Choi Ye-geun Band'. It has received positive reviews from the public. Her fans have commented how Choi's singing is improving by the years. Choi sings the song with her powerful and soulful voice. The song 'Adult' is about a man, whom she has a crush on, being more mature and calm than the singer herself, who is contrastingly impatient because of her unrequited love. “I'd had a crush on someone when I was in middle school. He was older than me as the title of the song implies, but the memory was only a motive for the song. Theest of the lyrics are all based on my own imagination,” said Choi. Before singing in a band, Choi in fact released several digital single albums as a solo artist. “I produced various songs as digital singles as I wanted to try out different genres of music. I didn’t know what kind of music suited me best at the time,” explained Choi. Choi met one current band member from one of her concerts. “When I was performing in different places, I met a senior from HYU, who is now a proud member of my band. He had asked if I’d want to perform in a band with him and his session, and I'd had no reason to hesitate. It just seemed fun enough to try.” Choi (middle) and her band members. (Photo courtesy of Reve Entertainment) If you love music, you are already a musician “I just loved music since I was very young. I loved playing the piano in my house since my kindergarten days. I once tried taking piano lessons but I quit after a short while. I was so used to playing it the way I wanted,” recalled Choi. Alongside the piano, Choi had also enjoyed singing as a child. “I started going to vocal lessons as a hobby. Participating in K-Pop Star 2 was actually a bet with friends at those lessons. We betted on who would survive the longest in the audition program. For me, it was really just a fun tryout, which allowed me to feel less pressured in the competition,” said Choi. Of course, being on a TV and being presented to the mass public wasn’t solely an experience without hardship. Choi remembered how the competition between its participants got fiercer after every round. “I was able to endure it because of the fellow participants I became friends with. I loved meeting people who had the same passion and interests as me." K-Pop Star 2 remains a precious memory for Choi. One of the reasons why Choi was able to continue on freely, trying out different music genres both as a solo and in a band, was because of the entertainment company she belongs in. “After K-Pop Star 2, I received many calls from different entertainment companies, but I ended up choosing Reve Entertainment as they promised to help me with “music” itself, which was my top priority rather than being an idol or a celebrity. Come to think of it, I think it was one of the best decisions I have ever made." More musical colors to be filled To Choi, her band is like a clean, white paper, where she can draw freely whatever she wants. This upcoming spring, she is planning to release a mini album featuring several songs including ‘Adult’, along with a new title song. “There are no constructive plans regarding my band as yet, but I don’t want to rush anything. The band can only go on when my music is ready. Still, I do have a long-term goal. I want to be a musician that HYU is proud of, just like the other seniors who made the school proud,” concluded Choi. In the upcoming semester, Choi is to focus on her band's soon-to-be-released mini album. Yun Ji Hyun uni27@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Choi Min-ju

2017-01 24 Important News

[Student]Aspirations of a Prospective Technical Official

A civil servant is one of the most admired jobs in Korea. It is due to the fact that the job involves taking part in researching, making, and assessing national policies. In order to become a Korean civil servant, one has to pass the Civil Service Examination. The exam is notorious for its immense difficulty, with a very high competition rate. There are diverse fields and ranks in the job, and the one Jo took was the official deputy director's post. Of all the test takers hoping to work as a technical official, Jo Min-woong (Division of Mechanical Engineering, 4th year) not only passed the test but attained the highest scores among the examinees of 2016. Jo spoke about his study tactics and his thoughts about being a public official. For the happiness of the public Jo Min-woong (Photo courtesy of Jo) December 13th, 2016 was the day the names of applicants who passed the Civil Service Examination were announced. “I felt relief when I saw that I passed the exam. After that, I realized I was the top among all applicants. That had been my objective, but I couldn’t believe that it actually came true,” Jo remarked. “Even though I’m not perfect, it’s a great honor to receive such good results. Now, as a future civil servant, I want to try to contribute all I can for the development of Korea." Jo wished to become a public official because he wanted to contribute to increasing people’s happiness. “I did some volunteering- teaching high school students, repairing houses, and carrying coal briquettes for the needy,“ said Jo. One special experience of his was when he helped distribute free lunches to the poor on Christmas Day. Seeing 2,000 people waiting for their lunches on the cold roadside, Jo became determined to become a government official who could enlarge happiness for the public by developing policies that could greatly benefit them. Another reason why Jo wanted to become a technical civil servant was because of the dream that he could devote to Korea’s adjustment in the change related to the 4th Industrial Revolution, characterized by AI (Artificial Intelligence), Big Data, and IoT (Internet of Things). “Like Korea did in the 3rd Industrial Revolution, reaching 10th place in the world economy, I believe that contributing to Korea’s adaptation to this new paradigm is what I want to endeavor for in developing my nation." Effort not in vain There are three stages in the Civil Service Examination. The first stage of the examination is called PSAT (Public Service Aptitude Test), which assesses whether the test taker has the basic ability and refinement of carrying out government affairs. PSAT comprises of subjects called language and logic, data analysis, and situational judgment. The second stage tests how well one is equipped with knowledge of one's major. There are three compulsory subjects and one elective subject, depending on the field that one applied for. The test is held for five days, one subject each day, and applicants are to write their answers in essay format. The final stage is the interview. Held for two days, the test comprises of PT (Presentation), GD (Group Discussion) and an individual interview on public service values and job competence. “I began studying for the test since my sophomore year. I took a leave of absence to concentrate on studying in 2015, one year before the test.” The most difficult time Jo went through was when he failed the first stage of the examination in 2015. However, due to much encouragement from his family and friends, Jo could settle himself down to study once again. “I tried to use all my time to study, except the time taken to maintain elementary needs, such as eating and sleeping. The episode I remember most during the time I spent studying is last year’s seollal, or the Lunar New Year. Instead of going home to see my relatives, I had to stay in my empty dorm alone to study. Eating instant food from the microwave oven, I vowed to pass the exam in 2016 and have rice-cake soup with my family,” Jo reminisced. The folders of papers Jo organized while studying. (Photo courtesy of Jo) “I will receive training from May to December this year. Next year, I am to be placed in a department and start working. I don’t know where I’m going to work yet, but I want to work in the Ministry of Trade, Industry and Energy because it is the department where officials handle the real economy." When asked to give advice to fellow students who are preparing for big national tests, Jo said, “There is a saying that goes: ’Move forward step by step. There’s no greater method than this in order to accomplish something.' There were times when I felt anxious because I had a lot of studying to do in a limited space of time. In those moments, I tried to repeat this message over and over in my head. I hope this message helps fellow Hanyangians as it did for me in times of distress.” Jang Soo-hyun luxkari@hanyang.ac.kr

2017-01 23 Important News

[Student]Visualization of Movies in Written Critique

"Three films a day, three books a week and records of great music would be enough to make me happy to the day I die" is a famous quotation of a French director François Roland Truffaut. Jason Bechervaise (Department of Theater & Film, Ph.D. ‘17) is a man who fits in perfectly into this. With the passion and love for Korean movies, Bechervaise has traveled all over the world, and into an unknown territory in 2010. Who Bechervaise is Jason Bechervaise works as a movie critic at the Screen International. In addition, he writes columns for the Korea Times and the Seoul Magazine once a week. Bechervaise not only writes, but he also made appearances on the Arirang TV radio station, TBS eFM, and EBS radio, where he introduces Korean movies and a selection of Golden Globe Award-winning films. Although there is numerous work that he is currently working on, Jason says that there are special seasons when he is most busy. “The Cannes Film Festival, Bucheon International Fantastic Film Festival, Busan International Film Festival, Jeonju International Film Festival- these movie festival seasons are when I am the busiest. I not only write reviews about movies but also give critiques for some of them." Since Bechervaise started studying Korean cinema in England, he naturally considered about moving to Korea. “Although I could see movies in England, it was just not enough. I could meet people in the Korean film industry more freely as well,” he added. Bechervaise says that he used to hold movie subscriptions after having seen the “Memories of Murder”. Since then, Bechervaise started studying the Korean culture and history in order to understand Korean movies more deeply. His life changed accordingly. “I gained interest in those fields, started writing academic papers and essays on Korean films and studied more about Korea,” said Bechervaise. "One of the best things about Korean movies is the creativity." Life in motion Bechervaise says that there things that are chaotic in Korea which makes it a better place to live in. “I would put this country in three words: colorful, exciting, and energetic." In the UK, a kind of order exists that lasts a long period of time when getting something done, which makes things boring. In contrast, everything has to be fast in Korea. “There’s no country in the world that can be considered as being perfect. Korea's like my second hometown,” said Bechervaise. Although Bechervaise had a hard time and still finds it difficult to use Korean perfectly, his goal is to write his movie reviews in Korean as well as in English. Although Bechervaise prefers to watch Korean movies without subtitles for a better understanding of film techniques and storyline, historical dramas are still quite hard for Jason to understand without subtitles. “Most movie previews do not have subtitles, although there are some exceptions. I think I would get better at Korean as time goes." The biggest merits of Korean movies that Bechervaise pointed out were about how they convey social issues. “Not only the storytelling, but also the film techniques used by the Korean filmmakers are so creative." He explained that the mise-en-scene and the editing is portrayed in a beautiful way in Korean movies, which is something that can't be seen in other countries' films. “There are so many talented people that create movies in such a great way. It’s interesting to see how they portray social issues to the viewers so well,” praised Bechervaise. "I hope to write movie reviews in Korean someday." Bechervaise wishes to continue with his work in the Korean movie industry, and let more great films in the Korean language be known to the world. As they are exciting and always something to watch for Bechervaise, he watches about 250 films every year. With his adventures in Korea, and as a foreign Korean movie critic, film fanatics could do well to keep track of Bechervaise's movie reviews. Kim Seung-jun nzdave94@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Moon Hana

2016-12 27 Important News

[Student]Flower Walls for Peaceful Demonstrations

The year 2016 has been a hard time for Koreans politically. Corruption related to President Park led Koreans to the streets to protest for her removal. In most sites where demonstrations were held, police were summoned to suppress the outburst. Violence inevitably occurs in protest sites, and there are cases where protesters aggressively collide with the police. On the other hand, in recent scenes of demonstrations, there was an idea to put flower stickers on the wall of police trucks as a symbol of peace instead of violent confrontation. The idea was thought up by an illustrator named Lee Gang-hun, and the project, named ‘Changing Car Walls to Flower Walls’ was backed up by a crowdfunding art company called 7Pictures. The company representative, Jeon Hee-jae (Financial Management, 4th year), was interested in the project, because he thought that it showed how art could influence society for the better. “By allowing people to participate in the creation of art, the project could really speak for protesters,“ he said. This week, News H met Jeon to hear about the works of his company and his viewpoint on art. Jeon is explaining about the 'Changing Car Walls to Flower Walls' project. Flowers for peaceful protests “The project started out from communicating with illustrator Lee through Facebook. We made contact and decided to carry out the plan,” Jeon explained. The fundraising was held in the way of crowdfunding, a method used by artists and social activists who need money to promote their works and projects, by asking the public for donation. More than one hundred artists cooperated in drawing and designing the stickers- through various means such as typography, illustrations, and messages. The result was successful. 30 thousand stickers were produced with the donated money. Soon after, the second project was held, this time making the stickers more detachable for the convenience of the police officers. Also, there were suggestions to use real flowers to decorate the walls of police cars, so the second donation included 90 thousand stickers with 700 flowers. Although the upgraded stickers were more expensive, the second fundraising also succeeded. People actively donated and voluntarily participated in decorating the car walls with the flower stickers during demonstrations. Jeon in front of the police truck decorated with flower stickers. (Photo courtesy of http://v.media.daum.net/v/20161212044252035) Art, an expression of life and the world 7Pictures is a company that aids artists through crowdfunding by introducing artists' projects or social activities on their homepage. Users can donate small sums of money, and can advertise a given product or project by sharing the information through SNS. “The 7Pictures website displays recent projects to fundraise for the flower stickers, including others like funding for a play about comfort women, who suffered as Japanese military sex slaves, and for the opportunity of allowing economically underprivileged children to visit an art exhibition,” Jeon said. Jeon became interested in art while actively working as a student director of TEDx, a conference for spreading novel ideas through lectures, held exclusively at Hanyang University. “Back then, I not only interviewed artists for TEDx events, but also met many people in the field of art out of pure interest and curiosity. Listening to their stories, I came to realize that artists needed money for holding gallery exhibits, and creating projects to products. That is why I decided to found my company, 7Pictures, to help them,” Jeon explained. The company’s prior mission was to introduce seven pictures a week, hence its name, 7Pictures. However, Jeon developed his idea into an internet fundraising platform for artists. 7Pictures won first prize in last year’s HYU startup competition. “Art is appealing because it freely expresses opinions from everyday life- money to political authority and so on. This is done in a beautiful and charming way, too. The way that art portrays life makes us think and change the way we view the world,” Jeon clarified. His dream is to encourage more people to become interested in art and help artists arrange much-needed funds. “Because money is donated and the art projects are advertised through SNS, it becomes easier for Korean and other Asian artists to make themselves well-known overseas,” Jeon mentioned. “Starting from small and attractive designer goods to catch customers’ eyes, I want to cover diverse fields, such as visual arts, music or even dance, in the immense world that is art.” Jeon believes that art expresses and changes viewpoints about life and the world. (Click on the link to visit the 7Pictures homepage. http://7pictures.co.kr/) Jang Soo-hyun luxkari@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Moon Ha-na

2016-12 19 Important News

[Student]Winners of 2016 Korea Interior Architecture Competition

On September 19th, the 28th Korea Interior Design Competition was held by the KCC architecture corporation and the Korean Society of Interior Architects/Designers (KOSID). It was an open competition for anyone interested in the field of interior design, but those who were handing in their work were required to be residents in Korea. Kim Hye-won and Jo Eun-byeol (both Department of Surface & Interior Design, ERICA Campus, 3rd year) won the grand prize in this year's competition along with Kim Ju-seok from the same department, who was unable to attend the interview. Q1: Congratulations on winning the grand prize! How do you feel? Kim: “Our team focused on communicating a lot with one another, and this was probably the reason why we were able to receive such a big award. We are still overwhelmed by the fact that we have won and we thank everyone who has helped us and supported us.” Jo: “This is one of the biggest competitions in the field of interior design, so we are very honored. We can never get used to being congratulated by people. We did go through very hard work and it couldn’t have been achieved had it not been for the professor and the seniors.” Q2: What was the concept of this competition? Jo: “There was nothing set in particular and it was supposed to be a free topic of each teams creating an interior design concept and making a model on the basis of that.” The Grand Prize-winning model made by Kim and Jo. (Photo courtesy of KOSID) Q3: Could you explain to us about your work? Kim: “We decided on the National Geographic brand, because they are known for lively, unique pictures, yet have a photo exhibition that is dull. We wanted to create a gallery for this brand and make it like no other. From the ritteri anemone, we got the idea of liquidity and brought it to our surface design. Because anemones tend to stick to rocks or other animals, these two different characteristics were to be harmonized together in our work. We wanted to make this National Geographic gallery set up by the Han River so that it serves as a place to rest and gaze at the photos at the same time.” Q4: How did the three of you become involved in the same team? Kim: “When we were in the second semester of our second year, we took the same course called Visual Merchandizing. Us three were brought together as a team and we had to do our project together for the semester. Jo suggested that we try out for this competition and we decided to submit our own project for it.” Kim (left) and Jo (right) explain the concept of their design model. Q5: What do you learn in the Department of Surface & Interior Design? Kim: “It is a combination of surface interior design, interior design and textiles. We learn how to deal with the fabrics along with designing. With this combination, we are educated to have diverse choices when it comes to choosing our career. Some of the things that we learn are the design trends, surface pattern drawing, textile expressions, furniture designs, including most of what is necessary when it comes to designing the insides of a building.” Q6: How long did you prepare for the competition? Jo: “About six months.” Kim: “Yes, since we developed almost all of our project during a semester last year, we had a rough draft of what it would look like. The night before we submitted our work, our professor visited us and encouraged us. We were able to carry on due to the support.” Q7: What were some of the things that were good and bad? Jo: “We were able to fill up the qualities that we each didn’t have. We were able to learn from one another through communication, too. We were kind of scared of our professor’s feedback on our work but we have learned a lot from it.” Kim: “I personally didn’t have any interaction with the seniors before, but through this competition, I was able to become acquainted with them. We had to do some unexpected presentations for people from time to time and we felt our skills improving every time.” Above is a 3D mass study of the model. (Photo courtesy of KOSID) Q8: How will you use the six million won? Kim: “We divided up the prize money evenly. Since we used about one and a half million won for creating our model for the competition, we had four and a half million won left. I've decided to use the money to travel to Japan, and use the rest for my graduation work.” Jo: “I gave the money to my parents.” Q9: Could you give a final piece of advice for those preparing for competitions? Kim: “Do not think that investing your money on a competition is a waste of money. We believe that it is all a part of experience. Since we invested a lot, the quality of our work was considerably better.” Jo: “If you believe that what you are doing is right and work hard on it, good results will eventually follow. I would also stress the importance of communication between teammates since that will reduce the uncertainties.” According to Kim and Jo, communication is a very important part of teamwork. Kim Seung-jun nzdave94@hanyang.ac.kr Photo by Kim Youn-soo

2016-12 18

[Student]Winners of 2016 Hanyang Newspaper Literary Contest

Writing is one of the most creative activities that humans can engage in. Authors portray their inner thoughts and the world around them through writing, which touches upon the hearts of many. On December 5th, the winners of the 2016 Hanyang Newspaper Literary Contest were chosen from numerous competitors both from Hanyang University (HYU)'s Seoul and ERICA Campuses. This week, News H met the winners of Korean poetry and written criticism fields, Lee Dong-won (Department of Economics, ERICA Campus, 3rd yr) and Kim Jun-sung (Departmnet of Korean Language and Literature, Seoul Campus, 4th yearr) respectively. The shimmering reasons of victory The Hanyang News Literary contest has a 49-year history that selects excellent student writers of Korean poetry, prose, and written criticism on culture, literature, academics or film. The two victors expressed their delight in winning and said that the contest gave them an opportunity to become more passionate about writing and think more about it. Lee commented, “I participated in the contest due to my interest in writing poems. I am grateful for the good results, and I plan to participate in more literary contests. As for my work, I got the idea for it when I was watching a documentary about the life of a man who produces salt in a salt field, and so the title is ‘The Old Saltmaker.’” Kim's writing, named ‘Psychoanalysis and Women’, is about how women are viewed in the academic domain of psychoanalysis. "This is also my final report for Women, History, and Media class. I am thankful for my professor, and fellow students who gave me feedback,” said Kim. He entered the contest because he was curious about how his work would be appraised, and the experience became a chance for Kim to write better. The winners of the 2016 Hanyang Newspaper Literary Contest, Kim (left) and Lee (right). Among all the contestants, Lee and Kim‘s work stood out due to their deep contemplations about their chosen fields, and their work that reflected their considerations. “I tend to lead people to think for themselves through my writing, rather than imposing my own thoughts unto the readers. I think that is the reason why my work was selected,” said Lee. ‘The Old Saltmaker’ depicts a day of an old man making salt. Described in a detailed manner, it gives the reader comfort and leaves lasting impressions. “When writing a piece of written criticism, choosing a theme and organizing the content in a consistent way is very important. Because I studied and applied a lot of theories to my work from academics such as Sigmund Freud and Jacques Lacan, I could write with less difficulty,“ explained Kim. According to him, there are some discriminating viewpoints toward women in the field of psychoanalysis. So in his writing, Kim tried to point out those points and tried to find the elements that still remain discriminatory. The meaning of writing Lee and Kim were interested in writing since they were in high school. Lee, praised by his teachers of his writing capacity, developed his abilities by entering various literary contests in those days. Kim had many worries when he was a freshman in high school. He contemplated about how to express his complex feelings, and started writing novels. As Kim studied diverse literary domains in his major, including criticism, he became interested in that genre as well. “I decided to go for the written criticism field in the contest because I gained interest in it during my classes. Through it, I can logically express and organize my thoughts,” said Kim. Lee and Kim’s hobby of writing continues on to the present. Their passion keeps them writing consistently in their daily lives. “I usually write diaries about two or three times a week, as well as short memos whenever I get inspired by something. I read them a few times to see whether those thoughts can develop into interesting pieces of writing,” revealed Lee. “I come up with ideas from books and everyday life. Since I like to write stories as well as criticisms, I find novels helpful,” said Kim. Lee studies vocabulary from dictionaries to improve his expressions in poetry. He also enjoys reading collections of poems, such as Mun Tae-jun’s Kajaemi (halibut). Kim believes in and tries to fulfill the need to read, write, and think a lot in order to write well. Kim and Lee are to continue writing in the future. Lee is to keep on writing poems in the future, and he wants to develop his own world of poetry. “I want to broaden and deepen the ideas in my poems. I also want to contemplate the problems of modern society through poetry,” Lee explained. Kim is to study psychoanalysis in depth, from Jacques Lacan to Slavoj Zizek in graduate school, and continue on writing. After that, Kim is planning to find a job at a publishing company because of his love of reading books. To Kim, writing is like searching for an answer to life’s complicated questions. For every authors and readers, writing is like a window that reveals the inner feelings, ideas, and thoughts of the writer to the world. As future writers, Lee and Kim are trying to open that window to confront life and the world we live in. Jang Soo-hyun luxkari@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Choi Min-ju

2016-12 11 Important News

[Student]Winner of the 2016 Campus Patent Strategy Universiade

University students can choose from a variety of off-campus activities to widen their perspectives or gain more experience in relation to their majors. One of them involves participating in various contests, which can push oneself to realize one’s potentials and abilities. Cho Soo-bin (Department of Materials Science, ERICA Campus, 4th year), who won the Minister of Trade, Industry and Energy prize from the 2016 Campus Strategy Universiade, shared her story regarding the contest and her dream. An idea that shone amidst the other 3500 According to its official website, Campus Patent Strategy Universiade is a contest that aims to foster a professional workforce with practical patent knowledge for various corporates. Being the 9th Universiade running, it was co-hosted by the Korean Intellectual Property Office, and the National Academy of Engineering of Korea. It was also sponsored by major corporations including Samsung Electronics, Hyundai Motors, and Posco. Participants are undergraduates and graduates, but the ratio of graduate participants is normally higher, as the contest requires a deep level of knowledge related to patents. Cho is posing for a picture with the President of HYU, Lee Young-moo, at the special awards ceremony at ERICA Campus. The contest roughly consists of paper examinations and presentations. There are largely two parts to the contest- prior art research and patent strategy. Both sections require students to submit their answers on paper. The due date was early June and late August respectively. Cho had participated in the contest for the third time this year. Last year, she won a prize of 6 million won with two other team members for the patent strategy section. Having accumulated more knowledge, this year, she applied to both sections and won 500,000 won and 10 million for prior art research and patent strategy sections respectively. This year, Cho prepared all the answers on her own. “As the required amount of research was larger than last year, I had to form stricter plans to prepare for the answers needed,” said Cho. Investing more than 10 hours a day The part to which Cho won the Minister of Trade Industry and Energy prize required her to choose one subject among those suggested by the Universiade, and to analyze existing domestic and foreign patents regarding the field. Then, a detailed report has to be written about promising research subjects, as well as the ways to obtain a new propitious patent. “I chose the question on display technology, which I was both interested and confident about doing. It was the subject I chose last year as well,” said Cho. Cho prioritized strategic planning the most in the preparation process. Display technology is one of the greatest fields of interest among corporations nowadays, as the rising trend of smart, self-driving cars’ main technology is the display. “I focused more on the software display than the hardware. I thought it would be more convenient for drivers to have their information displayed on their car window, so I suggested the specific technology and the way to obtain a patent for it,” said Cho. The progress of writing the answers for the questions was very challenging from its start. The implicative language of patents made the question itself complex to understand. After analyzing the questions, Cho pondered about the intent behind the questions. Cho thought it was necessary to refer to the examiners (sponsoring corporates) to satisfy them. As a result she studied more than 300 corporate-related articles and 5000 skills enrolled in patenting. The arduous process allowed Cho to successfully set the direction of the idea report she submitted as her answer. “Among a total of 167 pages of answers, I had to do all the research preparation by myself. It took me a lot of time to make powerpoints, which I am less proficient at. I had no option but to spend more than 10 hours a day for the contest,” said Cho. A step closer to her dream The contest rewards its winners well. One of the noticeable privileges is that winners are called to the sponsored corporates’ job interviews. In addition, winners can get involved in a community called Young Intellectual Property Leader (YIPL), which is composed of winners of past contests. “YIPL let its members have a quality time meeting up with CEOs and experts from corporates. I think such experiences are valuable as they cannot easily be done within school,” said Cho. One of the biggest reasons Cho chose this contest is because it is highly relevant to her dream- becoming a patent attorney. “I wanted to check for myself whether I am right for the job. Even though the work was hard and difficult, I enjoyed the progress of analyzing patents and writing reports about it. It made me feel that I am a step closer to my dream,” said Cho. Cho is currently on a leave of absence as she is studying for the patent attorney state examination. It was tough juggling the contest and the exam studies simultaneously. From now on, she will be focusing more on preparing for the exam to secure her future. Cho advised HYU students to try out more activities that can be done outside of school. Yun Ji-hyun uni27@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Moon Ha-na