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2018-12 02

[Student]Seeing the Future Through the AR Lenses

Augmented Reality (AR) looks wondrous in movies (for instance, the screen on Iron Man’s helmet). However, the current technology is yet to catch up with the movies, and trying on the AR smart glasses in real life could be a heavy, uncomfortable, and dizzying experience. The attempts to make these experiences extra light, comfortable, and high-quality has finally bore fruit – the CEO of LetinAR, Kim Jae-hyuk (Department of Industrial Engineering, 4th year) is the hero. LetinAR, co-founded by Kim and his friend and the Chief Technology Officer Ha Jeong-hun in 2016, is a start-up company that invented and produced the AR lenses. The company has recently received investments worth 3.6 million USD from Kakao Ventures, DSC Investment, Korea Asset Investment Securities, Naver Corporation, and Platinum Tech Investment, all thanks to the self-developed 'Pin Mirror (also known as PinMRTM) lens' which has been acknowledged for its phenomenal breakthrough in the AR-lens techniques. The Pin Mirror lens. Kim Jae-hyeok (Department of Industrial Engineering, 4th year) clarified that a newer version will resemble ordinary glasses much more, compared to the old version in the picture. (Photo courtesy of LetinAR) Kim explained that the original wearable AR smart glasses had many problems. “The glasses were too big, screens were too small, or out of focus. On top of these, they were hard to manufacture.” So Kim came up with a different approach, using the pin-mirror-effect technique, in which the microdisplay light is projected directly to the eye lens via a mirror tinier than a pupil. Whereas the former lenses blurred the image when the object was too near (similar to how the human eyes blur out anything that gets too near to the pupils), the new method allows the lens to stay in focus regardless of closeness, as well as of individual eyesight. Along with the more comfortable vision, the lenses became smaller, closely resembling the ordinary glasses and had a much increased productivity. “During this year’s Consumer Electronics Show, many renowned scholars tested the lens, leaving truly impressed by its performance. They said billions of won along with the complex and latest technologies invested could not overcome the limitations of the AR lens. What we have done is provide a simple, yet powerful solution to it all,” recalled Kim. Demonstration of the LetinAR's technique in the Mobile World Congress 2018. (Photo courtesy of LetinAR) They expect to have a formal announcement of the completed technology for full-fledged commercialization next January. “AR is yet an unexplored field, but the future seems bright,” assured Kim. “Just like how we have moved from desktops to laptops, and from laptops to phones, we constantly seek portability. As with the phones, the AR glasses will lead the future trend, and they will be absorbed in our daily lives.” Thus, the goal of LetinAR is to initiate that trend, added Kim. Indeed, it is a matter of time until we will all be wearing the light and comfortable 100-inch-screen on our eyes with the help of LetinAR glasses. Kim's goal is to develop a more portable AR lens and raise LetinAR as the trend-setting company. Lim Ji-woo il04131@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Park Geun-hyung

2018-11 26

[Student]Designing the Future Through HY-WEP

Being a university student means being open to various opportunities. This may also include developing professionalism through internships. To grant its students of such chances, Hanyang University’s Center for Academic Placement Support offers internships from smaller firms such as startups to major conglomerates through the Hanyang Work Experience Program (HY-WEP). Choi Jae-ran (Department of Industrial Engineering, 4th year) is one of the numerous students who has seized the opportunity. Choi Jae-ran (Department of Industrial Engineering, 4th year) completed her HY-WEP experience with EPIKAR in both the United States and South Korea from March to August of 2017 and participated in the National Research Foundation of Korea Work Experience Contest in November, 2018. Choi’s internship experience is a special one as she was able to work in the United States with the company called EPIKAR, a startup company that develops innovative mobility technology to alleviate efficiency. After her invaluable experience from March to August of 2017, Choi received the first prize in November of 2018, representing Hanyang University at the National Research Foundation of Korea: Work Experience Contest with the presentation topic, “Find My Roadmap.” Choi talked about her experience of working with EPIKAR and what she gained from the overseas internship through HY-WEP. Choi was responsible for designing the website of EPIKAR, the company she worked with through HY-WEP. (Photo courtesy of Choi) During her internship period, Choi was responsible for planning out “infotainment” (a combination of the words: “information” and “entertainment”) projects on automobiles’ onboard diagnostics analysis dashboard and control panels. She was able to attend the Michigan Show Car Project and planned and designed the show car’s user interface dashboard. As a result, Choi learned about the current automobile industry and market in depth. Along with cooperating and working with designers, these experiences have helped her develop work professionalism. After the internship, Choi gained an avid interest in the field of UX (user experience design) and plans on improving the related skills. Choi learned about the field of UX (user experience design) during her HY-WEP experience and hopes to further develop related skills. (Photo courtesy of Choi) When asked what some of the benefits of HY-WEP are, Choi answered, “in the majority of cases, HY-WEP is related to startups, so the task and role you receive may be quite diverse. This enables interns to experience a broad range of work which will surely be helpful in the long run.” In addition, Choi advised those who are applying to emphasize the importance of setting the goal straight away as well as what can be achieved from the internship in the self-introductory paper. For the upcoming HY-WEP, the Center for Academic Placement Support is offering an eight-week internship opportunity for Hanyang University students who have completed more than four semesters. The first round of the application period is to end on November 30th, 2018, and the additional application period will take part in December. More information can be found on the HY-WEP website. Seok Ga-ram carpethediem@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Park Geun-hyung

2018-11 05

[Student]Students from the School of Business Pass the 35th Customs Broker Examination

A banner congratulating those who passed the examination to be a certified customs broker was displayed in the School of Business at Hanyang University. On September 19th of this year, the names of applicants that passed the second-round of the 35th certified customs broker examination were announced. Names such as Kim Yoo-min (School of Business, 4th year) and Kim Ji-hoon (School of Business, 4th year) were proudly displayed. (From left) Kim Ji-hoon (School of Business, 4th year) and Kim Yoo-min (School of Business, 4th year) are pointing at their names in the banner that reads, "Congratulations on passing the 35th Customs Broker Exam 2018." A customs broker clears shipments of imported and exported goods. The Customs Broker Exam is held each year, and the percentage of candidates that passed this year was 37.95 percent for the first-round and 6.62 percent for the second-round, indicating the difficulty in becoming a customs broker. The first-round of the exam consisted of multiple choice questions, while the second-round consisted of essay questions. Every subject is scored out of 100, and those who receive more than 40 points or higher on every subject (the average is 60) pass the exam. However, when those who pass 60 points are less than the required number of people, which was 90 people total, those with the higher average pass the exam. Kim Yoo-min passed the exam with an average score of 58 and Kim Ji-hoon with 61. (From left to right) News H interviewed Kim Yoo-min (School of Business, 4th year) and Kim Ji-hoon (School of Business, 4th year) on November 2nd, 2018. Kim Ji-hoon started studying for the exam in 2014, and it took him 4 years to pass the exam this year. For Kim Yoo-min, the preparation for the examination took 1 and a half years. They both studied day and night. Kim Ji-hoon preferred to study at school, setting a goal to study from 9 a.m. to 12 p.m. They both agreed that the examination necessitates heavy loads of memorizing. They emphasized that repeating the studying process and constantly writing the content out is very important. In order to memorize effectively, Kim Ji-hoon wrote everything he learned in one book and kept going back to it. “It’s easy to forget even the things you studied yesterday. Memorizing by making acronyms or creating a sentence using the important words helps to effectively memorize a large quantity of content." From January to June is the period for the trial examination. There are 24 mock tests in total, and students take them weekly. Since scores over 60 are not common, curved-grading is done on the test scores. “It feels devastating when I don’t get in the top 90," said Kim Yoo-min. Kim Ji-hoon agreed and added that repeating the studying process gets exhausting, and the pressure to obtain a high score makes things very hard to go on. A sample of one of Ji-hoon's books that he used to increase the effectiveness of memorizing (Photo courtesy of Kim) To cope with all the stress from studying, Kim Ji-hoon and Kim Yoo-min took a day off after the trial examination ended. They would forget about the test and watch television, meet friends, or eat delicious food to refresh their minds. “One thing I took with me from studying for the customs broker examination is swimming. Swimming helped me get through the long days of studying in a healthy state," said Kim Yoo-min. Hanyang University does not have departments or classes related to commerce and trade. This can make things a little more difficult for those planning on or who are already preparing for the Customs Broker Examination. “Just try to get the exam over with as quickly as possible. Effectiveness runs low if the studying period increases,” said Kim Ji-hoon. “I hope luck is with you. You might see what you memorized the night before in the examination paper. Also, it is rather hard to find someone that is preparing to become a customs broker inside Hanyang University, but I still recommend you to look for and be connected with those who are in the same position as you,” added Kim Yoo-min. After the long and what seemed like never-ending days of fighting with oneself, Kim Ji-hoon and Kim Yoo-min are now taking in some deep breaths before they go on to plan for another goal. They plan on taking some days off before they attend vocational education in January of the following year. Kim Hyun-soo soosoupkimmy@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Lee Jin-myung

2018-10 29

[Student]Challenge Yourselves, Youth!

Graduate students from the Department of Mechanical Engineering who are also members of the team, Machine Dynamics Laboratory won first place in the IEEE VTS Motor Vehicles Challenge, 2018. The members include Lee Woong (Department of Mechanical Engineering, Doctoral Program), Jeong Hae-seong and Park Do-hyun (Department of Mechanical Engineering, Integrated Master’s-Doctor’s Program). IEEE stands for Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, and VTS stands for Vehicular Technology Society. The team was invited to the IEEE VPPC (Vehicle Power And Propulsion Conference) held in Chicago, IL, USA, from the 27th to the 30th of August this year, which they presented their research findings and earned 3000 dollars as their first place prize. (From left) The team leader, Lee Woong (Department of Mechanical Engineering, Doctoral Program) and two team members Jeong Hae-seong and Park Do-hyun (Department of Mechanical Engineering, Integrated Master’s-Doctor’s Program) were able to receive first prize in the VTS challenge with the guidance of their advisor for their team, professor Kim Nam-wook (Department of Mechanical Engineering). The VTS challenge competes for minimization of energy consumption and aims to develop a control strategy that can be applied to real cars. This year, the challenge was to minimize the mileage energy consumption of General Motors (GM) hybrid vehicle, ‘Volt 1st gen.' 52 teams from 20 countries participated in the challenge. The online posting regarding the opening of the VTS challenge were uploaded on January 5th, so the team had two months of preparation before the energy management submission deadline in March. The results were announced the following month. In the evaluation process, the jurors for the competition run the simulation model by themselves and whichever vehicle that consumes the least energy wins first place. The Machine Dynamics Laboratory team applied one of the optimal control theory called, ‘Pontryagin’s minimum principle.' It decides the relative value of the quantity of fuel and electricity and minimizes it. The system itself constantly monitors the remaining oil and electricity and decides whether to use more fuels or electric motor. Without a doubt, the final results had to be good due to the characteristic of hybrid cars to increase energy efficiency when the remainder quantity is similar. Members of the Machine Dynamics Laboratory explained that they have been researching cars for 3 years, yet this was the first time to receive such an honorable reward. (Photo courtesy of Lee) The VTS challenge is held every year but with a different subject and vehicle to work with. “Nothing is for certain yet, but maybe for next year’s competition, our team members will participate as leaders.” Lee Woong (Department of Mechanical Engineering, Doctoral Program) who actively took part in the VTS challenge as a leader went on to say, “challenge yourselves, youth!” Kim Hyun-soo soosoupkimmy@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Lee Jin-myung

2018-10 22

[Student]A New Horizon for Audiobooks

With the advent of Audible, an audiobook service by Amazon, audiobooks have been gaining enormous popularity. The fact that people can listen to books with voiceovers regardless of the place and time makes it even more convenient, and the user range can include the visually handicapped as well. However, not being able to personally select the desirable voiceover may be conventional. In order to improve the traditional audiobooks out in the current market, a startup team named LionRocket consisting of three Hanyang University student entrepreneurs gathered to create audiobooks using different voices, including celebrities. The LionRocket team, formed in February 2018, has seized various opportunities and was awarded prizes for winning numerous startup competitions. In the recent 2018 Excellent University Startup Competition in Seoul, held on September 20th, 2018, the team was awarded the prize of excellence. (From left) LionRocket's Mun Hyung-jun (Department of Information Systems, 2nd year), Park Jun-hyung (Department of Information Systems, 4th year), and Jeong Seung-hwan (Department of Information Systems, 4th year) won the prize of excellence at the 2018 University Startup Competition in Seoul, held on September 20th, 2018. (Photo Courtesy of Jeong) LionRocket’s Jeong Seung-hwan (Department of Information Systems, 4th year), Mun Hyung-jun (Department of Information Systems, 2nd year), and Park Jun-hyung (Department of Information Systems, 4th year) are friends in the same major who had the same interests in starting a startup company. The main goal of LionRocket is to provide audiobooks with various voiceovers customers can select from. “I was inspired by a presenter’s similar topic at a developer conference in 2017 and decided to start the business that could initially contribute to the visually handicapped who would have difficulties reading a written book,” stated Jeong, the representative of LionRocket. LionRocket’s current business plan consists of implementing a deep learning system and Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) to replace the original text-to-speech (TTs) technology, which tends to sound unnatural due to its mechanical sounds. LionRocket members talk about the difficult process they went through in order to develop their business plan. (From left), Park Jun-hyung (Department of Information Systems, 4th year), Jeong Seung-hwan (Department of Information Systems, 4th year), Mun Hyung-jun (Department of Information Systems, 2nd year) The three students take roles in the audiobook development process. As the representatives of LionRocket, Jeong focuses on taking care of the general project, and Park is responsible for analyzing the preprocessing of Korean language data most suitable for the AI. Mun designs and maintains the deep learning model. The current business model is yet to be completed but the team has been periodically uploading their work videos on YouTube. (Link to LionRocket's YouTube channel) Business model planning was not an easy process in the beginning. As the members lacked financial support and knowledge in artificial intelligence (AI), they had to spend their own money in the first month to initiate the plan. However, after receiving subsidy from Hanium, a center that provides IT talent training, and collecting prize money from winning various university startup competitions, they were able to utilize a GPU with a deep learning service and start their studies on AI. LionRocket is now awaiting government subsidy. (From left), Mun Hyung-jun (Department of Information Systems, 2nd grade), Jeong Seung-hwan (Department of Information Systems, 4th grade), and Park Jun-hyung (Department of Information Systems, 4th grade) hope they will be able to provide the audiobook service to the public by the end of 2018. LionRocket is in the process of negotiating with the publishers in order to provide the service to the public hopefully by the end of 2018. Their long-term goals for the business is to gain 50,000 users and provide these audiobooks to the visually impaired as soon as possible. Mun stated that he would wish nothing more than to take the subway and see people using the application in the future. “As we are a team of engineering students, we lack marketing and design skills. It would be nice if there is someone interested in working together after checking some of our work online,” hoped Jeong. Seok Ga-ram carpethediem@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Park Guen-hyung

2018-10 15

[Student]Passing the Civil Service Examination

The successful candidates for the 2018 Civil Service Examination were recently announced on the last day of September. Kim Geon-hui (Department of Economics and Finance, 1st year) successfully passed the examination, applying for the serial group of financial administration. Having started to prepare for the exam since early February of 2016, Kim says that he still feels bewildered by the result and happy that all the members of his study group have managed to pass this year’s exam. Entering Hanyang University in 2015, Kim mentioned how he became interested in the field of policy planning while taking his major courses. “Although becoming a professional in a particular field or major did seem interesting, it was planning policies and developing a synthetic perspective that got me more captivated,” explained Kim. Based upon his newly formed interests, Kim took time off from school after his first quarter and moved in to Sillim-dong Gosichon, where most of its residents are students preparing for various exams. Kim's preparation and advice Failing the first examination of 2017, Kim changed his daily schedule to studying eleven hours, starting from seven in the morning to eleven in the night. During the three-cycle period, which refers to the time period between the first and second exam, Kim slightly changed his time schedule of starting in nine in the morning due to emaciation. Kim also mentioned how joining the study group within the Sillim-dong Gosichon also greatly helped him with not only preparing for the overall exam, but also with sharing information and providing support towards each other. According to Kim, the Civil Service Examination is mainly divided into three stages. The first stage is the Public Service Aptitude Test (PSAT), which is once again divided into four parts: Linguistic Logic, Data Interpretation, Situational Judgement, and Constitutional Law. As for the Linguistic Logic and Data Interpretation section, Kim mentioned the importance of time management and how one must quickly distinguish the questions that should be abandoned in order to focus on the remaining questions. As for the Situational Judgement part, Kim stressed an emphasis upon the quizzes, and how finding the twists in sample questions from previous exams helped his preparation. On the Constitutional Law area, Kim shared his advice: "I was surprised this year due to the fact that provisions of the constitution were questioned rather than judicial precedents. For those who are preparing for the exam, I recommend you put less emphasis upon studying judicial precedents but focus upon the provisions also." Kim Geon-hui (Department of Economics and Finance, 1st year) explained that self-control is an important factor during the preparation process as the Civil Service Examination requires continuous effort. Kim used the term ‘real-game’ when referring to the second stage of the exam, which took place in June. Applying for the serial group of financial administration, Kim took the following exams of Economics, Finance, Administrative Law, Administration, and Statistics. Instead of writing in a beautiful manner, Kim says that he focused on writing answers roughly, but accurately. Out of the exams stated above, it is the Administration part that most examinees, including Kim, find most challenging. As for Kim, he explained that he prepared for the exam by trying to list short-answers as in a thesis and sharing answer sheets with other members within the group study. The third and last stage of the exam is the interview, which consisted of group discussions, individual presentations, and personality interviews. According to Kim, giving a relaxed and soft impression to the interviewers is important. He also added that providing ingenious and inventive ideas during group discussions and individual presentations would also give a positive impression. For this reason, Kim gave an emphasis on the need of utilizing one’s own original strengths during the preparation of the interview stage. Overcoming Hardships When asked about hardships during the preparation process, Kim recalled his memories of failing on the second stage of the 2017 Civil Service Examination. "The fact that I could not tell my parents that I will definitely pass the next year was what made me even more troubled. Having no guarantee that I will eventually pass the exam is what I think most examinees, including myself, find most challenging while preparing for the examination." Kim also recalled the time when he changed his serial group from General Administration to Financial Administration. He changed his serial group with the belief that he was better suited for the economic and financial area, yet the thought that he might regret this decision was also another hardship that he had to overcome. As changing his or her serial group was a rare case, Kim had trouble seeking advice on this matter. Having the thought that it is only himself who can overcome his own hardships that Kim studied even harder in order to defeat his uncertainties. Kim mentioned how he is planning to have various experiences and have some time to look back upon himself before turning into office. Nonetheless, without the steady support from his parents, friends, and fellow members of the studying group, who also prepared for the exam and went through similar hardships, Kim says that he would not have made it through the whole process. As for future plans, Kim mentioned that he is planning to have diverse experiences. “While preparing for the interview, I felt that I still had a lot to learn, as I have focused upon only studying from an early age. For this reason, I want to experience various fields and also have some time to look back upon myself,” explained Kim. Choi Seo-yong tjdyd1@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Kang Cho-hyun

2018-09 17

[Student]Equestrian Athlete Kim Hyeok Earns Two Medals at the Asian Games 2018

Dressage is “the art of riding and training a horse in a manner that develops obedience, flexibility, and balance.” It is evaluated by criterions such as beauty and accuracy; the judge subjectively scores players on how beautifully and correctly they make of a particular movement. Kim Hyeok (Division of Sports & Well-Being, major in Sports in Life, 4th year) who put forth great effort to earn a silver medal in the team event, received a bronze medal in the individual game at the Asian Games 2018 Jakarta Palembang on 23rd of August, 2018. Whilst it was Kim’s first time competing in the Asian Games, the equestrian athlete proudly brought back two medals to represent Korea. Kim Hyeok (Division of Sports & Well-Being, major in Sports in Life, 4th year) is smiling after receiving the bronze medal in dressage. (Photo courtesy of Yonhap News) Kim started horseback riding when he was a first grade student in high school. His father encouraged him to try horseback riding as a hobby. Since horseback riding was the only sport involving an animal, it appealed to Kim who loved animals of all kind. The reason he chose dressage in particular, was because dressage requires more delicate movements to control the horse in the way he wants it to be. “Dressage is a sport that promotes growth of both the athlete and the horse. That’s what I like about this sport so much.” The 2018 Asian Games was a special game for Kim since he waited 4 years to compete. When asked how he managed to persist in the 4 years of preparation and through the suspenseful competition, he said that he trained himself thinking that this was his last chance, and also by reminding himself that 4 years was too long of a time to give up or turn back. Not everything was easy for Kim. While training for the Asian Games, the hardest part was Jakarta’s hot and humid weather throughout the training. He said it was tough adjusting to the hot air, both for the athletes and their horses. Although Kim is now taking time off from school, attending school and training at the same time was a very difficult job to get done, he says. Kim exercises in the mornings and trains at the Hwaseong horse riding course in the afternoon during school life. Since it was Kim’s first time taking part in the Asian Game, he focused more on the team event than the individual game. “In the team event I was playing with seniors and I could depend on them, but during the individual game, I felt more nervous because I was truly alone in the competition.” Kim competing at the 2018 Asian Games (Photo courtesy of Kim) Kim’s next mountain to climb is the 2020 Tokyo Olympics and the 2022 Hangzhou Asian Games. Korea has won first place in dressage in six out of the seven Asian Games held in the past. The great potential and possibility that Kim and the other equestrian athletes have shown the people of Korea through the 2018 Asian Games has allowed spectators to look forward to further good news in this sport. Kim Hyun-soo soosoupkimmy@hanyang.ac.kr

2018-09 10

[Student]Artificial Intelligence Novel Competition Award Winners

Only a few fear that artificial intelligence (AI) will annihilate mankind, but many do worry that it will replace their jobs. Some repetitive and analytical jobs such as writing sports or stock news have in fact been mostly replaced by algorithms. In this era, a team of Hanyang University undergraduate students have developed an AI that can write fiction. From left, Ko Hyung-kwon (Mathematics, 4th year), Lee Kyu-won, Jung Jae-eun, and Yoon Cheol-ju (all three Industrial Engineering, 4th year), the members of the Long Short-term Memory team, on August 17th (Photo Courtesy of Ko) Led by Ko Hyung-kwon (Mathematics, 4thyear), the team named Long Short-term Memory (LSTM), a type of network the team used to enable deep learning, won the silver medal from the KT Artificial Intelligence Novel Contest on August 17, 2018 with their novel titled, ‘The Rebel.’ LSTM was the only team to be composed of undergraduate engineering students among all other competitors. Ko and three other team members, Lee Kyu-won (Industrial Engineering, 4th year), Jung Jae-eun (Industrial Engineering, 4th year), and Yoon Cheol-ju (Industrial Engineering, 4th year) met and formed their team in the IE Capstone Design class, where students must conduct group research on any topic. Ko originally recruited the team with the research focus on AI's writing poems but quickly changed the route to novels when they learned about the competition. Working for about four months on the project beginning in March, the team had spent a lot of time studying what an AI is. “There are a lot of open source algorithms that can create stuff, but as we had no prior knowledge of AI, we had to start from scratch by studying,” reminisced Lee. The hardest part of studying was that there were not many available materials in Korean. Ko remarked, “as a team leader, I had to know more than my team members, so I took online courses from prestigious U.S. universities despite my poor English.” Team members are explaining how they prepared for the competiton. Yoon Yoon Cheol-ju (Industrial Engineering, 4th year) mentioned that good teamwork led to good results. On top of the industriously-acquired knowledge, the team built their algorithm in a quite innovative way. Realizing the inevitability of human intervention, the team tried to minimize it by coding the AI to recommend five possible sentences that follow the previous one. “To make the computer understand the characteristics of sentences, whether it is part of a dialogue or a descriptive sentence, we had to tag all the sentences in the input database,” Ko said. Therefore, ‘The Rebel,' a high school romance fiction, was created. “We had to utilize online fiction for copyright issues, and the vast majority of the available source for the sentences were romantic novels,” mentioned Jung. To the question, ‘Is AI really life-threatening?’ All the team members crossed their heads. Yoon added, “I thought it would be, so I planned to take my career down that road. But as I learned more and struggled myself, I was able to feel the barrier still existing in many ways, especially in the creative work.” The team has now disbanded, and the members are expecting to graduate soon. They all have different plans, but the intense experience has influenced their career path to research or work in a related field. Click to read 'The Rebel' Kim So-yun dash070@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Park Geun-hyung

2018-09 04

[Student]Hanyang Lions Spreading Wings to the World

For those who aspire to take their life out to the world, studying or working overseas can be a great option. However, not everyone actually gets to live abroad because of so many elements to consider such as language, being apart from friends and family, and the lack of information. This week, News H met two proud Hanyang students, Heo Byeong-geun (Department of Political Science and International Studies, '18) and Cho Kyung-min (Mechanical Engineering, 4th year) to listen to their stories of how they tackled all the barriers. From left, Cho Kyung-min (Mechanical Engineering, 4th year) and Heo Byeong-geun (Department of Political Science and International Studies, '18) Off to New York to become a researcher Heo was accepted to New York University for a PhD in politics with a full scholarship this year. A scholarship package is given to all students in the doctorate program. He remarked that during his days in the military, he realized that he wanted pursue his career in Political Science. After being discharged from the military, Heo actively started to prepare for graduate school. “Along the way, I learned that I can go directly for a doctorate degree without a masters,” smiled Heo. Post graduate institutions require a Curriculum Vitae (CV), a form of resume, to assess one’s academic career. Nonetheless, Heo had little to write about, with him being an undergraduate student. “I had to knock on some doors,” mentioned Heo. He eventually got to join some projects with his professors. Although he started his preparation right before his senior year, he recommends others to start as soon as possible. “The sooner the better.” Japanese company to start a career Cho Kyung-min also made up his mind to work in Japan when he as a soldier. “A year of working holiday in Japan gave me some sense of what it would be like to work in Japan, and I loved it,” mentioned Cho. The key part in the preparation for him was ‘self-assessment.’ Cho wrote down ten of the most important events in his life and analyzed his characteristics into fifty words based on them. Cho emphasized the importance of this practice: “knowing oneself thoroughly from an objective point of view enables one to find the right job and to answer interview questions with stories and sound reason.” Both Heo and Cho emphasized that one need to go out and knock on doors and ask around for information, rather than relying too much on the internet or private matching organizations. “Simply wanting to escape the situation does not help. You need to prepare thoroughly and with confidence in the path you are choosing,” said Cho. Cho is starting his work with the Sumimoto Group, one of the four largest electronics companies in Japan as a researcher. Kim So-yun dash070@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Park Geun-hyung

2018-09 03

[Student]Unhappy? Pack Your Stuff, and Leave!

“If today were the last day of my life, would I want to do what I am about to do today?” Steve Jobs made it clear that if the answer was “no” for too many times, you had some changes to make in your life. Kim Jung-bum (Department of Mechanical Engineering, Master’s program) lived up to the advice of Steve Jobs. He worked at Hyundai, one of Korea's leading companies, for three years, after which he quit his job to go on a world tour for a year to learn more about marketing, a field he truly wanted to engage in. After his life-changing trip, Kim managed to publish a book titled World Tour Plan Book with five other travelers. Kim Jung-bum (Department of Mechanical Engineering, Master’s program) talked about his life-changing expedition on August 29th, 2018. Before he left for his life-changing journey, he used to work at Hyundai from 2010 to 2013. “Hyundai is a dream company for many people out there. It did offer great pay. However, when I asked myself if I was enjoying myself at work, the answer was a 'no.'” He deeply felt that where he worked was very limited in terms of space and information. He felt the need for more insight in marketing, so he went on a tour to learn more about the automobile market industry. The book, World Tour Plan Book was written solely for those having trouble making plans and forming routes for their trip. Kim wrote about how to resolve the difficult problems people faced when going on a trip, and recommended ways to transport efficiently when traveling. “Since I, myself, have suffered the most over which route I should take, this book had to specifically include how you plan where you should go during your voyage.” The book includes pictures that were mostly taken by Kim and the co-authors themselves. The book has five more co-authors, all of whom were members of a Daum cafe named “World Tour Study.” The time and the places that the six authors traveled were all different in their form, but they realized that they know so much about where they visited that it was a waste not to write a book about their now new expertise. Kim traveled to 30 countries and 150 cities in just one year. For him, the different places he had visited had to do with countries where the automobile market was known to be advanced. Of course, he learned much more than just new information about the automobile industry. He saw sites of superb scenic beauty as well as the unique cultural heritages of many countries and met local people who looked at life a little differently from himself. “My real dream was to work in the sales department. A new dream I had earned from my worldwide tour was to become a consultant who helps people find out what kind of trip they desire, and ease any of their worries for the planned trip. I have achieved both of my dreams because I now work as an overseas technical salesman at a new company and also as a consultant at a company named Nextrip to help design the perfect trip for travellers.” (A link for more information) Kim is holding his book, the World Tour Plan Book, which contains many tips of all the key places, food, budget, transportation, and accommodations for a trip. “It’s shameful to say, but I think I was living my parent’s dream, not mine. After the journey, I was finally living my own life.” Kim recommended visiting a local university when travelling to a new country and having a talk with students there. He realized that by talking to university students that they had very different points of view when facing life struggles, and this opened Kim up in terms of having more alternative options when making life choices. Kim encouraged Hanyang students to be “as insane as you can be.” He went on to say, "if you are not crazy about something, you probably cannot do it." He emphasized the value of four years of university life. Being a student means you have open potential and limitless opportunities. “My journey was priceless in that it helped me think in a whole new way, and it also gave me time to know more about the good and bad about myself. I recommend that you experience it yourself by simply going on a trip.” Kim Hyun-soo soosoupkimmy@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Lee Jin-myung