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2018-10 15

[Student]Passing the Civil Service Examination

The successful candidates for the 2018 Civil Service Examination were recently announced on the last day of September. Kim Geon-hui (Department of Economics and Finance, 1st year) successfully passed the examination, applying for the serial group of financial administration. Having started to prepare for the exam since early February of 2016, Kim says that he still feels bewildered by the result and happy that all the members of his study group have managed to pass this year’s exam. Entering Hanyang University in 2015, Kim mentioned how he became interested in the field of policy planning while taking his major courses. “Although becoming a professional in a particular field or major did seem interesting, it was planning policies and developing a synthetic perspective that got me more captivated,” explained Kim. Based upon his newly formed interests, Kim took time off from school after his first quarter and moved in to Sillim-dong Gosichon, where most of its residents are students preparing for various exams. Kim's preparation and advice Failing the first examination of 2017, Kim changed his daily schedule to studying eleven hours, starting from seven in the morning to eleven in the night. During the three-cycle period, which refers to the time period between the first and second exam, Kim slightly changed his time schedule of starting in nine in the morning due to emaciation. Kim also mentioned how joining the study group within the Sillim-dong Gosichon also greatly helped him with not only preparing for the overall exam, but also with sharing information and providing support towards each other. According to Kim, the Civil Service Examination is mainly divided into three stages. The first stage is the Public Service Aptitude Test (PSAT), which is once again divided into four parts: Linguistic Logic, Data Interpretation, Situational Judgement, and Constitutional Law. As for the Linguistic Logic and Data Interpretation section, Kim mentioned the importance of time management and how one must quickly distinguish the questions that should be abandoned in order to focus on the remaining questions. As for the Situational Judgement part, Kim stressed an emphasis upon the quizzes, and how finding the twists in sample questions from previous exams helped his preparation. On the Constitutional Law area, Kim shared his advice: "I was surprised this year due to the fact that provisions of the constitution were questioned rather than judicial precedents. For those who are preparing for the exam, I recommend you put less emphasis upon studying judicial precedents but focus upon the provisions also." Kim Geon-hui (Department of Economics and Finance, 1st year) explained that self-control is an important factor during the preparation process as the Civil Service Examination requires continuous effort. Kim used the term ‘real-game’ when referring to the second stage of the exam, which took place in June. Applying for the serial group of financial administration, Kim took the following exams of Economics, Finance, Administrative Law, Administration, and Statistics. Instead of writing in a beautiful manner, Kim says that he focused on writing answers roughly, but accurately. Out of the exams stated above, it is the Administration part that most examinees, including Kim, find most challenging. As for Kim, he explained that he prepared for the exam by trying to list short-answers as in a thesis and sharing answer sheets with other members within the group study. The third and last stage of the exam is the interview, which consisted of group discussions, individual presentations, and personality interviews. According to Kim, giving a relaxed and soft impression to the interviewers is important. He also added that providing ingenious and inventive ideas during group discussions and individual presentations would also give a positive impression. For this reason, Kim gave an emphasis on the need of utilizing one’s own original strengths during the preparation of the interview stage. Overcoming Hardships When asked about hardships during the preparation process, Kim recalled his memories of failing on the second stage of the 2017 Civil Service Examination. "The fact that I could not tell my parents that I will definitely pass the next year was what made me even more troubled. Having no guarantee that I will eventually pass the exam is what I think most examinees, including myself, find most challenging while preparing for the examination." Kim also recalled the time when he changed his serial group from General Administration to Financial Administration. He changed his serial group with the belief that he was better suited for the economic and financial area, yet the thought that he might regret this decision was also another hardship that he had to overcome. As changing his or her serial group was a rare case, Kim had trouble seeking advice on this matter. Having the thought that it is only himself who can overcome his own hardships that Kim studied even harder in order to defeat his uncertainties. Kim mentioned how he is planning to have various experiences and have some time to look back upon himself before turning into office. Nonetheless, without the steady support from his parents, friends, and fellow members of the studying group, who also prepared for the exam and went through similar hardships, Kim says that he would not have made it through the whole process. As for future plans, Kim mentioned that he is planning to have diverse experiences. “While preparing for the interview, I felt that I still had a lot to learn, as I have focused upon only studying from an early age. For this reason, I want to experience various fields and also have some time to look back upon myself,” explained Kim. Choi Seo-yong tjdyd1@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Kang Cho-hyun

2018-09 17

[Student]Equestrian Athlete Kim Hyeok Earns Two Medals at the Asian Games 2018

Dressage is “the art of riding and training a horse in a manner that develops obedience, flexibility, and balance.” It is evaluated by criterions such as beauty and accuracy; the judge subjectively scores players on how beautifully and correctly they make of a particular movement. Kim Hyeok (Division of Sports & Well-Being, major in Sports in Life, 4th year) who put forth great effort to earn a silver medal in the team event, received a bronze medal in the individual game at the Asian Games 2018 Jakarta Palembang on 23rd of August, 2018. Whilst it was Kim’s first time competing in the Asian Games, the equestrian athlete proudly brought back two medals to represent Korea. Kim Hyeok (Division of Sports & Well-Being, major in Sports in Life, 4th year) is smiling after receiving the bronze medal in dressage. (Photo courtesy of Yonhap News) Kim started horseback riding when he was a first grade student in high school. His father encouraged him to try horseback riding as a hobby. Since horseback riding was the only sport involving an animal, it appealed to Kim who loved animals of all kind. The reason he chose dressage in particular, was because dressage requires more delicate movements to control the horse in the way he wants it to be. “Dressage is a sport that promotes growth of both the athlete and the horse. That’s what I like about this sport so much.” The 2018 Asian Games was a special game for Kim since he waited 4 years to compete. When asked how he managed to persist in the 4 years of preparation and through the suspenseful competition, he said that he trained himself thinking that this was his last chance, and also by reminding himself that 4 years was too long of a time to give up or turn back. Not everything was easy for Kim. While training for the Asian Games, the hardest part was Jakarta’s hot and humid weather throughout the training. He said it was tough adjusting to the hot air, both for the athletes and their horses. Although Kim is now taking time off from school, attending school and training at the same time was a very difficult job to get done, he says. Kim exercises in the mornings and trains at the Hwaseong horse riding course in the afternoon during school life. Since it was Kim’s first time taking part in the Asian Game, he focused more on the team event than the individual game. “In the team event I was playing with seniors and I could depend on them, but during the individual game, I felt more nervous because I was truly alone in the competition.” Kim competing at the 2018 Asian Games (Photo courtesy of Kim) Kim’s next mountain to climb is the 2020 Tokyo Olympics and the 2022 Hangzhou Asian Games. Korea has won first place in dressage in six out of the seven Asian Games held in the past. The great potential and possibility that Kim and the other equestrian athletes have shown the people of Korea through the 2018 Asian Games has allowed spectators to look forward to further good news in this sport. Kim Hyun-soo soosoupkimmy@hanyang.ac.kr

2018-09 10

[Student]Artificial Intelligence Novel Competition Award Winners

Only a few fear that artificial intelligence (AI) will annihilate mankind, but many do worry that it will replace their jobs. Some repetitive and analytical jobs such as writing sports or stock news have in fact been mostly replaced by algorithms. In this era, a team of Hanyang University undergraduate students have developed an AI that can write fiction. From left, Ko Hyung-kwon (Mathematics, 4th year), Lee Kyu-won, Jung Jae-eun, and Yoon Cheol-ju (all three Industrial Engineering, 4th year), the members of the Long Short-term Memory team, on August 17th (Photo Courtesy of Ko) Led by Ko Hyung-kwon (Mathematics, 4thyear), the team named Long Short-term Memory (LSTM), a type of network the team used to enable deep learning, won the silver medal from the KT Artificial Intelligence Novel Contest on August 17, 2018 with their novel titled, ‘The Rebel.’ LSTM was the only team to be composed of undergraduate engineering students among all other competitors. Ko and three other team members, Lee Kyu-won (Industrial Engineering, 4th year), Jung Jae-eun (Industrial Engineering, 4th year), and Yoon Cheol-ju (Industrial Engineering, 4th year) met and formed their team in the IE Capstone Design class, where students must conduct group research on any topic. Ko originally recruited the team with the research focus on AI's writing poems but quickly changed the route to novels when they learned about the competition. Working for about four months on the project beginning in March, the team had spent a lot of time studying what an AI is. “There are a lot of open source algorithms that can create stuff, but as we had no prior knowledge of AI, we had to start from scratch by studying,” reminisced Lee. The hardest part of studying was that there were not many available materials in Korean. Ko remarked, “as a team leader, I had to know more than my team members, so I took online courses from prestigious U.S. universities despite my poor English.” Team members are explaining how they prepared for the competiton. Yoon Yoon Cheol-ju (Industrial Engineering, 4th year) mentioned that good teamwork led to good results. On top of the industriously-acquired knowledge, the team built their algorithm in a quite innovative way. Realizing the inevitability of human intervention, the team tried to minimize it by coding the AI to recommend five possible sentences that follow the previous one. “To make the computer understand the characteristics of sentences, whether it is part of a dialogue or a descriptive sentence, we had to tag all the sentences in the input database,” Ko said. Therefore, ‘The Rebel,' a high school romance fiction, was created. “We had to utilize online fiction for copyright issues, and the vast majority of the available source for the sentences were romantic novels,” mentioned Jung. To the question, ‘Is AI really life-threatening?’ All the team members crossed their heads. Yoon added, “I thought it would be, so I planned to take my career down that road. But as I learned more and struggled myself, I was able to feel the barrier still existing in many ways, especially in the creative work.” The team has now disbanded, and the members are expecting to graduate soon. They all have different plans, but the intense experience has influenced their career path to research or work in a related field. Click to read 'The Rebel' Kim So-yun dash070@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Park Geun-hyung

2018-09 04

[Student]Hanyang Lions Spreading Wings to the World

For those who aspire to take their life out to the world, studying or working overseas can be a great option. However, not everyone actually gets to live abroad because of so many elements to consider such as language, being apart from friends and family, and the lack of information. This week, News H met two proud Hanyang students, Heo Byeong-geun (Department of Political Science and International Studies, '18) and Cho Kyung-min (Mechanical Engineering, 4th year) to listen to their stories of how they tackled all the barriers. From left, Cho Kyung-min (Mechanical Engineering, 4th year) and Heo Byeong-geun (Department of Political Science and International Studies, '18) Off to New York to become a researcher Heo was accepted to New York University for a PhD in politics with a full scholarship this year. A scholarship package is given to all students in the doctorate program. He remarked that during his days in the military, he realized that he wanted pursue his career in Political Science. After being discharged from the military, Heo actively started to prepare for graduate school. “Along the way, I learned that I can go directly for a doctorate degree without a masters,” smiled Heo. Post graduate institutions require a Curriculum Vitae (CV), a form of resume, to assess one’s academic career. Nonetheless, Heo had little to write about, with him being an undergraduate student. “I had to knock on some doors,” mentioned Heo. He eventually got to join some projects with his professors. Although he started his preparation right before his senior year, he recommends others to start as soon as possible. “The sooner the better.” Japanese company to start a career Cho Kyung-min also made up his mind to work in Japan when he as a soldier. “A year of working holiday in Japan gave me some sense of what it would be like to work in Japan, and I loved it,” mentioned Cho. The key part in the preparation for him was ‘self-assessment.’ Cho wrote down ten of the most important events in his life and analyzed his characteristics into fifty words based on them. Cho emphasized the importance of this practice: “knowing oneself thoroughly from an objective point of view enables one to find the right job and to answer interview questions with stories and sound reason.” Both Heo and Cho emphasized that one need to go out and knock on doors and ask around for information, rather than relying too much on the internet or private matching organizations. “Simply wanting to escape the situation does not help. You need to prepare thoroughly and with confidence in the path you are choosing,” said Cho. Cho is starting his work with the Sumimoto Group, one of the four largest electronics companies in Japan as a researcher. Kim So-yun dash070@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Park Geun-hyung

2018-09 03

[Student]Unhappy? Pack Your Stuff, and Leave!

“If today were the last day of my life, would I want to do what I am about to do today?” Steve Jobs made it clear that if the answer was “no” for too many times, you had some changes to make in your life. Kim Jung-bum (Department of Mechanical Engineering, Master’s program) lived up to the advice of Steve Jobs. He worked at Hyundai, one of Korea's leading companies, for three years, after which he quit his job to go on a world tour for a year to learn more about marketing, a field he truly wanted to engage in. After his life-changing trip, Kim managed to publish a book titled World Tour Plan Book with five other travelers. Kim Jung-bum (Department of Mechanical Engineering, Master’s program) talked about his life-changing expedition on August 29th, 2018. Before he left for his life-changing journey, he used to work at Hyundai from 2010 to 2013. “Hyundai is a dream company for many people out there. It did offer great pay. However, when I asked myself if I was enjoying myself at work, the answer was a 'no.'” He deeply felt that where he worked was very limited in terms of space and information. He felt the need for more insight in marketing, so he went on a tour to learn more about the automobile market industry. The book, World Tour Plan Book was written solely for those having trouble making plans and forming routes for their trip. Kim wrote about how to resolve the difficult problems people faced when going on a trip, and recommended ways to transport efficiently when traveling. “Since I, myself, have suffered the most over which route I should take, this book had to specifically include how you plan where you should go during your voyage.” The book includes pictures that were mostly taken by Kim and the co-authors themselves. The book has five more co-authors, all of whom were members of a Daum cafe named “World Tour Study.” The time and the places that the six authors traveled were all different in their form, but they realized that they know so much about where they visited that it was a waste not to write a book about their now new expertise. Kim traveled to 30 countries and 150 cities in just one year. For him, the different places he had visited had to do with countries where the automobile market was known to be advanced. Of course, he learned much more than just new information about the automobile industry. He saw sites of superb scenic beauty as well as the unique cultural heritages of many countries and met local people who looked at life a little differently from himself. “My real dream was to work in the sales department. A new dream I had earned from my worldwide tour was to become a consultant who helps people find out what kind of trip they desire, and ease any of their worries for the planned trip. I have achieved both of my dreams because I now work as an overseas technical salesman at a new company and also as a consultant at a company named Nextrip to help design the perfect trip for travellers.” (A link for more information) Kim is holding his book, the World Tour Plan Book, which contains many tips of all the key places, food, budget, transportation, and accommodations for a trip. “It’s shameful to say, but I think I was living my parent’s dream, not mine. After the journey, I was finally living my own life.” Kim recommended visiting a local university when travelling to a new country and having a talk with students there. He realized that by talking to university students that they had very different points of view when facing life struggles, and this opened Kim up in terms of having more alternative options when making life choices. Kim encouraged Hanyang students to be “as insane as you can be.” He went on to say, "if you are not crazy about something, you probably cannot do it." He emphasized the value of four years of university life. Being a student means you have open potential and limitless opportunities. “My journey was priceless in that it helped me think in a whole new way, and it also gave me time to know more about the good and bad about myself. I recommend that you experience it yourself by simply going on a trip.” Kim Hyun-soo soosoupkimmy@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Lee Jin-myung

2018-08 13

[Student]Making A Connection Through Separation

Three senior students of the Department of Interior Design Na Myeong-hwa, Ahn Ju-bin, and Park Do-hyun received placed second in the Urban-Regeneration Exhibition held by Seoul City on 17th of July. Teaming up with Professor Hwang Hyun-seok (Department of Interior Design) and a Lim Joo-young (Department of Interior Design, '18), they were the only team consisting of only students to receive a prize in this exhibition. Park Do-hyun, Ahn Joo-bin, Na Myeong-hwa (Department of Interior Design, 4th year) from left, received second place for the Urban-Regeneration Exhibition held by Seoul City this 17th of July and became the sole student-only team to receive a prize. The targeted area of the exhibition was Majang-dong, an area in Seoul which is famous for its large meat market. However, because the market was not formed through attentive urban planning but rather disorderly, Majang-dong has long been an area of conflict between the area's residents market's merhcants. The main purpose of the exhibition was to ameliorate such confrontation by designing a building in an open space in Majang-dong owned by the city of Seoul . Divided mainly into two stages, the participating teams were required to submit an overall idea of how they were to use the open space and confront the problem that Majang-dong has long faced. Only 12 teams, out of the 66 that initially applied, made it to the second stage where they provided actual blueprints and images of their planned building. The three students became the only student-comprised team to not only make it to the second stage while competing with other architectural firms and construction offices but to win a prize. The team had the main theme of connection through separation. By separating Majang-dong into two floors, one for the residents and the other for the merchants, they believed the conflict would also be lessened. “The product market was not a place that one would enjoy passing by due to both the unpleasant visual and olfactory aspects. Even from the merchants’ perspective, the residents passing the market would have been a disturbance to their livelihood,” explained Park. The Majang-Bridge, which connects the Cheonggye-Stream with Majang-dong has the theme of connection through separation. The students separated the region to provide separate spaces for the merchants and residents, which would alleviate the long conflict that has been ongoing between them. The two floored building would allow the merchants to maintain their livelihood on the first floor without being disturbed, while the residents would be able to freely pass through the area in a much more pleasant environment on the second floor. Despite the fact that they would become literally separated, this would be a beginning for building an atmosphere of respect towards each other instead of the unpleasant confrontation that the residents and merchants of Majang-dong have been facing. Although the students have managed to achieve an outstanding result from the exhibition, they were surrounded by pessimistic concerns from their professors and colleagues during the early phases of preparation. “Due to the awareness that such exhibitions and competitions have a high entry barrier, many students are prevented from participating in them. We also faced many difficulties, yet having confidence with our challenge led us to positive results,” maintained Park. “Keeping the strength to see it through to the end is also important,” added Na as advice. When asked about their future plans, the three students answered that they are now preparing for their graduation exhibition, which is held October 2nd-4th at Hanyang Museum. Based on their experience, it seems that the three students are preparing themselves to once again go beyond the expectations of others and achieve outstanding results. Choi Seo-yong tjdyd1@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Choi Min-ju

2018-08 06

[Student]Receiving the Best Student Paper Award: First Prize

Four of the juniors from the Department of English Language and Literature, Kim Su-bin, Kang Na-rim, Park Su-bin, and Lee Kyu-won, received the Best Student Paper Award: First Prize from the academic competition recently held by The American Studies Association of Korea (ASAK) on the 12th of May. The competition had the main theme of presenting a paper on any aspect of American society. The four students focused their paper upon how sex education is taught in American schools, and compared the relatively progressive programs to the relatively conservative ones. For the conservative side, Park and Lee targeted Mississippi and Texas, respectively, while Kim and Kang concentrated on Massachusetts and California for the progressive side. Interesting differences were found between the conservative and progressive states. Mississippi and Texas, the conservative side, focused their sex education upon self-control and moderation rather than on contraceptive methods. According to Park, it seemed as if the politicians from the conservative states were sensitive to the topic and found it uncomfortable to set a curriculum for the subject. On the other hand, Massachusetts and California were much more open to providing detailed sex education to school students. Rather than preaching to students to simply remain abstinent, the two states focused on teaching students how to have a healthier sex life. Taking a step further, some schools in Massachusetts not only taught methods of contraception but also provided birth-control tools to students. Such differences led the four students to conclude that educational curriculums should be free from political bias and become more unified within the American society. (From left) Park Su-bin, Lee Su-bin, and Lee Kyu-won (Department of English Language and Literature, 3rd year) shared their experience of recieving the Best Student Paper Award at the academic competition held by the American Studies Association of Korea (ASAK). They stressed the importance of selecting a theme interesting to both the writer and readers. It was Professor Lee Hyung-seob (Department of English Language and Literature) who first suggested the students participate in this competition. Once they started their research, the four students received only minimal help from the professor. This allowed the students to have higher levels of responsibility and devotion towards their research. “When sharing our work at the actual competition, it seemed as if the other teams had actually received help from professionals. Conducting the whole paper through our own strength allowed us to become more proud of our results,” stated Kim. When asked to give advice to those who are interested in academic competitions, Lee and Kim emphasized the importance of setting an interest theme, as continuous interest in the subject is the key to producing better results. Park also mentioned good teamwork, which requires a lot of responsibility. At last, the four students concordantly said their dedication to the research was the key factor that bore such a positive result. Choi Seo-yong tjdyd1@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Kang Cho-hyun

2018-08 06

[Student]Passing the 34th Legislative Examination

There are many backbreaking exams that are difficult to pass in Korea, and one of the most notorious and competitive ones is the Legislative Examination (입법고시). Recording a passing rate of 352 to 1 in 2016, the exam seems challenging, if not impossible. On August 2, 2018, News H met with Shin Hong-cheol (Department of Public Administration, 4th year) who passed the 34th Legislative Examination. Shin Hong-cheol (Department of Public Administration, 4th year) seemed lighthearted and humorous throughout the interview. There are three different paths available for the legislative examination: general administrative official, law official, and finance and economy official. “I chose to try out for the general administrative official because I was always interested in the rights of minorities in society. A policy can be made only when basic human rights have a legal basis. I became interested in the legislative examination when I decided I wanted to support creating that legal basis of the fundamental rights,” Shin said. The first exam consists of the Public Service Aptitude Test (PSAT) and an English test which can be replaced by scores of official English tests. The biggest help that Shin received was from a study group formed in Hanyang University. The group was formed a month before the examination, meeting every single day from morning until night. The second part of the exam was a written essay test of five subjects. At school, the schedule is based on that of private educational institutes. In private institutes, it takes three months to have one rotation of studying the five subjects. They perform about three to four rotations in general. However, Shin thought that economics and administrative law were the two most important subjects, so he prepared for them every single day. He chose what he wanted to study later on, after the two crucial subjects were covered. “The rotation method that the private institutions and the school use is inefficient in my opinion, because they finish one subject after the other. You get tested for all five subjects. It is important that you don’t forget the previous subject that you studied,” said Shin. The final part of the legislative examination was the interview. One advantage at this point is that there are not many people competing, as most did not make it through the two prior tests. In addition, the interview groups are announced beforehand, which makes it easier to focus on practice interviews. The hardest part for Shin when preparing for the exam was his uncertainty about the future. There is only one chance a year open to participants, which makes it different from the regular path of finding employment. To overcome this uncertainty, Shin, who lived in the school dormitory, depended on his roommates. They cheered each other up by always preparing a nice, fulfilling meal together. “I believe that any kind of examination is an impartial system that allows you to be assessed on your ability and effort.” “Any kind of examination brings uncertainty. This is especially true when you are studying instead of preparing for finding a position like everyone else, so it is easy to get anxious which can get in the way of your studies. I received much help from the study groups of Hanyang University, and I believe that there are many great groups available for all kinds of exams. Also, the school provides us with online lectures that are much cheaper than those available at private institutes. I hope those preparing for an exam take full advantage of the benefits and support that the school offers.” Kim Hyun-soo soosoupkimmy@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Choi Min-ju

2018-07 30

[Student]Samer Samhoun, a Young "Korean" Entrepreneur and Consultant

All those who watched the Korean TV show, ‘Abnormal Summit’ might remember the handsome fellow Samer Samhoun from Beirut, Lebanon. After eight long years, Samhoun (Division of Mechanical Engineering, ’13) also graduated with a Hanyang Global Startup MBA in 2015 and took his big leap forward into the Korean society. His life-changing journey started upon his arrival at the Incheon airport. Prior to his rather abrupt decision to come to Korea to study, Samhoun had no knowledge of the language or culture of the country whatsoever. When he received a scholarship from the Korean Government Scholarship Program (known as the NIIED), he took it without really knowing what to expect. Samhoun first began his life as a Hanyangian at the Hanyang University (HYU) language school. There were about 220 foreign students with scholarships in Korea, and they all had to take both Korean and English exams. Their exam scores would decide which university they were to attend. “I know for a fact that I ranked low on the Korean test, but the HYU Office of International Cooperation (OIC) team still picked me to be one of their students,” said Samhoun. Samhoun with his friends on graduation day (Photo courtesy of Samhoun) Of course, as it is a challenge for many foreign students, Samhoun also went through some difficulties in the beginning. “Although my university life was a blast, I did have some hard time getting along with some Korean students, given the language barrier, but the foreign community was quite nice. It was a whole new system and I even ended up becoming one of the first batch of Global Saranghandae, the school’s honorary ambassador group,” said Samhoun. Samhoun’s career in Korea started during his senior year at HYU. After being recruited by Samsung S1 to be part of their Task Force Team, he began to expand his work scope as a consultant for startups, Middle-east related businesses, and also the medical tourism industry between the U.A.E. and South Korea. He is also an entrepreneur as he runs his own translation and interpretation service company. “I am the only foreigner that is a part of the policy forum for foreigners that initiates research and debates, while including various professors and officials from the Ministry of Justice where the effort to make foreigners’ stays in Korea more simple and easy.” Samhoun on the Abnormal Summit (Photo courtesy of jtbc) As for his experience on Abnormal Summit, Samhoun noted that when he was first recommended to be featured on the show, he refused as he wanted to focus on his work and MBA. However, he ended up giving it a try, and left impressed. He recalled his experience of the first few years in Korea 10 years ago, and noted how the TV program seemed to have brought a positive effect on Koreans. “The TV program addressed culture and diversity with deep conversations. 10 years ago, a lot of things such as immigration laws and the banking system were difficult. Even just getting a phone was a hassle and doing anything on your own was impossible. But at the end of the day, I still did enjoy sleepless, safe and convenient Seoul.” Samhoun as a successful and growing consultant and entrepreneur (Photo courtesy of Samhoun) Samhoun is now an active member of the Korean society, waiting for his Korean citizenship to be announced within a year. After that, he plans to expand his business and have the chance to just talk to students, passing on his experiences and stories as a foreign student making his way up in Korea. “I am still at a young age but financials are behind me at this point and want to strive to give back and build a stronger youth in Korea, the one main power Korea has for its future.” He ended with a note for fellow HYU students - “Be proud of your university and of being a Hanyang student. Know that every experience you had and will have is priceless and will never come back again. Our university is not only educating us, but it’s helping us grow and form a strong society, and it’s a fact that the person buying a coffee at HYU plaza or asking you for help today might be on Forbes tomorrow. So always stay active within your community and stay connected. Study hard, party harder, be grateful, and love truly.” Park Joo-hyun julia1114@hanyang.ac.kr

2018-07 30

[Student]The Dreams We Hold

From July 21st to 22nd, students from Hanyang University’s Department of Theater and Film performed a play they produced named The Night Stars (밤별), at Sungsoo Art Hall. The play was held in cooperation with Seongdong Foundation for Arts and Culture and in commemoration of the institution’s third year anniversary. The actors from the Department of Theater and Film are Kim Soo-jin, Jeong Sol-ah, Kim Yul-ah, Kim Joo-hun, Kwon Do-gyun, Kang Jeong-mook, Hong Sang-hyeon, and Kim Se-hee. The director and playwright Kim Ha-ram (Department of theater and film, 2nd year) spoke about the motives for writing the script for the play and what she learned after the performance. The journey of The Night Stars began last year when it was selected by the Creative Development Program at Hanyang University, which was then chosen to be officially presented to the public. The play goes back and forth between the past and present and gives the characters a chance to look back on their childhood and the dreams they used to have, which contrast strongly with the reality they are currently living in. The play The Night Stars is about "stars," which can either mean someone’s dream or a person valuable to another, but come to be lost as time goes. The actors that took part in the play told us that they practiced four hours a day during the semester, and more during vacations. They were all laughing when they traced back their memories to when Kim Ju-heun, one of the lead actors in the play, spoke about the time when he had an allergic reaction on stage, only to find out that the play setup was made of oak and birch wood, which he was allergic to. The director of the play Kim Ha-ram also wrote the play's script. “I was always a kid with a dream, so I thought I was sparkly,” she said when speaking about the motives of writing the script. “However, as I grew up, the person that I wanted to be had faded a little. I felt like I wasn’t shining anymore, and I hated that. I wanted to write a play about the stars, which led me to think that the dreams that we had as children are stars, but that the city’s lights could be stars, too.” The last scene of the play shows two main characters looking over the stars and the lights coming from the city, thinking that those two lights are similar in a way. (Photo courtesy of Kim Ha-ram) The play ends with a scene where the two main characters have grown up to be quite different from the people they dreamed of becoming as children. Two imperfect beings may have settled for the present, but they realize after watching the city’s lights in the night sky that city lights can be stars, too. The play gives the audience the lesson that the hopes and dreams they had as children are special, of course, but that the people they have become in the present is just as special. The strong story line engaged the audience, and the actors’ fluent, professional acting made them laugh and cry throughout the play. The eight actors of the play are posing in front of the photo wall of Sungsoo Art Hall. “A play is an act possible when people gather to form one. I believe that a play is a life, and you can’t really live life without people. I used to think of only my goals, but now I think I’ve learned to take a look around at my surroundings, while running for my goals,” said Kim Ha-ram. Kim Hyun-soo soosoupkimmy@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Choi Min-ju