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2017-09 10

[Student]Being the Eye For the Blind

Staring deep into the horizon, a man was sitting by the sea watching the waves splashing against the thirty-foot cliff. Although this is not a sentence with diverse adjectives, people who have been to the sea at least once in their lives and have seen it with their very own eyes would be able to picture the scene quite visually in their own ways. “Because blind people are lacking one of their senses, they seem to be missing out on a lot of fun in the world, which is why we have decided to become the eye for them,” commented Shin Jung-ah (Information System, 3rd year). Team Hues, consisting of Shin, Sung Young-jae (Business, 4th year) and two developers from different colleges have created “Miris: Memorable Iris”, which is a device that enables blind people to hear the texts being read out into speech. Sung and Shin discuss the developments necessary for the Miris. Team Hues, light and hope for All Team Hues have already won grand prizes in several contests with their brilliant technological idea for its high degree of completion and marketability. Over 90 percent of blind people are illiterate in Korea, meaning that only 10 percent of blind people in Korea are able to read braille. Yet there are not so many devices that enable blind people to be able to read or study. Most of the devices are targeted towards the 10 percent of the literate blind since it is much cheaper to develop and is easier to do so through braille. What team Hues have targeted were those in the 90 percent majority of blind people who cannot read braille, although they could speak Korean. “It is very obvious that knowledge inequality comes from not the disability itself, but rather from the lack of developers trying to help blind people eager to learn more,” pointed out Shin. Miris is a small camera device that people can wear like glasses and connects with the earphones to let them hear the texts being read out. Through the text to speech (TTS) technology, the camera would analyze the fonts which would let the people “hear” the books they wish to read. What is more interesting is that Miris would have a bookmark system which would let blind people find the book they were reading, plus mark the pages that they have read. Through the RFID and NFC chips, the Miris sensors would scan the microchips and would react to the sensor. Since there are so many cutting-edge technologies involved in this one machine, such as image processing technology, OCR, the text to speech, and so on, Miris has yet to be commercialized as the miniaturization process has yet to be developed. As the team name represents, team Hues will continue to suggest new pathways of enlightenment for the blind. They believe true knowledge comes from books, even with the development of the Internet--and Hues is determined to bring a new dimension to the educational sector for the blind. "We would love to be the eye for the blind and help them read books." Kim Seung Jun nzdave94@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Choi Minju

2017-08 20

[Student]Being Suit-able for All

Under the motto of “better design, better fit”, Ahn Ji-soo and Shin Yo-sup (Chinese Language & Literature) have set up their designer brand, “SUITABLE”. After setting up the brand in 2015, it has expanded its range of clothes from tailor-made suits to ready-made clothes and this year, women’s wear is ready to be launched. Since co-CEO Shin was on vacation, News H have met Ahn to hear about Suitable. Passion for Fashion Ahn was a natural born fashion star who loved to stand out in front of others. “I had the most shocking look out of all the freshmen when I first entered Hanyang University (HYU),” chuckled Ahn. With his Afro-hair bleached white, Ahn was always wearing the trendiest fashion on campus. “I didn’t really join a lot of clubs but I did work with ‘Campus style icon’ finding the fashion icon of different schools,” said Ahn. Being such a fashion star on campus, Ahn was always the one to reach for advice before going shopping. “I remember being so proud when my friend turned up so cool with a nice outfit after consulting with me,” recalled Ahn. After graduation, Ahn and Shin were both accepted to companies that they have always wanted. “I was good at my job but somehow, there was this empty feeling after returning home everyday,” said Ahn. It was the passion for fashion that was missing in Ahn’s life which he eventually realized after two years of work. “Shin first suggested about starting this business and I felt my heart beating so fast,” recalled Ahn. Shin takes care of most of the promotion and planning of the business while Ahn is responsible for designing clothes. “I always contemplate deeply about one issue and it works the same for designing as well,” explained Ahn. Trying to create clothes that he wants to wear everyday, Ahn says that he is proud to be a designer. Ahn tries to provide styling tips for their customers from head to toe. Philosophy in business “We use the best quality fabric that we can find,” explained Ahn. Comparing fabric from all over the world, Ahn and Shin tries to use the best that they could find and it has led to better quality in their finalized products. With high repurchase rate, Suitable is the type of brand that everyone loves after experiencing the product and its services. “We not only try to sell just our products, but we also try to give the best styling tips and advices that would suit our customers the best,” said Ahn. Providing the pride and hope everyday through their clothes is what Ahn wants to achieve. “There are days when we are filled with pride when we wake up in the morning and feel like we can do anything. I want all my customers to feel that way when wearing our product in the morning,” said Ahn. Suitable also exercises a lot of corporate social responsibility in real life through making tailor-made clothes for the disabled as well. “It takes a lot of time and effort to design a different type of shirt from the scratch,” explained Ahn. One time, Ahn had to design and create the shirt all over for a disabled customer and it took over two weeks to make the final product that fits perfectly. “He later visited our office wearing what I made for him and it looked perfect on him. Filled with pride, that customer thanked us which was very heartwarming,” recalled Ahn. Having big dreams of expanding Suitable into a global brand, Ahn and Shin wishes to enter a bigger market. With their philosophy and work ethics, it would be quite sure to please the customers as they have until now. “I hope everyone feels the pride when wearing our brand Suitable,” concluded Ahn. “I hope everyone feels the pride when wearing our brand Suitable.” Kim Seung-jun nzdave94@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Choi Min-ju

2017-07 17

[Student]Future Leader of Environmental Studies

Some people are lucky enough to find what they would like to do in the near future during their studies at university. Kim Tae-hong (Earth Resources and Environmental Engineering, Doctoral Program) is one of the lucky ones to be able to set his career plans and continue to be successful in his field, environmental engineering. As one of the co-author of the book “Integrative Understanding of Shale Gas Reservoirs” along with professor Lee Kun-sang (Department of Earth Resources and Environmental Engineering), Kim is already being recognized as one of the future leaders in the field. How it all started After Kim has finished writing his second research paper on methods to extract shale gas, Springer publisher, one of the biggest publishers worldwide, has offered Kim and professor Lee to write a book about shale gas. “In the United States, studies about shale gas was starting to catch fire and I was lucky to flow with the wave,” said Kim. Encountering such a huge opportunity was unexpected. “It’s such a new type of study and something uncommon in Korea. The field itself was full of uncertainty,” recalled Kim. The book itself is not only being sold in hard copies but E-book versions as well and about 2,300 copies have been sold so far. It could be viewed as an extended version of the research paper since it is where it all stemmed from. “There are not many specialists in this field of area and especially in Korea, it was all so new for us. We had to strive to find any information possible,” explained Kim. Kim has been studying this field of expertise for about ten years with the help of professor Lee. Although it has been hard work for them, Kim recalls the process of learning being filled with excitement in being the future specialist in the field. Kim recalls being filled with joy when he was offered to publish the book. There has been a lot of support for Kim from diverse research foundations which greatly helped him to continue his research. “I was able to study in the United States with the help of financial support that we were able to get. We sent many proposals and we were lucky enough to be the chosen a lot of the times,” said Kim. His latest research paper written with professor Lee in Applied Energy journal is being rated at 5.7 on the scale of impact factor, which means that in every research paper he writes, it is being quoted in 5.7 research papers by others. “Nature is about 30 to 40 and although it depends on the field of study, my paper is being quite highly quoted in our studies,” explained Kim. Current status and Future goals Kim and Lee’s research focuses on injecting CO2 into the shale reservoir, which is a very tight sedimentary rock. To simply put it, CO2 increases the pressure into the methane gas while CO2 resides in the shale also known as the carbon capture and storage (CCS) method. It is economically and environmentally beneficial in that CO2 is reduced from the air and is used to extract shale gas more than the old method. Kim and Lee are still working on the shale gas and developing the CCS method into a more accurate model. “A new project has been given from the national institute to study deeper about the CCS method to make it more economically beneficial which is what I am focusing on the most nowadays,” explained Kim. Kim wishes to study further about this field of study in the future at research centers. Since there are not much environmental factors that Korea could rely on as a stable type of fuel, shale gas is something that Korea should put more focus on.“Korea has a bad outlook regarding resource development and it seems right to me that there should be more research and development in this field to prepare for the future,” suggested Kim. As for the future researchers of Hanyang University, Kim advises them to have high hopes about what they enjoy learning about. “Someday, the lucky chance would come towards us and I prepared hard to own this moment which has resulted in this output I guess,” concluded Kim. Bright future lies ahead of Kim as a researcher. Kim Seung-jun nzdave94@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Kim Youn-soo

2017-07 01

[Student]Winners of 2017 Robofest Vision Centric Challenge

Robofest is a renowned robot competition that has started from 2000. Hosted by Lawrence Technological University in the United States, over 20,000 people have competed from 14 different countries in the last 17 years. Bae Jong-hak and Yoo Ho-yeon (Robot Engineering, 3rd year) have worked together as a team in 2017 Robofest that was held from June 1st to 3rd in Florida, and won the Vision Centric Challenge. Back to back winners Team Linker, consisted of Bae and Yoo have won the 2016 Robofest last year as well. It is the same competition with different rules. “They host the competition in the U.S. in June, while in Korea, it is held in October,” explained Bae. This time, Bae had the full support from the Department of Robot Engineering. “Our department has generously provided us with the opportunity to travel to the U.S. for free and also helped us out with the materials needed to create the robots as well. Special thanks to professor Han Jae-kwon for helping us out with the robots,” added Bae. Yoo (with the robot), Han (middle), and Bae (with the trophy) are smiling in front of the camera. Team Linker has received such a good feedback thanks to the internal software of their robot. The objective of the competition was the robot to perceive the numbers and equations through the camera and eventually reach a certain result out of it. “We put a lot of effort on the software so that when the robot gets stuck with the equations, it could move back a little instead of standing there still,” said Bae. He explained that Team Linker has prepared for the competition for 3 months and it took about one month to create the robot. “ Software of the robot took longer for us because it was more important than the hardware.” "It has been a privilege for us to participate in the competition." I – Robot After studying one more year to retake the college entrance examination, Bae found his interests in creating robots. “One of my childhood dream was to create a robot on my own,” recalled Bae. He explained that Department of Robot Engineering would be a perfect fit for those not interested in particular field of study. Since robotics requires knowledge from diverse fields, students are able to acquire engineering skills that could be applied in any type of studies. “We learn about diverse types of integrated studies and then move on focus on a certain field that catches your attention. For me, it was image recognition. I gained more interest after studying it during the competition,” said Bae. Bae wishes to create robots similar to Jarvis. In the future, Bae wishes to study more about the robots and image recognition in graduate school. “I see a lot of possibilities from the robots in that we could have a better future with them,” commented Bae. He wishes to create a home robot that would be able to handle useful tasks like Jarvis from Iron man. Bright future seems to lie in front of the winners of Robofest Vision Centric Challenge. Kim Seung-jun nzdave94@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Kim Youn-soo

2017-04 10

[Student]Marathon, Veni, Vidi, Vici!

“At least I ran all the way” is a famous quote by Murakami Haruki, a famous novelist who gets motivated to write through running. Moon Sam-sung (Department of Sports Industry, 4th year) is also a runner who doesn't believe in quitting. Although he injured his fibula (a bone parallel to tibia) 5 weeks before the Seoul Marathon, held on March 19th, Moon decided to run all the way, and he won the Master’s division. Career as a runner Moon started his career as a runner at the age of 10. Moon was Jung Jin-hyuk's training partner for about 7 years. Jung is currently a marathon runner at KEPCO. Living ust a few meters away from each other in the same neighborhood, Moon was able to run alongside Jung, while holding to his dream of becoming the best runner in Korea. “My partner Jung has been the greatest gift that I could ever hope for. Thanks to him, I was able to win the biggest tournament in my middle school years twice in a row,” recalled Moon. The concept of a running partner is of great importance since partners motivate each other to reach their fullest potential and achieve the best in a shorter period of time compared to training alone. Moon remembers his childhood years as a runner. One tip that Moon gave when dealing with injuries was to never stop exercising. Even if you are injured, according to Moon, workout routines must be kept although not to your fullest capacity. “Your running ability will eventually return once you are able to train again. There is no need to be pressured mentally even though others may be training harder than you are,” said Moon. He claims that marathons all come down to mental strength after the 35km mark. “Anyone can train to run up to 35km. It’s after the 35km mark that people fail,” said Moon. He likens that stage as “not being able to eat anything for one week, being out of breath, and hammers being thrown on the legs with every step." Hard work pays off The 2017 Seoul Marathon was the first tournament where Elites (Korea Athletics Federation Runners) and Masters (Non-professional runners) started the race at the same time. Moon won the Masters division this year. Right after entering Hanyang University in 2011 on a full-scholarship, Moon quit his career as a professional runner due to a knee injury. After five years of inactivity, Moon started preparing for marathon running again last year. “Although people warned me not to run in this race, I wanted to try my best due to the hard work that I had put in my training sessions.” Moon, running in the 2017 Seoul Marathon. During his period of inactivity, Moon worked as personal trainer and recently started working as a coach at 'Bang Sun-hee Academy'. After completing military service, he tried saving up money for university by working as a personal trainer. “As I worked, I realized that I should eventually attend university and get a degree,” said Moon. He started running half marathons last year, and, in order to be ready for the full marathon, he had to lose about 10kg. “I prepared for the Seoul Marathon for about 100 days, and I was proud to win the race and prove my skills as a coach,” said Moon. In the first month, Moon trained on sprints, the second month on endurance, and the last month on both speed and endurance. Moon wishes to participate in the 2020 Tokyo Olympics. Although it has been a hard race so far, life itself is a marathon, and Moon plans on preparing for the realization of a bigger dream. “I want to participate in the Tokyo Olympics in 2020 along with my former partner Jung,” said Moon. With such vivid dreams, we have yet to await Moon’s next step as a professional runner. Kim Seung-jun nzdave94@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Moon Hana

2017-01 23 Important News

[Student]Visualization of Movies in Written Critique

"Three films a day, three books a week and records of great music would be enough to make me happy to the day I die" is a famous quotation of a French director François Roland Truffaut. Jason Bechervaise (Department of Theater & Film, Ph.D. ‘17) is a man who fits in perfectly into this. With the passion and love for Korean movies, Bechervaise has traveled all over the world, and into an unknown territory in 2010. Who Bechervaise is Jason Bechervaise works as a movie critic at the Screen International. In addition, he writes columns for the Korea Times and the Seoul Magazine once a week. Bechervaise not only writes, but he also made appearances on the Arirang TV radio station, TBS eFM, and EBS radio, where he introduces Korean movies and a selection of Golden Globe Award-winning films. Although there is numerous work that he is currently working on, Jason says that there are special seasons when he is most busy. “The Cannes Film Festival, Bucheon International Fantastic Film Festival, Busan International Film Festival, Jeonju International Film Festival- these movie festival seasons are when I am the busiest. I not only write reviews about movies but also give critiques for some of them." Since Bechervaise started studying Korean cinema in England, he naturally considered about moving to Korea. “Although I could see movies in England, it was just not enough. I could meet people in the Korean film industry more freely as well,” he added. Bechervaise says that he used to hold movie subscriptions after having seen the “Memories of Murder”. Since then, Bechervaise started studying the Korean culture and history in order to understand Korean movies more deeply. His life changed accordingly. “I gained interest in those fields, started writing academic papers and essays on Korean films and studied more about Korea,” said Bechervaise. "One of the best things about Korean movies is the creativity." Life in motion Bechervaise says that there things that are chaotic in Korea which makes it a better place to live in. “I would put this country in three words: colorful, exciting, and energetic." In the UK, a kind of order exists that lasts a long period of time when getting something done, which makes things boring. In contrast, everything has to be fast in Korea. “There’s no country in the world that can be considered as being perfect. Korea's like my second hometown,” said Bechervaise. Although Bechervaise had a hard time and still finds it difficult to use Korean perfectly, his goal is to write his movie reviews in Korean as well as in English. Although Bechervaise prefers to watch Korean movies without subtitles for a better understanding of film techniques and storyline, historical dramas are still quite hard for Jason to understand without subtitles. “Most movie previews do not have subtitles, although there are some exceptions. I think I would get better at Korean as time goes." The biggest merits of Korean movies that Bechervaise pointed out were about how they convey social issues. “Not only the storytelling, but also the film techniques used by the Korean filmmakers are so creative." He explained that the mise-en-scene and the editing is portrayed in a beautiful way in Korean movies, which is something that can't be seen in other countries' films. “There are so many talented people that create movies in such a great way. It’s interesting to see how they portray social issues to the viewers so well,” praised Bechervaise. "I hope to write movie reviews in Korean someday." Bechervaise wishes to continue with his work in the Korean movie industry, and let more great films in the Korean language be known to the world. As they are exciting and always something to watch for Bechervaise, he watches about 250 films every year. With his adventures in Korea, and as a foreign Korean movie critic, film fanatics could do well to keep track of Bechervaise's movie reviews. Kim Seung-jun nzdave94@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Moon Hana

2016-12 19 Important News

[Student]Winners of 2016 Korea Interior Architecture Competition

On September 19th, the 28th Korea Interior Design Competition was held by the KCC architecture corporation and the Korean Society of Interior Architects/Designers (KOSID). It was an open competition for anyone interested in the field of interior design, but those who were handing in their work were required to be residents in Korea. Kim Hye-won and Jo Eun-byeol (both Department of Surface & Interior Design, ERICA Campus, 3rd year) won the grand prize in this year's competition along with Kim Ju-seok from the same department, who was unable to attend the interview. Q1: Congratulations on winning the grand prize! How do you feel? Kim: “Our team focused on communicating a lot with one another, and this was probably the reason why we were able to receive such a big award. We are still overwhelmed by the fact that we have won and we thank everyone who has helped us and supported us.” Jo: “This is one of the biggest competitions in the field of interior design, so we are very honored. We can never get used to being congratulated by people. We did go through very hard work and it couldn’t have been achieved had it not been for the professor and the seniors.” Q2: What was the concept of this competition? Jo: “There was nothing set in particular and it was supposed to be a free topic of each teams creating an interior design concept and making a model on the basis of that.” The Grand Prize-winning model made by Kim and Jo. (Photo courtesy of KOSID) Q3: Could you explain to us about your work? Kim: “We decided on the National Geographic brand, because they are known for lively, unique pictures, yet have a photo exhibition that is dull. We wanted to create a gallery for this brand and make it like no other. From the ritteri anemone, we got the idea of liquidity and brought it to our surface design. Because anemones tend to stick to rocks or other animals, these two different characteristics were to be harmonized together in our work. We wanted to make this National Geographic gallery set up by the Han River so that it serves as a place to rest and gaze at the photos at the same time.” Q4: How did the three of you become involved in the same team? Kim: “When we were in the second semester of our second year, we took the same course called Visual Merchandizing. Us three were brought together as a team and we had to do our project together for the semester. Jo suggested that we try out for this competition and we decided to submit our own project for it.” Kim (left) and Jo (right) explain the concept of their design model. Q5: What do you learn in the Department of Surface & Interior Design? Kim: “It is a combination of surface interior design, interior design and textiles. We learn how to deal with the fabrics along with designing. With this combination, we are educated to have diverse choices when it comes to choosing our career. Some of the things that we learn are the design trends, surface pattern drawing, textile expressions, furniture designs, including most of what is necessary when it comes to designing the insides of a building.” Q6: How long did you prepare for the competition? Jo: “About six months.” Kim: “Yes, since we developed almost all of our project during a semester last year, we had a rough draft of what it would look like. The night before we submitted our work, our professor visited us and encouraged us. We were able to carry on due to the support.” Q7: What were some of the things that were good and bad? Jo: “We were able to fill up the qualities that we each didn’t have. We were able to learn from one another through communication, too. We were kind of scared of our professor’s feedback on our work but we have learned a lot from it.” Kim: “I personally didn’t have any interaction with the seniors before, but through this competition, I was able to become acquainted with them. We had to do some unexpected presentations for people from time to time and we felt our skills improving every time.” Above is a 3D mass study of the model. (Photo courtesy of KOSID) Q8: How will you use the six million won? Kim: “We divided up the prize money evenly. Since we used about one and a half million won for creating our model for the competition, we had four and a half million won left. I've decided to use the money to travel to Japan, and use the rest for my graduation work.” Jo: “I gave the money to my parents.” Q9: Could you give a final piece of advice for those preparing for competitions? Kim: “Do not think that investing your money on a competition is a waste of money. We believe that it is all a part of experience. Since we invested a lot, the quality of our work was considerably better.” Jo: “If you believe that what you are doing is right and work hard on it, good results will eventually follow. I would also stress the importance of communication between teammates since that will reduce the uncertainties.” According to Kim and Jo, communication is a very important part of teamwork. Kim Seung-jun nzdave94@hanyang.ac.kr Photo by Kim Youn-soo