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2017-09 26

[Student]Two Brave Hanyangians Saving Lives

Stepping into emergency situations requires a great deal of courage and training. This week, News H met two of the brave lions of Hanyang, Lee Mok-wang (Division of Sport Science, 3rd year) and Lee Beum-hee (Chinese Language & Literature, 1st year). Both students saved a man’s life by operating cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Lee Mok-wang is explaining the situation. Q1. Could you explain the situation when you found the patient? Beom-hee: I was on patrol in the Dongdaemun area with a police lieutenant as usual when a couple walking in front of us reported the patient. The man was laying on the ground and his body was stiff, breath being short. His eyes were flipped, so I immediately felt something was wrong with him. Mok-wang: An evening before Memorial Day, I went to Korea Integrated Freight Terminal for a one day part time job. While I was working, a man about five meters away from me collapsed while grabbing a bar. Nobody knew he was having cardiac arrest. We all just thought he was taking a break. I had my eyes on him because I felt something was going on. Then I realized his breath was abnormally rapid and deep. Q2. Why were you around the area? Beom-hee: I am serving as a tourist police, and a tourist policeperson patrols tourist attractions such as Dongdaemun, Myung-dong, and Hongdae in rotation. I have never seen a person passed out on the ground on my past patrols, though. Mok-wang: I was working in the terminal as a daily part timer. I was planning to donate the daily wage to the Ansan Shalom Welfare Center because I always wanted to share with people in need. I find it very lucky for someone who can perform CPR to be there at the moment to save a man’s life. Q3. What was the first thought that came into your mind? Beom-hee: To be honest, I was scared at first. I am a policeperson but I have never seen anyone like that. But the uniform gave me a big sense of responsibility. Q4. What were the people around you doing at the time? Beom-hee: The police lieutenant that I was accompanied with told me that we have to tilt the patient’s head to open the airway. That’s when we realized his head was bleeding. As there were no more people than us and the initial reporters, I asked them to call for the ambulance. But they were already calling. The couple explained the situation to the paramedic on the phone and told me what he said. Mok-wang: They were in a state of panic, not knowing what to do. I asked a person to call the ambulance while performing CPR. It took about 10 to 15 minutes for the ambulance to come. Lee Beum-hee is holding an award from the Seoul Metropolitan Police Agency. (Photo courtesy of Lee) Q5. How long did you operate CPR? What thoughts did you have during the operation? Beom-hee: It took about four to five minutes, but I wasn't so sure. Performing CPR was harder than I thought because I had to put all my weight to my arms. During the operation, the patient’s wife and young daughter came and were crying. Looking at his family being so worried, I couldn’t stop. Mok-wang: I performed for about 10 to 15 minutes, and it was tiring. But, because I major in sports, I work our regularly, and I think it helped a lot. Q6. When did you know that the patient would be okay? Beon-hee: As I was performing CPR, right before the ambulance arrived, the patient’s eyes came back to a normal position, and he was able to breathe on his own. I could feel he was coming back. I was so relieved. Because for the past four minutes of operation, he did not move or react at all. I was also frantic at that time, but I still remembered hearing an old gentleman saying, ‘oh, he’s alive now.’ Q7. When did you learn how to perform CPR? Beom-hee: I learned CPR in the army recruits’ training center. I couldn’t remember everything I learned at the moment, but I did everything that I remembered. Mok-wang: I learned it for the first time when I entered the military in the army recruits’ training center. After I was discharged from the military, I had an opportunity to learn once again in school. (Left) Lee Mok-wang is delivering his daily wage to the Ansan Shalom Welfare Center. (Right) Lee recieved an achievement award from the Dean of College of Sports and Arts. Q8. Did you get in contact with the patient after they got better? Beom-hee: Unfortunately I didn't. About two weeks after the incident, I heard that he was a professor in Macau through a news article, so I tried to find his contact on the university homepage. However, I could not find him. I did ask for his contact in the hospital when I saw him for the last time, but his wife told me they don’t have any contact in Korea. Mok-wang: I did not personally get in touch with him, but I heard that he is living in a tough environment. I am not expecting any thanks because I did what I had to do. I just wish he gets well soon. Q9. Is there a thing you would like to mention to others? Beom-hee: I would like to say something to the people who will learn CPR in the future. You might wonder if you will ever perform CPR in your life, but unexpected things happen in life in unexpected moments. I recommend you teach CPR to your family members, as anyone can have cardiac arrest, even at home. Mok-wang: Please pay attention during the CPR education. Many people disregard the precious education and let it pass by. However, if you learn the operation properly, someday you will be able to handle emergency situations well. We need to be conscious that cardiac arrest can happen to your family and friends. "I was able to realize the weight of a uniform through this incident. I hope I can manage future emergency situations better and more calmly." Kim So-yun dash070@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Kim Youn-soo and Park Young-min

2017-08 14

[Student]Spreading Awareness Through Entertainment (1)

A team named Game In Love (G.I.L) won the 2nd place in the Contest for the Good by Prudential Foundation of Korea recently. News H met the team leader Jung-woo Jin (Culture Contents, 4th year) and one of the team members Park Myung-yong (Culture Contents, 4th year) to hear about the details and motives that made such result possible. Team G.I.L is receiving their award from the Prudential Foundation. From the left, Myung-yong Park (Culture Contents, 4th year), Jung-woo Jin (Culture Contents, 4th year), Ho-suk Yang (Culture Contents, 4th year), and Dong-hyuk Kang (Computer Science,3rd year). (Photo courtesy of Jin.) Have you ever heard of hematopoietic stem cell before? This is the question both Jin and Park has been repeating on and off line for the past 4 months. To raise awareness of hematopoietic stem cell donation and change the common perception that the process must hurt, the G.I.L team went through a lot. After spending 14 days in Jeju just to complete the proposal and to present it in front of the executive members of Prudential Foundation, the G.I.L team made it to the top 10%. Then they had to carry out their actual plans such as developing mobile games or organizing offline campaigns. “We were very hurt when people think we are a bunch of weirdos asking for blood donation,” said Park, thinking back of the offline campaign in Sinchon. The G.I.L team also went to Hanyang ERICA Campus, Hankuk University of Foreign Studies, and Hyupsung University during the festival season in May. Thankfully, many students were interested in the offline games they had in the booth and gladly joined their campaigns. “I still remember that there were a lot of people willing to register as a donor without any prize” reminisced Jin. Through such hard work, the team was able to have 191 people register as donors and make countless people aware of the patients looking for the 0.00005% chance of finding a matching donor. The G.I.L team is running its offline campaign on ERICA Campus. (Photo courtesy of Park) Changing the world slowly yet surely through games “I know it may sound cheesy and even absurd, but that is my motto.” Said Jin, proudly. After graduating Korea Game Science Highschool and coming to Department of Culture Contents, Jin naturally grew interest in social issues due to the geographic location of ERICA Campus. “I wanted to learn more and even solve the social problems through games because that is what I can do,” explained Jin. He is now working as an intern in a welfare foundation to pursue his roadmap. While offline campaigns definitely improved the general public’s awareness of the hematopoietic stem cell and the donation of it, the team’s main focus was an online game called ‘cell in love’. The player must solve mini quizzes to acquire ‘seeds’ to play the actual game, and if the player gets one quiz wrong, they must read related information on hematopoietic stem cell donation. This might look like one of the ‘educational mobile games’ which are in most cases nothing more than a digitized book in disguise, ‘cell in love’ is actually fun and even a bit addictive to play. As an adorable hematopoietic stem cell, a player has to go through cholesterols in blood veins and reach the girl who is waiting for the player’s donation. From the left, the main page, quiz page, study page, and game play page of ‘cell in love’. The game is available on google play store. Unlike Jin who had passion in social issues and resolving them, Park initially had not had much interest in such issues. “At the moment I was off school, I was looking for some experience. That was all,” said Park. However, a four-month long journey made him acknowledge that doing what one can do to make the life of others better and happier can be fun and inspiring, more than he initially thought it would be. “Now we both feel thankful that we can help others with my not-too-great talents,” said Park. Jin and Park now plans to work on various social issues in the future, utilizing games. Kim So-yun dash070@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Kim Youn-soo

2017-07 19

[Student]Early Bird Catches the Market

There is an old saying “early bird catches the worm”. In this case, the early bird caught the market of software education. Son Jin-ho (Department of Mechanical Engineering, 3rd yr) and his company Algorithm LABS was selected in one of the forty college start-ups by Hankyung’s Campus Job and Joy magazine. Focusing on Algorithm leading into successful results “I have never made it to the ranks for seven years in the regionals. I barely won the encouragement award. People like me are called ‘encouraged-ever-afters’,” chuckled Son. In 2002 when he began studying algorithm, there were not so many people studying the subject. Until he won the second prize ranking 13th in Korea Olympiad in Informatics, he never considered himself as elite in Algorithm. Even after coming to college, his GPA was never summa cum laude level. But the reason behind his recent success was focusing on one road. A professor in the department of Mechanical Engineering was looking for someone who could analyze data in his company, and Son opened his office door, trying to consult on his GPA. Son was scouted to the company as an intern, where all other employees had Ph.D. or equivalent level of education. Prior to the internship, he never knew where algorithms are used for. Through further experience in Samsung Membership program and more, he began to realize there is a demand in the market of algorithm experts. "Knowing that the education we provide will open many doors for the students motivates me the most" said Son, reminding of his students. Young CEO revolutionizing the way of software education Being taught how to program and construct the algorithm for as long as a decade, Son always thought the quality of education depends too much on the ability of individual instructors. The size of the class was too big for the teachers to give enough feedback to students, and the traditional method of education was highly passive and inefficient. Also, most of the institutions taught only coding, which does not meet the needs of the society. Therefore, Son came up with a system called ‘Flipped Learning’, which was designed to literally ‘flipp' the way of learning. Students study the rudimental concepts via online platform resembling MOOC (Massive Open Online Courses) and come to class no bigger than five to actually practice what they have learned already. This process enables students to freely ask questions and receives active feedback from the instructor. As algorithm questions tend to be highly complicated and require at least three hours to solve one, Son thought such style of learning would suit the condition of software education better. Son believes Flipped Learning is much more effective for the learners to completely understand and utilize what they have learned. “Students learned algorithm in this particular method for only four to five months are now winning the Korea Olympiad of Informatics.” says Son, proudly. Son is promoting his curriculum to students and parents in a classroom. (Photo courtesy to Son) Software education market’s wing beneath the wind of public education As the importance of coding and algorithm education is being emphasized now more than ever, Algorithm LABS provide a full package of original contents and platform. Attracting customers both in private and public sectors, Algorithm LABS seems like it is going to grow more in the coming year. Software subject will now substitute the Informatics subject in middle school and high school curriculum in Korea. Elementary school students will also be learn computer software starting 2019. “For the rest of the year, expanding our influence is our top priority” said Son. As a long-term goal, Son expects Algorithm LABS to provide full online courses and to even reach to the overseas market such as Vietnam “We’re still building our references,” said Son. Slow but steady, with a plausible goal and focus was how Son became the person who he is now and the way Algorithm LABS will grow further. Kim So-yun dash070@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Choi Min-ju